Discussion:
YASID: "Lord, give me strength"
(too old to reply)
Wolffan
2018-01-04 21:23:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t new
then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans think
she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord give
me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big problem
if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It seems
that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it or
not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength” and
the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.

Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
perpetuated it?
Wolffan
2018-01-07 15:14:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
(in article<***@news.supernews.com>):

> I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t new
> then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans think
> she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord give
> me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big problem
> if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It seems
> that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it or
> not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength” and
> the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.
>
> Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> perpetuated it?
no one has any ideas?
Robert Carnegie
2018-01-07 22:00:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, 7 January 2018 15:14:52 UTC, Wolffan wrote:
> On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
> (in article<***@news.supernews.com>):
>
> > I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t new
> > then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> > religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans think
> > she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord give
> > me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> > pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big problem
> > if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It seems
> > that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it or
> > not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> > something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength” and
> > the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.
> >
> > Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> > perpetuated it?
> no one has any ideas?

Not yet, but, I wonder if the real-life career of
Aimee Semple McPherson corresponds to the story particularly.
She was an American radio evangelist, amongst other things.

Or, some writer thought it would be amusing to tell a story
about God answering a prayer whenever he was mentioned.
Kay Shapero
2018-01-08 06:58:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In article <862d8fe5-c469-4746-9633-***@googlegroups.com>,
***@excite.com says...
>

> Not yet, but, I wonder if the real-life career of
> Aimee Semple McPherson corresponds to the story particularly.
> She was an American radio evangelist, amongst other things.
>
> Or, some writer thought it would be amusing to tell a story
> about God answering a prayer whenever he was mentioned.

FWIW I know I've read that story myself, just do not recall the name or
author. And at 67 I've been around to read an awful lot of stories...

--

Kay Shapero
Address munged, try my first name at kayshapero dot net.
Peter Trei
2018-01-08 13:47:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, January 7, 2018 at 5:00:53 PM UTC-5, Robert Carnegie wrote:
> On Sunday, 7 January 2018 15:14:52 UTC, Wolffan wrote:
> > On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
> > (in article<***@news.supernews.com>):
> >
> > > I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t new
> > > then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> > > religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans think
> > > she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord give
> > > me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> > > pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big problem
> > > if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It seems
> > > that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it or
> > > not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> > > something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength” and
> > > the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.
> > >
> > > Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> > > perpetuated it?
> > no one has any ideas?
>
> Not yet, but, I wonder if the real-life career of
> Aimee Semple McPherson corresponds to the story particularly.
> She was an American radio evangelist, amongst other things.
>
> Or, some writer thought it would be amusing to tell a story
> about God answering a prayer whenever he was mentioned.

Jack Chalker's "The Devil Will Drag You Under" features a universe in which
God takes a very 'hands-on' approach to enforcing good behavior among humans.

Its scary.

pt
Kevrob
2018-01-09 02:32:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, January 7, 2018 at 5:00:53 PM UTC-5, Robert Carnegie wrote:
> On Sunday, 7 January 2018 15:14:52 UTC, Wolffan wrote:
> > On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
> > (in article<***@news.supernews.com>):
> >
> > > I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t new
> > > then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> > > religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans think
> > > she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord give
> > > me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> > > pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big problem
> > > if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It seems
> > > that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it or
> > > not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> > > something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength” and
> > > the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.
> > >
> > > Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> > > perpetuated it?
> > no one has any ideas?
>
> Not yet, but, I wonder if the real-life career of
> Aimee Semple McPherson corresponds to the story particularly.
> She was an American radio evangelist, amongst other things.
>

Such as being the basis for the character, Sharon Falconer, in "Elmer
Gantry" by Sinclair Lewis, and brought to life on the screen by the
luminous Jean Simmons.

> Or, some writer thought it would be amusing to tell a story
> about God answering a prayer whenever he was mentioned.

"Now, Kevin, even `no' is an answer," Mother would say.
"Silence gives consent" didn't apply, apparently.

Kevin R
Moriarty
2018-01-08 22:47:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Monday, January 8, 2018 at 2:14:52 AM UTC+11, Wolffan wrote:
> On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
> (in article<***@news.supernews.com>):
>
> > I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t new
> > then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> > religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans think
> > she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord give
> > me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> > pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big problem
> > if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It seems
> > that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it or
> > not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> > something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength” and
> > the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.
> >
> > Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> > perpetuated it?
> no one has any ideas?

I've posted this on scifi stack exchange. Maybe someone there will answer it.

