Discussion:
Star Trek Style Stories that predate Star Trek
(too old to reply)
Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
2014-06-01 20:35:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Robert Carnegie
2014-06-01 21:48:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF
that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big
organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration?
Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of
stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or
spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in
that style.
I'm going to assume that "literary SF" means "written down",
and note <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sargasso_of_Space>
(1955) which apparently was reviewed /at the time/ as
"aimed at the audience whose concept of s.f. is derived
from T.V. serials." If that's what you're looking for......
However, the spaceship "Solar Queen" is a "Free Trader",
so they're specifically not part of a large organisation
but in competition against major space corporations, and
exploration isn't their main function - except this time.
So these elements do exist in the story...
Greg Goss
2014-06-01 22:17:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Exploration ships as part of big organizations?

Manticore bought their charter from an exploration company, but the
stories of the exploration era are all deep history and pretty vague
by the time we hear about them.

Exploration ship attached to a big organization? That's a pretty
vague requirement. The colony in Legacy of Heorot was sponsored by
the National Geographic Society.

Was there anything left of the Howard Families on earth after they
headed outsystem?

Most space exploration stories are navy based. Was Space Beagle part
of the navy? I think that the original Beagle was.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Don Kuenz
2014-06-01 22:28:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.

Now tell me this doesn't sound like the beginning of a STOS episode.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Future, Wizard of Science
Calling Captain Future by Edmond Hamilton

CHAPTER I
The Menace from Space

THE big liner Pallas throbbed through space on it regular run from Venus
to Earth. In the brightly lighted saloons of the big shop, throngs of
men and women drank, laughed, talked or danced to the haunting music of
the native Venusian orchestra.

Up in the televisor room, "Sparks" yawned over his instruments. Then the
youthful Earthman operator looked up quickly as the stocky first mate of
the liner entered the room.

"Call Earth Spaceport Four and tell them we'll dock at ten sharp
tomorrow," the mate ordered.

Sparks punched his switches, pressed the call-button. The televisor
screen broke into light. In it appeared the chief dispatcher, on duty at
Earth Spaceport 4.

The dispatcher heard the report and then nodded.

"Okay, Pallas. We'll have Dock Fifteen ready for -"

Then it happened!

The televisor went blank as an untuned wave of incredible power crowded
onto it. Then the image of a man appeared in it.

"What the devil -" Sparks gasped. The man in the screen was an
extraordinary-looking individual. He seemed an Earthman, yet his tall,
gaunt, black-clothed figure, his enormous bulging forehead and skull,
and his hypnotically burning black eyes, gave to his aspect some
indefinable but startling aura of the superman.

"Doctor Zarro calling the Solar System peoples," he rasped in a deep,
harsh voice. "People of the nine worlds, I bring you warning of a
dreadful peril - a peril which your bungling, stupid scientists have not
yet even discovered.

"A huge dark star is rushing upon our Solar System from the boundless
abyss of outer space! This colossal dead sun is coming from the
direction of the constellation Sagittarius - its exact position is Right
Ascension, seventeen hours, forty-one minutes, Declination, minus
twenty-seven degrees, forty-eight minutes. It is coming straight toward
us and will reach our System in several weeks, at its present speed.
This on-coming monster will wreck our System - unless it is turned
aside." ...

http://www.capitaineflam.free.fr/
JRStern
2014-06-03 04:02:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 1 Jun 2014 22:28:00 +0000 (UTC), Don Kuenz
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Now tell me this doesn't sound like the beginning of a STOS episode.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Captain Future, Wizard of Science
Calling Captain Future by Edmond Hamilton
CHAPTER I
The Menace from Space
THE big liner Pallas throbbed through space ...
stories I never finished reading

J.
Quadibloc
2014-06-03 18:24:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JRStern
On Sun, 1 Jun 2014 22:28:00 +0000 (UTC), Don Kuenz
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
THE big liner Pallas throbbed through space ...
stories I never finished reading
Oh, come on. It's not like it was a subway train.

John Savard
Robert Carnegie
2014-06-03 18:55:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quadibloc
Post by JRStern
On Sun, 1 Jun 2014 22:28:00 +0000 (UTC), Don Kuenz
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
THE big liner Pallas throbbed through space ...
stories I never finished reading
Oh, come on. It's not like it was a subway train.
It does /not/ sound like Star Trek to be confronted
at once by a big throbbing Pallas.

It sounds like Star Trek slash fanfic. Probably from
the episode where Commodore Decker is obsessed with
penetrating the Doomsday Machine.
Don Kuenz
2017-06-26 02:53:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Quadibloc
Post by JRStern
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Now tell me this doesn't sound like the beginning of a STOS episode.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Captain Future, Wizard of Science
Calling Captain Future by Edmond Hamilton
CHAPTER I
The Menace from Space
THE big liner Pallas throbbed through space on it regular run from Venus
to Earth. In the brightly lighted saloons of the big shop, throngs of
men and women drank, laughed, talked or danced to the haunting music of
the native Venusian orchestra.
Up in the televisor room, "Sparks" yawned over his instruments. Then the
youthful Earthman operator looked up quickly as the stocky first mate of
the liner entered the room.
"Call Earth Spaceport Four and tell them we'll dock at ten sharp
tomorrow," the mate ordered.
Sparks punched his switches, pressed the call-button. The televisor
screen broke into light. In it appeared the chief dispatcher, on duty at
Earth Spaceport 4.
The dispatcher heard the report and then nodded.
"Okay, Pallas. We'll have Dock Fifteen ready for -"
Then it happened!
The televisor went blank as an untuned wave of incredible power crowded
onto it. Then the image of a man appeared in it.
"What the devil -" Sparks gasped. The man in the screen was an
extraordinary-looking individual. He seemed an Earthman, yet his tall,
gaunt, black-clothed figure, his enormous bulging forehead and skull,
and his hypnotically burning black eyes, gave to his aspect some
indefinable but startling aura of the superman.
"Doctor Zarro calling the Solar System peoples," he rasped in a deep,
harsh voice. "People of the nine worlds, I bring you warning of a
dreadful peril - a peril which your bungling, stupid scientists have not
yet even discovered.
"A huge dark star is rushing upon our Solar System from the boundless
abyss of outer space! This colossal dead sun is coming from the
direction of the constellation Sagittarius - its exact position is Right
Ascension, seventeen hours, forty-one minutes, Declination, minus
twenty-seven degrees, forty-eight minutes. It is coming straight toward
us and will reach our System in several weeks, at its present speed.
This on-coming monster will wreck our System - unless it is turned
aside." ...
http://www.capitaineflam.free.fr/
THE big liner Pallas throbbed through space ...
stories I never finished reading
Oh, come on. It's not like it was a subway train.
It does /not/ sound like Star Trek to be confronted
at once by a big throbbing Pallas.
It sounds like Star Trek slash fanfic. Probably from
the episode where Commodore Decker is obsessed with
penetrating the Doomsday Machine.
Y'all ready for seconds? Tiptree's on deck so buckle up.

