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[tor dot com] SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids’ Section of the Library
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James Nicoll
2018-08-21 14:24:02 UTC
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SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library

https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
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l***@usa.com
2018-08-21 14:27:58 UTC
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That would be
"a Boy and his Dog"
When I'd read everything sci fi in my local library I desperately turned to the childrens section where I found that embarrassment, somewhere between 5th and 8th grade.

Nils
Garrett Wollman
2018-08-21 15:21:33 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
My middle school had an annual paperback book sale (for the students,
not a fundraiser). My parents were shocked one day when I came home
with a copy of Heinlein's /Friday/.

-GAWollman
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Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
d***@gmail.com
2018-08-21 16:02:40 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
My middle school had an annual paperback book sale (for the students,
not a fundraiser). My parents were shocked one day when I came home
with a copy of Heinlein's /Friday/.
-GAWollman
Friday includes a good deal of sex, but IIRC mostly in *very* blurred focus. Much less explicit than any Nora Roberts, say, today. The rape scene is so sanitized that it is IMO less disturbing than the interrogation scene in an average hard-boiled PI novel. (That Friday later marries or at least commits to her rapist is disturbing if you stop to analyze such things, but I doubt that most middle schoolers would, or indeed that most readers do.)

But I do doubt that anyone at the school realized what its contents were. Was this the edition showing a very white Friday with a zipper open halfway down her breast?

-DES
James Nicoll
2018-08-21 16:30:03 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
(That Friday
later marries or at least commits to her rapist is disturbing if you
stop to analyze such things, but I doubt that most middle schoolers
would, or indeed that most readers do.)
And is a detail shared with The Lantern Bearers: the protagonist's sister
ends up marrying the raider who carried her off.
--
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Garrett Wollman
2018-08-21 16:50:43 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
My middle school had an annual paperback book sale (for the students,
not a fundraiser). My parents were shocked one day when I came home
with a copy of Heinlein's /Friday/.
But I do doubt that anyone at the school realized what its contents
were. Was this the edition showing a very white Friday with a zipper
open halfway down her breast?
You betcha. Oh, did I mention, it was a parochial school?

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-21 15:15:36 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
Heh. To this I can also add _The Lord of the Rings_, which I
discovered as a graduate student in the *Children's Books*
section of the Education-Psychology Library on the UC Berkeley
Campus. Right next to _The Hobbit_, demonstrating the same
process you're talking about: "This author wrote a book for kids,
so all his/her books must be for kids."

Of course, any grade-school teacher or prospective teacher,
coming upon _The Lord of the Rings_ in the children's section,
*might* have been expected to read it first, before turning it
over to the kiddies. It isn't as if there's any sex in _LotR_
(which a number of reviewers listed as a defect in the work), but
there's violence and to spare.

My mother read science fiction, so I got to read the Big Three
magazines during the 1950s, plus a few novels (not a whole lot of
SF novels ever found hardcover publication in the 1950s). On the
other hand, she got hold of a copy of Leiber's _The Green
Millennium_ and, either after having read it or perhaps after
having looked at the cover, which was captioned "Sex Among the
Stars!" decided it was unsuitable for me and hid it in her bureau
drawer. Of *course* I winkled it out and put it in my locker in
high school, where I read it over and over. There's actually no
sex in it -- a certain amount of *talk* -- except at the very end
when we find out about the reproductive habits of the green cats.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jack Bohn
2018-08-21 16:05:12 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
Not SF, but _The Great Dinosaur Robbery_ by David Forrest was renamed _One of Our Dinosaurs Is Missing_ after the Disney runaround movie based on it, and sold by Scholastic Book Club through schools. If anyone had read it, they might have removed a scene between a young nanny and her charge who has gotten old enough that ...one thing has been leading to another for quite a while. Not sure what they would do with the more plot-relevant scene (I think this is where the plot to steal the dinosaur came from) where a pair of siblings, to escape the supervision of their nanny, drugged her. (ISTR them shaving it into chocolate ice cream to disguise it; could it have been a bar of hashish?)
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-Jack
l***@yahoo.com
2018-08-21 16:59:36 UTC
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To that I would add:

A Gift from Zeus by Jeanne Steig and William Steig.

Why?

Well, mainly because it includes the story of Myrrha. In detail.

Incredibly, some details in other stories were SANITIZED in the same book!

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/01/05/20/reviews/010520.20doniget.html

I can't imagine how it ends up in the kids' section of any library...


Lenona.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-21 20:40:09 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
A Gift from Zeus by Jeanne Steig and William Steig.
Why?
Well, mainly because it includes the story of Myrrha. In detail.
Incredibly, some details in other stories were SANITIZED in the same book!
https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/01/05/20/reviews/010520.20doniget.html
I can't imagine how it ends up in the kids' section of any library...
Oh, I can. Bored librarian, interested in something other than
her job, glances at the title and says, "Oh, fairy tales," and
shoves it into the kids' section.

Now, if she got a look at the *cover*, which features s satyr
playing the panpipes to two extremely naked, extremely fleshy
nymphs, she might have had a clue.

https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/a-gift-from-zeus_jeanne-steig/1182618/?mkwid=sznCWiYH7%7cdc&pcrid=70112861832&pkw=&pmt=&plc=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI2ILw-v_-3AIVk_hkCh03PwD4EAYYASABEgKb1_D_BwE#isbn=0060284064&idiq=25371943
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Quadibloc
2018-08-25 07:33:42 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
I postponed reading this one, but I see it was quite amusing.

But then, there are _children's books_ which don't seem to belong in the children's section of the library.

Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early on, a reference to female genitalia.

John Savard
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-25 14:47:17 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
I postponed reading this one, but I see it was quite amusing.
But then, there are _children's books_ which don't seem to belong in the
children's section of the library.
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
l***@yahoo.com
2018-08-25 16:06:12 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
Btw, does anyone know who this illustrator is? I have a copy.

http://neverpedia.com/pan/The_Story_of_Peter_Pan

It SAYS "Charles E. Graham," but from the title page, I always thought he was just the publisher and I don't see any proof otherwise. Besides, the "signature" doesn't seem to match those initials! (The easiest place to see it is in the mermaid lagoon picture, in the bottom right corner; one can also see it in the bedroom scene with Nana, also in the bottom right.)


Lenona.
Quadibloc
2018-08-25 16:08:30 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.

"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."

John Savard
Kevrob
2018-08-25 16:53:30 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
also, previous to that:

[quote]

She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet mocking
mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the other,
that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there is always
one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that Wendy could
never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the right-hand
corner.

[/quote] - http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/86/peter-pan/1532/chapter-1-peter-breaks-though/

The "inner sanctum" of Mrs D's "romantic mind" is the "innermost box,"
not her physical "ladyparts." Critics have hinted that it is a stand-
in for sexual pleasure, but would Barrie have meant that? The opinion
that he was what we would call asexual is prominent.

Beware the reader engaging in eisegesis!

Kevin R
J. Clarke
2018-08-25 17:02:12 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
[quote]
She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet mocking
mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the other,
that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there is always
one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that Wendy could
never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the right-hand
corner.
[/quote] - http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/86/peter-pan/1532/chapter-1-peter-breaks-though/
The "inner sanctum" of Mrs D's "romantic mind" is the "innermost box,"
not her physical "ladyparts." Critics have hinted that it is a stand-
in for sexual pleasure, but would Barrie have meant that? The opinion
that he was what we would call asexual is prominent.
Beware the reader engaging in eisegesis!
In any case, there are three children.
D B Davis
2018-08-26 04:00:04 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
[quote]
She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet mocking
mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the other,
that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there is always
one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that Wendy could
never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the right-hand
corner.
[/quote] - http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/86/peter-pan/1532/chapter-1-peter-breaks-though/
The "inner sanctum" of Mrs D's "romantic mind" is the "innermost box,"
not her physical "ladyparts." Critics have hinted that it is a stand-
in for sexual pleasure, but would Barrie have meant that? The opinion
that he was what we would call asexual is prominent.
Beware the reader engaging in eisegesis!
^^^^^^^^^
Sweet. Eisegesis just got squeezed to my rasw working vocabulary. It
comes after denouement and deus ex machina, but before exegesis.



