Discussion:
Sci-Fi Radio 00 - Voices Lost in Calling
(too old to reply)
James Nicoll
2012-11-06 17:32:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3

Sci-Fi Radio seems to have been a series of radio plays based on written
SF NPR broadcast in 1989-90. Not sure who wrote this one. Also not sure
what it is about, aside from a woman concerned about a series of interrupted
phone calls. A combination of odd musical choices and muddled sound track
defeated me.

(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
--
http://www.livejournal.com/users/james_nicoll
http://www.cafepress.com/jdnicoll (For all your "The problem with
defending the English language [...]" T-shirt, cup and tote-bag needs)
g***@kassiopeia.juls.savba.sk
2012-11-06 19:15:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
I wonder if people are really so clueless or it is a malice...
I mean, creating stereo mp3 with 32kbps bitrate for a _narrative_ is a
bit dumb. Either use better quality (64 kbps), or a better format
(AAC or, if you care about ideology, Ogg/Vorbis), or, if you really need
mp3 and the size is important, better sacrifice the stereo - 32kbps mono
mp3 is good for human voice, stereo isn't.
--
-----------------------------------------------------------
| Radovan Garabík http://kassiopeia.juls.savba.sk/~garabik/ |
| __..--^^^--..__ garabik @ kassiopeia.juls.savba.sk |
-----------------------------------------------------------
Antivirus alert: file .signature infected by signature virus.
Hi! I'm a signature virus! Copy me into your signature file to help me spread!
James Nicoll
2012-11-06 20:20:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
Post by James Nicoll
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
I wonder if people are really so clueless or it is a malice...
I lean clueless in many cases: people are going to the effort to upload
these things.

I suspect in a lot of cases the original files were not that great.
--
http://www.livejournal.com/users/james_nicoll
http://www.cafepress.com/jdnicoll (For all your "The problem with
defending the English language [...]" T-shirt, cup and tote-bag needs)
James Nicoll
2012-11-06 20:23:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
Post by James Nicoll
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
I wonder if people are really so clueless or it is a malice...
I lean clueless in many cases: people are going to the effort to upload
these things.
I suspect in a lot of cases the original files were not that great.
And then there's the problem with Mindwebs, where the incidental music
was often too loud to hear the dialogue over and also apparently recorded
without giving the musician any hint as to what was going on in the play.
--
http://www.livejournal.com/users/james_nicoll
http://www.cafepress.com/jdnicoll (For all your "The problem with
defending the English language [...]" T-shirt, cup and tote-bag needs)
Kevrob
2012-11-06 20:37:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-Voi...
Post by James Nicoll
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
I wonder if people are really so clueless or it is a malice...
I lean clueless in many cases: people are going to the effort to upload
these things.
I suspect in a lot of cases the original files were not that great.
And then there's the problem with Mindwebs, where the incidental music
was often too loud to hear the dialogue over and also apparently recorded
without giving the musician any hint as to what was going on in the play.
I haven't listened to much streaming audio lately, but I remember when
certain providers would offer the stream @ different bit rates, as
some had DSL, or a cable broadband connection, but many still had
plain vanilla dialup. The user chose the connection speed. For news,
talk or a sports broadcast, the less bits the better, when using
dialup.

Nowadays, the assumption seems to be that everyone has a fat pipe or
is using a mobile device.

Kevin
Mark Zenier
2012-11-07 17:34:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by James Nicoll
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-Voi....
Post by James Nicoll
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and
intrusiveness
Post by James Nicoll
Post by James Nicoll
Post by James Nicoll
of the music is a big issue for me)
I wonder if people are really so clueless or it is a malice...
I lean clueless in many cases: people are going to the effort to upload
these things.
I suspect in a lot of cases the original files were not that great.
And then there's the problem with Mindwebs, where the incidental music
was often too loud to hear the dialogue over and also apparently recorded
without giving the musician any hint as to what was going on in the play.
I haven't listened to much streaming audio lately, but I remember when
some had DSL, or a cable broadband connection, but many still had
plain vanilla dialup. The user chose the connection speed. For news,
talk or a sports broadcast, the less bits the better, when using
dialup.
Nowadays, the assumption seems to be that everyone has a fat pipe or
is using a mobile device.
But archive stuff is usually just a podcast file on a web site.
(That saves all the hassle (and cost) of runnning the streaming
server). Which means that you're stuck with how they ripped it.


Mark Zenier ***@eskimo.com
Googleproofaddress(account:mzenier provider:eskimo domain:com)
Raymond Daley
2012-11-08 19:05:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
Sci-Fi Radio seems to have been a series of radio plays based on written
SF NPR broadcast in 1989-90. Not sure who wrote this one. Also not sure
what it is about, aside from a woman concerned about a series of interrupted
phone calls. A combination of odd musical choices and muddled sound track
defeated me.
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
http://archive.org/details/Sci-fiRadio

Header page for all of the pieces in various formats.
Raymond Daley
2012-11-08 19:09:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
Sci-Fi Radio seems to have been a series of radio plays based on written
SF NPR broadcast in 1989-90. Not sure who wrote this one. Also not sure
what it is about, aside from a woman concerned about a series of interrupted
phone calls. A combination of odd musical choices and muddled sound track
defeated me.
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
http://archive.org/details/Sci-fiRadio
Header page for all of the pieces in various formats.
And list of contents, who wrote what

Sci-Fi Radio 00 - Voices Lost in Calling
Sci-Fi Radio 01 - I'm Scared by Jack Finney
Sci-Fi Radio 02&03 - Dark Benediction by Walter M. Miller
Sci-Fi Radio 04 - Light of Other Days by Bob Shaw
Sci-Fi Radio 05 - Ballard of Lost C'Mell by Cordwainer Smith
Sci-Fi Radio 06 - Sales Pitch by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 07 - Diary of a Rose by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 08&09 - Frost and Fire by Ray Bradbury
Sci-Fi Radio 10 - The Cold Equations by Tom Godwin
Close Encounter With The Diety & Sundance - Part 1
Sci-Fi Radio 13 - Wall of Darkness by Arthur C. Clarke
Sci-Fi Radio 14&15 - Vintage Season by H Kuttner & C.L. Moore
Sci-Fi Radio 16 - Grantha Sighting by Avram Davidson
Sci-Fi Radio 17 - Call Me Joe by Poul Anderson
Sci-Fi Radio 18 - Imposter by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 19 - Field of Vision by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 20&21 - Houston, Houston, Do You Read by James Tiptree (aka
Alice Sheldon
Sci-Fi Radio 22 - Shape by Robert Sheckley
Sci-Fi Radio 23&24 - Home is the Hangman by Roger Zelazny
Sci-Fi Radio 25 - The Twonky by Lewis Padgett
Sci-Fi Radio 26 - Yanqui Doodle by James Tiptree (aka Alice Sheldon
Don Kuenz
2017-04-29 04:18:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
Sci-Fi Radio seems to have been a series of radio plays based on written
SF NPR broadcast in 1989-90. Not sure who wrote this one. Also not sure
what it is about, aside from a woman concerned about a series of interrupted
phone calls. A combination of odd musical choices and muddled sound track
defeated me.
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
http://archive.org/details/Sci-fiRadio
Header page for all of the pieces in various formats.
And list of contents, who wrote what
Sci-Fi Radio 00 - Voices Lost in Calling
Sci-Fi Radio 01 - I'm Scared by Jack Finney
Sci-Fi Radio 02&03 - Dark Benediction by Walter M. Miller
Sci-Fi Radio 04 - Light of Other Days by Bob Shaw
Sci-Fi Radio 05 - Ballard of Lost C'Mell by Cordwainer Smith
Sci-Fi Radio 06 - Sales Pitch by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 07 - Diary of a Rose by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 08&09 - Frost and Fire by Ray Bradbury
Sci-Fi Radio 10 - The Cold Equations by Tom Godwin
Close Encounter With The Diety & Sundance - Part 1
Sci-Fi Radio 13 - Wall of Darkness by Arthur C. Clarke
Sci-Fi Radio 14&15 - Vintage Season by H Kuttner & C.L. Moore
Sci-Fi Radio 16 - Grantha Sighting by Avram Davidson
Sci-Fi Radio 17 - Call Me Joe by Poul Anderson
Sci-Fi Radio 18 - Imposter by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 19 - Field of Vision by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 20&21 - Houston, Houston, Do You Read by James Tiptree (aka
Alice Sheldon
Sci-Fi Radio 22 - Shape by Robert Sheckley
Sci-Fi Radio 23&24 - Home is the Hangman by Roger Zelazny
Sci-Fi Radio 25 - The Twonky by Lewis Padgett
Sci-Fi Radio 26 - Yanqui Doodle by James Tiptree (aka Alice Sheldon
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"