IT FLOATS THERE visibly engorged, blue-green against the
blackness. He stares: it swells, pulsing to a terrifying
dim beat, slowly extrudes a great ghostly bulge which
extends, solidifies ... it is a planet-testicle pushing
a monster penis toward the stars. Its blood-beat
reverberates through weeping immensities: cold, cold.
The parsecs-long phallus throbs, probes blindly under
intolerable pressure from within; its tip is a huge
cloudy glans lit by a spark: Centaur. In grief it bulges,
lengthens, seeking release - stars toll unbearable
crescendo. ...

"A Momentary Taste of Being" (Tiptree)

Alice's "parsecs-long phallus" is one improbably long rocket chemtrail.
Do rockets even *have* chemtrails IN SPACE that are visible to the naked
eye?

Thank you,

--
Don, KB7RPU
J. Clarke
2017-06-26 03:04:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Quadibloc
Post by JRStern
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Now tell me this doesn't sound like the beginning of a STOS episode.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Captain Future, Wizard of Science
Calling Captain Future by Edmond Hamilton
CHAPTER I
The Menace from Space
THE big liner Pallas throbbed through space on it regular run from Venus
to Earth. In the brightly lighted saloons of the big shop, throngs of
men and women drank, laughed, talked or danced to the haunting music of
the native Venusian orchestra.
Up in the televisor room, "Sparks" yawned over his instruments. Then the
youthful Earthman operator looked up quickly as the stocky first mate of
the liner entered the room.
"Call Earth Spaceport Four and tell them we'll dock at ten sharp
tomorrow," the mate ordered.
Sparks punched his switches, pressed the call-button. The televisor
screen broke into light. In it appeared the chief dispatcher, on duty at
Earth Spaceport 4.
The dispatcher heard the report and then nodded.
"Okay, Pallas. We'll have Dock Fifteen ready for -"
Then it happened!
The televisor went blank as an untuned wave of incredible power crowded
onto it. Then the image of a man appeared in it.
"What the devil -" Sparks gasped. The man in the screen was an
extraordinary-looking individual. He seemed an Earthman, yet his tall,
gaunt, black-clothed figure, his enormous bulging forehead and skull,
and his hypnotically burning black eyes, gave to his aspect some
indefinable but startling aura of the superman.
"Doctor Zarro calling the Solar System peoples," he rasped in a deep,
harsh voice. "People of the nine worlds, I bring you warning of a
dreadful peril - a peril which your bungling, stupid scientists have not
yet even discovered.
"A huge dark star is rushing upon our Solar System from the boundless
abyss of outer space! This colossal dead sun is coming from the
direction of the constellation Sagittarius - its exact position is Right
Ascension, seventeen hours, forty-one minutes, Declination, minus
twenty-seven degrees, forty-eight minutes. It is coming straight toward
us and will reach our System in several weeks, at its present speed.
This on-coming monster will wreck our System - unless it is turned
aside." ...
http://www.capitaineflam.free.fr/
THE big liner Pallas throbbed through space ...
stories I never finished reading
Oh, come on. It's not like it was a subway train.
It does /not/ sound like Star Trek to be confronted
at once by a big throbbing Pallas.
It sounds like Star Trek slash fanfic. Probably from
the episode where Commodore Decker is obsessed with
penetrating the Doomsday Machine.
Y'all ready for seconds? Tiptree's on deck so buckle up.
IT FLOATS THERE visibly engorged, blue-green against the
blackness. He stares: it swells, pulsing to a terrifying
dim beat, slowly extrudes a great ghostly bulge which
extends, solidifies ... it is a planet-testicle pushing
a monster penis toward the stars. Its blood-beat
reverberates through weeping immensities: cold, cold.
The parsecs-long phallus throbs, probes blindly under
intolerable pressure from within; its tip is a huge
cloudy glans lit by a spark: Centaur. In grief it bulges,
lengthens, seeking release - stars toll unbearable
crescendo. ...
"A Momentary Taste of Being" (Tiptree)
Alice's "parsecs-long phallus" is one improbably long rocket chemtrail.
Do rockets even *have* chemtrails IN SPACE that are visible to the naked
eye?
Well, if it's "parsecs-long" it's not a "rocket" as we know the term, so
the answer is pretty much "these ones do".
David Goldfarb
2017-06-26 05:43:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Kuenz
IT FLOATS THERE visibly engorged, blue-green against the
blackness. He stares: it swells, pulsing to a terrifying
dim beat, slowly extrudes a great ghostly bulge which
extends, solidifies ... it is a planet-testicle pushing
a monster penis toward the stars. Its blood-beat
reverberates through weeping immensities: cold, cold.
The parsecs-long phallus throbs, probes blindly under
intolerable pressure from within; its tip is a huge
cloudy glans lit by a spark: Centaur. In grief it bulges,
lengthens, seeking release - stars toll unbearable
crescendo. ...
"A Momentary Taste of Being" (Tiptree)
"'This Tiptree story restored my faith in humanity,' said
no reviewer ever." -- James Nicoll
--
David Goldfarb |"You realize you're insane, don't you?"
***@gmail.com | "*hahahaha*. Don't change the subject."
***@ocf.berkeley.edu | -- _Zot!_ #3
Don Kuenz
2017-06-26 15:52:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Don Kuenz
IT FLOATS THERE visibly engorged, blue-green against the
blackness. He stares: it swells, pulsing to a terrifying
dim beat, slowly extrudes a great ghostly bulge which
extends, solidifies ... it is a planet-testicle pushing
a monster penis toward the stars. Its blood-beat
reverberates through weeping immensities: cold, cold.
The parsecs-long phallus throbs, probes blindly under
intolerable pressure from within; its tip is a huge
cloudy glans lit by a spark: Centaur. In grief it bulges,
lengthens, seeking release - stars toll unbearable
crescendo. ...
"A Momentary Taste of Being" (Tiptree)
"'This Tiptree story restored my faith in humanity,' said
no reviewer ever." -- James Nicoll
"Ignorance is bliss." Unfortunately Alice was a child of privilege who
probably knew some of the dirty little secrets of the system. Cognitive
dissonance has to take a toll after a while.

My own faith in humanity remains intact regardless of stories. OTOH
psychopaths earned further study by me. "Forewarned is forearmed."

My way's not for everyone. Some people just want bliss and that's OK.

Eccl 1:18 For in much wisdom there is much sorrow,
and he who stores up knowledge stores up grief.

Thank you,

--
Don, KB7RPU
Mike Van Pelt
2017-06-29 00:11:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Goldfarb
"'This Tiptree story restored my faith in humanity,' said
no reviewer ever." -- James Nicoll
This! This goes in my quotes file.

I don't demand all happy stories by any means, but I got tired
of relentlessly depressing "Everything and everybody sucks"
stories pretty quickly.
--
"The urge to save humanity is almost | Mike Van Pelt
always a false front for the urge to rule." | mvp at calweb.com
-- H.L. Mencken | KE6BVH
Anthony Nance
2017-06-29 13:21:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by David Goldfarb
"'This Tiptree story restored my faith in humanity,' said
no reviewer ever." -- James Nicoll
This! This goes in my quotes file.
I don't demand all happy stories by any means, but I got tired
of relentlessly depressing "Everything and everybody sucks"
stories pretty quickly.
Oh yes - I have to read her in small doses, 'cause she dials up
The Bleak to 11.