Thank you,
--
Don
Peter Trei
2018-08-26 04:40:54 UTC
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Post by D B Davis
Post by Kevrob
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
[quote]
She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet mocking
mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the other,
that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there is always
one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that Wendy could
never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the right-hand
corner.
[/quote] - http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/86/peter-pan/1532/chapter-1-peter-breaks-though/
The "inner sanctum" of Mrs D's "romantic mind" is the "innermost box,"
not her physical "ladyparts." Critics have hinted that it is a stand-
in for sexual pleasure, but would Barrie have meant that? The opinion
that he was what we would call asexual is prominent.
Beware the reader engaging in eisegesis!
^^^^^^^^^
Sweet. Eisegesis just got squeezed to my rasw working vocabulary. It
comes after denouement and deus ex machina, but before exegesis.
New word for me too.

Pt
Kevrob
2018-08-26 06:42:50 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
Post by D B Davis
Post by Kevrob
Beware the reader engaging in eisegesis!
^^^^^^^^^
Sweet. Eisegesis just got squeezed to my rasw working vocabulary. It
comes after denouement and deus ex machina, but before exegesis.
New word for me too.
I just learned it, myself. I was familiar with exegesis, and with
the "lit crit" mantra of "the reader imposing meaning on the text,"
and stumbled upon it searching for the perfect tag expressing that
concept.

Kevin R
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-26 09:17:15 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Peter Trei
Post by D B Davis
Post by Kevrob
Beware the reader engaging in eisegesis!
^^^^^^^^^
Sweet. Eisegesis just got squeezed to my rasw working vocabulary. It
comes after denouement and deus ex machina, but before exegesis.
New word for me too.
I just learned it, myself. I was familiar with exegesis, and with
the "lit crit" mantra of "the reader imposing meaning on the text,"
and stumbled upon it searching for the perfect tag expressing that
concept.
Kevin R
Putting the "I" in eisegesis; when I read a book,
it means what I want it to mean. :-)
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2018-08-25 19:12:06 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.

If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-25 20:08:15 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been
boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her,
and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who
took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her,
except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and
in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.
If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
I'm with you.

The play was written in 1904, and the novel (from which the text
quoted undoubtedly comes) in 1911. I do know that the word "box"
has been used to mean "vulva" for a while now. I don't know if
it dates back to 1911. I have *extreme* doubts that J. M.
Barrie. if he knew that usage at all, would have used hit. Take
a look at his biographical sketch here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._M._Barrie
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2018-08-25 21:49:32 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been
boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her,
and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who
took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her,
except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and
in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.
If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
I'm with you.
The play was written in 1904, and the novel (from which the text
quoted undoubtedly comes) in 1911. I do know that the word "box"
has been used to mean "vulva" for a while now. I don't know if
it dates back to 1911.
One source says that it dates to the 1300s.
<https://www.bustle.com/articles/94316-13-nicknames-for-vagina-throughout-history-because-weve-had-vagina-slang-since-1230>

However if Mr. D did not get the "box" then where Wendy come from?
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I have *extreme* doubts that J. M.
Barrie. if he knew that usage at all, would have used hit. Take
a look at his biographical sketch here.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._M._Barrie
Kevrob
2018-08-26 02:48:02 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been
boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her,
and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who
took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her,
except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and
in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.
If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
I'm with you.
The play was written in 1904, and the novel (from which the text
quoted undoubtedly comes) in 1911. I do know that the word "box"
has been used to mean "vulva" for a while now. I don't know if
it dates back to 1911.
One source says that it dates to the 1300s.
<https://www.bustle.com/articles/94316-13-nicknames-for-vagina-throughout-history-because-weve-had-vagina-slang-since-1230>
However if Mr. D did not get the "box" then where Wendy come from?
He only had the occasional loan of it....?
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I have *extreme* doubts that J. M.
Barrie. if he knew that usage at all, would have used hit. Take
a look at his biographical sketch here.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._M._Barrie
Kevin R
Quadibloc
2018-08-26 00:02:59 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I have *extreme* doubts that J. M.
Barrie. if he knew that usage at all, would have used hit.
Having seen that paragraph when glancing at the book in the library, I did miss
the preceding one.

I was startled, because I was used to children's literature being more thoroughly
sanitized, but I hadn't made the value judgement of considering it offensive. I
had just assumed people were a bit earthier back in 1911 than in 1950.

John Savard
d***@gmail.com
2018-08-27 19:25:55 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.
If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
I must agree. While "box" can be a euphemism, it can also simply mean a container or a division. In this case it seems that by "He got all of her, except the innermost box" the author means that Mr Darling failed to understand his wife's innermost nature, not that he didn't have sex with her.

In any case, this is not the sort of reference that most people would be worried about children encountering.

Although I recall reading an anecdote about a librarian who said that _The Prisoner of Zenda_ was not suitable for children, because its opening dealt with bastardy. (In the opening chapter it is said, but a bit elliptically, that one of Rudolf Rassendyl's female ancestors had had an affair with the then king of Ruritania, which is why his physical appearance is so close to that of the about to be crowned king, thus setting up the whole substitution plot.)

The anecdote would have been set a long time ago. Perhaps the 1920s? I am not sure.

-DES
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-27 20:22:16 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had
been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved
her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling,
who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of
her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box,
and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.
If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
I must agree. While "box" can be a euphemism, it can also simply mean a
container or a division. In this case it seems that by "He got all of
her, except the innermost box" the author means that Mr Darling failed
to understand his wife's innermost nature, not that he didn't have sex
with her.
In any case, this is not the sort of reference that most people would be
worried about children encountering.
Although I recall reading an anecdote about a librarian who said that
_The Prisoner of Zenda_ was not suitable for children, because its
opening dealt with bastardy. (In the opening chapter it is said, but a
bit elliptically, that one of Rudolf Rassendyl's female ancestors had
had an affair with the then king of Ruritania, which is why his physical
appearance is so close to that of the about to be crowned king, thus
setting up the whole substitution plot.)
The anecdote would have been set a long time ago. Perhaps the 1920s? I am not sure.
Published in 1894; presumably set in a near-contemporary year.

And once you get a few generations back, there's no telling. I
forget where I read that after twelve hundred years or so, everybody
of European descent has Charlemagne as an ancestor somewhere.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
d***@gmail.com
2018-08-28 00:39:53 UTC
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<snip stuff about Peter Pan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by d***@gmail.com
Although I recall reading an anecdote about a librarian who said that
_The Prisoner of Zenda_ was not suitable for children, because its
opening dealt with bastardy. (In the opening chapter it is said, but a
bit elliptically, that one of Rudolf Rassendyl's female ancestors had
had an affair with the then king of Ruritania, which is why his physical
appearance is so close to that of the about to be crowned king, thus
setting up the whole substitution plot.)
The anecdote would have been set a long time ago. Perhaps the 1920s? I am not sure.
Published in 1894; presumably set in a near-contemporary year.
And once you get a few generations back, there's no telling. I
forget where I read that after twelve hundred years or so, everybody
of European descent has Charlemagne as an ancestor somewhere.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
I think i was unclear. The anecdote was that sometime in the 1920s or 30s, a librarian alleged that the already classic book _The Prisoner of Zenda_ was unsuitable for children because of its implication that the protagonist was descended from the product of an extramarital affair.