My story begins earlier today when a fellow conspiracy theorist said
"Rudolph Fentz." We often talk conspiracy theory (CT) in real life, out
loud, in public, at the clinic where she works. It's hard to say exactly
what the other employees and patients think of our theory. :0)

Here's an executive summary of Rudolph Fentz theory:

The Time Traveler Who Was Run Down In Time Square, New York

In New York's bustling Times Square in 1950, a man named
Rudolph Fentz was run down and killed by a car after walking
into traffic. Not an altogether strange occurrence. Fentz,
however, was no ordinary pedestrian and was found to be
dressed in 1800's clothing and with oddly antiquated items
about his person. The result of which is that some suspect
that he was some time traveler. ...

(excerpt)

http://warrioressence.com/the-time-traveler-who-was-run-down-in-time-square-new-york/

OK. Some raswers already pegged this as a hoax. But just give me one
more minute of your time before you hit your followup button to flame me
for peddling a hoax as genuine CT.

Rudolf Fentz is a character that appears in "I'm Scared" (Finney). It's
the second Sci-Fi episode listed above. It also appears in the Sep 15,
1951 issue of _Collier's Weekly_, which is available for free online at

http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00024
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060

UNZ breaks that issue of _Collier's_ into PDF segments. "I'm Scared"
begins on page 1 of the first link. You have to hunt a little to find
the continuation of the story (just like you do in real life with a dead
tree magazine). The continuation starts on page 19 of the second link.

Deja vu kicked in *hard* for me at this part of the story.

On July 20, 1950, Mr Trachnor told me, he walked out on the
front porch of his house about six o'clock in the morning. Running
from the eaves of his house to the floor of the porch was a streak
of gray paint, still damp. "It was about the width of an eight-
inch brush," Mr Trachnor told me, "and it looked like hell,
because the house was white.

This story is known to me. This isn't my first read. So the _Collier's_
PDFs must be in my SciFi folder under Finney, Jack. Only there's nothing
there. There's not even a Finney, Jack folder.

No biggie. Just search isfdb for every occurrence of the story. The
pertinent anthology's got to be on my shelf somewhere.

Only there's no such anthology on my shelf. Now things get eerie. This
story is known to me, but how? Did the future me read it? No, that's
crazy talk.

There's only one place left to look, my rasw archives. Imagine my relief
when this thread popped up. It turns out that the story wasn't read by
me, it was heard by me.

Thank you,

--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-04-29 05:15:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by James Nicoll
Sci-Fi Radio seems to have been a series of radio plays based on written
SF NPR broadcast in 1989-90. Not sure who wrote this one. Also not sure
what it is about, aside from a woman concerned about a series of interrupted
phone calls. A combination of odd musical choices and muddled sound track
defeated me.
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
http://archive.org/details/Sci-fiRadio
Header page for all of the pieces in various formats.
And list of contents, who wrote what
Sci-Fi Radio 00 - Voices Lost in Calling
Sci-Fi Radio 01 - I'm Scared by Jack Finney
Sci-Fi Radio 02&03 - Dark Benediction by Walter M. Miller
Sci-Fi Radio 04 - Light of Other Days by Bob Shaw
Sci-Fi Radio 05 - Ballard of Lost C'Mell by Cordwainer Smith
Sci-Fi Radio 06 - Sales Pitch by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 07 - Diary of a Rose by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 08&09 - Frost and Fire by Ray Bradbury
Sci-Fi Radio 10 - The Cold Equations by Tom Godwin
Close Encounter With The Diety & Sundance - Part 1
Sci-Fi Radio 13 - Wall of Darkness by Arthur C. Clarke
Sci-Fi Radio 14&15 - Vintage Season by H Kuttner & C.L. Moore
Sci-Fi Radio 16 - Grantha Sighting by Avram Davidson
Sci-Fi Radio 17 - Call Me Joe by Poul Anderson
Sci-Fi Radio 18 - Imposter by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 19 - Field of Vision by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 20&21 - Houston, Houston, Do You Read by James Tiptree (aka
Alice Sheldon
Sci-Fi Radio 22 - Shape by Robert Sheckley
Sci-Fi Radio 23&24 - Home is the Hangman by Roger Zelazny
Sci-Fi Radio 25 - The Twonky by Lewis Padgett
Sci-Fi Radio 26 - Yanqui Doodle by James Tiptree (aka Alice Sheldon
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My story begins earlier today when a fellow conspiracy theorist said
"Rudolph Fentz." We often talk conspiracy theory (CT) in real life, out
loud, in public, at the clinic where she works. It's hard to say exactly
what the other employees and patients think of our theory. :0)
The Time Traveler Who Was Run Down In Time Square, New York
In New York's bustling Times Square in 1950, a man named
Rudolph Fentz was run down and killed by a car after walking
into traffic. Not an altogether strange occurrence. Fentz,
however, was no ordinary pedestrian and was found to be
dressed in 1800's clothing and with oddly antiquated items
about his person. The result of which is that some suspect
that he was some time traveler. ...
(excerpt)
http://warrioressence.com/the-time-traveler-who-was-run-down-in-time-square-new-york/
OK. Some raswers already pegged this as a hoax. But just give me one
more minute of your time before you hit your followup button to flame me
for peddling a hoax as genuine CT.
Rudolf Fentz is a character that appears in "I'm Scared" (Finney). It's
the second Sci-Fi episode listed above. It also appears in the Sep 15,
1951 issue of _Collier's Weekly_, which is available for free online at
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00024
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060
UNZ breaks that issue of _Collier's_ into PDF segments. "I'm Scared"
begins on page 1 of the first link. You have to hunt a little to find
the continuation of the story (just like you do in real life with a dead
tree magazine). The continuation starts on page 19 of the second link.
Deja vu kicked in *hard* for me at this part of the story.
On July 20, 1950, Mr Trachnor told me, he walked out on the
front porch of his house about six o'clock in the morning. Running
from the eaves of his house to the floor of the porch was a streak
of gray paint, still damp. "It was about the width of an eight-
inch brush," Mr Trachnor told me, "and it looked like hell,
because the house was white.
This story is known to me. This isn't my first read. So the _Collier's_
PDFs must be in my SciFi folder under Finney, Jack. Only there's nothing
there. There's not even a Finney, Jack folder.
No biggie. Just search isfdb for every occurrence of the story. The
pertinent anthology's got to be on my shelf somewhere.
Only there's no such anthology on my shelf. Now things get eerie. This
story is known to me, but how? Did the future me read it? No, that's
crazy talk.
There's only one place left to look, my rasw archives. Imagine my relief
when this thread popped up. It turns out that the story wasn't read by
me, it was heard by me.
Thank you,
Congrats on finding what you sought.