Many years ago, based on the strength of a few short stories,
I picked up "Warm Worlds and Otherwise" and read the whole thing
over the course of two evenings. What an utterly stupid idea. :)

It was really good though, and I decided that moving forward,
I'd sprinkle her stuff in along the way. So far, it is working
well for the collections, but I don't know if/how it would work
for the few novels I have - so I haven't read them yet.

Tony
D B Davis
2017-06-29 15:48:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Anthony Nance
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by David Goldfarb
"'This Tiptree story restored my faith in humanity,' said
no reviewer ever." -- James Nicoll
This! This goes in my quotes file.
I don't demand all happy stories by any means, but I got tired
of relentlessly depressing "Everything and everybody sucks"
stories pretty quickly.
Oh yes - I have to read her in small doses, 'cause she dials up
The Bleak to 11.
Many years ago, based on the strength of a few short stories,
I picked up "Warm Worlds and Otherwise" and read the whole thing
over the course of two evenings. What an utterly stupid idea. :)
It was really good though, and I decided that moving forward,
I'd sprinkle her stuff in along the way. So far, it is working
well for the collections, but I don't know if/how it would work
for the few novels I have - so I haven't read them yet.
Sometimes it's only too easy for me to go dark. And create my own little
patch of darkness with all the bells and whistles.

"Cynicism is intellectual dandyism" (Meredith)

You sound like one of my acquaintances who reminiscences about watching
three motorcycle gang B-movies in a row at a movie house back in the
day. He ranks that event as the greatest waste of his time ever.

What does James fondly call those poor children that he inflicts old sf
stories on? His test subjects?

My wife occasionally allows me to inflict sf on her. She actually read
_The Door Into Summer_ (RAH) and she liked it, probably because of the
cat. OTOH she only tolerated a few lines my elocution of "Her Smoke"
(Tiptree) before she stopped my show short with a curt, eye-rolled
"pa-lease." ROFL.

Some Inet sage says that you're the average of the five people that you
spend the most time with. So you want to pick your associates wisely. If
that's true, book worms might also be the average of the five authors
that they spend the most time with.

BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join the ranks
of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So this post appears
under my new nom de plume for rasw. Daniel Boone Davis is the
protagonist in my favorite sf story, _The Door Into Summer_ (RAH).

Thank you,

--
Don
Anthony Nance
2017-06-29 16:54:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by D B Davis
Post by Anthony Nance
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by David Goldfarb
"'This Tiptree story restored my faith in humanity,' said
no reviewer ever." -- James Nicoll
This! This goes in my quotes file.
I don't demand all happy stories by any means, but I got tired
of relentlessly depressing "Everything and everybody sucks"
stories pretty quickly.
Oh yes - I have to read her in small doses, 'cause she dials up
The Bleak to 11.
Many years ago, based on the strength of a few short stories,
I picked up "Warm Worlds and Otherwise" and read the whole thing
over the course of two evenings. What an utterly stupid idea. :)
It was really good though, and I decided that moving forward,
I'd sprinkle her stuff in along the way. So far, it is working
well for the collections, but I don't know if/how it would work
for the few novels I have - so I haven't read them yet.
Sometimes it's only too easy for me to go dark. And create my own little
patch of darkness with all the bells and whistles.
"Cynicism is intellectual dandyism" (Meredith)
You sound like one of my acquaintances who reminiscences about watching
three motorcycle gang B-movies in a row at a movie house back in the
day. He ranks that event as the greatest waste of his time ever.
Oh, reading so much Tiptree consecutively certainly wasn't
a waste of time, but it did affect my mood, and in such a way
that I don't want to do it that way again.
Post by D B Davis
<some snippage>
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join the ranks
of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So this post appears
under my new nom de plume for rasw. Daniel Boone Davis is the
protagonist in my favorite sf story, _The Door Into Summer_ (RAH).
Hmm...I have no idea what I'd do for a nom de plume. Wait, that's
wrong - let me say it better: I'd have several ideas for some sort
of non de plume, but nothing stands out as "the one".

Tony
D B Davis
2017-06-30 02:34:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Anthony Nance
Post by D B Davis
<some snippage>
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join the ranks
of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So this post appears
under my new nom de plume for rasw. Daniel Boone Davis is the
protagonist in my favorite sf story, _The Door Into Summer_ (RAH).
Hmm...I have no idea what I'd do for a nom de plume. Wait, that's
wrong - let me say it better: I'd have several ideas for some sort
of non de plume, but nothing stands out as "the one".
D B Davis works as my nom de plume for a variety of reasons.

* Our cat Noirton passed away shortly after my wife and I read the story.
* There's two psycho-biotches in my past who destroyed relationships.
* UC Boulder has nostalgic value.
* Southern California has nostalgic value.
* D B Davies operates out of a hermitage (just like me).
* Time travel's one of my two favorite tropes.

Thank you,

--
Don
David DeLaney
2017-07-01 10:24:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Anthony Nance
Post by D B Davis
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join the ranks
of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So this post appears
under my new nom de plume for rasw. Daniel Boone Davis is the
protagonist in my favorite sf story, _The Door Into Summer_ (RAH).
Hmm...I have no idea what I'd do for a nom de plume. Wait, that's
wrong - let me say it better: I'd have several ideas for some sort
of non de plume, but nothing stands out as "the one".
And I've been me on the Internet so long that I've become dbdatvic (VIC, sadly,
stopped letting me Usenet from there a while back, so Earthlink bears the
burden of my newsfroup presence now) in a good many other places. It's still
my email.

(hmmm, I need to update my .sig ... but first I need to find out if earthlink
gives me webspace, I guess.)

Dave, and no, I have no idea how the Siopsises scored a three-letter domain,
around 1994 or so
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Default User
2017-06-29 18:34:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by D B Davis
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join the ranks
of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So this post appears
under my new nom de plume for rasw.
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be anyway.


Brian
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-06-29 18:46:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 10:52:46 AM UTC-5, D B Davis
Post by D B Davis
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join
the ranks of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So
this post appears under my new nom de plume for rasw.
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be
anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium, either
could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who insists that a
pen name must involve an actual pen).

nom de guerre

/?näm d? 'ger/

noun
noun: nom de guerre; plural noun: noms de guerre

an assumed name under which a person engages in combat or some
other activity or enterprise.


nom de plume

/?näm d? 'plo?om/

noun
noun: nom de plume; plural noun: noms de plume

a pen name.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-06-29 20:13:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 10:52:46 AM UTC-5, D B Davis
Post by D B Davis
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join
the ranks of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So
this post appears under my new nom de plume for rasw.
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be
anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium, either
could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who insists that a
pen name must involve an actual pen).
nom de guerre
/?näm d? 'ger/
noun
noun: nom de guerre; plural noun: noms de guerre
an assumed name under which a person engages in combat or some
other activity or enterprise.
nom de plume
/?näm d? 'plo?om/
noun
noun: nom de plume; plural noun: noms de plume
a pen name.
So is an anonymous newspaper food critic like "Eaton Wright"
a nom de nom nom?
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Default User
2017-06-29 21:52:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be
anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium, either
could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who insists that a
pen name must involve an actual pen).
More to the combative nature of the medium.


