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OT speculated - Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
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a425couple
2018-04-25 15:46:09 UTC
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No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity

By Charles Q. Choi, Space.com Contributor |
April 23, 2018 07:15am ET

No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
Artist's illustration of the super-Earth alien planet Kepler-69c.
Credit: NASA
"Super-Earth" planets are giant-size versions of Earth, and some
research has suggested that they're more likely to be habitable than
Earth-size worlds. But a new study reveals how difficult it would be for
any aliens on these exoplanets to explore space.

To launch the equivalent of an Apollo moon mission, a rocket on a
super-Earth would need to have a mass of about 440,000 tons (400,000
metric tons), due to fuel requirements, the study said. That's on the
order of the mass of the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt.

"On more-massive planets, spaceflight would be exponentially more
expensive," said study author Michael Hippke, an independent researcher
affiliated with the Sonneberg Observatory in Germany. "Such
civilizations would not have satellite TV, a moon mission or a Hubble
Space Telescope." [10 Exoplanets That Could Host Alien Life]

As researchers have discovered alien worlds around other stars, one
class of exoplanets that popped up was the super-Earths, planets that
can reach up to 10 times the mass of our own. A number of super-Earths
apparently lie in the habitable zones of their stars, where temperatures
can theoretically support liquid water on the planetary surface and
thus, potentially, life as it is known on Earth.

Prior work suggested not only that worlds other than Earth-like ones
could offer circumstances suitable for life, but also that some could be
even more suitable than Earth-like planets. Super-Earths, researchers
have suggested, might be "super-habitable" — their greater mass giving
them stronger gravitational pulls, so they could hold thicker
atmospheres to better shield life from harmful cosmic rays.

If life did evolve on a distant super-Earth, such aliens could have
developed an advanced civilization capable of spaceflight. However, the
strong gravitational pull of such planets could also make it more
difficult for extraterrestrials to blast off their planets, Hippke said
in the new study.

To see how difficult it might be for super-Earthlings to launch a
conventional rocket, Hippke calculated the rocket sizes needed to escape
a super-Earth 70 percent wider than our planet and 10 times more
massive. Those are roughly the specs of the alien planet Kepler-20b,
which lies about 950 light-years from Earth. On such a world, the escape
velocity is about 2.4 times greater than on Earth.

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A big challenge for aliens on such a world would be the weight of the
fuel that conventional rockets carry. Launching a rocket off a planet
requires a lot of fuel, which makes the rockets heavy, which requires
more fuel, making the craft heavier, and so on.

"I am surprised to see how close we as humans are to end up on a planet
which is still reasonably lightweight to conduct spaceflight," Hippke
told Space.com. "Other civilizations, if they exist, might not be as
lucky."

Assuming a rocket on the simulated super-Earth worked about as well as
SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, to launch a payload like NASA's upcoming James
Webb Space Telescope would require 60,000 tons (55,000 metric tons) of
fuel, about the mass of the largest ocean battleships, Hippke said. [In
Photos: SpaceX's 1st Falcon Heavy Rocket Test Launch Success!]

"Civilizations from super-Earths are much less likely to explore the
stars," Hippke said. "Instead, they would be to some extent arrested on
their home planet and, for example, make more use of lasers or radio
telescopes for interstellar communication instead of sending probes or
spaceships."

Rockets work better in the vacuum of space than in an atmosphere,
though. So, Hippke suggested that super-Earthlings might want to launch
from a mountaintop. However, the strong gravitational pull of
super-Earths would squash down their surfaces, leading to smaller
mountains. And on Earth, the benefit of launching at high altitudes is
not very large compared to launching at sea level, Hippke said.

There could be ways of reaching orbit other than via conventional
rockets, such as by using space elevators traveling on giant cables
rising out of the atmosphere. However, a key limiting factor of space
elevators is the strength of the cable material. The most suitable
material known today, carbon nanotubes, is just barely strong enough for
Earth's gravity, and it is unclear if stronger materials are physically
possible, making it difficult to predict if space elevators on
super-Earths could work.

Another possibility is nuclear pulse propulsion, which would involve
detonating a series of atom bombs behind a vehicle to hurl it through
space. This explosive strategy offers more lifting power than
conventional rockets, and might be the only way for a civilization to
leave a planet more than 10 times Earth's mass, Hippke said.

However, such a nuclear-powered spacecraft would pose not only technical
challenges but political ones as well, he said.

"A launch failure, which typically happens with a 1 percent risk, could
cause dramatic effects on the environment" for a nuclear-powered
spacecraft, Hippke said. "I could only imagine that a society takes
these risks in a flagship project where no other options are available,
but the desire is strong — for example, one single mission to leave
their planet and visit a moon."

Hippke detailed his findings online April 12 in a study submitted to the
International Journal of Astrobiology.

Follow Charles Q. Choi on Twitter @cqchoi. Follow us @Spacedotcom,
Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.

https://www.space.com/40375-super-earth-exoplanets-hard-aliens-launch.html
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-04-25 15:52:53 UTC
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Post by a425couple
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
By Charles Q. Choi, Space.com Contributor |
April 23, 2018 07:15am ET
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
Artist's illustration of the super-Earth alien planet Kepler-69c.
Credit: NASA
"Super-Earth" planets are giant-size versions of Earth, and some
research has suggested that they're more likely to be habitable than
Earth-size worlds. But a new study reveals how difficult it would be for
any aliens on these exoplanets to explore space.
Mesklin anyone?
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-25 16:18:39 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by a425couple
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
By Charles Q. Choi, Space.com Contributor |
April 23, 2018 07:15am ET
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
Artist's illustration of the super-Earth alien planet Kepler-69c.
Credit: NASA
"Super-Earth" planets are giant-size versions of Earth, and some
research has suggested that they're more likely to be habitable than
Earth-size worlds. But a new study reveals how difficult it would be for
any aliens on these exoplanets to explore space.
Mesklin anyone?
They would have to launch from the equator, obviously.