I found the book at project Gutenberg, (see https://www.gutenberg.org/files/95/95-h/95-h.htm) and here is the passage in question:

<blockquote> ...in the year 1733, George II. sitting then on the throne, peace reigning for the moment, and the King and the Prince of Wales being not yet at loggerheads, there came on a visit to the English Court a certain prince, who was afterwards known to history as Rudolf the Third of Ruritania. The prince was a tall, handsome young fellow, marked (maybe marred, it is not for me to say) by a somewhat unusually long, sharp and straight nose, and a mass of dark-red hair—in fact, the nose and the hair which have stamped the Elphbergs time out of mind. He stayed some months in England, where he was most courteously received; yet, in the end, he left rather under a cloud. For he fought a duel (it was considered highly well bred of him to waive all question of his rank) with a nobleman, well known in the society of the day, not only for his own merits, but as the husband of a very beautiful wife. In that duel Prince Rudolf received a severe wound, and, recovering therefrom, was adroitly smuggled off by the Ruritanian ambassador, who had found him a pretty handful. The nobleman was not wounded in the duel; but the morning being raw and damp on the occasion of the meeting, he contracted a severe chill, and, failing to throw it off, he died some six months after the departure of Prince Rudolf, without having found leisure to adjust his relations with his wife—who, after another two months, bore an heir to the title and estates of the family of Burlesdon. This lady was the Countess Amelia, whose picture my sister-in-law wished to remove from the drawing-room in Park Lane; and her husband was James, fifth Earl of Burlesdon and twenty-second Baron Rassendyll, both in the peerage of England, and a Knight of the Garter. As for Rudolf, he went back to Ruritania, married a wife, and ascended the throne, whereon his progeny in the direct line have sat from then till this very hour—with one short interval. And, finally, if you walk through the picture galleries at Burlesdon, among the fifty portraits or so of the last century and a half, you will find five or six, including that of the sixth earl, distinguished by long, sharp, straight noses and a quantity of dark-red hair; these five or six have also blue eyes, whereas among the Rassendylls dark eyes are the commoner. </blockquote>


Now I ask you. Is that sufficient to make the book "unsuitable for children"?

-DES
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-28 03:06:35 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
<snip stuff about Peter Pan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by d***@gmail.com
Although I recall reading an anecdote about a librarian who said that
_The Prisoner of Zenda_ was not suitable for children, because its
opening dealt with bastardy. (In the opening chapter it is said, but a
bit elliptically, that one of Rudolf Rassendyl's female ancestors had
had an affair with the then king of Ruritania, which is why his physical
appearance is so close to that of the about to be crowned king, thus
setting up the whole substitution plot.)
The anecdote would have been set a long time ago. Perhaps the 1920s? I am not sure.
Published in 1894; presumably set in a near-contemporary year.
And once you get a few generations back, there's no telling. I
forget where I read that after twelve hundred years or so, everybody
of European descent has Charlemagne as an ancestor somewhere.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
I think i was unclear. The anecdote was that sometime in the 1920s or
30s, a librarian alleged that the already classic book _The Prisoner of
Zenda_ was unsuitable for children because of its implication that the
protagonist was descended from the product of an extramarital affair.
I found the book at project Gutenberg, (see
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/95/95-h/95-h.htm) and here is the
<blockquote> ...in the year 1733, George II. sitting then on the throne,
peace reigning for the moment, and the King and the Prince of Wales
being not yet at loggerheads, there came on a visit to the English Court
a certain prince, who was afterwards known to history as Rudolf the
Third of Ruritania. The prince was a tall, handsome young fellow, marked
(maybe marred, it is not for me to say) by a somewhat unusually long,
sharp and straight nose, and a mass of dark-red hair—in fact, the nose
and the hair which have stamped the Elphbergs time out of mind. He
stayed some months in England, where he was most courteously received;
yet, in the end, he left rather under a cloud. For he fought a duel (it
was considered highly well bred of him to waive all question of his
rank) with a nobleman, well known in the society of the day, not only
for his own merits, but as the husband of a very beautiful wife. In that
duel Prince Rudolf received a severe wound, and, recovering therefrom,
was adroitly smuggled off by the Ruritanian ambassador, who had found
him a pretty handful. The nobleman was not wounded in the duel; but the
morning being raw and damp on the occasion of the meeting, he contracted
a severe chill, and, failing to throw it off, he died some six months
after the departure of Prince Rudolf, without having found leisure to
adjust his relations with his wife—who, after another two months, bore
an heir to the title and estates of the family of Burlesdon. This lady
was the Countess Amelia, whose picture my sister-in-law wished to remove
from the drawing-room in Park Lane; and her husband was James, fifth
Earl of Burlesdon and twenty-second Baron Rassendyll, both in the
peerage of England, and a Knight of the Garter. As for Rudolf, he went
back to Ruritania, married a wife, and ascended the throne, whereon his
progeny in the direct line have sat from then till this very hour—with
one short interval. And, finally, if you walk through the picture
galleries at Burlesdon, among the fifty portraits or so of the last
century and a half, you will find five or six, including that of the
sixth earl, distinguished by long, sharp, straight noses and a quantity
of dark-red hair; these five or six have also blue eyes, whereas among
the Rassendylls dark eyes are the commoner. </blockquote>
Now I ask you. Is that sufficient to make the book "unsuitable for children"?
It's a topic that an adult in 1920 would not want children asking
about. It's also a chunk of prose that a child would probably
not be able to wade through.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
William Hyde
2018-08-28 19:33:33 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had
been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved
her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling,
who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of
her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box,
and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.
If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
I must agree. While "box" can be a euphemism, it can also simply mean a
container or a division. In this case it seems that by "He got all of
her, except the innermost box" the author means that Mr Darling failed
to understand his wife's innermost nature, not that he didn't have sex
with her.
In any case, this is not the sort of reference that most people would be
worried about children encountering.
Although I recall reading an anecdote about a librarian who said that
_The Prisoner of Zenda_ was not suitable for children, because its
opening dealt with bastardy. (In the opening chapter it is said, but a
bit elliptically, that one of Rudolf Rassendyl's female ancestors had
had an affair with the then king of Ruritania, which is why his physical
appearance is so close to that of the about to be crowned king, thus
setting up the whole substitution plot.)
The anecdote would have been set a long time ago. Perhaps the 1920s? I am not sure.
Published in 1894; presumably set in a near-contemporary year.
And once you get a few generations back, there's no telling. I
forget where I read that after twelve hundred years or so, everybody
of European descent has Charlemagne as an ancestor somewhere.
I said it when I was fifteen. But it seems I was pre-empted by a few decades.

There went my chance for a non-dangerous Nicoll moment.

William Hyde
Dimensional Traveler
2018-08-28 19:55:26 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had
been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved
her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling,
who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of
her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box,
and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.
If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
I must agree. While "box" can be a euphemism, it can also simply mean a
container or a division. In this case it seems that by "He got all of
her, except the innermost box" the author means that Mr Darling failed
to understand his wife's innermost nature, not that he didn't have sex
with her.
In any case, this is not the sort of reference that most people would be
worried about children encountering.
Although I recall reading an anecdote about a librarian who said that
_The Prisoner of Zenda_ was not suitable for children, because its
opening dealt with bastardy. (In the opening chapter it is said, but a
bit elliptically, that one of Rudolf Rassendyl's female ancestors had
had an affair with the then king of Ruritania, which is why his physical
appearance is so close to that of the about to be crowned king, thus
setting up the whole substitution plot.)
The anecdote would have been set a long time ago. Perhaps the 1920s? I am not sure.
Published in 1894; presumably set in a near-contemporary year.
And once you get a few generations back, there's no telling. I
forget where I read that after twelve hundred years or so, everybody
of European descent has Charlemagne as an ancestor somewhere.
I said it when I was fifteen. But it seems I was pre-empted by a few decades.
There went my chance for a non-dangerous Nicoll moment.
Why does the word "Oxymoron" come to mind when reading that last sentence?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-27 22:09:25 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly early
on, a reference to female genitalia.
In *Barrie's* _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I didn't say it was particularly explicit... but I can provide the quote.
"The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss."
Methinks the reader doth project o'ermuch.
If you read the preceding paragraphs, the "innermost box" isn't a
physical thing, it's a mental one.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
I must agree. While "box" can be a euphemism, it can also simply mean a container or a division. In this case it seems that by "He got all of her, except the innermost box" the author means that Mr Darling failed to understand his wife's innermost nature, not that he didn't have sex with her.
Also, sometimes a box is just cigars.