Brian
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-06-29 23:43:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Default User
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be
anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium, either
could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who insists
that a pen name must involve an actual pen).
More to the combative nature of the medium.
Perhaps it should be plume de guerre, which I guess would be "pen of
battle." The pen *is* mightier than the sword, after all. Esepcially
if you stab someone in the eye with it.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Juho Julkunen
2017-06-30 01:13:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium, either
could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who insists
that a pen name must involve an actual pen).
More to the combative nature of the medium.
Perhaps it should be plume de guerre, which I guess would be "pen of
battle." The pen *is* mightier than the sword, after all. Esepcially
if you stab someone in the eye with it.
Getting stabbed in the eye with a sword doesn't sound too pleasant
either.
--
Juho Julkunen
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-06-30 04:39:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-5, Gutless
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium,
either could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who
insists that a pen name must involve an actual pen).
More to the combative nature of the medium.
Perhaps it should be plume de guerre, which I guess would be
"pen of battle." The pen *is* mightier than the sword, after
all. Esepcially if you stab someone in the eye with it.
Getting stabbed in the eye with a sword doesn't sound too
pleasant either.
Yeah, but in the sort of circumstances where one can realistically
aim for the eye, the shorter, more nimbly wielded pen would likely
be easier to hit the target with.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
D B Davis
2017-06-30 02:37:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be
anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium, either
could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who insists
that a pen name must involve an actual pen).
More to the combative nature of the medium.
Perhaps it should be plume de guerre, which I guess would be "pen of
battle." The pen *is* mightier than the sword, after all. Especially
if you stab someone in the eye with it.
Nym de guerre? Speaking of plume/nym de guerre, Olaf Stapledon wrote
_Star Maker_. Who knew?

Mike Resnick, the editor of _Galaxy's Edge_, for one. (The great thing
about a magazine that only comes out every other month is that sooner or
later you end up reading just about everything in it.) Resnick writes,

...Olaf Stapledon's _Star Maker_ was to most important
[SF novel], since ninety percent of all science fiction
since it appeared stole knowingly - or far more often,
unknowingly - from it. ...
... The stars themselves are sentient [in the story],
and eventually all the sentient entities in the
galaxy - men, aliens, stars, everything - merge into
a single Cosmic Mind.
But Stapledon didn't even stop there. He was
interested in what /created/ that Cosmic Mind, and
became the first - and almost only - to tackle the
notion of God (i.e., the Star Maker) in a non-religious
way.

Thank you,

--
Don
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-06-30 04:40:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by D B Davis
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
On Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-5, Gutless
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium,
either could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who
insists that a pen name must involve an actual pen).
More to the combative nature of the medium.
Perhaps it should be plume de guerre, which I guess would be
"pen of battle." The pen *is* mightier than the sword, after
all. Especially if you stab someone in the eye with it.
Nym de guerre? Speaking of plume/nym de guerre, Olaf Stapledon
wrote _Star Maker_. Who knew?
Anybody who has heard of Olaf Stapledon, or Star Maker.

Which, as Resnick points out, is sadly not that many people.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Michael F. Stemper
2017-06-30 17:04:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by D B Davis
Nym de guerre? Speaking of plume/nym de guerre, Olaf Stapledon
wrote _Star Maker_. Who knew?
Anybody who has heard of Olaf Stapledon, or Star Maker.
Which, as Resnick points out, is sadly not that many people.
I read _Last and First Men_ (checks book log) in 2003. I was not
impressed. In fact, I found it incredibly boring. It's basically
a history text, as opposed to a series of vignettes illustrating
the span of history.

_Last Men in London_ and _Star Maker_ are still unread on my shelves.
Given my reaction to _Last and First Men_, is there any point in my
trying them?
--
Michael F. Stemper
Nostalgia just ain't what it used to be.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-06-30 17:32:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by D B Davis
Nym de guerre? Speaking of plume/nym de guerre, Olaf Stapledon
wrote _Star Maker_. Who knew?
Anybody who has heard of Olaf Stapledon, or Star Maker.
Which, as Resnick points out, is sadly not that many people.
I read _Last and First Men_ (checks book log) in 2003. I was not
impressed. In fact, I found it incredibly boring. It's basically
a history text, as opposed to a series of vignettes illustrating
the span of history.
_Last Men in London_ and _Star Maker_ are still unread on my
shelves. Given my reaction to _Last and First Men_, is there any
point in my trying them?
I haven't read them either. But I do know who Olaf Stapledon was!
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
David DeLaney
2017-07-01 10:32:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by D B Davis
Nym de guerre? Speaking of plume/nym de guerre, Olaf Stapledon
wrote _Star Maker_. Who knew?
[hand]
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Anybody who has heard of Olaf Stapledon, or Star Maker.
Which, as Resnick points out, is sadly not that many people.
I read _Last and First Men_ (checks book log) in 2003. I was not
impressed. In fact, I found it incredibly boring. It's basically
a history text, as opposed to a series of vignettes illustrating
the span of history.
_Last Men in London_ and _Star Maker_ are still unread on my shelves.
Given my reaction to _Last and First Men_, is there any point in my
trying them?
Given that, then you should leave _Last Men in London_ alone, as it's a
"from the end of time They come, to deal with the incredibly odd morals and
activities existent in the London of primitive hu-mans of the First Men" book.

_Star Maker_ is a series of vignettes in much the same way ... except they
are scattershot over time and space, illustrating the slow progress of the
narrator and his Psychic Friends (no really, that's literal) into exploring
the meaning of Community by imagining ever-stranger versions of it and going
to meet them and mentally absorb a representative to help them understand it.

Eventually, forms of sentient life that would've been unimaginable to the plain
old Protagonist Guy are discovered ... leading to the Supreme Moment of the
Cosmos (capitalization included). And, a bit later, to what They saw and
comprehended of the other Cosmoi...

Dave, and it ends where it began, on a British hillside looking at the stars
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Michael F. Stemper
2017-07-11 14:39:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Michael F. Stemper
I read _Last and First Men_ (checks book log) in 2003. I was not
impressed. In fact, I found it incredibly boring. It's basically
a history text, as opposed to a series of vignettes illustrating
the span of history.
_Last Men in London_ and _Star Maker_ are still unread on my shelves.
Given my reaction to _Last and First Men_, is there any point in my
trying them?
Given that, then you should leave _Last Men in London_ alone,
Will do.
Post by David DeLaney
_Star Maker_ is a series of vignettes in much the same way ... except they
Since you're not saying "leave it alone", is there an implication that
it'd be worth my giving it a try?
Post by David DeLaney
Eventually, forms of sentient life that would've been unimaginable to the plain
old Protagonist Guy are discovered ... leading to the Supreme Moment of the
Cosmos (capitalization included). And, a bit later, to what They saw and
comprehended of the other Cosmoi...
Cosmic!
Post by David DeLaney
Dave, and it ends where it began, on a British hillside looking at the stars
Not with a bang?
--
Michael F. Stemper
Deuteronomy 24:17
Peter Trei
2017-07-11 15:24:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Michael F. Stemper
I read _Last and First Men_ (checks book log) in 2003. I was not
impressed. In fact, I found it incredibly boring. It's basically
a history text, as opposed to a series of vignettes illustrating
the span of history.
_Last Men in London_ and _Star Maker_ are still unread on my shelves.
Given my reaction to _Last and First Men_, is there any point in my
trying them?
Given that, then you should leave _Last Men in London_ alone,
I read 'Last and First Men', and 'Star Maker' when I was about 14, and still
in my personal 'Golden Age of SF'. They were the first books to really
bring home the concept of 'deep time', (something hinted at in some Andre Norten
books about Forerunner races). The Stapledons were able to make me
comprehend to some small extent how small a single human is before all of Time
and Space.

