Discussion:
YASID - "Ferrinite Is Death"
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m***@gmail.com
2018-02-19 09:03:41 UTC
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Richard Cartland is one of a number of criminals who volunteer to work in the Ferrinite mines on the Moon, in return for a year of the sentence for each month served. Unfortunately he may not live to benefit, as Ferrinite gives off lethal radiation. "Fourteen days of it and you're a corpse. A nasty messy corpse with running sores and rotting insides."

Cartland gets involved with the Freedom Group which seeks to overthrow the Earth Council. However, when he learns that their plans involve bombarding earth with atomic missiles, he turs against it and wins over enough of its members to defeat the plot. He is rewarded with a pardon and a place in the new spacefleet. The head of the Council tells him "The stars are yours".

Probably another Badger, but I can't swear to it.

Couple of other recollections. There is a horrible scene in which the Group's leader is blinded because he was wearing contact lenses when they blasted off - though we are told elsewhere that the acceleration was only 5g, which imho makes this a bit unlikely. Also I'm pretty sure that the first chapter was entitled "Ferrinite Is Death" and the last one "Death on Lunar" (not a typo, it really was spelt with an r). Hope this helps.

Mike Stone, Peterborough, England

Always drink upriver from the herd.
Quadibloc
2018-02-19 20:51:11 UTC
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Avatar, by Donald W. Phipps, mentions a substance called "Ferrinite".

John Savard
Quadibloc
2018-02-19 20:54:05 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Avatar, by Donald W. Phipps, mentions a substance called "Ferrinite".
So does "The Winds of Gath", the first novel in the Dumarest series by E. C. Tubb,
and the description of it mentions slave labor, so this may be what you're looking
for.

John Savard
b***@dontspam.silent.com
2018-02-19 21:07:21 UTC
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On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 12:54:05 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Avatar, by Donald W. Phipps, mentions a substance called "Ferrinite".
So does "The Winds of Gath", the first novel in the Dumarest series by E. C. Tubb,
and the description of it mentions slave labor, so this may be what you're looking
for.
John Savard
I'm sure there is no mention of mining or miners and I don't remember
Ferrinite in that book.
m***@gmail.com
2018-03-02 07:36:07 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Avatar, by Donald W. Phipps, mentions a substance called "Ferrinite".
So does "The Winds of Gath", the first novel in the Dumarest series by E. C. Tubb,
and the description of it mentions slave labor, so this may be what you're looking
for.
John Savard
Definitely not a Dumarest. My own fault though. I forgot to mention that I read it in 1958/9.

Something else I've recalled. On the cover it had the words. "He lost his honour - and found it in the black deeps of space" or something extremely close to that. I think honour was spelt with a u, but can's swear too it.

Mike Stone, Peterborough England

Always drink upriver from the herd.
David DeLaney
2018-03-05 10:28:14 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Something else I've recalled. On the cover it had the words. "He lost his
honour - and found it in the black deeps of space" or something extremely
close to that. I think honour was spelt with a u, but can's swear too it.
Googling for "lost his honour" "found it in the black deeps of space" pulls
up exactly two results for me: your post here, and the scifistackexchange
thread which gives an answer:
Return to Space by W. H. Fear, John Spencer and Co/Badger Books, London, 1958.

Dave, does that help?
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
b***@dontspam.silent.com
2018-02-19 20:57:40 UTC
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On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 12:51:11 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Avatar, by Donald W. Phipps
Could be a different tale
https://www.amazon.com/Avatar-Donald-W-Phipps/dp/1587211858

When Virgil Deux loses his heart to the little alien diplomat marooned
on his world, he never imagines she will lead him across the galaxy
and into the maelstrom of political and mystical intrigues swirling at
the end of the Second Galactic Age. An ancient god of Darkness has
manipulated the great mortal empires of the galaxy to the brink of
apocalypse, and only the Avatar of Light can prevent their ultimate
annihilation.

However, Virgil discovers that instead of a god, the Light has chosen
his own fragile soul as its champion, and has compelled him to embark
on an odyssey that takes him from Twinsun IV's crystalline Imperial
Citadel to Nema's sanguinous capitol of Enirum, from Sodome's great
city-state of Port Royal to General Gondaga's flying war metropolis,
Vampyr - and finally to the very heart of the galaxy and the legendary
treasure planet of Aura. There, with Councilor Aurelia and Captain
Coreandra Flint beside him, he must pit his love against a faceless
storm of evil to save all loving souls.
m***@gmail.com
2018-03-02 08:43:32 UTC
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Flap over. It's just been found on StackExchange.

It's "Return To Space, by WH Fear (probably a pseudonym), Badger Books
1958.

Anyway, thanks for looking.

Mike Stone, Peterborough, England.

Always drink upriver from the herd.
Robert Woodward
2018-03-02 17:35:40 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Flap over. It's just been found on StackExchange.
It's "Return To Space, by WH Fear (probably a pseudonym), Badger Books
1958.
The ISFDB claims that W. H. Fear was a real person (William Henry
Charles Fear), they even have a death date.

BTW, was Badger Books one of the publishers "featured" in a book
published back in the 1990s, _The Vultures of the Void_?
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Quadibloc
2018-03-02 18:26:07 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Flap over. It's just been found on StackExchange.
It's "Return To Space, by WH Fear (probably a pseudonym), Badger Books
1958.
Wow! I'm glad it was found. Once I knew what it was, I searched for more
information, and found the mention of a full name for W. H. Fear another poster
has cited.

I've asked for some help in a music newsgroup, but since someone here managed to
find "Samba de Orfeu" for me, perhaps one of the answers I seek can be found
here as well:

Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart composed a song, titled "Prayer", in 1933, for the
movie "Hollywood Party". It ended up not being used.

In 1934, the same melody was used for "Manhattan Melodrama", but with different
lyrics, as its title song. It wasn't used as the title song, but it was used with
a third set of lyrics, later in the movie, as "The Bad in Every Man".



It was the fourth set of lyrics, still written by Lorenz Hart, that made the song
into Blue Moon, the hit we know today.

After there were several successful conventional versions of this song that were popular, in 1961, the Marcels recorded their famous doo-wop version of the song:



So here is my first request of this newsgroup.

I know that in reading about this song, I had seen in one of the books about
music history a photographic reproduction of the very advertisement that Richard
Rodgers took out expressing his unhappiness with that version.

I haven't been able to find it again - but I *have* found claims that this was
just an "urban legend", and Richard Rodgers actually did no such thing. So I'm
hoping someone can help me set the record straight.

As to my second request:

The Marcels' version of Blue Moon wasn't the only doo-wop version of that song.

Before them, this version



was performed by the Drivers.

Now, the rythym track - the bass line - is very familiar to me from *some other
song*, but I haven't been able to recall which one. I've been hunting around,
but it isn't "Quiet Village" or "El Cumbanchero", the closest things I've found
so far.

John Savard
Quadibloc
2018-03-02 19:58:46 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
The Marcels' version of Blue Moon wasn't the only doo-wop version of that song.
Before them, this version
http://youtu.be/W_xtbtJ5ldU
was performed by the Drivers.
Now, the rythym track - the bass line - is very familiar to me from *some other
song*, but I haven't been able to recall which one. I've been hunting around,
but it isn't "Quiet Village" or "El Cumbanchero", the closest things I've found
so far.
I've managed to find what I was thinking of: "El Manisero", or "The Peanut Vendor".

John Savard
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