Discussion:
comfort books
Add Reply
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-28 22:43:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/

My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment

Yes, these are all young adult SF books.

What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-08-28 22:52:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my
comfort books to push back the harsh realities of the world.
The first comfort book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John
Varley. This may be my 10th reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011
624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
Mutineer's Moon and Old Man's War are YA books?
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-28 23:38:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my
comfort books to push back the harsh realities of the world.
The first comfort book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John
Varley. This may be my 10th reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011
624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
Mutineer's Moon and Old Man's War are YA books?
Kinda. Both are about regressing older people to being younger. Maybe
I should classify them as old adult SF books ?

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-08-28 23:47:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to
my comfort books to push back the harsh realities of the
world. The first comfort book that I found was _Red Thunder_
by John Varley. This may be my 10th reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441
011 624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
Mutineer's Moon and Old Man's War are YA books?
Kinda. Both are about regressing older people to being younger.
Maybe I should classify them as old adult SF books ?
I think you're using the term differently than the marketing people
do.

Very, very differently.

Like calling a grasshopper a planet, differently.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-08-29 01:26:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my
comfort books to push back the harsh realities of the world.
The first comfort book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John
Varley.  This may be my 10th reading of this book.
     https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011
     624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
Mutineer's Moon and Old Man's War are YA books?
Kinda.  Both are about regressing older people to being younger.  Maybe
I should classify them as old adult SF books ?
I would call 'Mutineer's Moon' space opera. I'm not sure what sub-genre
I'd put 'Old Man's War' in but it wouldn't be young adult. The whole in
universe reason for putting those old people in new bodies was to take
advantage of all that knowledge and experience they had from surviving
to get that old.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-08-28 23:27:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Well, I don't know if I can truthfully claim comfort books as I re-read
very seldom these days, but back-in-the-day:

_Space Cadet_ Heinlein
_Raiders From The Rings_ Nourse
_The Universe Between_ Nourse
_The Zero Stone_ Norton
_The Vega Sector_ hmm, Darlton probably
_Adventures In Time & Space_ ed Healy & McComas
All the Skylark & Lensman books
_100 Fathoms Under_ John Blaine
_The Living Fire Menace_ Kenneth Robeson
_Envoy To New Worlds_ Laumer
_A Princess Of Mars_ Burroughs
_The Weapon Shops Of Isher_ van Vogt

I'm sure I read all those at least a dozen times.


Best wishes for a speedy recovery!
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Kevrob
2018-08-28 23:38:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Well, I don't know if I can truthfully claim comfort books as I re-read
_Space Cadet_ Heinlein
_Raiders From The Rings_ Nourse
_The Universe Between_ Nourse
_The Zero Stone_ Norton
_The Vega Sector_ hmm, Darlton probably
_Adventures In Time & Space_ ed Healy & McComas
All the Skylark & Lensman books
_100 Fathoms Under_ John Blaine
_The Living Fire Menace_ Kenneth Robeson
_Envoy To New Worlds_ Laumer
_A Princess Of Mars_ Burroughs
_The Weapon Shops Of Isher_ van Vogt
I'm sure I read all those at least a dozen times.
Best wishes for a speedy recovery!
Yes, the very best!

Now, shouldn't your list be of Very Boring Books, to keep
your pulse stabilized? ERB is far too pulse-pounding, of course.

You need something more snooze-inducing.