If you're after character development and tight plot, forget it.
If you're after 'Star Trek' style adventures, forget that too.

But these books have 'sensawunda' in spades.

pt
David DeLaney
2017-07-18 09:03:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by David DeLaney
_Star Maker_ is a series of vignettes in much the same way ... except they
Since you're not saying "leave it alone", is there an implication that
it'd be worth my giving it a try?
It might well be. I was going to say, but forgot, that it's very much a
travelogue, through time and space, to more and more alien-to-the-protagonist
cultures and beings. This may be among your interests. The most screen time is
given to his very first one encountered, with things speeding up continually
after that as he gets more cosmopolitan and more used to hivemind travel.
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by David DeLaney
leading to the Supreme Moment of the
Cosmos (capitalization included). And, a bit later, to what They saw and
comprehended of the other Cosmoi...
Cosmic!
Very. The titular entitry and its activities are ... not exactly seen, not
exactly inferred. But reported on. Spoiler: Our Cosmos is NOT its ultimate
creation and supremest form of existence. (It wasn't the first, either.) Gasp.
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by David DeLaney
Dave, and it ends where it began, on a British hillside looking at the stars
Not with a bang?
No, with going back inside to where the Companion has been Preparing Supper
in the protagonist's own little two-person Community. But now he has a much
larger knowledge of the Role of Community in the universe.

Dave, it does touch very briefly on the Last & First Men developments and
races, partway through, but moves on quickly
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
David DeLaney
2017-07-01 10:26:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium, either
could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who insists
that a pen name must involve an actual pen).
More to the combative nature of the medium.
Perhaps it should be plume de guerre, which I guess would be "pen of
battle." The pen *is* mightier than the sword, after all. Esepcially
if you stab someone in the eye with it.
Alternatively, given that Don's ssaying to post here he has to take on an
Aspect now, it could be his nom d'un nom?

Dave, he be who he be
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
D B Davis
2017-07-01 16:16:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around here? Used to be anyway.
Strictly speaking, since usenet is purely a text medium, either
could apply (unless you're the sort of OCD moron who insists
that a pen name must involve an actual pen).
More to the combative nature of the medium.
Perhaps it should be plume de guerre, which I guess would be "pen of
battle." The pen *is* mightier than the sword, after all. Esepcially
if you stab someone in the eye with it.
Alternatively, given that Don's ssaying to post here he has to take on an
Aspect now, it could be his nom d'un nom?
Yes. My nom d'un nom empowers me. It enables me to "think out loud" free
from future history.

In the past it never occurred to me that every casual remark
of mine would be snatched up and recorded. Otherwise I would
have crept further into my shell. - Einstein

OTOH, it /did/ occur to me that every casual rasw remark of mine would
be snatched up and recorded. And that aspect of rasw stifled me, until
now.

Feynman was of a similar mind. He participated in what he thought was an
"off the record" brain storming session at a Cornell. He got upset after
Gold published the proceedings in _The Nature of Time_.

Thank you,

--
Don
Robert Carnegie
2017-06-30 10:10:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Default User
Post by D B Davis
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join the ranks
of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So this post appears
under my new nom de plume for rasw.
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around
here? Used to be anyway.
And I presume that most of us aren't doing this
with a pen (stylus), although it is possible.
Robert Carnegie
2017-06-30 10:23:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Default User
Post by D B Davis
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join the ranks
of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So this post appears
under my new nom de plume for rasw.
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around
here? Used to be anyway.
And I presume that most of us aren't doing this
with a pen (stylus), although it is possible.
...by the way, I prefer real names, or at least
plausible ones. Here, if not in fiction
(Zaphod Beeblebrox, Hiro Protagonist).
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-07-01 14:45:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Default User
Post by D B Davis
BTW, the time seems ripe for me to re-invent myself and join the ranks
of Ahasuerus, Butch Malahide, Seawasp, and others. So this post appears
under my new nom de plume for rasw.
Isn't that more of a nom de guerre around
here? Used to be anyway.
And I presume that most of us aren't doing this
with a pen (stylus), although it is possible.
...by the way, I prefer real names, or at least
plausible ones. Here, if not in fiction
(Zaphod Beeblebrox, Hiro Protagonist).
It's harder to use a good _nom du net_ these days, since a lot of
online services annoyingly insist on you using your birth name.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
David Johnston
2014-06-01 22:31:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they
go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or
part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current
series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or
spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Van Vogt also wrote Mission to the Stars although he was depressingly
more interested in his off-the-rack superman than the far more
interesting lady-captain of the coolest big ship ever. Isaac Asimov
wrote Green Patches in 1950 which was a total Star Trek episode except
for the part where the heroic spacemen doom all of us...making it a
Twilight Zone episode instead. In Ray Bradbury's The Exiles, there's a
ship with a fairly large crew on its way to Mars.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2014-06-02 12:28:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Johnston
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they
go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or
part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current
series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or
spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Van Vogt also wrote Mission to the Stars although he was depressingly
more interested in his off-the-rack superman than the far more
interesting lady-captain of the coolest big ship ever. Isaac Asimov
wrote Green Patches in 1950 which was a total Star Trek episode except
for the part where the heroic spacemen doom all of us...making it a
Twilight Zone episode instead. In Ray Bradbury's The Exiles, there's a
ship with a fairly large crew on its way to Mars.
Doesn't the earliest John Grimes predate Star Trek? The Survey Service
is kind of Star Fleet like.

Agreed Van Vogt's "Storm" stories were neat but the mixed man hero was
even more irresolute in the clench than usual VV.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
William December Starr
2014-06-02 23:57:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Johnston
Van Vogt also wrote Mission to the Stars although he was
depressingly more interested in his off-the-rack superman than the
far more interesting lady-captain of the coolest big ship ever.
Isaac Asimov wrote Green Patches in 1950 which was a total Star
Trek episode except for the part where the heroic spacemen doom
all of us...making it a Twilight Zone episode instead. In Ray
Bradbury's The Exiles, there's a ship with a fairly large crew on
its way to Mars.
Which might count if Ray Bradbury had written science fiction.

Sorry.

-- wds
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2014-06-03 17:25:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Johnston
Van Vogt also wrote Mission to the Stars although he was
depressingly more interested in his off-the-rack superman than the
far more interesting lady-captain of the coolest big ship ever.
Isaac Asimov wrote Green Patches in 1950 which was a total Star
Trek episode except for the part where the heroic spacemen doom
all of us...making it a Twilight Zone episode instead.
Just saw this.