That said, I bet in a couple of generations there will be
Mesklinites in space, aided by human technology. A couple of
generations after that, they could be building their own
spacecraft. They're schmott guys.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Kevrob
2018-04-25 16:50:07 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by a425couple
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
By Charles Q. Choi, Space.com Contributor |
April 23, 2018 07:15am ET
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
Artist's illustration of the super-Earth alien planet Kepler-69c.
Credit: NASA
"Super-Earth" planets are giant-size versions of Earth, and some
research has suggested that they're more likely to be habitable than
Earth-size worlds. But a new study reveals how difficult it would be for
any aliens on these exoplanets to explore space.
Mesklin anyone?
They would have to launch from the equator, obviously.
That said, I bet in a couple of generations there will be
Mesklinites in space, aided by human technology. A couple of
generations after that, they could be building their own
spacecraft. They're schmott guys.
I think this is why "Jor-El's Golden Folly" had an anti-grav
drive.

Kevin R

* http://www.fortress.net.nu/tales2/goldenfolly/
David DeLaney
2018-04-26 00:34:08 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Mesklin anyone?
They would have to launch from the equator, obviously.
That said, I bet in a couple of generations there will be
Mesklinites in space, aided by human technology. A couple of
generations after that, they could be building their own
spacecraft. They're schmott guys.
In the sequel, the first part was already true. _Star Light_, Barlennan gets to
go on a mission on a 40-G non-dizzyingly-rotating planet, Dhrawn, colonized by
Mesklinites. Ammonia-water-oxygen atmosphere, extremely interesting phase
diagrams. Plotting and intrigue and harrowing rescues, oh my!

Dave
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Greg Goss
2018-04-26 09:49:02 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by a425couple
"Super-Earth" planets are giant-size versions of Earth, and some
research has suggested that they're more likely to be habitable than
Earth-size worlds. But a new study reveals how difficult it would be for
any aliens on these exoplanets to explore space.
Mesklin anyone?
They would have to launch from the equator, obviously.
That said, I bet in a couple of generations there will be
Mesklinites in space, aided by human technology. A couple of
generations after that, they could be building their own
spacecraft. They're schmott guys.
Didn't the earth people hire that Mesklinite captain and his crew for
a mission on some other megaplanet in the sequel?
(quick google) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Light

Wikipedia lists two other sequels I was unaware of.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
David Johnston
2018-04-25 16:44:47 UTC
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Post by a425couple
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
By Charles Q. Choi, Space.com Contributor |
April 23, 2018 07:15am ET
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
Artist's illustration of the super-Earth alien planet Kepler-69c.
Credit: NASA
"Super-Earth" planets are giant-size versions of Earth, and some
research has suggested that they're more likely to be habitable than
Earth-size worlds. But a new study reveals how difficult it would be for
any aliens on these exoplanets to explore space.
To launch the equivalent of an Apollo moon mission, a rocket on a
super-Earth would need to have a mass of about 440,000 tons (400,000
metric tons), due to fuel requirements, the study said. That's on the
order of the mass of the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt.
"On more-massive planets, spaceflight would be exponentially more
expensive," said study author Michael Hippke, an independent researcher
affiliated with the Sonneberg Observatory in Germany. "Such
civilizations would not have satellite TV, a moon mission or a Hubble
Space Telescope." [10 Exoplanets That Could Host Alien Life]
As researchers have discovered alien worlds around other stars, one
class of exoplanets that popped up was the super-Earths, planets that
can reach up to 10 times the mass of our own.
You know I really wish just once an article talking about "super-earths"
would give the figure in terms of estimated surface gravity and not "x
times the mass".
Robert Woodward
2018-04-25 17:27:51 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by a425couple
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
By Charles Q. Choi, Space.com Contributor |
April 23, 2018 07:15am ET
No Way Out? Aliens on 'Super-Earth' Planets May Be Trapped by Gravity
Artist's illustration of the super-Earth alien planet Kepler-69c.
Credit: NASA
"Super-Earth" planets are giant-size versions of Earth, and some
research has suggested that they're more likely to be habitable than
Earth-size worlds. But a new study reveals how difficult it would be for
any aliens on these exoplanets to explore space.
To launch the equivalent of an Apollo moon mission, a rocket on a
super-Earth would need to have a mass of about 440,000 tons (400,000
metric tons), due to fuel requirements, the study said. That's on the
order of the mass of the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt.
"On more-massive planets, spaceflight would be exponentially more
expensive," said study author Michael Hippke, an independent researcher
affiliated with the Sonneberg Observatory in Germany. "Such
civilizations would not have satellite TV, a moon mission or a Hubble
Space Telescope." [10 Exoplanets That Could Host Alien Life]
As researchers have discovered alien worlds around other stars, one
class of exoplanets that popped up was the super-Earths, planets that
can reach up to 10 times the mass of our own.
You know I really wish just once an article talking about "super-earths"
would give the figure in terms of estimated surface gravity and not "x
times the mass".
A back of the envelope calculation is straightforward (using the example
was a world with a diameter 70% greater than Earth's and 10 times the
mass). Relative surface gravity would be the relative mass divided by
the square of the relative diameter. The density ratio would be the
relative mass divided by the cube of the relative diameter. This results
in an average density twice that of Earth (what is the composition to
end up that way?) and a surface gravity just under 3 and half times that
of Earth's.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
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