Discussion:
Odd printing error in Farthest Star
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Anthony Nance
2017-04-07 11:51:01 UTC
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I happened to finish a book right before seeing James' review
of Farthest Star by Pohl&Williamson, so I decided to read that
next[1].

The chapters are numbered by roman numerals, and the text
starts just an inch or so below the numeral in (what looks
like) the very same font.

Chapter 16 though, was labeled upside down. Specifically, it is
labeled "I /\ X" [2], instead of "X V I".

Kinda wonder how that happened, esp since upside-down-V isn't
a normal character/symbol.

Tony
[1] Meh - for many of James' reasons, without being spoilery.
[2] Where "/\" is actually an inverted capital V.
Quadibloc
2017-04-07 15:50:03 UTC
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Post by Anthony Nance
Kinda wonder how that happened, esp since upside-down-V isn't
a normal character/symbol.
Well, aside from the "AND" mathematical operator, there is capital Greek
letter lambda, so if one deliberately intends to turn the chapter number
upside-down, one *can* do so. Without even losing serifs.

Also, if the book was composed using metal type, as opposed to a laser
printer or phototypesetting, one _could_ erroneously insert the chapter
number upside-down. In the case of Linotype, of course, the number would
have to be on a line by itself, but with Monotype or foundry type - even
Ludlow, although there the error would have to happen at an earlier
stage in the process - that restriction would not exist.

John Savard

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