Kevin R
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-29 00:50:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Well, I don't know if I can truthfully claim comfort books as I re-read
_Space Cadet_ Heinlein
_Raiders From The Rings_ Nourse
_The Universe Between_ Nourse
_The Zero Stone_ Norton
_The Vega Sector_ hmm, Darlton probably
_Adventures In Time & Space_ ed Healy & McComas
All the Skylark & Lensman books
_100 Fathoms Under_ John Blaine
_The Living Fire Menace_ Kenneth Robeson
_Envoy To New Worlds_ Laumer
_A Princess Of Mars_ Burroughs
_The Weapon Shops Of Isher_ van Vogt
I'm sure I read all those at least a dozen times.
Best wishes for a speedy recovery!
Oh man, I need to reread _The Zero Stone_ and its sequel again.
Dadgumit, the twofer went out of print.
https://www.amazon.com/Search-Star-Stones-Andre-Norton/dp/1439133379/

Lynn
J. Clarke
2018-08-29 01:38:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Well, I don't know if I can truthfully claim comfort books as I re-read
_Space Cadet_ Heinlein
_Raiders From The Rings_ Nourse
_The Universe Between_ Nourse
_The Zero Stone_ Norton
_The Vega Sector_ hmm, Darlton probably
_Adventures In Time & Space_ ed Healy & McComas
All the Skylark & Lensman books
_100 Fathoms Under_ John Blaine
_The Living Fire Menace_ Kenneth Robeson
_Envoy To New Worlds_ Laumer
_A Princess Of Mars_ Burroughs
_The Weapon Shops Of Isher_ van Vogt
I see enough on there that I like that I think I'm going to check out
the others.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
I'm sure I read all those at least a dozen times.
Best wishes for a speedy recovery!
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-28 23:38:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Hm. _The Star Beast_ is one of mine. Also Kipling's _Kim_, and
for some reason Betty MacDonald's _The Plague and I_, about her
sojourn in a tuberculosis sanatarium. Almost anything by Dorothy
L. Sayers or Patricia Wrede.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
D B Davis
2018-08-29 00:37:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
A prayer was said for you. A long time ago my bicycle went under a car
with me on it. The impact left a three hairline cracks about a quarter
of an inch long on my left anterior-superior tibia. Immediately before
the anesthesiologist knocked me out, the surgeon grabbed my left leg and
said, "This is the leg with the break, right?"
Enough of that. Here's my current list (subject to change at any
time):

_The Hidden Truth_ (Schantz)
_Black Tuesday_ (Mayer)
_The Past Through Tomorrow_ (RAH)
_A Canticle for Leibowitz_ (Miller)
_The Martian Chronicles_ (Bradbury)
_Foundation_ (Asimov)
_The Man Who Folded Himself_ (Gerrold)



Thank you,
--
Don
a***@yahoo.com
2018-08-29 00:54:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Buddy Holly is Alive and Well on Ganymede by Bradley Denton
Zod Wallop by William Browning Spencer
Joe Morris
2018-08-29 20:06:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Buddy Holly is Alive and Well on Ganymede by Bradley Denton
Zod Wallop by William Browning Spencer
Love these two! Another comfort book for me:
Replay by Ken Grimwood
--
Joe Morris Atlanta history blog
***@gmail.com http://atlhistory.com
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-29 20:17:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Morris
Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Buddy Holly is Alive and Well on Ganymede by Bradley Denton
Zod Wallop by William Browning Spencer
Replay by Ken Grimwood
Yes ! I have reread that a few times.

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-29 01:51:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world.  The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley.  This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
   https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ?  Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
How could I forget:
9. _Shards of Honor_ by Lois McMaster Bujold

Which is definitely not a YA book.

Lynn
William Hyde
2018-08-29 03:23:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
Good luck on Thursday.

If you want a struggle between humanity (1) and malicious (1) aliens, a book where the bad are very, very, very ... very bad indeed, the good indomitable, where the fate of humanity hangs by a thread, I recommend, again, Christopher Rowley's "Starhammer".

This is a book with plenty of action but a great deal more. In the hands of most other writers it would be a 500 page novel - and sometimes wish it was.

(1) Well, both sides are somewhat divided, which only makes it more interesting. The race to save humanity is in almost as much danger from fellow humans as from the aliens. And some aliens, while not exactly candidates for the Nobel peace prize, wonder just how insane their colleagues/superiors are.