I've read that story, in some anthology or other, in fact I may
even still have it somewhere. That's the one approaches its end
with "Man is disturbing the clock of time, and I fear it may
break," isn't it?

And looking at ISFDB,

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?41297

I find that it was in _Tomorrow, the Stars,_ ed. Heinlein, and I
am pretty sure I still have it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Don Kuenz
2017-04-29 06:38:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by James Nicoll
Sci-Fi Radio seems to have been a series of radio plays based on written
SF NPR broadcast in 1989-90. Not sure who wrote this one. Also not sure
what it is about, aside from a woman concerned about a series of interrupted
phone calls. A combination of odd musical choices and muddled sound track
defeated me.
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
http://archive.org/details/Sci-fiRadio
Header page for all of the pieces in various formats.
And list of contents, who wrote what
Sci-Fi Radio 00 - Voices Lost in Calling
Sci-Fi Radio 01 - I'm Scared by Jack Finney
Sci-Fi Radio 02&03 - Dark Benediction by Walter M. Miller
Sci-Fi Radio 04 - Light of Other Days by Bob Shaw
Sci-Fi Radio 05 - Ballard of Lost C'Mell by Cordwainer Smith
Sci-Fi Radio 06 - Sales Pitch by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 07 - Diary of a Rose by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 08&09 - Frost and Fire by Ray Bradbury
Sci-Fi Radio 10 - The Cold Equations by Tom Godwin
Close Encounter With The Diety & Sundance - Part 1
Sci-Fi Radio 13 - Wall of Darkness by Arthur C. Clarke
Sci-Fi Radio 14&15 - Vintage Season by H Kuttner & C.L. Moore
Sci-Fi Radio 16 - Grantha Sighting by Avram Davidson
Sci-Fi Radio 17 - Call Me Joe by Poul Anderson
Sci-Fi Radio 18 - Imposter by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 19 - Field of Vision by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 20&21 - Houston, Houston, Do You Read by James Tiptree (aka
Alice Sheldon
Sci-Fi Radio 22 - Shape by Robert Sheckley
Sci-Fi Radio 23&24 - Home is the Hangman by Roger Zelazny
Sci-Fi Radio 25 - The Twonky by Lewis Padgett
Sci-Fi Radio 26 - Yanqui Doodle by James Tiptree (aka Alice Sheldon
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My story begins earlier today when a fellow conspiracy theorist said
"Rudolph Fentz." We often talk conspiracy theory (CT) in real life, out
loud, in public, at the clinic where she works. It's hard to say exactly
what the other employees and patients think of our theory. :0)
The Time Traveler Who Was Run Down In Time Square, New York
In New York's bustling Times Square in 1950, a man named
Rudolph Fentz was run down and killed by a car after walking
into traffic. Not an altogether strange occurrence. Fentz,
however, was no ordinary pedestrian and was found to be
dressed in 1800's clothing and with oddly antiquated items
about his person. The result of which is that some suspect
that he was some time traveler. ...
(excerpt)
http://warrioressence.com/the-time-traveler-who-was-run-down-in-time-square-new-york/
OK. Some raswers already pegged this as a hoax. But just give me one
more minute of your time before you hit your followup button to flame me
for peddling a hoax as genuine CT.
Rudolf Fentz is a character that appears in "I'm Scared" (Finney). It's
the second Sci-Fi episode listed above. It also appears in the Sep 15,
1951 issue of _Collier's Weekly_, which is available for free online at
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00024
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060
UNZ breaks that issue of _Collier's_ into PDF segments. "I'm Scared"
begins on page 1 of the first link. You have to hunt a little to find
the continuation of the story (just like you do in real life with a dead
tree magazine). The continuation starts on page 19 of the second link.
Deja vu kicked in *hard* for me at this part of the story.
On July 20, 1950, Mr Trachnor told me, he walked out on the
front porch of his house about six o'clock in the morning. Running
from the eaves of his house to the floor of the porch was a streak
of gray paint, still damp. "It was about the width of an eight-
inch brush," Mr Trachnor told me, "and it looked like hell,
because the house was white.
This story is known to me. This isn't my first read. So the _Collier's_
PDFs must be in my SciFi folder under Finney, Jack. Only there's nothing
there. There's not even a Finney, Jack folder.
No biggie. Just search isfdb for every occurrence of the story. The
pertinent anthology's got to be on my shelf somewhere.
Only there's no such anthology on my shelf. Now things get eerie. This
story is known to me, but how? Did the future me read it? No, that's
crazy talk.
There's only one place left to look, my rasw archives. Imagine my relief
when this thread popped up. It turns out that the story wasn't read by
me, it was heard by me.
Thank you,
Congrats on finding what you sought.
I've read that story, in some anthology or other, in fact I may
even still have it somewhere. That's the one approaches its end
with "Man is disturbing the clock of time, and I fear it may
break," isn't it?
And looking at ISFDB,
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?41297
I find that it was in _Tomorrow, the Stars,_ ed. Heinlein, and I
am pretty sure I still have it.
That's the story. The line that you cite appears near the end of the
second to last paragraph. Allow me to pose a question to the group that
should've been asked in my original followup.

Page 19 (78) of the __Collier's_ has a cartoon in the lower right
corner. The cartoon shows a chemist in his lab. His wife appears framed
in the open door to the next room, where a baby sits at a high chair in
the background. The baby's pushing his food dish away. The wife says,
"Hilary, do something about Junior! He won't eat his NX6.25-CaCO3 . . ."

OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?