<https://quoteinvestigator.com/2011/08/12/just-a-cigar/>;
TL;DR no.
Default User
2018-08-25 17:10:24 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
But then, there are _children's books_ which don't seem to belong
in the children's section of the library.
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly
early on, a reference to female genitalia.
In Barrie's _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I checked the public library to see if it had a e-book copy, but alas
only hardcopies.


Brian
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-08-25 18:42:01 UTC
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On Sat, 25 Aug 2018 17:10:24 -0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by Quadibloc
But then, there are _children's books_ which don't seem to belong
in the children's section of the library.
Thus, one day I opened up the book "Peter Pan", and saw, fairly
early on, a reference to female genitalia.
In Barrie's _Peter Pan_? I think you must be mistaken.
I checked the public library to see if it had a e-book copy, but alas
only hardcopies.
It's on Project Gutenberg. Pretty early one too.
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/16

Cheers - Jaimie
--
IIS is still popular in the public sector, where the two highest
priorities in IT are unfitness for purpose and high cost.
-- Tony Houghton
Default User
2018-08-25 22:06:48 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On Sat, 25 Aug 2018 17:10:24 -0000 (UTC), "Default User"
[Peter Pan]
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Default User
I checked the public library to see if it had a e-book copy, but
alas only hardcopies.
It's on Project Gutenberg. Pretty early one too.
Didn't even think about that. Sounds like the passage has already been
identified.


Brian
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-27 00:52:48 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-27 01:52:44 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
'Twas trite in that primeval dawn
When painting got its start
That a lady with her garments on
Is life, but is she Art?
By undraped nymphs
I am not wooed;
I'd rather painters painted food.
-- Ogden Nash
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Michael F. Stemper
2018-08-27 12:37:03 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
Is the title of the book in question a secret to be known only to
Facebook victims?
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
'Twas trite in that primeval dawn
When painting got its start
That a lady with her garments on
Is life, but is she Art?
By undraped nymphs
I am not wooed;
I'd rather painters painted food.
-- Ogden Nash
For Mr. Nash, two pieces which show that his is not an unheard-of
quirk:

"F---", by Richard Matheson, in which a time-traveller unwittingly
violates the mores of a future generation.
<http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?58477>

"The Brass God", by Keith Laumer, in which it's stated "[...] there's
an nspoken agreement among the cultured element that the stork brings
the goodies."
<http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?62871>
--
Michael F. Stemper
What happens if you play John Cage's "4'33" at a slower tempo?
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-27 19:34:23 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
Is the title of the book in question a secret to be known only to
Facebook victims?
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
'Twas trite in that primeval dawn
When painting got its start
That a lady with her garments on
Is life, but is she Art?
By undraped nymphs
I am not wooed;
I'd rather painters painted food.
-- Ogden Nash
For Mr. Nash, two pieces which show that his is not an unheard-of
"F---", by Richard Matheson, in which a time-traveller unwittingly
violates the mores of a future generation.
<http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?58477>
"The Brass God", by Keith Laumer, in which it's stated "[...] there's
an nspoken agreement among the cultured element that the stork brings
the goodies."
<http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?62871>
I did not catch the title of the book, only that there was a sketch of
scantily clad lady in the book that he was reading.

Lynn
Michael F. Stemper
2018-08-27 22:06:23 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Michael F. Stemper
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. 
His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.  His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
Is the title of the book in question a secret to be known only to
Facebook victims?
I did not catch the title of the book, only that there was a sketch of
scantily clad lady in the book that he was reading.
Okay, thanks.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Why doesn't anybody care about apathy?
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-27 22:29:32 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
I did not catch the title of the book, only that there was a sketch of
scantily clad lady in the book that he was reading.
Which tells us very little. Publishers know that if they can put
a naked or near-naked female on the cover of anything, it'll sell
better.

/thinks

Well, practically anything. I did a quick google and didn't
*see* any near-naked females on any edition of _Zen and the Art
of Motorcycle Maintenance._
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-27 23:03:00 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
I did not catch the title of the book, only that there was a sketch of
scantily clad lady in the book that he was reading.
Which tells us very little. Publishers know that if they can put
a naked or near-naked female on the cover of anything, it'll sell
better.
/thinks
Well, practically anything. I did a quick google and didn't
*see* any near-naked females on any edition of _Zen and the Art
of Motorcycle Maintenance._
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
This is "in" the book though.

In unrelated news, today I looked up the title
_Bimbo on the Cover_ because I just wondered
whether this would produce the book in question.
It pretty much did, but I learned it's also
(most of) a song title.
David Johnston
2018-08-28 03:01:27 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
I did not catch the title of the book, only that there was a sketch of
scantily clad lady in the book that he was reading.
Which tells us very little. Publishers know that if they can put
a naked or near-naked female on the cover of anything, it'll sell
better.
/thinks
Well, practically anything. I did a quick google and didn't
*see* any near-naked females on any edition of _Zen and the Art
of Motorcycle Maintenance._
Mighta sold better though.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-08-28 03:18:51 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
I did not catch the title of the book, only that there was a sketch of
scantily clad lady in the book that he was reading.
Which tells us very little. Publishers know that if they can put
a naked or near-naked female on the cover of anything, it'll sell
better.
/thinks
Well, practically anything. I did a quick google and didn't
*see* any near-naked females on any edition of _Zen and the Art
of Motorcycle Maintenance._
Mighta sold better though.
The movie could be "Zen & Hot Motorcycle Mamas".

Angie Dickinson to star..
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-28 03:11:28 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
I did not catch the title of the book, only that there was a sketch of
scantily clad lady in the book that he was reading.
Which tells us very little. Publishers know that if they can put
a naked or near-naked female on the cover of anything, it'll sell
better.
/thinks
Well, practically anything. I did a quick google and didn't
*see* any near-naked females on any edition of _Zen and the Art
of Motorcycle Maintenance._
Mighta sold better though.
I was under the impression that it sold pretty well, back in its
day. But I can't find any review that lowers itself to mention
sales; it's all about philosophy.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2018-08-28 23:15:22 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
I did not catch the title of the book, only that there was a sketch of
scantily clad lady in the book that he was reading.
Which tells us very little. Publishers know that if they can put
a naked or near-naked female on the cover of anything, it'll sell
better.
/thinks
Well, practically anything. I did a quick google and didn't
*see* any near-naked females on any edition of _Zen and the Art
of Motorcycle Maintenance._
Mighta sold better though.
I was under the impression that it sold pretty well, back in its
day. But I can't find any review that lowers itself to mention
sales; it's all about philosophy.
According to wiki it sold at least 5 million copies. According to
Amazon it's #39000 overall, #38 in Zen Philosophy and also in Road
Travel, and #107 in Writing/Travel.
David Johnston
2018-08-27 03:41:01 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.  His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
   https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
Lynn
What was the book?
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-27 21:23:39 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview.
His teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.
His dad came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is
literature".
    https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
Lynn
What was the book?
Sorry, I did not catch that title.

Lynn
Robert Woodward
2018-08-27 05:21:08 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-27 05:35:34 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live. Maybe the
last ten minutes.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2018-08-28 00:15:17 UTC
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On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live. Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes. The book is Defoe's "Roxana: The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-28 22:14:16 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live. Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes. The book is Defoe's "Roxana: The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks ! This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking. I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.

