Discussion:
Galaxy sci-fi magazine put up free online.
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Robert Clark
2017-07-16 12:19:30 UTC
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Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
been put up online for free:

Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
Rob LeFebvre, @roblef
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/

Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?

Bob Clark

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
This crowdfunding campaign is to prove it:

Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-16 13:46:45 UTC
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Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.

I'll have to look this up. Thanks.

....

Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Ahasuerus
2017-07-16 17:30:25 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they will appear
chronologically -- https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-16 19:38:09 UTC
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Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they will appear
chronologically -- https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
Ah, thanks.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-07-16 22:05:13 UTC
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Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they will appear
chronologically -- https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First Serial Rights?
Surely stuff from 1976 is still under copyright?
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Carl Fink
2017-07-16 23:00:50 UTC
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I wonder if this issue is available at the Archive:
https://lileks.tumblr.com/post/846178020/space-babes-of-the-future-are-excellent-welders

If that "Brown" is Fredric Brown, that must be a hell of an issue.

Hah! It's in the archive!

Holy sh!t. It has the first publication of "To Serve Man" and "The Stars are
the Styx".

And it is Fredric Brown.
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-16 23:11:48 UTC
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Post by Carl Fink
https://lileks.tumblr.com/post/846178020/space-babes-of-the-future-are-excellent-welders
If that "Brown" is Fredric Brown, that must be a hell of an issue.
Yeah, he wrote for Galaxy sometimes.
Post by Carl Fink
Hah! It's in the archive!
Holy sh!t. It has the first publication of "To Serve Man" and "The Stars are
the Styx".
And the serialized _The Demolished Man_ and _The Stars My
Destination_ and lots of early Asimovs.
Post by Carl Fink
And it is Fredric Brown.
Of course.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Carl Fink
2017-07-16 23:44:16 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Carl Fink
https://lileks.tumblr.com/post/846178020/space-babes-of-the-future-are-excellent-welders
If that "Brown" is Fredric Brown, that must be a hell of an issue.
Yeah, he wrote for Galaxy sometimes.
Post by Carl Fink
Hah! It's in the archive!
Holy sh!t. It has the first publication of "To Serve Man" and "The Stars are
the Styx".
And the serialized _The Demolished Man_ and _The Stars My
Destination_ and lots of early Asimovs.
No, no: THAT ONE ISSUE has Brown, Matheson, Leiber, Sturgeon, Asimov, and
Simak as its fiction writers. Hell, Nebula-winner Katherine MacLean wasn't
worth putting on the cover. (She won the Neb later, of course.)

Also the seriously-under-appreciated Willy Ley as its
science writer.
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-17 00:21:24 UTC
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Post by Carl Fink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Carl Fink
https://lileks.tumblr.com/post/846178020/space-babes-of-the-future-are-excellent-welders
If that "Brown" is Fredric Brown, that must be a hell of an issue.
Yeah, he wrote for Galaxy sometimes.
Post by Carl Fink
Hah! It's in the archive!
Holy sh!t. It has the first publication of "To Serve Man" and "The Stars are
the Styx".
And the serialized _The Demolished Man_ and _The Stars My
Destination_ and lots of early Asimovs.
No, no: THAT ONE ISSUE has Brown, Matheson, Leiber, Sturgeon, Asimov, and
Simak as its fiction writers. Hell, Nebula-winner Katherine MacLean wasn't
worth putting on the cover. (She won the Neb later, of course.)
Well, the accustomed process in those days was to send the story
to Astounding (because Campbell paid the best rates), and then to
Galaxy if Campbell didn't want it or to F&SF if it was either
fantasy, or very literary,
Post by Carl Fink
Also the seriously-under-appreciated Willy Ley as its
science writer.
Speak for yourself -- I appreciated the hell out of him when I
was reading him in the fifties.

Once upon a time there was a kids' television show called _Tom
Corbett, Space Cadet_ (VERY loosely based on the Heinlein
juvenile). It was broadcast live, and after each show the actor
playing Tom would meet the studio audience and answer questions
about science.