Thank you,

--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-04-29 14:51:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
http://ia601208.us.archive.org/17/items/Sci-fiRadio/Sci-fiRadio00-VoicesLostInCallingplay.mp3
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by Raymond Daley
Post by James Nicoll
Sci-Fi Radio seems to have been a series of radio plays based on written
SF NPR broadcast in 1989-90. Not sure who wrote this one. Also not sure
what it is about, aside from a woman concerned about a series of interrupted
phone calls. A combination of odd musical choices and muddled sound track
defeated me.
(added for rasfw post: due to my crap hearing, audio quality and intrusiveness
of the music is a big issue for me)
http://archive.org/details/Sci-fiRadio
Header page for all of the pieces in various formats.
And list of contents, who wrote what
Sci-Fi Radio 00 - Voices Lost in Calling
Sci-Fi Radio 01 - I'm Scared by Jack Finney
Sci-Fi Radio 02&03 - Dark Benediction by Walter M. Miller
Sci-Fi Radio 04 - Light of Other Days by Bob Shaw
Sci-Fi Radio 05 - Ballard of Lost C'Mell by Cordwainer Smith
Sci-Fi Radio 06 - Sales Pitch by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 07 - Diary of a Rose by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 08&09 - Frost and Fire by Ray Bradbury
Sci-Fi Radio 10 - The Cold Equations by Tom Godwin
Close Encounter With The Diety & Sundance - Part 1
Sci-Fi Radio 13 - Wall of Darkness by Arthur C. Clarke
Sci-Fi Radio 14&15 - Vintage Season by H Kuttner & C.L. Moore
Sci-Fi Radio 16 - Grantha Sighting by Avram Davidson
Sci-Fi Radio 17 - Call Me Joe by Poul Anderson
Sci-Fi Radio 18 - Imposter by Philip K. Dick
Sci-Fi Radio 19 - Field of Vision by Ursula K. LeGuin
Sci-Fi Radio 20&21 - Houston, Houston, Do You Read by James Tiptree (aka
Alice Sheldon
Sci-Fi Radio 22 - Shape by Robert Sheckley
Sci-Fi Radio 23&24 - Home is the Hangman by Roger Zelazny
Sci-Fi Radio 25 - The Twonky by Lewis Padgett
Sci-Fi Radio 26 - Yanqui Doodle by James Tiptree (aka Alice Sheldon
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My story begins earlier today when a fellow conspiracy theorist said
"Rudolph Fentz." We often talk conspiracy theory (CT) in real life, out
loud, in public, at the clinic where she works. It's hard to say exactly
what the other employees and patients think of our theory. :0)
The Time Traveler Who Was Run Down In Time Square, New York
In New York's bustling Times Square in 1950, a man named
Rudolph Fentz was run down and killed by a car after walking
into traffic. Not an altogether strange occurrence. Fentz,
however, was no ordinary pedestrian and was found to be
dressed in 1800's clothing and with oddly antiquated items
about his person. The result of which is that some suspect
that he was some time traveler. ...
(excerpt)
http://warrioressence.com/the-time-traveler-who-was-run-down-in-time-square-new-york/
OK. Some raswers already pegged this as a hoax. But just give me one
more minute of your time before you hit your followup button to flame me
for peddling a hoax as genuine CT.
Rudolf Fentz is a character that appears in "I'm Scared" (Finney). It's
the second Sci-Fi episode listed above. It also appears in the Sep 15,
1951 issue of _Collier's Weekly_, which is available for free online at
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00024
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060
UNZ breaks that issue of _Collier's_ into PDF segments. "I'm Scared"
begins on page 1 of the first link. You have to hunt a little to find
the continuation of the story (just like you do in real life with a dead
tree magazine). The continuation starts on page 19 of the second link.
Deja vu kicked in *hard* for me at this part of the story.
On July 20, 1950, Mr Trachnor told me, he walked out on the
front porch of his house about six o'clock in the morning. Running
from the eaves of his house to the floor of the porch was a streak
of gray paint, still damp. "It was about the width of an eight-
inch brush," Mr Trachnor told me, "and it looked like hell,
because the house was white.
This story is known to me. This isn't my first read. So the _Collier's_
PDFs must be in my SciFi folder under Finney, Jack. Only there's nothing
there. There's not even a Finney, Jack folder.
No biggie. Just search isfdb for every occurrence of the story. The
pertinent anthology's got to be on my shelf somewhere.
Only there's no such anthology on my shelf. Now things get eerie. This
story is known to me, but how? Did the future me read it? No, that's
crazy talk.
There's only one place left to look, my rasw archives. Imagine my relief
when this thread popped up. It turns out that the story wasn't read by
me, it was heard by me.
Thank you,
Congrats on finding what you sought.
I've read that story, in some anthology or other, in fact I may
even still have it somewhere. That's the one approaches its end
with "Man is disturbing the clock of time, and I fear it may
break," isn't it?
And looking at ISFDB,
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?41297
I find that it was in _Tomorrow, the Stars,_ ed. Heinlein, and I
am pretty sure I still have it.
That's the story. The line that you cite appears near the end of the
second to last paragraph. Allow me to pose a question to the group that
should've been asked in my original followup.
Page 19 (78) of the __Collier's_ has a cartoon in the lower right
corner. The cartoon shows a chemist in his lab. His wife appears framed
in the open door to the next room, where a baby sits at a high chair in
the background. The baby's pushing his food dish away. The wife says,
"Hilary, do something about Junior! He won't eat his NX6.25-CaCO3 . . ."
OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?
Spinach is definitely one of those dark green vegetables.
Contains lots of iron, too, which is why it's good for you and
why many people, including little kids with sensitive taste buds,
hate it.

I asked my husband, who took a lot more chemistry back in the day
than I did, and he says NX6.25 doesn't mean anything to him
either. N would be nitrogen, which is one of the bases of
organic matter, but the rest of it doesn't look like a chemical
formula at all. My seat-of-pants guess is that the cartoonist
made it up so it would "sound scientific." 1951, don't forget.

And do you still have that old issue of Colliers? Or did you
find it online somewhere?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Don Kuenz
2017-04-29 17:57:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
<snip>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
Page 19 (78) of the __Collier's_ has a cartoon in the lower right
corner. The cartoon shows a chemist in his lab. His wife appears framed
in the open door to the next room, where a baby sits at a high chair in
the background. The baby's pushing his food dish away. The wife says,
"Hilary, do something about Junior! He won't eat his NX6.25-CaCO3 . . ."
OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?
Spinach is definitely one of those dark green vegetables.
Contains lots of iron, too, which is why it's good for you and
why many people, including little kids with sensitive taste buds,
hate it.
I asked my husband, who took a lot more chemistry back in the day
than I did, and he says NX6.25 doesn't mean anything to him
either. N would be nitrogen, which is one of the bases of
organic matter, but the rest of it doesn't look like a chemical
formula at all. My seat-of-pants guess is that the cartoonist
made it up so it would "sound scientific." 1951, don't forget.
And do you still have that old issue of Colliers? Or did you
find it online somewhere?
See, this is why you (and Hal) are so handy to have around. To point out
the possibility of an artistic license component in an heretofore unseen
chemistry. The page with the cartoon in the lower right corner is
available online at:

http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78

Thank you,

--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-04-29 20:23:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Kuenz
<snip>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
Page 19 (78) of the __Collier's_ has a cartoon in the lower right
corner. The cartoon shows a chemist in his lab. His wife appears framed
in the open door to the next room, where a baby sits at a high chair in
the background. The baby's pushing his food dish away. The wife says,
"Hilary, do something about Junior! He won't eat his NX6.25-CaCO3 . . ."
OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?
Spinach is definitely one of those dark green vegetables.
Contains lots of iron, too, which is why it's good for you and
why many people, including little kids with sensitive taste buds,
hate it.
I asked my husband, who took a lot more chemistry back in the day
than I did, and he says NX6.25 doesn't mean anything to him
either. N would be nitrogen, which is one of the bases of
organic matter, but the rest of it doesn't look like a chemical
formula at all. My seat-of-pants guess is that the cartoonist
made it up so it would "sound scientific." 1951, don't forget.
And do you still have that old issue of Colliers? Or did you
find it online somewhere?
See, this is why you (and Hal) are so handy to have around. To point out
the possibility of an artistic license component in an heretofore unseen
chemistry. The page with the cartoon in the lower right corner is
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78
Fthppp. Once I get "Your search [URL[ did not match any
documents."