Er, in Green Patches they don't doom all of us. Yes, luck saves us
because the enemy is too clever for its own good, but it definitely ends
on a high note for humanity.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
lal_truckee
2014-06-02 02:01:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that [goes] out on a voyage of exploration
I don't recall how Nicholas van Rijn found his markets in Poul
Anderson's Technic History, but he certainly interacted with a bunch of
unusual peoples, and had his own ships. Did he also do his own trade
exploring?
<Loading Image...>
David Johnston
2014-06-02 06:40:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by lal_truckee
other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that [goes] out on a
voyage of exploration
I don't recall how Nicholas van Rijn found his markets in Poul
Anderson's Technic History, but he certainly interacted with a bunch of
unusual peoples, and had his own ships. Did he also do his own trade
exploring?
<http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/318/2/9/nicholas_van_rijn_by_tolmancotton-d32ugpc.jpg>
He wasn't working for anyone except himself though.
Gene Wirchenko
2014-06-02 23:35:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 01 Jun 2014 19:01:12 -0700, lal_truckee
Post by lal_truckee
other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that [goes] out on a voyage of exploration
I don't recall how Nicholas van Rijn found his markets in Poul
Anderson's Technic History, but he certainly interacted with a bunch of
unusual peoples, and had his own ships. Did he also do his own trade
exploring?
<http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/318/2/9/nicholas_van_rijn_by_tolmancotton-d32ugpc.jpg>
Van Rijn without a woman? Where is the woman?

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Kay Shapero
2014-06-05 22:37:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by lal_truckee
other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that [goes] out on a
voyage of exploration
I don't recall how Nicholas van Rijn found his markets in Poul
Anderson's Technic History, but he certainly interacted with a bunch
of unusual peoples, and had his own ships. Did he also do his own
trade exploring?
<http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/318/2/9/nicholas_van_rijn_by_
tolmancotton-d32ugpc.jpg>
Not his own per se, but certainly he fielded exploration and general
trouble-twisting ships like "Muddlin Thru" with David Falkayn, Chee Lan
and Adzel.
--
Kay Shapero
Address munged, try my first name at kayshapero dot net.
v$af$ ("ppint. at pplay")
2014-06-10 05:34:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
- hi; in article,
Post by Kay Shapero
Post by lal_truckee
about a crew of ship that [goes] out on a voyage of exploration
I don't recall how Nicholas van Rijn found his markets in Poul
Anderson's Technic History, but he certainly interacted with a bunch
of unusual peoples, and had his own ships. Did he also do his own
trade exploring?
<http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2010/318/2/9/nicholas_van_rijn_by_
tolmancotton-d32ugpc.jpg>
Not his own per se, but certainly he fielded exploration and general
trouble-twisting ships like "Muddlin Thru" with David Falkayn, Chee Lan
and Adzel.
- van rijn does so, directly and in (impropria) persona -
if initially, inadvertently - in _War of the Wing-Men_ (aka
_The Man who Counts_). together with _Satan's World_, which
sees nicholas van rijn and david falkayn together in a novel,
albeit nearing the end of the trader-prince milieu, and tells
a thundering fine story of adventure sf, and with _Fire Time_,
and with _People of the Wind_, my nominations for poul ander-
son's four essential novels - though it'd be easy to find two
or three more to add - the odd flandry? - to the essentials list...

- love, ppint.
[drop the "v", and change the "f" to a "g", to email or cc.]
--
"only two groups of people in society actually behave
in a completely logical, self-interested way: one of
these is economists themselves; the other is psychopaths."
- "the trap" - bbc2 18/3/07 [3/18/07 for merkins] 21:55 GMT
Quadibloc
2014-06-08 01:03:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by lal_truckee
I don't recall how Nicholas van Rijn found his markets in Poul
Anderson's Technic History, but he certainly interacted with a bunch of
unusual peoples, and had his own ships. Did he also do his own trade
exploring?
The Polesotechnic League was certainly very analogous to the Federation.

John Savard
Larry Headlund
2014-06-02 13:20:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The Great Explosion by Eric Frank Russell which includes "...And Then There Were None."

Turning Point by Poul Anderson ("Please, mister, could I have a cracker for my oontatherium?")

Time for the Stars by Robert Heinlein.
First Contact by Murray Leinster
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2014-06-02 13:29:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The Great Explosion by Eric Frank Russell which includes "...And Then There Were None."
Turning Point by Poul Anderson ("Please, mister, could I have a cracker
for my oontatherium?")
Time for the Stars by Robert Heinlein.
First Contact by Murray Leinster
You could make a case for Leinster's "Med Service" stories except the
"crew" is just one guy and his Tormal. Chee!

Possibly also Stableford's "Grainger" and "Daedlaus" books except everyone
is depressed and living in a 70s-things-fall-apart universe.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jack Bohn
2014-06-03 01:48:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Larry Headlund
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The Great Explosion by Eric Frank Russell which includes "...And Then There Were None."
I think the introduction to the reprint of EFR's collection "Men, Martians, and Machines" specifically referenced Trek, mainly because of the stereotyping: Martians are good at math (and chess) and do the navigation, while Earthlings do engineering and fighting, or some division.
--
-Jack
T Guy
2014-06-09 12:38:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Larry Headlund
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The Great Explosion by Eric Frank Russell which includes "...And Then There Were None."
And many other examples in Russell's ouevre. Though one of my fasvourites, 'Allapolooza' or however it's spelt, is not really *straight* exploration/patrol by the Spacey fiction.
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2014-06-09 16:37:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by T Guy
Post by Larry Headlund
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The Great Explosion by Eric Frank Russell which includes "...And Then There Were None."
And many other examples in Russell's ouevre. Though one of my
fasvourites, 'Allapolooza' or however it's spelt, is not really
*straight* exploration/patrol by the Spacey fiction.
"Allamagoosa."

Love that story.
--
I'm serializing a new Ethshar novel!
The twenty-second chapter is online at:
http://www.ethshar.com/ishtascompanion22.html
Jack Bohn
2014-06-11 16:26:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by T Guy
Post by Larry Headlund
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The Great Explosion by Eric Frank Russell which includes "...And Then
There Were None."
And many other examples in Russell's ouevre. Though one of my
fasvourites, 'Allapolooza' or however it's spelt, is not really
*straight* exploration/patrol by the Spacey fiction.
"Allamagoosa."
Love that story.
Great bottle episode.
--
-Jack
Kay Shapero
2014-06-14 07:26:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by T Guy
Post by Larry Headlund
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The Great Explosion by Eric Frank Russell which includes "...And Then
There Were None."
And many other examples in Russell's ouevre.
Notably the "Jay Score" stories. According to the isfdb there were four
of them (which also matches my memory), eventually collected into "Men,
Martians and Machines". These are the adventures of the crew of a
spaceship out exploring the universe, thus germane to the topic.
--
Kay Shapero
Address munged, try my first name at kayshapero dot net.
T Guy
2014-06-12 12:43:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by T Guy
Post by Larry Headlund
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The Great Explosion by Eric Frank Russell which includes "...And Then
There Were None."
And many other examples in Russell's ouevre. Though one of my
fasvourites, 'Allapolooza' or however it's spelt, is not really
*straight* exploration/patrol by the Spacey fiction.
"Allamagoosa."
Love that story.
That's the one!

