Discussion:
the glass age ?
(too old to reply)
Lynn McGuire
2017-04-27 21:17:33 UTC
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We are living in … the glass age ? “The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass”


Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.

Lynn
nuny@bid.nes
2017-04-28 02:22:08 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
We are living in … the glass age ? “The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass”
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.

Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass and Julian May's glass armor.

Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.


Mark L. Fergerson
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-04-28 02:37:40 UTC
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Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in 
 the glass age ? “The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass”
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow
glass and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
I recall a dagger that wasn't useless.

Also -- mirrors.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Don Kuenz
2017-05-01 02:58:28 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow
glass and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
I recall a dagger that wasn't useless.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.

"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.

Thank you,

--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
Greg Goss
2017-05-01 03:24:33 UTC
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Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.
"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.
If I ever wrote fantasy (or anything), I would use the point that a
mirror's magic is related to the magic of the silver in it.

Modern aluminum "silvered" mirrors WILL show you a vampire's
reflection, where the silver in a classic mirror won't co-operate with
a vampire at all. Similarly, the aluminum based mirror makes a crappy
dimensional portal.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
nuny@bid.nes
2017-05-01 20:07:05 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.
"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.
If I ever wrote fantasy (or anything), I would use the point that a
mirror's magic is related to the magic of the silver in it.
Modern aluminum "silvered" mirrors WILL show you a vampire's
reflection, where the silver in a classic mirror won't co-operate with
a vampire at all.
That's... obvious as hell now you've pointed it out.
Post by Greg Goss
Similarly, the aluminum based mirror makes a crappy
dimensional portal.
Or, the metal determines which dimension(s) the mirror leads to?

Speaking of chemistry and the supernatural, why is there always a smell of sulfur when a demon transits from Hell to here? Is there an energy barrier that manifests as sulfur? What do humans smell of when they go to Heaven?


Mark L. Fergerson
Anthony Nance
2017-05-02 13:10:45 UTC
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Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.
"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.
If I ever wrote fantasy (or anything), I would use the point that a
mirror's magic is related to the magic of the silver in it.
Modern aluminum "silvered" mirrors WILL show you a vampire's
reflection, where the silver in a classic mirror won't co-operate with
a vampire at all.
That's... obvious as hell now you've pointed it out.
Post by Greg Goss
Similarly, the aluminum based mirror makes a crappy
dimensional portal.
Or, the metal determines which dimension(s) the mirror leads to?
Speaking of chemistry and the supernatural, why is there always a smell of sulfur when a demon transits from Hell to here? Is there an energy barrier that manifests as sulfur?
It's a deliberate part of a warning system, much the same as
adding mercaptan/sulfur to natural gas so we can detect a leak.
Post by ***@bid.nes
What do humans smell of when they go to Heaven?
Unicorn farts. Obviously.
- Tony
David DeLaney
2017-05-05 12:25:11 UTC
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Post by Anthony Nance
Post by ***@bid.nes
What do humans smell of when they go to Heaven?
Unicorn farts. Obviously.
We know they trail an odor of sanctity when they come back; I believe
Dorothy could corroborate?

Dave, also, whatever it is that makes parents sniff newborns' heads - obviously
that new-soul scent
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Robert Carnegie
2017-05-02 17:57:45 UTC
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Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.
"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.
If I ever wrote fantasy (or anything), I would use the point that a
mirror's magic is related to the magic of the silver in it.
Modern aluminum "silvered" mirrors WILL show you a vampire's
reflection, where the silver in a classic mirror won't co-operate with
a vampire at all.
That's... obvious as hell now you've pointed it out.
Post by Greg Goss
Similarly, the aluminum based mirror makes a crappy
dimensional portal.
Or, the metal determines which dimension(s) the mirror leads to?
Speaking of chemistry and the supernatural, why is there always a smell of sulfur when a demon transits from Hell to here? Is there an energy barrier that manifests as sulfur? What do humans smell of when they go to Heaven?
The first is (possibly) a lot like when a non-smoker
meets someone who isn't smoking /now/ but has been
recently, and the gaseous residue is all over them
and /inside/ them - it takes many breaths to
get the smoke out of the lungs.

I expect hell's non-smoking section is reserved
for tobacco addicts only, and vice versa, if that
works. Does it?