And then there are the aliens the first aliens are afraid of. And the aliens *those* aliens are afraid of. And Blue Seygfan flies alone.

Not entirely dissimilar is Eric Frank Russel's "Wasp". Full of ideas Russel and his colleagues wanted to pull in WWII.

Walter Jon Williams "Praxis" novels will provide you with a much (much much) longer space opera. If you haven't read them, this trilogy should keep you going for a while. If you're in the mood for humor his "Drake Majistral" novels provide hours of fun - but not everyone likes that style of comedy.

William Hyde
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-29 03:49:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by William Hyde
Not entirely dissimilar is Eric Frank Russel's "Wasp". Full of ideas
Russel and his colleagues wanted to pull in WWII.
Oh, yes. That's delightful. Russell did a number of
novels/stories full of dirty tricks he had wanted to pull on the
Japanese, but they wouldn't let him.
Post by William Hyde
Walter Jon Williams "Praxis" novels will provide you with a much (much
much) longer space opera. If you haven't read them, this trilogy should
keep you going for a while. If you're in the mood for humor his "Drake
Majistral" novels provide hours of fun - but not everyone likes that
style of comedy.
I do, as it happens. I also like a similar trilogy, Alexei
Panshin's _Star Well_ and following. It's been out of print for
a long time, but maybe Amazon or Abebooks will have copies.

And there's another trilogy that's been out of print since rocks
were soft: Chester Anderson's _The Butterfly Kid_, Michael
Kurland's _The Unicorn Girl,_ and T. A. Waters's _The Probability
Pad_. The authors are their own main characters, and they're
silly as hell.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
m***@sky.com
2018-08-29 04:24:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
I would re-read David Drake's RCN/Leary-Mundy series, because he shows people making the best of difficult situations. All the best with the heart surgery, and with whatever regime of pills and diet that they advise for you afterwards.
Default User
2018-08-29 04:26:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.

The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.



Brian
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-08-29 04:38:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
William Hyde
2018-08-29 21:09:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.

Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.

William Hyde
Default User
2018-08-29 23:45:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 12:38:20 AM UTC-4, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I
was in the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought
me some SF books out of the library. The only one I remember was
Varley’s Steel Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary
triology.
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for
non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times
crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book
before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.
These days I bring the iPad with me. If the environment is too
distracting for reading I’ll play solitaire or something.
Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
That’s a plus. With age, my back doesn’t like a lot of the chairs it
encoungers.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in
hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.
I could see that.


Brian
m***@sky.com
2018-08-30 17:42:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by William Hyde
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.
Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.
William Hyde
Since you talk about the NY Times crossword, was that a US Hospital? Here in the UK I was under the impression that in countries where medical care is not free at the point of delivery, there wasn't so much waiting around. In the UK, it is pretty obvious that medical care is rationed by waiting list, both in terms of waiting months to get seen, and then spending a day for a 15 minute consultation.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-08-30 17:50:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by William Hyde
On Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 12:38:20 AM UTC-4, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for
non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times
crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book
before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.
Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in
hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.
William Hyde
Since you talk about the NY Times crossword, was that a US Hospital?
Here in the UK I was under the impression that in countries where
medical care is not free at the point of delivery, there wasn't so much
waiting around. In the UK, it is pretty obvious that medical care is
rationed by waiting list, both in terms of waiting months to get seen,
and then spending a day for a 15 minute consultation.
My original point about waiting rooms was from the POV of somebody waiting
for the results of a loved one undergoing surgery at the time.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
William Hyde
2018-08-30 19:46:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by William Hyde
On Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 12:38:20 AM UTC-4, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for
non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times
crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book
before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.
Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in
hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.
William Hyde
Since you talk about the NY Times crossword, was that a US Hospital?
Here in the UK I was under the impression that in countries where
medical care is not free at the point of delivery, there wasn't so much
waiting around. In the UK, it is pretty obvious that medical care is
rationed by waiting list, both in terms of waiting months to get seen,
and then spending a day for a 15 minute consultation.
My original point about waiting rooms was from the POV of somebody waiting
for the results of a loved one undergoing surgery at the time.
I agree, that's worse.