Maybe it's ESET being coy again. Lemme try it on Firefox.

...

Well, Firefox was willing to read it, and the caption (just
barely large enough to be legible) says what you said it said.
I still think the cartoonist made it up.

Any real chemists in the house?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2017-04-29 21:11:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78
Fthppp. Once I get "Your search [URL[ did not match any
documents."
Maybe it's ESET being coy again. Lemme try it on Firefox.
...
Well, Firefox was willing to read it, and the caption (just
barely large enough to be legible) says what you said it said.
I still think the cartoonist made it up.
Any real chemists in the house?
I've got a BSc.Chem in it, if that'll do. And I reckon the cartoonist
made it up.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
BE PURE
BE VIGILANT
BEHAVE
Cryptoengineer
2017-04-30 02:55:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78
Fthppp. Once I get "Your search [URL[ did not match any
documents."
Maybe it's ESET being coy again. Lemme try it on Firefox.
...
Well, Firefox was willing to read it, and the caption (just
barely large enough to be legible) says what you said it said.
I still think the cartoonist made it up.
Any real chemists in the house?
I've got a BSc.Chem in it, if that'll do. And I reckon the cartoonist
made it up.
B.Sc. Biochemistry here. Ditto - its made up.

pt
Greg Goss
2017-05-01 03:37:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78
Fthppp. Once I get "Your search [URL[ did not match any
documents."
My Chrome suddenly stopped showing embedded PDFs at all. Doesn't
download them, doesn't show them. Just shows a black box where the
document is supposed to be embedded. It worked up to a week or so
ago, then stopped today.

Today, of course, is tax deadline day and I needed to download
statements from my bank. The tech at the bank and I managed to
delete a useful history from my Chrome (which didn't help) before I
realized I had two more browsers in my system, and Edge gave me the
statements I needed.

Tonight, I get the same symptoms - a black empty box in Chrome and the
correct output in Edge.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-29 22:33:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Kuenz
<snip>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
Page 19 (78) of the __Collier's_ has a cartoon in the lower right
corner. The cartoon shows a chemist in his lab. His wife appears framed
in the open door to the next room, where a baby sits at a high chair in
the background. The baby's pushing his food dish away. The wife says,
"Hilary, do something about Junior! He won't eat his NX6.25-CaCO3 . . ."
OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?
Spinach is definitely one of those dark green vegetables.
Contains lots of iron, too, which is why it's good for you and
why many people, including little kids with sensitive taste buds,
hate it.
I asked my husband, who took a lot more chemistry back in the day
than I did, and he says NX6.25 doesn't mean anything to him
either. N would be nitrogen, which is one of the bases of
organic matter, but the rest of it doesn't look like a chemical
formula at all. My seat-of-pants guess is that the cartoonist
made it up so it would "sound scientific." 1951, don't forget.
And do you still have that old issue of Colliers? Or did you
find it online somewhere?
See, this is why you (and Hal) are so handy to have around. To point out
the possibility of an artistic license component in an heretofore unseen
chemistry. The page with the cartoon in the lower right corner is
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78
Is it possible to identify an actual male scientist
called Hilary? Was the name male back then?

It ought to be in the area of food science, although
the laboratory is Generic Cartoon Chemical Lab.
And perhaps vitamins and other additives in
breakfast cereal were current? When we were talking
about "Chex" I noted a remark that they were
"before" nutrition in cereal mattered...!

Calcium carbonate itself might be rather crunchy...
you want calcium for bones, but you get that in
the milk. Aha! ... maybe?
J. Clarke
2017-04-29 23:10:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Don Kuenz
<snip>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
Page 19 (78) of the __Collier's_ has a cartoon in the lower right
corner. The cartoon shows a chemist in his lab. His wife appears framed
in the open door to the next room, where a baby sits at a high chair in
the background. The baby's pushing his food dish away. The wife says,
"Hilary, do something about Junior! He won't eat his NX6.25-CaCO3 . . ."
OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?
Spinach is definitely one of those dark green vegetables.
Contains lots of iron, too, which is why it's good for you and
why many people, including little kids with sensitive taste buds,
hate it.
I asked my husband, who took a lot more chemistry back in the day
than I did, and he says NX6.25 doesn't mean anything to him
either. N would be nitrogen, which is one of the bases of
organic matter, but the rest of it doesn't look like a chemical
formula at all. My seat-of-pants guess is that the cartoonist
made it up so it would "sound scientific." 1951, don't forget.
And do you still have that old issue of Colliers? Or did you
find it online somewhere?
See, this is why you (and Hal) are so handy to have around. To point out
the possibility of an artistic license component in an heretofore unseen
chemistry. The page with the cartoon in the lower right corner is
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78
Is it possible to identify an actual male scientist
called Hilary? Was the name male back then?
It ought to be in the area of food science, although
the laboratory is Generic Cartoon Chemical Lab.
And perhaps vitamins and other additives in
breakfast cereal were current? When we were talking
about "Chex" I noted a remark that they were
"before" nutrition in cereal mattered...!
Calcium carbonate itself might be rather crunchy...
you want calcium for bones, but you get that in
the milk. Aha! ... maybe?
There's a Wikipedia entry that lists a number of male Hilarys, including a
Pope. I did not know that Zig Ziglar's given name was "Hilary".
Kevrob
2017-04-30 11:11:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Don Kuenz
<snip>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
Page 19 (78) of the __Collier's_ has a cartoon in the lower right
corner. The cartoon shows a chemist in his lab. His wife appears framed
in the open door to the next room, where a baby sits at a high chair in
the background. The baby's pushing his food dish away. The wife says,
"Hilary, do something about Junior! He won't eat his NX6.25-CaCO3 . . ."
OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?
Spinach is definitely one of those dark green vegetables.
Contains lots of iron, too, which is why it's good for you and
why many people, including little kids with sensitive taste buds,
hate it.
I asked my husband, who took a lot more chemistry back in the day
than I did, and he says NX6.25 doesn't mean anything to him
either. N would be nitrogen, which is one of the bases of
organic matter, but the rest of it doesn't look like a chemical
formula at all. My seat-of-pants guess is that the cartoonist
made it up so it would "sound scientific." 1951, don't forget.
And do you still have that old issue of Colliers? Or did you
find it online somewhere?
See, this is why you (and Hal) are so handy to have around. To point out
the possibility of an artistic license component in an heretofore unseen
chemistry. The page with the cartoon in the lower right corner is
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78
Is it possible to identify an actual male scientist
called Hilary? Was the name male back then?
It ought to be in the area of food science, although
the laboratory is Generic Cartoon Chemical Lab.
And perhaps vitamins and other additives in
breakfast cereal were current? When we were talking
about "Chex" I noted a remark that they were
"before" nutrition in cereal mattered...!
Calcium carbonate itself might be rather crunchy...
you want calcium for bones, but you get that in
the milk. Aha! ... maybe?
There's a Wikipedia entry that lists a number of male Hilarys, including a
Pope. I did not know that Zig Ziglar's given name was "Hilary".
Hilarius (giving us Hilary) was the Latin male name.
Hilaria was the feminine.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilary_(name)

Wiki points out cognates in other languages.