Lynn
Dimensional Traveler
2018-08-28 22:21:26 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.  His
dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on. :D

Best wishes.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-28 22:30:08 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.
His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on.  :D
Best wishes.
When my wife had a mastectomy for breast cancer 13 years ago, we wrote
yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie. But, I only have
one heart.

Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-28 22:35:37 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.
His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on.  :D
Best wishes.
yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie. But, I only have
one heart.
In Joe Haldeman's _The Long Habit of Living_, a patient
in long and complicated surgery gets basically a zipper
put on there. Temporarily. So you could... no.
You probably won't want your surgeon to laugh.
Even giggle.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-08-28 22:54:02 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the
Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belon
g-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic"
book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019
181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it,
you should give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's
"Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on
Thursday and am getting ready for it with tests and mental
"you can do this" thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests
today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed
to be operating on.  :D
Best wishes.
When my wife had a mastectomy for breast cancer 13 years ago, we
wrote yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie.
But, I only have one heart.
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye gets
poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker, especially on
the face.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-28 23:34:20 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belon
g-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic"
book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019
181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it,
you should give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's
"Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on
Thursday and am getting ready for it with tests and mental
"you can do this" thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests
today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed
to be operating on.  :D
Best wishes.
When my wife had a mastectomy for breast cancer 13 years ago, we
wrote yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie.
But, I only have one heart.
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye gets
poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker, especially on
the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the appropriate
eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one. (Note I don't
say "right one" in either case, because it was the left.)

The process consisted of about three hours lying in a recliner
having innumerable drops dropped into the eye, and ten minutes on
the operating table.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-08-29 06:07:40 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-bel
on g-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic"
book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography,
that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/20751900
19 181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite
it, you should give the timestamp for the passage in
question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's
"Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery
on Thursday and am getting ready for it with tests and
mental "you can do this" thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE
tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are
supposed to be operating on.  :D
Best wishes.
When my wife had a mastectomy for breast cancer 13 years ago,
we wrote yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie.
But, I only have one heart.
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye
gets poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker,
especially on the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the appropriate
eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one. (Note I don't
say "right one" in either case, because it was the left.)
Drew with what? As I said, I prefer an easily removable sticker to
magic marker.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
The process consisted of about three hours lying in a recliner
having innumerable drops dropped into the eye, and ten minutes
on the operating table.
I'm only getting injections at this point. Cataract surgery is on
the horizon, but probably several years away, at least. (And
possibly indefinitely away, since the beginnings of the cataracts
are likely diabetes related, and since that's under control, they
haven't changed. Yet.)
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-29 13:13:50 UTC
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Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye
gets poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker,
especially on the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the appropriate
eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one. (Note I don't
say "right one" in either case, because it was the left.)
Drew with what? As I said, I prefer an easily removable sticker to
magic marker.
I don't know with what, but I just looked in the mirror and it
isn't there any more. So probably with something less permanent
than magic markers. (I have a ten-year-old grandson; he's gotten
out of the keep-the-markers-away-from-him stage, but the
memories, and the marks, linger on.)
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
The process consisted of about three hours lying in a recliner
having innumerable drops dropped into the eye, and ten minutes
on the operating table.
I'm only getting injections at this point. Cataract surgery is on
the horizon, but probably several years away, at least. (And
possibly indefinitely away, since the beginnings of the cataracts
are likely diabetes related, and since that's under control, they
haven't changed. Yet.)
Well, the better care you take care of your diabetes, the better
all round.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-08-29 18:40:04 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye
gets poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker,
especially on the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the appropriate
eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one. (Note I
don't say "right one" in either case, because it was the
left.)
Drew with what? As I said, I prefer an easily removable sticker
to magic marker.
I don't know with what, but I just looked in the mirror and it
isn't there any more. So probably with something less permanent
than magic markers.
Could be worse, then. I'm guessing you were unconscious, too, so I
guess something less likely to come loose was preferable.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
(I have a ten-year-old grandson; he's gotten
out of the keep-the-markers-away-from-him stage, but the
memories, and the marks, linger on.)
Don't get me started on children.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
The process consisted of about three hours lying in a recliner
having innumerable drops dropped into the eye, and ten minutes
on the operating table.
I'm only getting injections at this point. Cataract surgery is
on the horizon, but probably several years away, at least. (And
possibly indefinitely away, since the beginnings of the
cataracts are likely diabetes related, and since that's under
control, they haven't changed. Yet.)
Well, the better care you take care of your diabetes, the better
all round.
That is entirely true. At least I'm down to every other month now.
(And the guy doing it is a world renowned researcher in the field,
who literally wrote the textbook for some of the procedures, so
I'm in good hands. Still wouldn't recommend "getting drugs
injected directly into the eyeball" as a fun vacation activity,
though.)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-08-29 20:25:16 UTC
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Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye
gets poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker,
especially on the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the
appropriate eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one.
(Note I don't say "right one" in either case, because it
was the left.)
Drew with what? As I said, I prefer an easily removable
sticker to magic marker.
I don't know with what, but I just looked in the mirror and it
isn't there any more. So probably with something less
permanent than magic markers.
Could be worse, then. I'm guessing you were unconscious, too, so
I guess something less likely to come loose was preferable.
On the contrary, I was conscious throughout. As I said upthread
somewhere, three hours on a recliner getting innumerable drops,
ten minues on the operating table looking at assorted blinking
lights and amorphous shapes, and then back to the recliner.
They did put an IV needle in my arm, just in case, but I don't
think they ever attached anything to it.
Well, that sounds like fun.
....
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the better care you take care of your diabetes, the
better all round.
That is entirely true. At least I'm down to every other month
now. (And the guy doing it is a world renowned researcher in the
field, who literally wrote the textbook for some of the
procedures, so I'm in good hands. Still wouldn't recommend
"getting drugs injected directly into the eyeball" as a fun
vacation activity, though.)
No - o - o.
At least he's competent at his beside (or chairside, as the case
may be) manner.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-08-29 10:33:11 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
When my wife had a mastectomy for breast cancer 13 years ago, we
wrote yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie.
But, I only have one heart.
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye gets
poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker, especially on
the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the appropriate
eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one. (Note I don't
say "right one" in either case, because it was the left.)
Terminology and even symbology can be confusing. An X beside the
appropriate eye may be interpreted as "not this one". Even Lynn's "yes"
and "no" could be read as "yes keep this one" or "yes take this one"

A friend showed me his brother's entry to theatre with "DON'T REMOVE
THIS ONE" written on one leg in large letters. That seemed pretty hard
to get wrong.

English as she is spoke. Terrible language.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
To every complex problem there is a solution which is simple, neat and wrong.
-- HL Mencken
Leif Roar Moldskred
2018-08-29 11:58:46 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
A friend showed me his brother's entry to theatre with "DON'T REMOVE
THIS ONE" written on one leg in large letters. That seemed pretty hard
to get wrong.
Unless "DON'T" get smudged or hidden somehow.
--
Leif Roar Moldskred
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-08-29 12:11:38 UTC
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Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
A friend showed me his brother's entry to theatre with "DON'T REMOVE
THIS ONE" written on one leg in large letters. That seemed pretty hard
to get wrong.
Unless "DON'T" get smudged or hidden somehow.
Or his hospital underwear covers the DON'T. Sigh. Chopping off the right
limb is *hard*.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"I'd tried caffeine a few times; it made me believe I was focused and
energetic, but it turned my judgment to shit. Widespread use of
caffeine explains a lot about the twentieth century."
- "Distress", Greg Egan
Leif Roar Moldskred
2018-08-29 12:42:18 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Or his hospital underwear covers the DON'T. Sigh. Chopping off the right
limb is *hard*.
Let's say the _correct_ limb, just in case.
--
Leif Roar Moldskred
You want the right limb to be left, after all.
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-08-29 13:04:20 UTC
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Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Or his hospital underwear covers the DON'T. Sigh. Chopping off the right
limb is *hard*.
Let's say the _correct_ limb, just in case.
--
Leif Roar Moldskred
You want the right limb to be left, after all.
Badum-tish! Ever considered a career in writing pre-surgery checklists?