King James had some ideas on the subject...
that will work.
Peter Trei
2017-05-03 13:02:51 UTC
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Post by ***@bid.nes
Speaking of chemistry and the supernatural, why is there always a smell of
sulfur when a demon transits from Hell to here? Is there an energy barrier
that manifests as sulfur? What do humans smell of when they go to Heaven?
I hope I'm not replying at the wrong level here, but most manifestations of
vulcanism emit H2S or deposit sulfur. Vulcanism is mythologically (and
literally) connected to the underworld and underground.

pt
Robert Carnegie
2017-05-01 20:26:46 UTC
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Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow
glass and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
I recall a dagger that wasn't useless.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.
"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.
Magic mirrors go back at least to Snow White;
I don't know if there are ancient-myth cases.
Maybe "through a glass darkly" (Bible,
1st Corinthians 13), although that's really
an imperfect mirror made of metal, without
glass.

Magic water-pools which reflect something
prophetic - well, that isn't glass either.
But on a cold day, it may be ice?
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-05-02 11:53:28 UTC
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Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow
glass and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
I recall a dagger that wasn't useless.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.
"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.
Donaldson's _The Mirror of Her Dreams_ has mirrors whose particular
composition and design determines what world and location they are
gateways to. (and no one in that world uses mirrors as we do)

In my own _Paradigms Lost_, Jason has to use mirrors to defeat the
Maelkodan.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
David DeLaney
2017-05-05 12:23:36 UTC
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Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow
glass and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
I recall a dagger that wasn't useless.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.
"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.
And, duh, Bob Shaw's "slow glass" that has the sped of 'light' inside it
measurable in millimeters per year.

Dave, also, Oz's Glass Cat
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Scott Lurndal
2017-05-05 13:59:52 UTC
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Post by David DeLaney
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by ***@bid.nes
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow
glass and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
I recall a dagger that wasn't useless.
Also -- mirrors.
"Paycheck" (PKD) uses a "time mirror" that enables operators to look
into the future.
"The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag" (Heinlein) uses mirrors as
extradimensional portals.
And, duh, Bob Shaw's "slow glass" that has the sped of 'light' inside it
measurable in millimeters per year.
Fetches use mirrors to enter the real-world in the Dresden Files.
larry
2017-05-07 12:55:35 UTC
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Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
I recall a dagger that wasn't useless.
Thank you,
--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
The Larry Niven story?
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-05-07 17:01:34 UTC
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Post by larry
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
I recall a dagger that wasn't useless.
Thank you,
--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
The Larry Niven story?
yep
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
David DeLaney
2017-04-30 05:03:45 UTC
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Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities being used as
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen that in more
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that incorporate
holographic displays, HUD and others.

Neal Asher's chainglass? Used for armor and cutting blades.

Dave
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Carl Fink
2017-04-30 12:25:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities being used as
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen that in more
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that incorporate
holographic displays, HUD and others.
The nonsensical glass knives from *Snow Crash*? (Nonsensical because in the
real world, while flint[1] knives are indeed really sharp, the edges also
shatter if you brush them against anything, let alone try to cut through
armor. Glass is brittle, especially when it's micrometers thick. They also
get ever-so-slightly dull even if they *don't* touch anything, because
extremely thin glass flows slightly. Ask anyone who has done transmission
electron microscopy using glass blades to make sections--you can't leave the
blade lying around very long.)

[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
J. Clarke
2017-04-30 13:14:35 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities being used as
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen that in more
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that incorporate
holographic displays, HUD and others.
The nonsensical glass knives from *Snow Crash*? (Nonsensical because in the
real world, while flint[1] knives are indeed really sharp, the edges also
shatter if you brush them against anything, let alone try to cut through
armor. Glass is brittle, especially when it's micrometers thick. They also
get ever-so-slightly dull even if they *don't* touch anything, because
extremely thin glass flows slightly. Ask anyone who has done transmission
electron microscopy using glass blades to make sections--you can't leave the
blade lying around very long.)
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.