Kevin R
Jay E. Morris
2017-04-29 23:42:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Don Kuenz
<snip>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
Page 19 (78) of the __Collier's_ has a cartoon in the lower right
corner. The cartoon shows a chemist in his lab. His wife appears framed
in the open door to the next room, where a baby sits at a high chair in
the background. The baby's pushing his food dish away. The wife says,
"Hilary, do something about Junior! He won't eat his NX6.25-CaCO3 . . ."
OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?
Spinach is definitely one of those dark green vegetables.
Contains lots of iron, too, which is why it's good for you and
why many people, including little kids with sensitive taste buds,
hate it.
I asked my husband, who took a lot more chemistry back in the day
than I did, and he says NX6.25 doesn't mean anything to him
either. N would be nitrogen, which is one of the bases of
organic matter, but the rest of it doesn't look like a chemical
formula at all. My seat-of-pants guess is that the cartoonist
made it up so it would "sound scientific." 1951, don't forget.
And do you still have that old issue of Colliers? Or did you
find it online somewhere?
See, this is why you (and Hal) are so handy to have around. To point out
the possibility of an artistic license component in an heretofore unseen
chemistry. The page with the cartoon in the lower right corner is
http://www.unz.org/Pub/Colliers-1951sep15-00060:78
Is it possible to identify an actual male scientist
called Hilary? Was the name male back then?
It ought to be in the area of food science, although
the laboratory is Generic Cartoon Chemical Lab.
And perhaps vitamins and other additives in
breakfast cereal were current? When we were talking
about "Chex" I noted a remark that they were
"before" nutrition in cereal mattered...!
Calcium carbonate itself might be rather crunchy...
you want calcium for bones, but you get that in
the milk. Aha! ... maybe?
Found this paper from 1996:
http://www.fsp.usp.br/~dmbastos/determination%20of%20protein%20Nx6,25.pdf

Titled: "Determination of protein in foods: comparison of net protein
and crude protein (Nx6.25) values"

In the introduction, second paragraph: "It was assumed (Henneberg, 1865)
that the protein content of a natural product in general could be
calculated by multiplying the total nitrogen content by a conversion
factor of 6.25."

I'm amazed that it was used in a cartoon in a general publication.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-04-30 01:19:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jay E. Morris
http://www.fsp.usp.br/~dmbastos/determination%20of%20protein%20Nx6,25.pdf
Titled: "Determination of protein in foods: comparison of net protein
and crude protein (Nx6.25) values"
In the introduction, second paragraph: "It was assumed (Henneberg, 1865)
that the protein content of a natural product in general could be
calculated by multiplying the total nitrogen content by a conversion
factor of 6.25."
I'm amazed that it was used in a cartoon in a general publication.
I am too. And also, that you could find it. Well done.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Cryptoengineer
2017-04-30 02:57:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jay E. Morris
http://www.fsp.usp.br/~dmbastos/determination%20of%20protein%20Nx6,25.pdf
Titled: "Determination of protein in foods: comparison of net protein
and crude protein (Nx6.25) values"
In the introduction, second paragraph: "It was assumed (Henneberg, 1865)
that the protein content of a natural product in general could be
calculated by multiplying the total nitrogen content by a conversion
factor of 6.25."
I'm amazed that it was used in a cartoon in a general publication.
I am too. And also, that you could find it. Well done.
Impressed!

pt
Jay E. Morris
2017-04-30 14:46:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jay E. Morris
http://www.fsp.usp.br/~dmbastos/determination%20of%20protein%20Nx6,25.pdf
Titled: "Determination of protein in foods: comparison of net protein
and crude protein (Nx6.25) values"
In the introduction, second paragraph: "It was assumed (Henneberg, 1865)
that the protein content of a natural product in general could be
calculated by multiplying the total nitrogen content by a conversion
factor of 6.25."
I'm amazed that it was used in a cartoon in a general publication.
I am too. And also, that you could find it. Well done.
Impressed!
pt
My google-fu was strong. Or I was just damn lucky.
Greg Goss
2017-05-01 03:38:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jay E. Morris
http://www.fsp.usp.br/~dmbastos/determination%20of%20protein%20Nx6,25.pdf
Titled: "Determination of protein in foods: comparison of net protein
and crude protein (Nx6.25) values"
In the introduction, second paragraph: "It was assumed (Henneberg, 1865)
that the protein content of a natural product in general could be
calculated by multiplying the total nitrogen content by a conversion
factor of 6.25."
I'm amazed that it was used in a cartoon in a general publication.
I love (and miss) the information resource that Usenet was, and still
is to a limited extent.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-04-30 01:17:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Is it possible to identify an actual male scientist
called Hilary? Was the name male back then?
I don't know if there's a real scientist by that name, but Hilary
has been a male name for

/quick google

St. Hilary of Poitiers lived in the fourth century, was Bishop of
Poitiers and a Doctor of the Church.

So there have male Hilaries *at least* that far back.

ObSF, almost: In Anthony Boucher's whodunit _Rocket to the
Morgue,_ which figures Tuckerizations of Heinlein, Hamilton, and
several other SF figures of the early forties, there's a guy
named Hilary whom everyone wants to murder and someone eventually
does. Or so it seems ....

[Anthony Boucher himself has a brief walk-on under that name, the
pseud he used for F/SF. The book was originally published under
his mystery pseud, H. H. Holmes.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
h***@gmail.com
2017-04-30 10:19:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Don Kuenz
OK. The CaCO3 is calcium carbonate, which is found in dark green
vegetables such as kale, broccoli, and ?spinach? Does anyone know what
the NX6.25 symbol signifies?
Spinach is definitely one of those dark green vegetables.
Yes.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Contains lots of iron,
Not huge amounts actually.
It's also got very low availability of the iron because of other compounds in the spinach.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
too, which is why it's good for you and
why many people, including little kids with sensitive taste buds,
hate it.
James Nicoll
2017-04-29 16:38:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Kuenz
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My first reaction was "someone else listens to science fiction
radio plays? Do they know of any that I do not?"
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Livejournal at http://www.livejournal.com/users/james_nicoll
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Don Kuenz
2017-04-29 18:28:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Don Kuenz
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My first reaction was "someone else listens to science fiction
radio plays? Do they know of any that I do not?"
IIRC, back in 2012 we concluded that "Dimension X," "SciFi Radio," and
"X-Minus One" was about it, in regards to professional product available
at archive.org. But you never know. Five years ago archive.org's pulp
fiction was spotty and now it's grown much more comprehensive.