Cheers - Jaimie
--
There he saw Merry's feet still sticking out - the rest had already been
drawn further inside. Tom put his mouth to the crack and began singing
into it in a low voice. They could not catch the words, but evidently
Merry was aroused. -- J R R Tolkien
Gene Wirchenko
2018-08-30 23:05:24 UTC
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Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Or his hospital underwear covers the DON'T. Sigh. Chopping off the right
limb is *hard*.
Let's say the _correct_ limb, just in case.
The right-left and right-wrong confusion is probably the first
thing that I would correct if I were put in charge of the English
language.

I would want to be paid hourly. There is too much to correct on
fixed quote.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Leif Roar Moldskred
2018-08-31 02:18:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
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Post by Gene Wirchenko
Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Or his hospital underwear covers the DON'T. Sigh. Chopping off the right
limb is *hard*.
Let's say the _correct_ limb, just in case.
The right-left and right-wrong confusion is probably the first
thing that I would correct if I were put in charge of the English
language.
I would want to be paid hourly. There is too much to correct on
fixed quote.
Sincerely,
Gene Wirchenko
'Pham Nuwen spent years learning to program/explore. Programming went
back to the beginning of time. It was a little like the midden out back
of his father’s castle. Where the creek had worn that away, ten meters
down, there were the crumpled hulks of machines—flying machines,
the peasants said—from the great days of Canberra’s original colonial
era. But the castle midden was clean and fresh compared to what lay
within the Reprise’s local net. There were programs here that had been
written five thousand years ago, before Humankind ever left Earth.
The wonder of it—the horror of it, Sura said—was that unlike the useless
wrecks of Canberra’s past, these programs still worked! And via a million
million circuitous threads of inheritance, many of the oldest programs
still ran in the bowels of the Qeng Ho system. Take the Traders’ method
of timekeeping. The frame corrections were incredibly complex—and down at
the very bottom of it was a little program that ran a counter. Second by
second, the Qeng Ho counted from the instant that a human had first set
foot on Old Earth’s moon. But if you looked at it still more closely...
the starting instant was actually some hundred million seconds later,
the 0-second of one of Humankind’s first computer operating systems.

So behind all the top-level interfaces was layer under layer of support.
Some of that software had been designed for wildly different situations.
Every so often, the inconsistencies caused fatal accidents. Despite the
romance of spaceflight, the most common accidents were simply caused by
ancient, misused programs finally getting their revenge.

“We should rewrite it all,” said Pham.

“It’s been done,” said Sura, not looking up. She was preparing to go
off-Watch, and had spent the last four days trying to root a problem
out of the coldsleep automation.

“It’s been tried,” corrected Bret, just back from the freezers. “But even
the top levels of fleet system code are enormous. You and a thousand of
your friends would have to work for a century or so to reproduce it.”
Trinli grinned evilly. “And guess what—even if you did, by the time you
finished, you’d have your own set of inconsistencies. And you still
wouldn’t be consistent with all the applications that might be needed
now and then.”'
-- Vernor Vinge, *A Deepness in the Sky*
--
Leif Roar Moldskred
And let's not even talk about the Y10K problem!
David DeLaney
2018-08-31 14:55:30 UTC
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Post by Gene Wirchenko
Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Or his hospital underwear covers the DON'T. Sigh. Chopping off the right
limb is *hard*.
Let's say the _correct_ limb, just in case.
The right-left and right-wrong confusion is probably the first
thing that I would correct if I were put in charge of the English
language.
Is this where I ask for examples of SF involving left-right reversal, usually
but not always involving The Fourth Dimension?

dave, i'll start off with _Alice_
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-30 01:38:35 UTC
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Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
A friend showed me his brother's entry to theatre with "DON'T REMOVE
THIS ONE" written on one leg in large letters. That seemed pretty hard
to get wrong.
Unless "DON'T" get smudged or hidden somehow.
--
Leif Roar Moldskred
"GOOD" on one, a drawing of a saw on the other?

"WALK" and "DON'T WALK"?
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-29 13:16:42 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
When my wife had a mastectomy for breast cancer 13 years ago, we
wrote yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie.
But, I only have one heart.
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye gets
poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker, especially on
the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the appropriate
eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one. (Note I don't
say "right one" in either case, because it was the left.)
Terminology and even symbology can be confusing. An X beside the
appropriate eye may be interpreted as "not this one". Even Lynn's "yes"
and "no" could be read as "yes keep this one" or "yes take this one"
A friend showed me his brother's entry to theatre with "DON'T REMOVE
THIS ONE" written on one leg in large letters. That seemed pretty hard
to get wrong.
English as she is spoke. Terrible language.
Sloppy language, what with losing all its inflectional endings
about a millennium ago, massive admixtures of vocabulary from
everywhere else (vide Nicoll), and the fact that any noun can be
verbed. On the other hand, flexible as a rubber snake, which can
be useful.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-29 20:33:41 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
When my wife had a mastectomy for breast cancer 13 years ago, we
wrote yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie.
But, I only have one heart.
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye gets
poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker, especially on
the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the appropriate
eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one. (Note I don't
say "right one" in either case, because it was the left.)
Terminology and even symbology can be confusing. An X beside the
appropriate eye may be interpreted as "not this one". Even Lynn's "yes"
and "no" could be read as "yes keep this one" or "yes take this one"
A friend showed me his brother's entry to theatre with "DON'T REMOVE
THIS ONE" written on one leg in large letters. That seemed pretty hard
to get wrong.
English as she is spoke. Terrible language.
Sloppy language, what with losing all its inflectional endings
about a millennium ago, massive admixtures of vocabulary from
everywhere else (vide Nicoll), and the fact that any noun can be
verbed. On the other hand, flexible as a rubber snake, which can
be useful.
The image of English as a rubber snake is cute, and true. Sounds worthy
of a new saying from James Nicoll.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-29 20:50:20 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
When my wife had a mastectomy for breast cancer 13 years ago, we
wrote yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie.
But, I only have one heart.
My opthamologist uses stick-on circles to indicate which eye gets
poked with a needle. I prefer that to magic marker, especially on
the face.
Mine, on the other hand, just drew an X beside the appropriate
eye. It must've worked; he got the correct one. (Note I don't
say "right one" in either case, because it was the left.)
Terminology and even symbology can be confusing. An X beside the
appropriate eye may be interpreted as "not this one". Even Lynn's "yes"
and "no" could be read as "yes keep this one" or "yes take this one"
A friend showed me his brother's entry to theatre with "DON'T REMOVE
THIS ONE" written on one leg in large letters. That seemed pretty hard
to get wrong.
English as she is spoke. Terrible language.
Sloppy language, what with losing all its inflectional endings
about a millennium ago, massive admixtures of vocabulary from
everywhere else (vide Nicoll), and the fact that any noun can be
verbed. On the other hand, flexible as a rubber snake, which can
be useful.
The image of English as a rubber snake is cute, and true. Sounds worthy
of a new saying from James Nicoll.
Awwww, thanks.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2018-08-28 23:17:29 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Tue, 28 Aug 2018 17:30:08 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.
His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on.  :D
Best wishes.
yes and the right and no on the left using a sharpie. But, I only have
one heart.
In any case, I hope all goes well.
Titus G
2018-08-29 04:56:18 UTC
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On 29/08/18 10:30, Lynn McGuire wrote:
snip
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
snip
An acquaintance recently underwent marathon heart surgery but he knows
nothing about it of course and is now happily recovering as I am sure
you will be on Friday. All the best.
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-28 22:30:40 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.  His
dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on. :D
Best wishes.
Likewise; I was about to say "surely you get someone else
to do this?"
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-28 22:32:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.  His
dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall bladder
out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the gurney and
this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello, I'm Doctor
So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist. In a couple of
minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in
there, and do you know what we're going to do?"