William Hyde
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-30 20:13:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by William Hyde
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by William Hyde
On Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 12:38:20 AM UTC-4, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for
non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times
crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book
before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.
Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in
hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.
William Hyde
Since you talk about the NY Times crossword, was that a US Hospital?
Here in the UK I was under the impression that in countries where
medical care is not free at the point of delivery, there wasn't so much
waiting around. In the UK, it is pretty obvious that medical care is
rationed by waiting list, both in terms of waiting months to get seen,
and then spending a day for a 15 minute consultation.
My original point about waiting rooms was from the POV of somebody waiting
for the results of a loved one undergoing surgery at the time.
I agree, that's worse.
William Hyde
Well... in the specific sense of spoiling the pleasure
of reading, certainly; and since afterwards, re-reading
the book will recall to you the previous distressing
circumstance.
Ahasuerus
2018-08-30 18:35:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by William Hyde
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.
Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.
William Hyde
Since you talk about the NY Times crossword, was that a US
Hospital? Here in the UK I was under the impression that in
countries where medical care is not free at the point of delivery,
there wasn't so much waiting around. In the UK, it is pretty obvious
that medical care is rationed by waiting list, both in terms of
waiting months to get seen, and then spending a day for a 15 minute
consultation.
It's complicated. To quote
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168851013001759?via%3Dihub

"Fifteen of the 23 [OECD] countries monitor and publish national
waiting time statistics and have some form of waiting time guarantees.
There are significant differences in how waiting times are measured:
whether they measure the “ongoing” or “completed” waiting period[;]
what kind of care the patient is waiting for; the parameters used; and
where in the patient journey the measurement begins. Current national
waiting time statistics are of limited use for comparing health care
availability among the various countries due to the differences in
measurements and data collection. Different methodological issues must
be taken into account when making such cross-country comparisons."
William Hyde
2018-08-30 19:44:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by William Hyde
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.
Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.
William Hyde
Since you talk about the NY Times crossword, was that a US Hospital? Here in the UK I was under the impression that in countries where medical care is not free at the point of delivery, there wasn't so much waiting around. In the UK, it is pretty obvious that medical care is rationed by waiting list, both in terms of waiting months to get seen, and then spending a day for a 15 minute consultation.
Canadian hospital. Some papers here reprint the NY times puzzle.

If it is something that must be attended to that day, but not that hour, you are naturally low priority in either system. I had to wait for an opening in the ctscan queue, then an x-ray on my potentially broken but not very painful arm, then wait for doctors to have time to look at these and decide what to do.

I've no complaints.

My experiences with true emergencies in both systems is one of extreme speed and efficiency.

I am in awe of how hard these people work.