Your taste and my taste are similar in audio books. We both want
professionally produced product. OTOH, an amateur reading a story in a
monologue voice does beat the sound of wind whooshing over a windshield
on a road trip. YMMV. :0)

Thank you,

--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
James Nicoll
2017-04-30 12:43:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Don Kuenz
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My first reaction was "someone else listens to science fiction
radio plays? Do they know of any that I do not?"
IIRC, back in 2012 we concluded that "Dimension X," "SciFi Radio," and
"X-Minus One" was about it, in regards to professional product available
at archive.org. But you never know. Five years ago archive.org's pulp
fiction was spotty and now it's grown much more comprehensive.
Your taste and my taste are similar in audio books. We both want
professionally produced product. OTOH, an amateur reading a story in a
monologue voice does beat the sound of wind whooshing over a windshield
on a road trip. YMMV. :0)
Thank you,
These are the ones I found:

By the decade in which they debuted

1950s
2000 Plus
Beyond Tomorrow
Dimension X
Exploring Tomorrow
Tales of Tomorrow
World Security Workshop
X Minus 1


1960s
SF 68


1970s
Mindwebs

1980s
Nightfall
Sci Fi Radio
Vanishing Point

1990s
Seeing Ear Theater

2000s
2000x/Beyond 2000
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Livejournal at http://www.livejournal.com/users/james_nicoll
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Cryptoengineer
2017-04-30 20:53:54 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Post by Don Kuenz
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Don Kuenz
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My first reaction was "someone else listens to science fiction
radio plays? Do they know of any that I do not?"
IIRC, back in 2012 we concluded that "Dimension X," "SciFi Radio," and
"X-Minus One" was about it, in regards to professional product
available at archive.org. But you never know. Five years ago
archive.org's pulp fiction was spotty and now it's grown much more
comprehensive.
Your taste and my taste are similar in audio books. We both want
professionally produced product. OTOH, an amateur reading a story in a
monologue voice does beat the sound of wind whooshing over a
windshield on a road trip. YMMV. :0)
Thank you,
By the decade in which they debuted
1950s
2000 Plus
Beyond Tomorrow
Dimension X
Exploring Tomorrow
Tales of Tomorrow
World Security Workshop
X Minus 1
1960s
SF 68
1970s
Mindwebs
1980s
Nightfall
Sci Fi Radio
Vanishing Point
1990s
Seeing Ear Theater
2000s
2000x/Beyond 2000
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"

pt
James Nicoll
2017-05-01 15:30:39 UTC
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Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.

I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Livejournal at http://www.livejournal.com/users/james_nicoll
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Peter Trei
2017-05-01 16:35:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an overarching plot.
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.

pt
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-05-01 17:11:34 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an overarching plot.
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
pt
There are a number of plot arcs and they fit in quite well with all
the weirdness stuff.. I find it quite enjoyable to listen to on
night drives, though I may never catch up to current.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-01 17:32:14 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Peter Trei
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an overarching plot.
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
Heh. That was my reaction to the first Discworld book.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-05-01 18:09:25 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an overarching plot.
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
Heh. That was my reaction to the first Discworld book.
Well that's true, but the thing about an audio format is that the time
is essentially free if you drive much. I know you don't, but many people
do.

The same goes for the read-to-me option on my kindle as well. That has
totally transformed the driving experience.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Peter Trei
2017-05-01 18:52:37 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an overarching plot.
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
Heh. That was my reaction to the first Discworld book.
Well that's true, but the thing about an audio format is that the time
is essentially free if you drive much. I know you don't, but many people
do.
The same goes for the read-to-me option on my kindle as well. That has
totally transformed the driving experience.
Its widely agreed, even among Pratchett fans, that the first few books in the
series are inferior to what followed.

If you want to take another stab at it, try 'Mort' or 'Guards! Guards!', each
of which start excellent story arcs.

http://io9.gizmodo.com/how-to-read-terry-pratchetts-discworld-series-in-one-h-1567312812

pt
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-01 19:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an
overarching plot.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
Heh. That was my reaction to the first Discworld book.
Well that's true, but the thing about an audio format is that the time
is essentially free if you drive much. I know you don't, but many people
do.
The same goes for the read-to-me option on my kindle as well. That has
totally transformed the driving experience.
Its widely agreed, even among Pratchett fans, that the first few books in the
series are inferior to what followed.
If you want to take another stab at it, try 'Mort' or 'Guards! Guards!', each
of which start excellent story arcs.
http://io9.gizmodo.com/how-to-read-terry-pratchetts-discworld-series-in-one-h-1567312812
Thanks, but no thanks. I'll be seventy-five this summer, and for
quite a long time now my motto has been "Life is too short to
stuff a mushroom," or in other words I'm not going to waste my
remaining time reading things that don't appeal to me.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
h***@gmail.com
2017-05-01 23:46:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
Heh. That was my reaction to the first Discworld book.
Its widely agreed, even among Pratchett fans, that the first few books in the
series are inferior to what followed.
If you want to take another stab at it, try 'Mort' or 'Guards! Guards!', each
of which start excellent story arcs.
http://io9.gizmodo.com/how-to-read-terry-pratchetts-discworld-series-in-one-h-1567312812
Thanks, but no thanks. I'll be seventy-five this summer, and for
quite a long time now my motto has been "Life is too short to
stuff a mushroom," or in other words I'm not going to waste my
remaining time reading things that don't appeal to me.
In this case the odds are good that it's not reading things that don't appeal to you as much as it is trying something to see whether it appeals to you.

The difference between the first couple of discworld books and the bulk of the series is massive.
Default User
2017-05-02 15:31:14 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
Its widely agreed, even among Pratchett fans, that the first few books in the
series are inferior to what followed.
If you want to take another stab at it, try 'Mort' or 'Guards! Guards!', each
of which start excellent story arcs.
I have to say that I was skeptical of the Discworld series, but decided to give it a chance by sampling the major sub-series. I was happy that I did. I didn't like the "witches" as much as many here do, but I did enjoy most of the rest. My particular favorite are those featuring Death, particularly with Susan Sto Helit as a character.


Brian
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-02 16:23:15 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Default User
Post by Peter Trei
Its widely agreed, even among Pratchett fans, that the first few books in the
series are inferior to what followed.
If you want to take another stab at it, try 'Mort' or 'Guards! Guards!', each
of which start excellent story arcs.
I have to say that I was skeptical of the Discworld series, but decided
to give it a chance by sampling the major sub-series. I was happy that I
did. I didn't like the "witches" as much as many here do, but I did
enjoy most of the rest. My particular favorite are those featuring
Death, particularly with Susan Sto Helit as a character.
Well, my son likes Pratchett, and while he was still living with
us he'd occasionally read bits to me. I did like Granny
Weatherwax and her kitty-cat. And there was one book (not a
Discworld book, I don't think) where a human is accompanied by a
group of dwarves? gnomes? somebody, who spoke in Braid Scots.
Holy Valar, my son is good at a Braid Scots accent. But neither
of these performances inclined me to read the entire book(s).

Analogy: David Weber. My husband read a whole lot of the early
Honor Harringtons, and from time to time he'd read me some of the
funny bits. So I read a couple of the Harringtons myself, and
discovered that the funny bits were isolated instances in a huge
lump of technological dumps and what my son calls "spaceship
porn." Kind of like a not very good Cornish pasty with one tiny
fragment of meat in among a lot of potato and anonymous vedge.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Default User
2017-05-02 20:22:12 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, my son likes Pratchett, and while he was still living with
us he'd occasionally read bits to me. I did like Granny
Weatherwax and her kitty-cat. And there was one book (not a
Discworld book, I don't think) where a human is accompanied by a
group of dwarves? gnomes? somebody, who spoke in Braid Scots.
Holy Valar, my son is good at a Braid Scots accent. But neither
of these performances inclined me to read the entire book(s).
Possibly The Wee Free Men, which is a Discworld book in the Young Adult sub-series featuring developing witch Tiffany Aching. Not my favorite.

If you should want to get serious about sampling the series, and I don't mean excerpts read to you, then the ones suggested previously are a good start. I'm not a fantasy reader normally, but I had enough positive review material on the newsgroup to give it a shot. However, I was getting the books from the library so my investment was time only.