About which he knew damn little, of course; so they had Willy Ley
hide behind a curtain and feed the answers to the actor via an
earphone. There was a picture article about it, entitled
"Whispering Willy."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Jack Bohn
2017-07-17 01:06:06 UTC
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I like to point to a story about a fan of Willy Ley, from Horace Gold's son:


--
=Jack
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-17 02:01:40 UTC
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Post by Jack Bohn
http://youtu.be/XoPSLv0kM6w
Yeah. Asimov tells approximately the same tale somewhere, and he
quoted him as saying "Veelee oder Veelee, it makes no difference."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
J. Clarke
2017-07-17 00:52:40 UTC
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Post by Carl Fink
https://lileks.tumblr.com/post/846178020/space-babes-of-the-future-are-excellent-welders
If that "Brown" is Fredric Brown, that must be a hell of an issue.
Hah! It's in the archive!
Holy sh!t. It has the first publication of "To Serve Man" and "The Stars are
the Styx".
And it is Fredric Brown.
And an interesting story--

<spoiler spaces>






































American and Soviet AIs conspire in a global flimflam to save humanity.
Was that the earliest publication of that idea?
Michael F. Stemper
2017-07-24 18:03:13 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
<spoiler spaces>
(It's not a spoiler if the title's gone.)
Post by J. Clarke
American and Soviet AIs conspire in a global flimflam to save humanity.
Was that the earliest publication of that idea?
I've never encountered that story line. However, in "Push-Button
Passion" by Albert C. Friborg, the American battle computer (not
referred to as "AI", but it passes the duck test) seduces and elopes
(the "true love" variety) with the Soviet battle computer.

It's a rather amusing story, too.
--
Michael F. Stemper
87.3% of all statistics are made up by the person giving them.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-24 19:13:51 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by J. Clarke
<spoiler spaces>
(It's not a spoiler if the title's gone.)
Post by J. Clarke
American and Soviet AIs conspire in a global flimflam to save humanity.
Was that the earliest publication of that idea?
I've never encountered that story line. However, in "Push-Button
Passion" by Albert C. Friborg, the American battle computer (not
referred to as "AI", but it passes the duck test) seduces and elopes
(the "true love" variety) with the Soviet battle computer.
It's a rather amusing story, too.
Oh, I remember that one, I think. Tag line "The only way to
fight war is with love" or something like that, and the computer
was called "Dinah"?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Michael F. Stemper
2017-07-24 20:27:50 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by J. Clarke
American and Soviet AIs conspire in a global flimflam to save humanity.
Was that the earliest publication of that idea?
I've never encountered that story line. However, in "Push-Button
Passion" by Albert C. Friborg, the American battle computer (not
referred to as "AI", but it passes the duck test) seduces and elopes
(the "true love" variety) with the Soviet battle computer.
It's a rather amusing story, too.
Oh, I remember that one, I think. Tag line "The only way to
fight war is with love" or something like that, and the computer
was called "Dinah"?
I didn't remember the tag line, but a quick check shows me that your
memory's just fine. And our computer was indeed called "Dinah".
--
Michael F. Stemper
Why doesn't anybody care about apathy?
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-16 23:10:40 UTC
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Post by Robert Clark
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early
stories from
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they will appear
chronologically -- https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First Serial Rights?
Surely stuff from 1976 is still under copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died (if
human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?

I started reading Galaxy (and Astounding and F&SF) when I
was a smallish kid (born 1942), because my mother bought them.
I had years and years of the Big Three, neatly sorted by date and
stored in shoeboxes. When I went off to college, my parents put
them all in an old Army footlocker and stored them under the
house, where they rotted.

So it's nice to have these back.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 00:23:17 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
In article
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes
early
stories from
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-fre
e-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo
or Nebula award winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they will
appear chronologically --
https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First
Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died (if
human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And nothing
written that recently is likely to ever be in the public domain.

Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading for a
serious spanking.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
J. Clarke
2017-07-17 00:48:26 UTC
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In article <***@69.16.179.42>, ***@gmail.com
says...
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
In article
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early
stories from
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-fre
e-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo
or Nebula award winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they will
appear chronologically --
https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First
Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died (if
human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And nothing
written that recently is likely to ever be in the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading for a
serious spanking.
Or there's something that you don't know and they do about copyright.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 03:06:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
In article
On Sunday, July 16, 2017 at 10:15:06 AM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early
stories from
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-
fre e-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or
Hugo or Nebula award winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they
will appear chronologically --
https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First
Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under
copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died
(if human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And
nothing written that recently is likely to ever be in the
public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading
for a serious spanking.
Or there's something that you don't know and they do about
copyright.
Like that they have more than first rights. Or they don't know
shit.

Do feel free to explain what to not follow the link to the relevant
part of the US Code, not read it, and be incapable of understanding
it. You know what's what you'll do.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
J. Clarke
2017-07-17 03:14:39 UTC
Reply
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In article <***@69.16.179.42>, ***@gmail.com
says...
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
In article
On Sunday, July 16, 2017 at 10:15:06 AM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early
stories from
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-
fre e-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or
Hugo or Nebula award winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they
will appear chronologically --
https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First
Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under
copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died
(if human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And
nothing written that recently is likely to ever be in the
public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading
for a serious spanking.
Or there's something that you don't know and they do about
copyright.
Like that they have more than first rights. Or they don't know
shit.
Do feel free to explain what to not follow the link to the relevant
part of the US Code, not read it, and be incapable of understanding
it. You know what's what you'll do.
https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17
Yep, you show you don't know anything about law either. First, that is not
the normal form of a legal citation, and second what leads you to believe
that the US Code will shed any light on this particular situation? Why
don't you do like a real lawyer and plug Lexis/Nexus and find the relevant
case law, since you're so sure you're right?
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 04:58:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
In article
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and
includes early
stories from
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-gala
xy- fre e-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or
Hugo or Nebula award winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line,
they will appear chronologically --
https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought
First Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under
copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has
died (if human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody
cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights
today belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs.
And nothing written that recently is likely to ever be in
the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading
for a serious spanking.
Or there's something that you don't know and they do about
copyright.
Like that they have more than first rights. Or they don't know
shit.
Do feel free to explain what to not follow the link to the
relevant part of the US Code, not read it, and be incapable of
understanding it. You know what's what you'll do.
https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17
Yep, you show you don't know anything about law either. First,
that is not the normal form of a legal citation, and second what
leads you to believe that the US Code will shed any light on
this particular situation? Why don't you do like a real lawyer
and plug Lexis/Nexus and find the relevant case law, since
you're so sure you're right?
What country's copyright law would you hallucinate would apply to a
US published magazine? Seriously. Either give a straight answer to
that question, or STFU, or I'll keep asking it until you do.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Quadibloc
2017-07-17 05:13:49 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
What country's copyright law would you hallucinate would apply to a
US published magazine? Seriously. Either give a straight answer to
that question, or STFU, or I'll keep asking it until you do.
As long as that magazine never crosses the U.S. borders, U.S. copyright
law. But for it to be imported into some other country, it would have
to be in compliance with the copyright laws of that country as well.

And so Internet sites like the Internet Archive basically have to
comply with the most restrictive copyright laws of any country in
the world. Unless they can block access from some countries.

John Savard
D B Davis
2017-07-17 13:01:27 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
What country's copyright law would you hallucinate would apply to a
US published magazine? Seriously. Either give a straight answer to
that question, or STFU, or I'll keep asking it until you do.
As long as that magazine never crosses the U.S. borders, U.S. copyright
law. But for it to be imported into some other country, it would have
to be in compliance with the copyright laws of that country as well.
And so Internet sites like the Internet Archive basically have to
comply with the most restrictive copyright laws of any country in
the world. Unless they can block access from some countries.
If the initial publication and subsequent take down of _Omni_ magazine
issues is any indicator, archive.org uses the "it's better to beg for
forgiveness than to ask for permission" rule-of-thumb. The "notice
and take down" [1] process places the onus on the copyright owner to
defend their copyrighted material. youtube.com, for one, seems to only
take down material after they receive a notice and take down.