It occurs to me that we can include this and similar Russell work on the basis that _ST:TOS_ included 'The Trouble With Tribbles.'
James Nicoll
2014-06-02 13:29:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
The film Forbidden Planet.
--
http://www.livejournal.com/users/james_nicoll
http://www.cafepress.com/jdnicoll (For all your "The problem with
defending the English language [...]" T-shirt, cup and tote-bag needs)
lal_truckee
2014-06-02 14:56:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration?
clip
Post by James Nicoll
The film Forbidden Planet.
He specified "literary, and so might be inclined to dismiss _Forbidden
Planet_.

However I have a copy of the book _Forbidden Planet_ by W. J. Stuart on
the shelf (purchased in the 1950s.) It is I believe a 1956 novelization,
but it is written and printed, and so in some context meets the
"literary" criterion.

Where it might not count is _Forbidden Planet_ features a rescue mission
and not an exploration mission.
Kevrob
2017-06-26 15:09:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by lal_truckee
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration?
clip
Post by James Nicoll
The film Forbidden Planet.
He specified "literary, and so might be inclined to dismiss _Forbidden
Planet_.
However I have a copy of the book _Forbidden Planet_ by W. J. Stuart on
the shelf (purchased in the 1950s.) It is I believe a 1956 novelization,
but it is written and printed, and so in some context meets the
"literary" criterion.
Where it might not count is _Forbidden Planet_ features a rescue mission
and not an exploration mission.
Enterprise was sent to investigate colonies that had SOSed Starfleet
or that the Federation had lost contact with. What starts out as a
mission to reestablish communication could turn out to be a rescue
mission, or a "contain or destroy the beastie o' the week" mission.

If you enter "forbidden planet influence trek" in your search engine
you'll find page after page comparing the pioneering SF film to ST:TOS.
Rightly so, I'd say.

Kevin R
Robert Carnegie
2014-06-03 03:58:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF
that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big
organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration?
Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories
& novels. Also are their any current series in that vein?
I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
I did assume that someone else would mention "Rescue Party" (1946)
by Arthur C. Clarke, which is very Star Trek-ish, and, apparently,
his first sale. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rescue_Party> -
"a ship full of aliens visits Earth only hours before the sun
will explode" - and finds the planet mysteriously unpopulated,
despite interstellar radio signals and quite serviceable
modern cities. Then the landing party gets into trouble...
Robert Carnegie
2014-06-03 03:58:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF
that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big
organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration?
Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories
& novels. Also are their any current series in that vein?
I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
I did assume that someone else would mention "Rescue Party" (1946)
by Arthur C. Clarke, which is very Star Trek-ish, and, apparently,
his first sale. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rescue_Party> -
"a ship full of aliens visits Earth only hours before the sun
will explode" - and finds the planet mysteriously unpopulated,
despite interstellar radio signals and quite serviceable
modern cities. Then the landing party gets into trouble...
JRStern
2014-06-03 04:09:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 1 Jun 2014 13:35:30 -0700 (PDT), Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Even Lensmen have the big organization and do some exploring, even if
they are after all just a tool of the culturally imperialistic
Arisians.

J.
Robert Carnegie
2014-06-03 04:23:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JRStern
Even Lensmen have the big organization and do some exploring, even if
they are after all just a tool of the culturally imperialistic
Arisians.
And this raises the point upon which a young British television
viewer (no, not me) wrote to the BBC: the Starship Enterprise
is supposed to boldly go where no man has gone before, but each
week, when they arrive, there are other people already there.
(Well, almost every week.)
Quadibloc
2014-06-03 18:23:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
the Starship Enterprise
is supposed to boldly go where no man has gone before, but each
week, when they arrive, there are other people already there.
(Well, almost every week.)
Next you'll be saying that the Indians discovered America.

John Savard
JRStern
2014-06-04 01:01:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 2 Jun 2014 21:23:29 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by JRStern
Even Lensmen have the big organization and do some exploring, even if
they are after all just a tool of the culturally imperialistic
Arisians.
And this raises the point upon which a young British television
viewer (no, not me) wrote to the BBC: the Starship Enterprise
is supposed to boldly go where no man has gone before, but each
week, when they arrive, there are other people already there.
(Well, almost every week.)
And after they go they leave behind yet another Kirk bastard, well at
least they get the "boldly" part done, I don't recall him recoiling at
any blonde naked alien who wasn't certifiably virgin.

J.
J. Clarke
2014-06-04 11:23:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by JRStern
On Mon, 2 Jun 2014 21:23:29 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by JRStern
Even Lensmen have the big organization and do some exploring, even if
they are after all just a tool of the culturally imperialistic
Arisians.
And this raises the point upon which a young British television
viewer (no, not me) wrote to the BBC: the Starship Enterprise
is supposed to boldly go where no man has gone before, but each
week, when they arrive, there are other people already there.
(Well, almost every week.)
And after they go they leave behind yet another Kirk bastard, well at
least they get the "boldly" part done, I don't recall him recoiling at
any blonde naked alien who wasn't certifiably virgin.
He didn't seem to have much problem with the green ones either.
Quadibloc
2014-06-05 22:39:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. Clarke
He didn't seem to have much problem with the green ones either.
That wasn't Kirk. That was Pike. And she was only pretending to be green.

John Savard
John F. Eldredge
2014-06-07 23:37:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quadibloc
Post by J. Clarke
He didn't seem to have much problem with the green ones either.
That wasn't Kirk. That was Pike. And she was only pretending to be green.
John Savard
I hear it's not easy.
One of the Star Trek movies poked fun at this cliche, with Kirk wooing an
alien prisoner who could shape-shift between a Yeti-like form and a
humanoid female. Afterwards, he learned the prisoner was actually male.
Quadibloc
2014-06-08 01:01:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by John F. Eldredge
One of the Star Trek movies poked fun at this cliche, with Kirk wooing an
alien prisoner who could shape-shift between a Yeti-like form and a
humanoid female. Afterwards, he learned the prisoner was actually male.
I didn't remember the last part, but the shape-shifting reminds me of when the Klingons had Kirp prisoner, and the humanoid female was played by the model Iman.