William Hyde
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-30 23:33:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by m***@sky.com
On Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 12:38:20 AM UTC-4, Ted Nolan
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room
will suck.
Post by m***@sky.com
My local hospital is (Surprise!) overcrowded and waits for
non-critical care can be long. Last time I finished the NY times
crossword, a Reginald Hill novel and was digging into a second book
before I got out. I'd say the books saved my life.
Post by m***@sky.com
Mind you, as waiting rooms go, it was pretty nice. Comfortable chairs.
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
"Casey Agonistes" was not an ideal read for a fourteen year old in
hospital. But most other Richard McKenna was.
Post by m***@sky.com
William Hyde
Since you talk about the NY Times crossword, was that a US Hospital?
Here in the UK I was under the impression that in countries where
medical care is not free at the point of delivery, there wasn't so much
waiting around. In the UK, it is pretty obvious that medical care is
rationed by waiting list, both in terms of waiting months to get seen,
and then spending a day for a 15 minute consultation.
Canadian hospital. Some papers here reprint the NY times puzzle.
If it is something that must be attended to that day, but not that hour,
you are naturally low priority in either system. I had to wait for an
opening in the ctscan queue, then an x-ray on my potentially broken but
not very painful arm, then wait for doctors to have time to look at
these and decide what to do.
I've no complaints.
My experiences with true emergencies in both systems is one of extreme speed and efficiency.
I am in awe of how hard these people work.
Well, when I went to the ER with intense abdominal pain, I had to
wait a couple of hours. But it was a Friday night and a lot of
people who had been sticking knives into each other took, as I
acknowledged at the time, precedence. Fortunately the ER had a
secondary waiting room, held about ten people, that did NOT have
a television set in it. I was not reading anything; I was
pushing myself up from the arms of the chair to keep some of my
internal organs from putting their weight on some of the others.
When they were finally able to see me, it took them about another
hour to decide to admit me and fill me full of divinely blessed
Demerol. But they had to make sure I actually had what they
thought I had. (It was pancreatitis, right up there with kidney
stones for ouchness.)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-29 22:29:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Default User
I generally like to read new stuff at most opportunities. When I was in
the hospital for surgery back in the 90s, a friend brought me some SF
books out of the library. The only one I remember was Varley’s Steel
Beach.
The only thing I have reread lately has been the Ancillary triology.
Brian
I will say this: Any book read while in a hospital waiting room will suck.
It is probably better not to waste a good book in such a situation.
How about writing a book in a hospital waiting room?

I wrote a chapter of _The Interior Life_ in a waiting room in
Long Beach, waiting for my mother to come out of the OR (heart
surgery, I find I can't remember the details now). She lived for
another decade, dying at ninety.

And no, it was not the chapter where Sue takes her kid to have
his appendix out.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-08-29 11:13:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 28 Aug 2018 17:43:03 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
Good luck with the surgery!

I tend towards....

Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart
The Automatic Detective, A Lee Martinez
Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, ibid.

Anything by Ursula Vernon/T Kingfisher.

Almost anything from these series -
- Known Space, Larry Niven
- Discworld, Terry Pratchett
- Taltos saga, Steven Brust
- Ethshar, Lawrence Watt-Evans
- October Daye, Seanan McGuire
- Falco serieses, Lindsey Davis
- Flavia de Luce, Alan Bradley

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"the average homeowner should expect to repair direct
meteor damage every hundred million years."
-- http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030506.html
Joe Bernstein
2018-08-29 18:11:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my
comfort books to push back the harsh realities of the world.
Um, depending on when you read this, good luck with it, or good luck
with the recovery.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The
first comfort book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley.
This may be my 10th reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Huh. I'm used to thinking of your tastes and mine as differing
considerably, but your list is closer to mine than most of those
that have been posted in reply to it. I had a category in my book
catalogue, representing a physical shelf, as of 2006, called
"keepsake"; it was mostly meant to hold comfort books. I had Gould's
<Wildside> in that category, and Varley's <The Persistence of Vision>;
nothing by Heinlein, but I've read, at various times, his <Tunnel in
the Sky>, <The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress>, and <The Door into Summer>
as comfort books.
Post by Lynn McGuire
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Well, probably not from mine - see differences of taste - but I often
re-read Guy Gavriel Kay, the 1632verse, and Stirling's Change-verse
for comfort these days. The 2006 list included books I just kept
around to impress myself with what I owned and had read, seems to me,
as well as books by authors I then focused on (Crowley, Gentle, Ryman,
Tiptree), but these I specifically remember reading as comfort books:

another vote for <The Butterfly Kid> by Chester Anderson
various books by Peter Beagle, especially <The Last Unicorn>, which I
used to read something like annually
<Dead Lion> by John and Emery Bonett (a mystery)
a bunch of Gillian Bradshaw's historicals, not her fantasies
<A Civil Campaign> and <The Curse of Chalion>
<War for the Oaks>
<Possession> (well, skimming), not speculative
<Engine Summer> and <Little, Big>
Ansen Dibell's Kantmorie books
the first Thomas Covenant trilogy (yes, I've actually read this for
comfort in my life, I am not making this up)
<Solitaire> by Kelley Eskridge
Eleanor Farjeon's Martin Pippin books, primarily the first
<The Princess Bride>
Lisa Goldstein's <Summer King, Winter Fool>
<Wildside>
Joyce Ballou Gregorian's Tredana trilogy
Linda Haldeman's <Esbae> and <Star of the Sea>
Tom Holt's <Expecting Someone Taller>; I'm not sure about his
<Goatsong> and <The Walled Orchard>, but they were also on that
shelf; those are arguably not speculative
<The Phantom Tollbooth>
Kay's 1990s books, still my favourites of his
Peg Kerr's <Emerald House Rising>
Nancy Kress's <The Prince of Morning Bells> (though I don't remember
it actually *working* as a comfort book)
Tanith Lee's <Don't Bite the Sun> and, um, part of its sequel
Gail Carson Levine's <The Two Princesses of Bamarre>
Anne Logston's <Firewalk>
a couple by McDevitt (another point of contact between us, I gather)
I'm pretty sure I actually re-read parts of Jay McInerney's <Bright
Lights, Big City> for comfort; that and two of his other books
were on that shelf, but I'm not sure why; none speculative
<Winter Rose>, <The Changeling Sea>, <The Sorceress and the Cygnet>,
and <The Book of Atrix Wolfe>
Robin McKinley's <Beauty>
Kevin O'Donnell's <War of Omission>
<Elise>, a book of poems by Evelyn Posamentier, arguably not
speculative
Marta Randall's <The Sword of Winter>
<A College of Magics>
Sean Stewart's <Nobody's Son>
<The Lord of the Rings> and <Smith of Wootton Major>
<The Persistence of Vision> (the collection)
<Homecoming> and <Dicey's Song>, also <Glass Mountain>, by Cynthia
Voigt, none of which are among her speculative books
<Promised Land> by Connie Willis and Cynthia Felice; other books by
Willis were on that shelf, but I think I only read <Remake> as a
comfort book
<Sorcery and Cecelia>, <Mairelon the Magician> and <Magician's Ward>

I'm really not sure how many of these I still own. Oddly, I've found
myself recently missing, in a time when physical obstacles really
constrain my reading choices, a lot of 1990s science fiction that
*wasn't* in that category, and *isn't* on the above list.