(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he had
the right patient and the right organ.)

"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."

The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
Post by James Nicoll
Best wishes.
Ditto.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-08-28 23:12:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the
Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-th
e-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic"
book.  His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019
181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it,
you should give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's
"Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on
Thursday and am getting ready for it with tests and mental
"you can do this" thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests
today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed
to be operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall bladder
out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the gurney and
this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello, I'm Doctor
So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist. In a couple
of minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in
there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he had
the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
As long as the doctor doesn't show up with an ice cream scoop and a
squeeze bottle of chocolate syrup . . .
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-28 23:35:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-th
e-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic"
book.  His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019
181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it,
you should give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's
"Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on
Thursday and am getting ready for it with tests and mental
"you can do this" thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests
today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed
to be operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall bladder
out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the gurney and
this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello, I'm Doctor
So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist. In a couple
of minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in
there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he had
the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
As long as the doctor doesn't show up with an ice cream scoop and a
squeeze bottle of chocolate syrup . . .
Heh. He didn't have one with him while we were talking. I have
no idea what he had while I was under anesthesia.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-08-29 06:08:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-
th e-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic"
book.  His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography,
that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/20751900
19 181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite
it, you should give the timestamp for the passage in
question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's
"Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery
on Thursday and am getting ready for it with tests and
mental "you can do this" thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE
tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed
to be operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall
bladder out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the
gurney and this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello,
I'm Doctor So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist.
In a couple of minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll
wheel you in there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he
had the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out
my gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
As long as the doctor doesn't show up with an ice cream scoop
and a squeeze bottle of chocolate syrup . . .
Heh. He didn't have one with him while we were talking. I have
no idea what he had while I was under anesthesia.
I had a roommate who was undergoing radiation for brain cancer that
took great pride in grossing the radiology nurse out with that
joke. (And she *immediately* had to go tell all the rest of the
nurses, because that was a new one.)
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-29 13:25:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-
th e-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic"
book.  His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography,
that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/20751900
19 181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite
it, you should give the timestamp for the passage in
question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's
"Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery
on Thursday and am getting ready for it with tests and
mental "you can do this" thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE
tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed
to be operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall
bladder out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the
gurney and this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello,
I'm Doctor So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist.
In a couple of minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll
wheel you in there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he
had the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out
my gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
As long as the doctor doesn't show up with an ice cream scoop
and a squeeze bottle of chocolate syrup . . .
Heh. He didn't have one with him while we were talking. I have
no idea what he had while I was under anesthesia.
I had a roommate who was undergoing radiation for brain cancer that
took great pride in grossing the radiology nurse out with that
joke. (And she *immediately* had to go tell all the rest of the
nurses, because that was a new one.)
Go, him! Was the treatment successful? Did he recover?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-29 19:22:29 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-i
n- th e-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live
facebook interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a
"pornographic" book.  His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography,
that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/207519
00 19 181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite
it, you should give the timestamp for the passage in
question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's
"Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery
on Thursday and am getting ready for it with tests and
mental "you can do this" thinking.  I passed my CTA and
TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are
supposed to be operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall
bladder out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the
gurney and this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello,
I'm Doctor So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist.
In a couple of minutes, when an operating room opens up,
we'll wheel you in there, and do you know what we're going
to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he
had the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack
out my gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the
usual term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general
idea."
As long as the doctor doesn't show up with an ice cream scoop
and a squeeze bottle of chocolate syrup . . .
Heh. He didn't have one with him while we were talking. I
have no idea what he had while I was under anesthesia.
I had a roommate who was undergoing radiation for brain cancer
that took great pride in grossing the radiology nurse out with
that joke. (And she *immediately* had to go tell all the rest of
the nurses, because that was a new one.)
Go, him! Was the treatment successful? Did he recover?
Sadly, no. He beat the two year average by six months, nearly all
of which was pretty normal living, but with that type of brain
cancer, you know how you're going to die.
(The nurses adored him, though, because he was always so cheerful
and had as black a sense of humor as theirs.)
Sorry to hear it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-08-29 20:26:08 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong
-i n- th e-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live
facebook interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a
"pornographic" book.  His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not
pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075
19 00 19 181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to
cite it, you should give the timestamp for the
passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was
live.  Maybe the last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is
Defoe's "Roxana:  The Fortunate Mistress", written in
1724.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart
surgery on Thursday and am getting ready for it with
tests and mental "you can do this" thinking.  I passed
my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are
supposed to be operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall
bladder out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on
the gurney and this green-clad doctor comes up and says,
"Hello, I'm Doctor So-and-so, I'm going to be your
anesthesiologist. In a couple of minutes, when an
operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in there, and do
you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure
he had the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack
out my gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the
usual term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general
idea."
As long as the doctor doesn't show up with an ice cream
scoop and a squeeze bottle of chocolate syrup . . .
Heh. He didn't have one with him while we were talking. I
have no idea what he had while I was under anesthesia.
I had a roommate who was undergoing radiation for brain cancer
that took great pride in grossing the radiology nurse out with
that joke. (And she *immediately* had to go tell all the rest
of the nurses, because that was a new one.)
Go, him! Was the treatment successful? Did he recover?
Sadly, no. He beat the two year average by six months, nearly
all of which was pretty normal living, but with that type of
brain cancer, you know how you're going to die.
(The nurses adored him, though, because he was always so
cheerful and had as black a sense of humor as theirs.)
Sorry to hear it.
There are more greusome ways to go, but not many.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Greg Goss
2018-08-29 14:09:33 UTC
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Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
As long as the doctor doesn't show up with an ice cream scoop and a
squeeze bottle of chocolate syrup . . .
My sister in law refers to her epilepsy treatment as "the
mellon-baller approach". I have no idea how liiteral that was.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-08-29 18:44:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
As long as the doctor doesn't show up with an ice cream scoop
and a squeeze bottle of chocolate syrup . . .
My sister in law refers to her epilepsy treatment as "the
mellon-baller approach". I have no idea how liiteral that was.
Hard to say, but it could be disturbingly literal.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-08-28 23:38:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.  His
dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall bladder
out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the gurney and
this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello, I'm Doctor
So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist. In a couple of
minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in
there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he had
the right patient and the right organ.)
Also that the patient was coherent enough to give informed consent. If
you had started crying about how your daughter had brought you here and
no one was telling you what was going on he'd know there was a problem. :)
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
Post by James Nicoll
Best wishes.
Ditto.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-28 23:42:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.Â
His
dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.Â
Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:Â
The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on.  :D
They are fairly careful about that.  When I had my gall bladder
out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the gurney and
this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello, I'm Doctor
So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist.  In a couple of
minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in
there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he had
the right patient and the right organ.)
Also that the patient was coherent enough to give informed consent.  If
you had started crying about how your daughter had brought you here and
no one was telling you what was going on he'd know there was a problem.  :)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool.  "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
Post by James Nicoll
Best wishes.
Ditto.
Everyone was asking me my birth date today while looking at my wrist id
which had it on it. Just another form of validation.

Lynn
Kevrob
2018-08-29 01:56:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.  His
dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall bladder
out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the gurney and
this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello, I'm Doctor
So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist. In a couple of
minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in
there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he had
the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
They mostly do that via laparoscopy, now, so less hacking.

After artificial hearts, livers, kidneys, and more
glamorous organs are perfected, I hope gall bladder
substitutes can be created.