John Savard
Kay Shapero
2014-06-09 05:10:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@loft.tnolan.com
says...
Post by Quadibloc
Post by J. Clarke
He didn't seem to have much problem with the green ones either.
That wasn't Kirk. That was Pike. And she was only pretending to be green.
John Savard
I hear it's not easy.
Having done it, I assure you it takes a LOT of makeup. (This being back
in the days you had to use film and get it developed, I also had the
same problem ST had where I was made up green, and the developers
changed it to a nice Mediterranean tan. Which looked great but wasn't
what I had in mind. :) )
--
Kay Shapero
Address munged, try my first name at kayshapero dot net.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2014-06-09 05:42:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kay Shapero
says...
Post by Quadibloc
Post by J. Clarke
He didn't seem to have much problem with the green ones either.
That wasn't Kirk. That was Pike. And she was only pretending to be green.
John Savard
I hear it's not easy.
Having done it, I assure you it takes a LOT of makeup. (This being back
in the days you had to use film and get it developed, I also had the
same problem ST had where I was made up green, and the developers
changed it to a nice Mediterranean tan. Which looked great but wasn't
what I had in mind. :) )
And people tend to pass you over 'cause you're
Not standing out like flashy sparkles in the water
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Quadibloc
2014-06-11 01:25:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quadibloc
Post by J. Clarke
He didn't seem to have much problem with the green ones either.
That wasn't Kirk. That was Pike. And she was only pretending to be green.
I hear it's not easy.
I had just run across this video, which I thought was appropriate to this particular side topic,



but I see that to your post, a reference to this video is more in order:



John Savard
Quadibloc
2014-06-11 01:37:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Of course, when one thinks of being green, *this* famous character comes to mind...



John Savard
v$af$ ("ppint. at pplay")
2014-06-10 05:41:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
- hi; in article,
<3e6851ee-fe54-4ae0-88a4-***@googlegroups.com>,
***@excite.com "Robert Carnegie" worrited:
..
Post by Robert Carnegie
And this raises the point upon which a young British television
viewer (no, not me) wrote to the BBC: the Starship Enterprise
is supposed to boldly go where no man has gone before, but each
week, when they arrive, there are other people already there.
(Well, almost every week.)
- well, what do you think happens to a poor quaddie vat-
girl as gets pregnant?

- "it's the same, the whole world over..."

- love, ppint.
[drop the "v", and change the "f" to a "g", to email or cc.]
--
"never trust a man with shaved buttocks"
- jim darby, 2/9/96 (9/2/96 for merkins)
Mark Zenier
2014-06-02 16:37:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are
about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go
out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part
of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in
that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just
straight forward/serious stories in that style.
James H. Schmitz's _Agent of Vega_ collection could be shoehorned into
that category.


Mark Zenier ***@eskimo.com
Googleproofaddress(account:mzenier provider:eskimo domain:com)
Brian M. Scott
2014-06-05 03:26:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Mon, 2 Jun 2014 16:37:31 GMT, Mark Zenier
Post by Mark Zenier
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary
SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some
big organization and they go out on a voyage of
exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a
series of stories & novels. Also are their any current
series in that vein? I am not really interested in
parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious
stories in that style.
James H. Schmitz's _Agent of Vega_ collection could be
shoehorned into that category.
In the sense that everyone fits Prokrustes’ bed.

Brian
--
It was the neap tide, when the baga venture out of their
holes to root for sandtatties. The waves whispered
rhythmically over the packed sand: haggisss, haggisss,
haggisss.
David Johnston
2014-06-07 14:57:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Brian M. Scott
On Mon, 2 Jun 2014 16:37:31 GMT, Mark Zenier
Post by Mark Zenier
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary
SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some
big organization and they go out on a voyage of
exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a
series of stories & novels. Also are their any current
series in that vein? I am not really interested in
parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious
stories in that style.
James H. Schmitz's _Agent of Vega_ collection could be
shoehorned into that category.
In the sense that everyone fits Prokrustes? bed.
ROFL. More bonesawed than shoehorned, as you see it. Or stretched, as
circumstances warrant.
Baen generously provides a free ebook.
http://baencd.freedoors.org/Books/Agent%20of%20Vega/index.htm
The _Agent of Vega_ (AoV) stories are serious and feature a big
organization. A big secretive organization that tasks itself with ruling
others.
As usual, the Department's motive was practical enough. Its
king-sized job was to keep the eighteen thousand individual
civilizations so far registered in its Zones out of as much
dangerous trouble as it could, while nudging them unobtrusively,
whenever the occasion was offered, just a little farther into
the path of righteousness and order.
It was slow, dangerous, carefully unspectacular work, since it
violated, in fact and in spirit, every galactic treaty of
nonintervention the Confederacy had ever signed.
(The tin foil hatter says it reminds one of nations getting nudged by
the City just a little farther into the path of righteousness, order,
and central banking.)
AoV qualifies as space opera. It has spaceships. It has a command
structure. It has violent conflicts. It has formulaic stories that tend
towards the mediocre after a while. New civilizations, or at least
civilizations new to the reader, are explored.
AoV is space opera that was published before Star Trek, which is a Titan
of space opera. What's the show stopper with it fulfilling the OP's
request?
It has nothing to do with the crew of a ship on a voyage of exploration.
Don Kuenz
2014-06-07 14:17:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Brian M. Scott
On Mon, 2 Jun 2014 16:37:31 GMT, Mark Zenier
Post by Mark Zenier
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary
SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some
big organization and they go out on a voyage of
exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a
series of stories & novels. Also are their any current
series in that vein? I am not really interested in
parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious
stories in that style.
James H. Schmitz's _Agent of Vega_ collection could be
shoehorned into that category.
In the sense that everyone fits Prokrustes? bed.
ROFL. More bonesawed than shoehorned, as you see it. Or stretched, as
circumstances warrant.

Baen generously provides a free ebook.
http://baencd.freedoors.org/Books/Agent%20of%20Vega/index.htm

The _Agent of Vega_ (AoV) stories are serious and feature a big
organization. A big secretive organization that tasks itself with ruling
others.

As usual, the Department's motive was practical enough. Its
king-sized job was to keep the eighteen thousand individual
civilizations so far registered in its Zones out of as much
dangerous trouble as it could, while nudging them unobtrusively,
whenever the occasion was offered, just a little farther into
the path of righteousness and order.

It was slow, dangerous, carefully unspectacular work, since it
violated, in fact and in spirit, every galactic treaty of
nonintervention the Confederacy had ever signed.

(The tin foil hatter says it reminds one of nations getting nudged by
the City just a little farther into the path of righteousness, order,
and central banking.)

AoV qualifies as space opera. It has spaceships. It has a command
structure. It has violent conflicts. It has formulaic stories that tend
towards the mediocre after a while. New civilizations, or at least
civilizations new to the reader, are explored.

AoV is space opera that was published before Star Trek, which is a Titan
of space opera. What's the show stopper with it fulfilling the OP's
request?
j***@gmail.com
2014-06-07 09:58:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Edmond Hamilton wrote a series of stories about the "Interstellar Patrol" in 1928 and 1929. The only one I've ever read was "The Star Stealers," which I reviewed on <i>Fantastic Worlds</i>:

http://fantasticworlds-jordan179.blogspot.com/2011/02/retro-review-edmond-hamilton-star.html
David Johnston
2017-06-26 15:07:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Keith Wetzel AKA Space Cadet
Besides "Voyage of the Space Beagle" what other literary SF that are about a crew of ship that is part of some big organization and they go out on a voyage of exploration? Either as a stand alone story or part of a series of stories & novels. Also are their any current series in that vein? I am not really interested in parodies or spoofs. But just straight forward/serious stories in that style.
Isaac Asimov wrote a couple of stories which could have been Star Trek scripts with some modifications. Green Patches (exploratory vessel discovers all life on the planet is part of the same planetary mass mind) and Sucker Bait (Earth vessel investigates why a colony failed a century ago)
Loading...