Brian
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-02 23:01:45 UTC
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Post by Default User
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, my son likes Pratchett, and while he was still living with
us he'd occasionally read bits to me. I did like Granny
Weatherwax and her kitty-cat. And there was one book (not a
Discworld book, I don't think) where a human is accompanied by a
group of dwarves? gnomes? somebody, who spoke in Braid Scots.
Holy Valar, my son is good at a Braid Scots accent. But neither
of these performances inclined me to read the entire book(s).
Possibly The Wee Free Men, which is a Discworld book in the Young Adult
sub-series featuring developing witch Tiffany Aching. Not my favorite.
Yes, that sounds right.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-01 19:04:07 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an overarching plot.
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
Heh. That was my reaction to the first Discworld book.
Well that's true, but the thing about an audio format is that the time
is essentially free if you drive much. I know you don't, but many people
do.
Correct. But IF I drove, and IF I drove a lot, and IF I wanted
to listen to audiobooks instead of classical music, I would've
picked something other than Discworld.

I really don't like listening to talking heads. (Possibly
because I can read faster than anybody can talk, with the
exception of those speeded-up voices that are the equivalent of
the very fine print that advertisers must include but don't want
you to read.) I have never been sufficiently motivated to figure
out how to listen to podcasts on various news media that I read.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
The same goes for the read-to-me option on my kindle as well. That has
totally transformed the driving experience.
If it works for you, it works.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Peter Trei
2017-05-02 02:57:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an overarching plot.
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
Heh. That was my reaction to the first Discworld book.
Well that's true, but the thing about an audio format is that the time
is essentially free if you drive much. I know you don't, but many people
do.
Correct. But IF I drove, and IF I drove a lot, and IF I wanted
to listen to audiobooks instead of classical music, I would've
picked something other than Discworld.
I really don't like listening to talking heads. (Possibly
because I can read faster than anybody can talk, with the
exception of those speeded-up voices that are the equivalent of
the very fine print that advertisers must include but don't want
you to read.) I have never been sufficiently motivated to figure
out how to listen to podcasts on various news media that I read.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
The same goes for the read-to-me option on my kindle as well. That has
totally transformed the driving experience.
If it works for you, it works.
Not all audiobooks are created equal. The Audible full-cast version of American Gods
is a masterpiece. Even single readers vary a lot. The art of storytelling is much more than
just reading. Didn't you listen to tales being spun around the campfire at SCA events?

I tend to listen to most non-drama podcasts at 1.5x speed. If the sound quality and diction support it, 2x. Drama is usually 1x.

Put
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-02 03:13:34 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
It's not really my thing either - I listened to the first few episodes, and
it seemed to be 'weirdness for weirdness sake', without an
overarching plot.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
I'm told it gets better in later seasons, but I have only so much time.
Heh. That was my reaction to the first Discworld book.
Well that's true, but the thing about an audio format is that the time
is essentially free if you drive much. I know you don't, but many people
do.
Correct. But IF I drove, and IF I drove a lot, and IF I wanted
to listen to audiobooks instead of classical music, I would've
picked something other than Discworld.
I really don't like listening to talking heads. (Possibly
because I can read faster than anybody can talk, with the
exception of those speeded-up voices that are the equivalent of
the very fine print that advertisers must include but don't want
you to read.) I have never been sufficiently motivated to figure
out how to listen to podcasts on various news media that I read.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
The same goes for the read-to-me option on my kindle as well. That has
totally transformed the driving experience.
If it works for you, it works.
Not all audiobooks are created equal. The Audible full-cast version of American Gods
is a masterpiece. Even single readers vary a lot. The art of
storytelling is much more than
just reading. Didn't you listen to tales being spun around the campfire at SCA events?
Songs, for the most part, rather than tales. Back in the day, I
would sing myself. Now I can neither sing nor stay up late. :)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Robert Carnegie
2017-05-01 21:10:54 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
Speaking technologically, or aesthetically?
James Nicoll
2017-05-02 03:35:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
Speaking technologically, or aesthetically?
The second. There's so much out there.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Livejournal at http://www.livejournal.com/users/james_nicoll
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
David Johnston
2017-05-01 22:02:19 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Post by Cryptoengineer
Currently, there's "Welcome to Night Vale"
Which seems fine but not my thing.
I have no idea where to start with podcasts, to be honest.
Start with Decoddering Theater. It's Canadian!
Jack Bohn
2017-05-01 13:12:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
By the decade in which they debuted
1950s
2000 Plus
Beyond Tomorrow
Dimension X
Exploring Tomorrow
Tales of Tomorrow
World Security Workshop
X Minus 1
1960s
SF 68
1970s
Mindwebs
1980s
Nightfall
Sci Fi Radio
Vanishing Point
1990s
Seeing Ear Theater
2000s
2000x/Beyond 2000
'70s/'80s, when NPR was playing the 13 episode adaptation of Star Wars and the BBC's Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, they added another series about The Further Adventures of Jack Flanders, and another series of one-episode stories from the same studio. A web search finds:

http://www.zbs.org/index_new.php/product/stars-and-stuff-mp3

which pretty much confirms my thoughts at the time that the stories were written for the show.
--
-Jack
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-29 20:51:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Don Kuenz
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My first reaction was "someone else listens to science fiction
radio plays? Do they know of any that I do not?"
Since it's your thread in the first place,
the Ray Bradbury one about the last man on
abandoned colony Mars who left time-delayed
telephone messages for himself across years
suggests itself. I think I heard it on BBC
in the series called "Bradbury 13".

Except that in rasfw there are other people
here besides you. Or are there? :-)

Repeats on BBC Radio 4 Extra are mostly
limited to the old BBC7 strand "The Seventh
Dimension" at weekends, but on weekdays
this week they've been playing "Paradise
Lost in Space" - the technically unrelated
"Paradise Lost in Cyberspace" may follow;
I think that's the one about age-related
euthanasia.

Iain M. Banks's _The State of the Art_
also just went by.
David Goldfarb
2017-04-30 01:27:44 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
the Ray Bradbury one about the last man on
abandoned colony Mars who left time-delayed
telephone messages for himself across years
suggests itself.
When I first read _The Martian Chronicles_ I was young enough not
to question the setup for that story. Sometime in my teenage years,
I said to myself: "Wait a minute. Earth messages Mars saying,
'We've decided to have a horrible nuclear war! Come back to Earth!'
...and they DO?"

(And that's of course leaving aside the question of just *how*
they all left.)
--
David Goldfarb |From the fortune cookie file:
***@gmail.com |
***@ocf.berkeley.edu |"Sell your ideas -- they are totally acceptable."
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-30 17:05:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Don Kuenz
Please be patient. Just in case your first reaction to my followup
happens to be, "FFS, a followup to a 2012 thread, WTF?"
My first reaction was "someone else listens to science fiction
radio plays? Do they know of any that I do not?"
Since it's your thread in the first place,
the Ray Bradbury one about the last man on
abandoned colony Mars who left time-delayed
telephone messages for himself across years
suggests itself. I think I heard it on BBC
in the series called "Bradbury 13".
Oops - just noticed that BBC Radio 4 Extra
is playing /now/ for six weekends a series
of "Ray Bradbury's Tales of the Bizarre",
the first being "Night Call Collect",
introduced by him. Adapted in 1995 by:

<http://briansibleysblog.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/bradbury-at-beeb-night-call-collect.html>
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