-Moriarty
Wolffan
2018-01-09 02:28:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 08Jan 2018, Moriarty wrote
(in article<eb7351de-c510-4743-a8c9-***@googlegroups.com>):

> On Monday, January 8, 2018 at 2:14:52 AM UTC+11, Wolffan wrote:
> > On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
> > (in article<***@news.supernews.com>):
> >
> > > I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t new
> > > then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> > > religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans
> > > think
> > > she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord give
> > > me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> > > pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big problem
> > > if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It
> > > seems
> > > that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it or
> > > not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> > > something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength” and
> > > the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.
> > >
> > > Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> > > perpetuated it?
> > no one has any ideas?
>
> I've posted this on scifi stack exchange. Maybe someone there will answer it.
>
> -Moriarty

thanks
Moriarty
2018-02-12 05:24:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at 1:28:20 PM UTC+11, Wolffan wrote:
> On 08Jan 2018, Moriarty wrote
> (in article<eb7351de-c510-4743-a8c9-***@googlegroups.com>):
>
> > On Monday, January 8, 2018 at 2:14:52 AM UTC+11, Wolffan wrote:
> > > On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
> > > (in article<***@news.supernews.com>):
> > >
> > > > I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t new
> > > > then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> > > > religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans
> > > > think
> > > > she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord give
> > > > me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> > > > pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big problem
> > > > if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It
> > > > seems
> > > > that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it or
> > > > not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> > > > something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength” and
> > > > the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.
> > > >
> > > > Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> > > > perpetuated it?
> > > no one has any ideas?
> >
> > I've posted this on scifi stack exchange. Maybe someone there will answer it.
> >
> > -Moriarty
>
> thanks

No one bit. Sorry.

-Moriarty
Wolffan
2018-02-12 09:39:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 12Feb 2018, Moriarty wrote
(in article<a4a2351c-fbb0-4d23-bc06-***@googlegroups.com>):

> On Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at 1:28:20 PM UTC+11, Wolffan wrote:
> > On 08Jan 2018, Moriarty wrote
> > (in article<eb7351de-c510-4743-a8c9-***@googlegroups.com>):
> >
> > > On Monday, January 8, 2018 at 2:14:52 AM UTC+11, Wolffan wrote:
> > > > On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
> > > > (in article<***@news.supernews.com>):
> > > >
> > > > > I’m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn’t
> > > > > new
> > > > > then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> > > > > religious songs who isn’t particularly religious herself but her fans
> > > > > think
> > > > > she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of “Lord
> > > > > give
> > > > > me a baby”. It’s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> > > > > pregnancy. No father. No husband, ‘cause she ain’t married. Big
> > > > > problem
> > > > > if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It
> > > > > seems
> > > > > that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it
> > > > > or
> > > > > not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> > > > > something. The story ends with her saying “Lord, give me strength”
> > > > > and
> > > > > the desk or table or whatever she’s holding starts to break up.
> > > > >
> > > > > Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> > > > > perpetuated it?
> > > > no one has any ideas?
> > >
> > > I've posted this on scifi stack exchange. Maybe someone there will answer
> > > it.
> > >
> > > -Moriarty
> >
> > thanks
>
> No one bit. Sorry.
>
> -Moriarty

thanks anyway.
Kay Shapero
2018-02-21 02:49:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In article <***@news.supernews.com>,
***@gmail.com says...
>
> On 12Feb 2018, Moriarty wrote
> (in article<a4a2351c-fbb0-4d23-bc06-***@googlegroups.com>):
>
> > On Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at 1:28:20 PM UTC+11, Wolffan wrote:
> > > On 08Jan 2018, Moriarty wrote
> > > (in article<eb7351de-c510-4743-a8c9-***@googlegroups.com>):
> > >
> > > > On Monday, January 8, 2018 at 2:14:52 AM UTC+11, Wolffan wrote:
> > > > > On 2018 Jan 04, Wolffan wrote
> > > > > (in article<***@news.supernews.com>):
> > > > >
> > > > > > I?m looking for a story ID. I read it many years ago, and it wasn?t
> > > > > > new
> > > > > > then. Basic plot: we have a wildly, wildly, WILDLY popular writer of
> > > > > > religious songs who isn?t particularly religious herself but her fans
> > > > > > think
> > > > > > she is. Her latest hit has a name something along the lines of ?Lord
> > > > > > give
> > > > > > me a baby?. It?s a very big hit. And suddenly she has a baby. No
> > > > > > pregnancy. No father. No husband, ?cause she ain?t married. Big
> > > > > > problem
> > > > > > if, when, her fans find out. And then other things start happening. It
> > > > > > seems
> > > > > > that she can get anything that she asks for, whether she really wants it
> > > > > > or
> > > > > > not, just by praying, which in her case means merely asking God for
> > > > > > something. The story ends with her saying ?Lord, give me strength?
> > > > > > and
> > > > > > the desk or table or whatever she?s holding starts to break up.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Anyone have any ideas as to what the name might be and who might have
> > > > > > perpetuated it?
> > > > > no one has any ideas?
> > > >
> > > > I've posted this on scifi stack exchange. Maybe someone there will answer
> > > > it.
> > > >
> > > > -Moriarty
> > >
> > > thanks
> >
> > No one bit. Sorry.
> >
> > -Moriarty
>
> thanks anyway.

What annoys me is that I KNOW I've read that, and I don't recall where
are when. And, alas, at 67 years old there's an awful lot of where and
when to search...

--

Kay Shapero
Address munged, try my first name at kayshapero dot net.
Loading...