Discussion:
YASID Crime and Colour.
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Titus G
2018-06-06 04:09:43 UTC
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On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
Butch Malahide
2018-06-06 06:45:13 UTC
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Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
They didn't even tell you if it was a novel or a short story or a
television episode or a stage play or a comic book? No idea what
language it was in or what century it's from? At least we know it's
fiction, right?
Titus G
2018-06-06 07:00:32 UTC
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Post by Butch Malahide
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
They didn't even tell you if it was a novel or a short story or a
television episode or a stage play or a comic book? No idea what
language it was in or what century it's from? At least we know it's
fiction, right?
Sorry. Yes, it was a novel, a paperback in English.
(I just assume that anything here is about books because that is where
MY interest is.)
Bill Gill
2018-06-06 13:18:31 UTC
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Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
In "Kabumpo in Oz" by Ruth Dudley Thompson there was a Chief Dipper.
His job was to punish people by dipping them in a well where the
water was dark blue. They came out colored blue and it took some
time for the color to wear off.

Bill
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2018-06-06 19:43:45 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
In "Kabumpo in Oz" by Ruth Dudley Thompson there was a Chief Dipper.
His job was to punish people by dipping them in a well where the
water was dark blue. They came out colored blue and it took some
time for the color to wear off.
Ruth Plumly Thompson.

(Fantasy writer Phyllis Ann Karr was (and probably still is) a huge
fan of Thompson's Oz books; she once won a convention masquerade as
Kabumpo.)
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
My latest novel is Stone Unturned: A Legend of Ethshar.
See http://www.ethshar.com/StoneUnturned.shtml
Bill Gill
2018-06-06 22:29:59 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Bill Gill
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
In "Kabumpo in Oz" by Ruth Dudley Thompson there was a Chief Dipper.
His job was to punish people by dipping them in a well where the
water was dark blue. They came out colored blue and it took some
time for the color to wear off.
Ruth Plumly Thompson.
(Fantasy writer Phyllis Ann Karr was (and probably still is) a huge
fan of Thompson's Oz books; she once won a convention masquerade as
Kabumpo.)
Thompson really did a good job of carrying on the OZ
that was created by Baum. I think I have all of them from
when they were reprinted in the late 70s and early 80s, and
still reread them occasionally.

I'm not sure how you would dress as Kabumpo, but it sounds
wonderful.

Bill
Robert Carnegie
2018-06-07 20:09:56 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Bill Gill
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
In "Kabumpo in Oz" by Ruth Dudley Thompson there was a Chief Dipper.
His job was to punish people by dipping them in a well where the
water was dark blue. They came out colored blue and it took some
time for the color to wear off.
Ruth Plumly Thompson.
(Fantasy writer Phyllis Ann Karr was (and probably still is) a huge
fan of Thompson's Oz books; she once won a convention masquerade as
Kabumpo.)
Thompson really did a good job of carrying on the OZ
that was created by Baum. I think I have all of them from
when they were reprinted in the late 70s and early 80s, and
still reread them occasionally.
I'm not sure how you would dress as Kabumpo, but it sounds
wonderful.
But the crime is a little less likely to be rape or
murder...... the Wicked Witch of the West tried to
murder Dorothy's friends, and got most of them.
She got dunked for that...
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2018-06-08 04:16:09 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Bill Gill
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
In "Kabumpo in Oz" by Ruth Dudley Thompson there was a Chief Dipper.
His job was to punish people by dipping them in a well where the
water was dark blue. They came out colored blue and it took some
time for the color to wear off.
Ruth Plumly Thompson.
(Fantasy writer Phyllis Ann Karr was (and probably still is) a huge
fan of Thompson's Oz books; she once won a convention masquerade as
Kabumpo.)
Thompson really did a good job of carrying on the OZ
that was created by Baum.
Did she get significantly better than she was in _The Royal Book of
Oz_? Because that one was really very badly "off" in many ways. I can
re-read all of Baum's originals with only occasional stumbles, but that
one I won't even read to my kids.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Bill Gill
2018-06-08 13:19:51 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Bill Gill
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
In "Kabumpo in Oz" by Ruth Dudley Thompson there was a Chief Dipper.
His job was to punish people by dipping them in a well where the
water was dark blue.  They came out colored blue and it took some
time for the color to wear off.
Ruth Plumly Thompson.
(Fantasy writer Phyllis Ann Karr was (and probably still is) a huge
fan of Thompson's Oz books; she once won a convention masquerade as
Kabumpo.)
Thompson really did a good job of carrying on the OZ
that was created by Baum.
    Did she get significantly better than she was in _The Royal Book of
Oz_? Because that one was really very badly "off" in many ways. I can
re-read all of Baum's originals with only occasional stumbles, but that
one I won't even read to my kids.
I will say that "The Royal Book of Oz" isn't one of her best, but
overall she did a good job on the series.