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-29 03:52:33 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
They mostly do that via laparoscopy, now, so less hacking.
In fact, I was not hacked. They went in through my navel (this
was in 1997) and the only visible marks on me were two little
punctures on my abdomen where drains were inserted. After they
came out, it looked as if I had been fanged by a hobbit vampire
who couldn't reach any higher.
Post by Kevrob
After artificial hearts, livers, kidneys, and more
glamorous organs are perfected, I hope gall bladder
substitutes can be created.
That's probably lower priority than the items you name above,
since you can do *without* your gall bladder.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2018-08-29 17:24:38 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
They mostly do that via laparoscopy, now, so less hacking.
In fact, I was not hacked. They went in through my navel (this
was in 1997) and the only visible marks on me were two little
punctures on my abdomen where drains were inserted. After they
came out, it looked as if I had been fanged by a hobbit vampire
who couldn't reach any higher.
That's an apt description.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
After artificial hearts, livers, kidneys, and more
glamorous organs are perfected, I hope gall bladder
substitutes can be created.
That's probably lower priority than the items you name above,
since you can do *without* your gall bladder.
Oh, yes, which is why GBs are further down the "we need these,
STAT" list. Quality of life with a healthy gall bladder is
higher than without one, but QoL without a gall bladder is
superior to trying to live with a sick one. An infected GB
will kill you if not treated, and AIUI, nonsurgical treatment
is only helpful in a small percentage of cases of gallstones.

Kevin R
J. Clarke
2018-08-30 01:33:45 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
They mostly do that via laparoscopy, now, so less hacking.
In fact, I was not hacked. They went in through my navel (this
was in 1997) and the only visible marks on me were two little
punctures on my abdomen where drains were inserted. After they
came out, it looked as if I had been fanged by a hobbit vampire
who couldn't reach any higher.
That's an apt description.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
After artificial hearts, livers, kidneys, and more
glamorous organs are perfected, I hope gall bladder
substitutes can be created.
That's probably lower priority than the items you name above,
since you can do *without* your gall bladder.
Oh, yes, which is why GBs are further down the "we need these,
STAT" list. Quality of life with a healthy gall bladder is
higher than without one, but QoL without a gall bladder is
superior to trying to live with a sick one. An infected GB
will kill you if not treated, and AIUI, nonsurgical treatment
is only helpful in a small percentage of cases of gallstones.
I haven't missed mine at all.
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2018-08-30 02:18:22 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Wed, 29 Aug 2018 21:33:45 -0400, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
They mostly do that via laparoscopy, now, so less hacking.
In fact, I was not hacked. They went in through my navel (this
was in 1997) and the only visible marks on me were two little
punctures on my abdomen where drains were inserted. After they
came out, it looked as if I had been fanged by a hobbit vampire
who couldn't reach any higher.
That's an apt description.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
After artificial hearts, livers, kidneys, and more
glamorous organs are perfected, I hope gall bladder
substitutes can be created.
That's probably lower priority than the items you name above,
since you can do *without* your gall bladder.
Oh, yes, which is why GBs are further down the "we need these,
STAT" list. Quality of life with a healthy gall bladder is
higher than without one, but QoL without a gall bladder is
superior to trying to live with a sick one. An infected GB
will kill you if not treated, and AIUI, nonsurgical treatment
is only helpful in a small percentage of cases of gallstones.
I haven't missed mine at all.
Likewise. I'm very glad it's gone.

(Though it would have been nice if the surgery had been laporoscopic.
It was supposed to be, but when they got the little camera in there
and discovered that I didn't have a gall bladder anymore so much as a
mess of scattered scar tissue that used to be one... well, that's
where I got this seven-inch scar.)
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
My latest novel is Stone Unturned: A Legend of Ethshar.
See http://www.ethshar.com/StoneUnturned.shtml
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-29 20:35:43 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook
interview.  His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.  His
dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live.  Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes.  The book is Defoe's "Roxana:  The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Lynn
Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Make sure the surgeon knows what part of you they are supposed to be
operating on. :D
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall bladder
out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the gurney and
this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello, I'm Doctor
So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist. In a couple of
minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in
there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he had
the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
They mostly do that via laparoscopy, now, so less hacking.
After artificial hearts, livers, kidneys, and more
glamorous organs are perfected, I hope gall bladder
substitutes can be created.
Kevin R
Watch the movie "Repo Men" about the artificial organ business in 2050.
https://www.amazon.com/Repo-Men-Unrated-Blu-ray-Jude/dp/B002ZG98TG/

Lynn
Scott Lurndal
2018-08-29 13:30:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
They are fairly careful about that. When I had my gall bladder
out, back in the nineties, there I was lying on the gurney and
this green-clad doctor comes up and says, "Hello, I'm Doctor
So-and-so, I'm going to be your anesthesiologist. In a couple of
minutes, when an operating room opens up, we'll wheel you in
there, and do you know what we're going to do?"
(This was not as silly as it sounded; he was making sure he had
the right patient and the right organ.)
"Well," I said, "as I understand it, you're going to hack out my
gall bladder."
The doctor nearly lost his cool. "Well," said he, "the usual
term is 'surgically remove,' but that's the general idea."
A doctor (Dr. Doty) in Los Gatos was a pioneer of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy
not to long after that - much less recovery time for gall bladder
removal, with two simple 1/2" incisions into the abdomen.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-08-28 22:29:30 UTC
Reply
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Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live. Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes. The book is Defoe's "Roxana: The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Thanks ! This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking. I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Best of luck.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-28 23:36:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by James Nicoll
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 00:35:34 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-sect
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
ion-of-the-library/
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview. His
teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book. His dad
came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
That video is 55 minutes long; if you are going to cite it, you should
give the timestamp for the passage in question.
I only caught the end of the video myself while it was live. Maybe the
last ten minutes.
It is at approximately 48 minutes. The book is Defoe's "Roxana: The
Fortunate Mistress", written in 1724.
Thanks ! This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking. I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Best of luck.
Thanks to all !

Lynn
Michael F. Stemper
2018-08-29 12:33:32 UTC
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Thanks !  This week is just crazy as I have heart surgery on Thursday
and am getting ready for it with tests and mental "you can do this"
thinking.  I passed my CTA and TEE tests today so Thursday is a go.
Good luck!
--
Michael F. Stemper
Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.
Default User
2018-08-27 05:24:29 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
Post by Lynn McGuire
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview.
His teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.
His dad came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is
literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
A time code would be helpful with a 51 minute video.


Brian
Kevrob
2018-08-27 05:27:03 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
Post by Lynn McGuire
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview.
His teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.
His dad came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is
literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
A time code would be helpful with a 51 minute video.
Brian
..and a summary for those of us who don't bother
with Farcebook.

Kevin R
Lynn McGuire
2018-08-27 21:29:05 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by James Nicoll
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by James Nicoll
SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids Section of the Library
https://www.tor.com/2018/08/21/sf-books-that-did-not-belong-in-the-kids-section-of-the-library/
Post by Lynn McGuire
David Weber talked about this today in his live facebook interview.
His teacher sent him to the principal about a "pornographic" book.
His dad came to the school and said, "that's not pornography, that is
literature".
https://www.facebook.com/david.weber.5621/videos/2075190019181290/
A time code would be helpful with a 51 minute video.
Brian
..and a summary for those of us who don't bother
with Farcebook.
Kevin R
I only caught the last ten minutes. It was interesting seeing that his
"office" appears to be an old utility room with a microwave and a sink.
And the continuous technical difficulties were funny.

David Weber also talked about future book plans. He wants to write a
ten book series in the Dahak world but does not have the time. He and
John Ringo are writing a fifth book in the "Empire Of Man" series but he
has yet to reply to Ringo's outline. He wants to write another Fury
book. Etc, etc, etc.

Lynn
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