As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-30 13:22:52 UTC
Permalink
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities being used as
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen that in more
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that incorporate
holographic displays, HUD and others.
The nonsensical glass knives from *Snow Crash*? (Nonsensical because in the
real world, while flint[1] knives are indeed really sharp, the edges also
shatter if you brush them against anything, let alone try to cut through
armor. Glass is brittle, especially when it's micrometers thick. They also
get ever-so-slightly dull even if they *don't* touch anything, because
extremely thin glass flows slightly. Ask anyone who has done transmission
electron microscopy using glass blades to make sections--you can't leave the
blade lying around very long.)
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
J. Clarke
2017-04-30 14:02:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities being used as
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen that in more
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that incorporate
holographic displays, HUD and others.
The nonsensical glass knives from *Snow Crash*? (Nonsensical because in the
real world, while flint[1] knives are indeed really sharp, the edges also
shatter if you brush them against anything, let alone try to cut through
armor. Glass is brittle, especially when it's micrometers thick. They also
get ever-so-slightly dull even if they *don't* touch anything, because
extremely thin glass flows slightly. Ask anyone who has done transmission
electron microscopy using glass blades to make sections--you can't leave the
blade lying around very long.)
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
Good luck getting any range or accuracy out of something with a flat blade.
Sjouke Burry
2017-04-30 14:35:54 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities being used as
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen that in more
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that incorporate
holographic displays, HUD and others.
The nonsensical glass knives from *Snow Crash*? (Nonsensical because in the
real world, while flint[1] knives are indeed really sharp, the edges also
shatter if you brush them against anything, let alone try to cut through
armor. Glass is brittle, especially when it's micrometers thick. They also
get ever-so-slightly dull even if they *don't* touch anything, because
extremely thin glass flows slightly. Ask anyone who has done transmission
electron microscopy using glass blades to make sections--you can't leave the
blade lying around very long.)
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
Bullets are shaped like an extremely dull knife point,
and works like one when entering flesh, so that invention
is already implemented. :)
Juho Julkunen
2017-04-30 14:48:43 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
Flechette guns, while marginal IRL, are pretty common in near-future
SF. Needles are sort of like smalle knives, right?

I don't think they penetrate armor much, though.
--
Juho Julkunen
J. Clarke
2017-04-30 15:00:31 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
Flechette guns, while marginal IRL, are pretty common in near-future
SF. Needles are sort of like smalle knives, right?
I don't think they penetrate armor much, though.
In practical terms a flechette is just a way to get more range and possibly
a better pattern out of canister shot or shotgun shells. There's no magic
there. In SF stories it's just a meaningless noise that says "fancy future
gun".
Kevrob
2017-04-30 15:33:17 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities being used as
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen that in more
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that incorporate
holographic displays, HUD and others.
The nonsensical glass knives from *Snow Crash*? (Nonsensical because in the
real world, while flint[1] knives are indeed really sharp, the edges also
shatter if you brush them against anything, let alone try to cut through
armor. Glass is brittle, especially when it's micrometers thick. They also
get ever-so-slightly dull even if they *don't* touch anything, because
extremely thin glass flows slightly. Ask anyone who has done transmission
electron microscopy using glass blades to make sections--you can't leave the
blade lying around very long.)
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
Needle gun loaded with flechettes close enough?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/

In mundane lit, we have Salinger's glass Family.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Needlegun

"I was down to my last cartridge in my needle gun, so of course
that's when the banana fish turned on me..."

Kevin R
Kevrob
2017-04-30 15:38:39 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Should have been:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_family
Post by Kevrob
In mundane lit, we have Salinger's Glass Family.
Kevin R
J. Clarke
2017-04-30 15:59:11 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
We are living in ??? the glass age ? ???The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities being used as
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen that in more
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that incorporate
holographic displays, HUD and others.
The nonsensical glass knives from *Snow Crash*? (Nonsensical because in the
real world, while flint[1] knives are indeed really sharp, the edges also
shatter if you brush them against anything, let alone try to cut through
armor. Glass is brittle, especially when it's micrometers thick. They also
get ever-so-slightly dull even if they *don't* touch anything, because
extremely thin glass flows slightly. Ask anyone who has done transmission
electron microscopy using glass blades to make sections--you can't leave the
blade lying around very long.)
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
Needle gun loaded with flechettes close enough?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
I think you left something off there.
Post by Kevrob
In mundane lit, we have Salinger's glass Family.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Needlegun
Oh, the one the Beltway Bandits tried to sell to the Army and the Army
after giving them a thorough hearing said "no thanks"?
Post by Kevrob
"I was down to my last cartridge in my needle gun, so of course
that's when the banana fish turned on me..."
Kevin R
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-04-30 16:29:39 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Flexible,
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
Bendable Glass???
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's
slow glass
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by ***@bid.nes
and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Well, we can start with cubes of glass with slight impurities
being used as
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
mostly-read-only laser-searchable memory units. I know I've seen
that in more
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
than one place, and it was partly implied in Diaspar, wasn't it? And their
relative, 'glass' windows in starships, vehicles, or helmets that
incorporate
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by David DeLaney
holographic displays, HUD and others.
The nonsensical glass knives from *Snow Crash*? (Nonsensical because in the
real world, while flint[1] knives are indeed really sharp, the edges also
shatter if you brush them against anything, let alone try to cut through
armor. Glass is brittle, especially when it's micrometers thick. They also
get ever-so-slightly dull even if they *don't* touch anything, because
extremely thin glass flows slightly. Ask anyone who has done transmission
electron microscopy using glass blades to make sections--you can't leave the
blade lying around very long.)
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
If anyone can do it, it's this guy:

http://www.basicinstructions.net/basic-instructions/2010/1/24/how-to-accept-creative-input-from-a-friend.html

http://www.basicinstructions.net/basic-instructions/2015/1/29/how-to-accept-assistance.html

http://www.basicinstructions.net/basic-instructions/2012/7/24/how-to-re-explain-details-in-a-long-running-narrative.html
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Scott Lurndal
2017-05-01 13:00:07 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Needlegun
Lynn McGuire
2017-05-02 21:03:07 UTC
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On 4/30/2017 8:22 AM, Robert Carnegie wrote:
...
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
That is called a flechette gun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flechette

Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2017-05-03 06:47:16 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
...
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
That is called a flechette gun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flechette
I know.
Jay E. Morris
2017-05-03 22:06:45 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
...
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an
afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
That is called a flechette gun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flechette
Lynn
Or you can just get flechette shells for your 12ga.
Lynn McGuire
2017-05-03 23:51:01 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Lynn McGuire
...
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an
afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Not to wish harm on anyone, but why doesn't
somebody invent a gun that fires small knives?
That is called a flechette gun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flechette
Lynn
Or you can just get flechette shells for your 12ga.
I had forgotten about those. I would like to have a 5,000 round
flechette gun using a linear accelerator though. It would come in most
useful in the zombie apocalypse.

Lynn
Carl Fink
2017-04-30 18:38:37 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
Not conflating. Confusing. I just plain typed the wrong word.
Post by J. Clarke
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Nonetheless. Glass blades cannot cut through it and remain sharp. Really.
Think about how weak glass is to transverse stress.
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
J. Clarke
2017-04-30 19:04:09 UTC
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Post by Carl Fink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
Not conflating. Confusing. I just plain typed the wrong word.
Post by J. Clarke
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Nonetheless. Glass blades cannot cut through it and remain sharp. Really.
Think about how weak glass is to transverse stress.
Steel blades cannot cut through it and remain sharp either. What of it?
How may people did he stab at one go with one knife?
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-30 19:23:20 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Carl Fink
[1]Flint is volcanic glass.
You are conflating flint and obsidian. Flint is a rock, obsidian is glass.
Not conflating. Confusing. I just plain typed the wrong word.
Post by J. Clarke
As for armor, we're talking about cutting cloth here. Modern armor is
intended to stop bullets--protection against knives was an afterthought and
only some armor is even rated for knife protection.
Nonetheless. Glass blades cannot cut through it and remain sharp. Really.
Think about how weak glass is to transverse stress.
Steel blades cannot cut through it and remain sharp either. What of it?
How may people did he stab at one go with one knife?
"Four thousand throats may be cut in a single night
by a running man"?

If he's Harpo Marx?
a***@yahoo.com
2017-04-30 22:57:04 UTC
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Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Lynn McGuire
We are living in … the glass age ? “The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass”
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Now that I know what it is, I won't watch it. Thank you.
Anyway, I'll take the Glass Age seriously when we have Shaw's slow glass and Julian May's glass armor.
Other SFnal glass? Transparent aluminum does not count.
Glasshouse by Charlie Stross sort of, although it is basically one way glass.
Gene Wirchenko
2017-04-30 18:31:55 UTC
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On Thu, 27 Apr 2017 16:17:33 -0500, Lynn McGuire
We are living in … the glass age ? “The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible,
Bendable Glass”
http://youtu.be/12OSBJwogFc
Now, this is science ! And a infomercial for Gorilla Glass. Might be
good for munchkins.
Very well presented and very entertaining.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
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