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-29 20:26:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my
comfort books to push back the harsh realities of the world.
Um, depending on when you read this, good luck with it, or good luck
with the recovery.
Post by Lynn McGuire
The
first comfort book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley.
This may be my 10th reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Huh. I'm used to thinking of your tastes and mine as differing
considerably, but your list is closer to mine than most of those
that have been posted in reply to it. I had a category in my book
catalogue, representing a physical shelf, as of 2006, called
"keepsake"; it was mostly meant to hold comfort books. I had Gould's
<Wildside> in that category, and Varley's <The Persistence of Vision>;
nothing by Heinlein, but I've read, at various times, his <Tunnel in
the Sky>, <The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress>, and <The Door into Summer>
as comfort books.
Post by Lynn McGuire
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Well, probably not from mine - see differences of taste - but I often
re-read Guy Gavriel Kay, the 1632verse, and Stirling's Change-verse
for comfort these days. The 2006 list included books I just kept
around to impress myself with what I owned and had read, seems to me,
as well as books by authors I then focused on (Crowley, Gentle, Ryman,
another vote for <The Butterfly Kid> by Chester Anderson
various books by Peter Beagle, especially <The Last Unicorn>, which I
used to read something like annually
<Dead Lion> by John and Emery Bonett (a mystery)
a bunch of Gillian Bradshaw's historicals, not her fantasies
<A Civil Campaign> and <The Curse of Chalion>
<War for the Oaks>
<Possession> (well, skimming), not speculative
<Engine Summer> and <Little, Big>
Ansen Dibell's Kantmorie books
the first Thomas Covenant trilogy (yes, I've actually read this for
comfort in my life, I am not making this up)
<Solitaire> by Kelley Eskridge
Eleanor Farjeon's Martin Pippin books, primarily the first
<The Princess Bride>
Lisa Goldstein's <Summer King, Winter Fool>
<Wildside>
Joyce Ballou Gregorian's Tredana trilogy
Linda Haldeman's <Esbae> and <Star of the Sea>
Tom Holt's <Expecting Someone Taller>; I'm not sure about his
<Goatsong> and <The Walled Orchard>, but they were also on that
shelf; those are arguably not speculative
<The Phantom Tollbooth>
Kay's 1990s books, still my favourites of his
Peg Kerr's <Emerald House Rising>
Nancy Kress's <The Prince of Morning Bells> (though I don't remember
it actually *working* as a comfort book)
Tanith Lee's <Don't Bite the Sun> and, um, part of its sequel
Gail Carson Levine's <The Two Princesses of Bamarre>
Anne Logston's <Firewalk>
a couple by McDevitt (another point of contact between us, I gather)
I'm pretty sure I actually re-read parts of Jay McInerney's <Bright
Lights, Big City> for comfort; that and two of his other books
were on that shelf, but I'm not sure why; none speculative
<Winter Rose>, <The Changeling Sea>, <The Sorceress and the Cygnet>,
and <The Book of Atrix Wolfe>
Robin McKinley's <Beauty>
Kevin O'Donnell's <War of Omission>
<Elise>, a book of poems by Evelyn Posamentier, arguably not
speculative
Marta Randall's <The Sword of Winter>
<A College of Magics>
Sean Stewart's <Nobody's Son>
<The Lord of the Rings> and <Smith of Wootton Major>
<The Persistence of Vision> (the collection)
<Homecoming> and <Dicey's Song>, also <Glass Mountain>, by Cynthia
Voigt, none of which are among her speculative books
<Promised Land> by Connie Willis and Cynthia Felice; other books by
Willis were on that shelf, but I think I only read <Remake> as a
comfort book
<Sorcery and Cecelia>, <Mairelon the Magician> and <Magician's Ward>
I'm really not sure how many of these I still own. Oddly, I've found
myself recently missing, in a time when physical obstacles really
constrain my reading choices, a lot of 1990s science fiction that
*wasn't* in that category, and *isn't* on the above list.
Joe Bernstein
I should reread Gould's _Wildside_ with the accompanying excellent books
by S.M. Stirling, _Conquistador_
https://www.amazon.com/Conquistador-S-M-Stirling/dp/0451459334/

and Dennis Taylor's _Outland_

https://www.amazon.com/Outland-World-Lines-1-Dennis-Taylor/dp/150563119X/

Thanks,
Lynn
t***@gmail.com
2018-08-29 18:56:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Like some others, I don't re-read a whole lot nowadays, but
these are some that I have re-read and enjoyed in the past:

Note: I'm steering clear of fantasy, since you don't like much of it:

Anderson - Tau Zero; The Star Fox; most van Rijn and/or Falkayn
Glen Cook - The Dragon Never Sleeps; Passage at Arms
Zelazny - Lord of Light; Doorways in the Sand
Vance - Demon Princes series (five books)
Banks - Excession
Clement - Mission of Gravity

Seconding others' recommendations:
Hughart - Bridge of Birds
Martinez - The Automatic Detective

Non-fiction:
Chuck Jones - Chuck Amuck (this is his autobiography)

And these two are fun for flipping around when you can't focus, or need
to put the book down frequently, etc:
Beck & Friedwald - Looney Tunes & Merrie Melodies: A Complete Illustrated
Guide to the Warner Bros. Cartoons
Bill James - Historical Baseball Abstract (2001 = newest edition)