Bill
Titus G
2018-06-08 21:13:02 UTC
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Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
Answered elsewhere. "When She Woke." Hillary Jordan. 2011

From Wikipedia: "...a dystopian reimagining of Nathaniel Hawthorne's
The Scarlet Letter, set in a future theocratic America where rather than
being imprisoned and rehabilitated, criminals are punished by being
"chromed" – having their skin color genetically altered to fit their
crime – and released into the general population to survive as best they
can."
Robert Carnegie
2018-06-08 21:44:35 UTC
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Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
Answered elsewhere. "When She Woke." Hillary Jordan. 2011
From Wikipedia: "...a dystopian reimagining of Nathaniel Hawthorne's
The Scarlet Letter, set in a future theocratic America where rather than
being imprisoned and rehabilitated, criminals are punished by being
"chromed" – having their skin color genetically altered to fit their
crime – and released into the general population to survive as best they
can."
Christian as well as Muslim societies have used
punishments that left a distinctive mark of the cause -
e.g. missing church. But that's generally about cutting
bits off. Then there's tattooing. Very dark business.
Kevrob
2018-06-08 22:32:24 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
Answered elsewhere. "When She Woke." Hillary Jordan. 2011
From Wikipedia: "...a dystopian reimagining of Nathaniel Hawthorne's
The Scarlet Letter, set in a future theocratic America where rather than
being imprisoned and rehabilitated, criminals are punished by being
"chromed" – having their skin color genetically altered to fit their
crime – and released into the general population to survive as best they
can."
Christian as well as Muslim societies have used
punishments that left a distinctive mark of the cause -
e.g. missing church. But that's generally about cutting
bits off. Then there's tattooing. Very dark business.
Those convicted of deserting the US armed forces were once
branded with the letter "D," or tattooed.

Kevin R
David Duffy
2018-06-13 00:04:45 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
Answered elsewhere. "When She Woke." Hillary Jordan. 2011
From Wikipedia: "...a dystopian reimagining of Nathaniel Hawthorne's
The Scarlet Letter, set in a future theocratic America where rather than
being imprisoned and rehabilitated, criminals are punished by being
"chromed" ?? having their skin color genetically altered to fit their
crime ?? and released into the general population to survive as best they
can."
Christian as well as Muslim societies have used
punishments that left a distinctive mark of the cause -
e.g. missing church. But that's generally about cutting
bits off. Then there's tattooing. Very dark business.
cf Adam Roberts _Land of the Headless_

Jerry Brown
2018-06-09 06:52:14 UTC
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Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
On conviction of a crime, the criminal is coloured, perhaps red for
murder or maybe that was rape.
Now you know as much as I do. On behalf so answers to questions might
take a while.
Answered elsewhere. "When She Woke." Hillary Jordan. 2011
From Wikipedia: "...a dystopian reimagining of Nathaniel Hawthorne's
The Scarlet Letter, set in a future theocratic America where rather than
being imprisoned and rehabilitated, criminals are punished by being
"chromed" – having their skin color genetically altered to fit their
crime – and released into the general population to survive as best they
can."
In one episode of Black Mirror where everyone has tech-augmented eyes,
individuals can choose to be anonymised to selected other individuals,
appearing as a human silhouette formed of an effect resembling grey
analog TV static. Somehow this also works for video and even
photographs.

At the end of the episode the protagonist is sentenced to this
treatment both ways on a universal basis - he sees everyone else as
grey static, but they see him as RED static.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
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