Best wishes for your surgery & recovery,
Tony
a425couple
2018-08-29 23:53:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world.  The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley.  This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
   https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ?  Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
I certainly agree with your including "the Star Beast".
I would also suggest Heinlein's "Have Space Suit—Will Travel"

And Arthur Clarke's "Rendezvous with Rama" is a comforting reread.
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-30 00:16:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by a425couple
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my
comfort books to push back the harsh realities of the world.  The
first comfort book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley.
This may be my 10th reading of this book.
    https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ?  Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
I certainly agree with your including "the Star Beast".
I would also suggest Heinlein's "Have Space Suit—Will Travel"
And Arthur Clarke's "Rendezvous with Rama" is a comforting reread.
I just bought _Podkayne of Mars_ for a reread. I suspect that I lost
the original copy in the great flood of 1989. And the version that I
bought has two endings apparently.
https://www.amazon.com/Podkayne-Mars-Robert-Heinlein/dp/1612422624/

Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-30 01:37:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world. The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley. This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ? Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Presently, I'll pick up some of Ben Aaronovitch's
"Rivers of London" series (some parts very far from
feel-good), "Jack Campbell's" "Lost Fleet" universe,
and maybe again Star Trek The Next Generation:
_Debtors' Planet_, not for the offstage rape but for the
crewmembers shown as being effective and in character,
including a new and well-developed alien on the team.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2018-08-31 02:47:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am having heart surgery on Thursday and am rolling back to my comfort
books to push back the harsh realities of the world.  The first comfort
book that I found was _Red Thunder_ by John Varley.  This may be my 10th
reading of this book.
   https://www.amazon.com/Red-Thunder-Lightning-Novel/dp/0441011624/
My other comfort books are
2. _Mutineer's Moon_ by David Weber
3. _The Tar-aiym Krang_ by Alan Dean Foster
4. _Citizen of the Galaxy_ by Robert Heinlein
5. _Jumper_ by Steven Gould
6. _The Star Beast_ by Robert Heinlein
7. _Old Man's War_ by John Scalzi
8. a few others that I cannot recall at the moment
Yes, these are all young adult SF books.
What are your comfort books ?  Maybe I can expand my list.
Lynn
Little Fuzzy
The Nero Wolfe series
Lord Valentine's Castle
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Michael F. Stemper
2018-08-31 16:52:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
What are your comfort books ?  Maybe I can expand my list.
For me, a "comfort read" (note that I'm expanding it from "comfort
book") has to have these properties:

* Broad scope. This means not just length, but depth. Could be
covering a lot of time or a long journey.
* Varied dramatis personae or settings. (Partly redundant with
previous point)
* Straight-forward writing, to allow me to read without having
to engage my brain. This leads to some of my choices being,
shall we say, "pulpy".

With that preface, here are some of mine:

Poul Anderson: the Nicholas van Rijn stories. Just going out into
space and giving folks (alien and human) the old flim-flam.

James Blish: _Cities in Flight_. I think that the above points
explain this one.

Stephen Goldin: The Family d'Alembert stories. Ditto.

Robert A. Henlein: _The Number of the Beast_. The first time that
I read this, it put me off of him for a decade. But, it's moved
into "comfort read" territory since then, due in large part to the
way it allows me to totally turn off my brain (except for the
necessary autonomic functions, of course).

C. S. Lewis: _The Chronicles of Narnia_. A lot of characters over
a lot of years. And a background that fits like an old shoe.

Robert Silverberg: _Lord Valentine's Castle_. Although Valentine
covers only a small part of a planet, it's a big planet and most
of the travel is on foot. And you can feel the size of the planet.
More races, mostly fleshed out, than some novels have characters.

I hope that everything went well with your surgery.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Always use apostrophe's and "quotation marks" properly.
Loading...