Note.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notice_and_take_down

Thank you,

--
Don
Greg Weeks
2017-07-17 13:10:55 UTC
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Post by D B Davis
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
What country's copyright law would you hallucinate would apply to a
US published magazine? Seriously. Either give a straight answer to
that question, or STFU, or I'll keep asking it until you do.
As long as that magazine never crosses the U.S. borders, U.S. copyright
law. But for it to be imported into some other country, it would have
to be in compliance with the copyright laws of that country as well.
And so Internet sites like the Internet Archive basically have to
comply with the most restrictive copyright laws of any country in
the world. Unless they can block access from some countries.
If the initial publication and subsequent take down of _Omni_ magazine
issues is any indicator, archive.org uses the "it's better to beg for
forgiveness than to ask for permission" rule-of-thumb. The "notice
and take down" [1] process places the onus on the copyright owner to
defend their copyrighted material. youtube.com, for one, seems to only
take down material after they receive a notice and take down.
Note.
1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notice_and_take_down
This was my assumption also. Since Galaxy never filed for renewals on any of the magazines it won't be "Galaxy" that can complain. I will be up to each individual author (or their estates) to complain. There apparently are some that have complained as there are issues that have stories removed. There were quite a few stories with renewals if I remember right. Project Gutenberg has everything that will clear their process in the 1950-1963 issues.

Greg Weeks
Greg Goss
2017-07-18 03:13:28 UTC
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Post by Greg Weeks
This was my assumption also. Since Galaxy never filed for renewals on any of the magazines it won't be "Galaxy" that can complain. I will be up to each individual author (or their estates) to complain. There apparently are some that have complained as there are issues that have stories removed. There were quite a few stories with renewals if I remember right. Project Gutenberg has everything that will clear their process in the 1950-1963 issues.
An analogy might be song lyrics. I often use my phone to recognize
songs in the bar. For about two thirds of the songs, the app calls up
the lyrics and "sings" along. For the other third, they provide a
link to a google search for the lyrics, thus dropping the onus on
other people if they (or more likely their lyrics provider) have been
told to "take it down".
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 16:37:15 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
What country's copyright law would you hallucinate would apply
to a US published magazine? Seriously. Either give a straight
answer to that question, or STFU, or I'll keep asking it until
you do.
As long as that magazine never crosses the U.S. borders, U.S.
copyright law.
Not really. Copyright laws don't vary much throughout the Berne
Convention (that being the entire point of said treaty).

Plus, archive.org appears to be in San Francisco, so US law applies
to them, without any possibly doubt.
Post by Quadibloc
And so Internet sites like the Internet Archive basically have
to comply with the most restrictive copyright laws of any
country in the world. Unless they can block access from some
countries.
Quot obviously untrue. They have to comply with the most restrcive
laws of any country _they have a presence in_. The rest of the world
will be told by courts that have actual authority of them (which is
to say, US courts) to go fuck themselves.

As usualy, you don't know your ass from a whole in the ground.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Quadibloc
2017-07-17 21:55:34 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Quadibloc
And so Internet sites like the Internet Archive basically have
to comply with the most restrictive copyright laws of any
country in the world. Unless they can block access from some
countries.
Quot obviously untrue. They have to comply with the most restrcive
laws of any country _they have a presence in_. The rest of the world
will be told by courts that have actual authority of them (which is
to say, US courts) to go fuck themselves.
It is true that Google only has to comply with, say, the laws of
Germany about Nazi-related stuff because Google does business in
Germany. Or with the laws of European countries about the "right
to be forgotten" because they have a presence there.

When it comes to _copyright_ law, though, having a business
presence in a country is *not* required, just that the servers
can be accessed. Thus, because of treaties, the U.S. is quite
capable of shutting down sites in foreign countries with
material that doesn't violate _those countries'_ copyright laws,
only U.S. law even though nobody having anything to do with
those sites has any business presence in the U.S..

John Savard
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-18 05:39:30 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Quadibloc
And so Internet sites like the Internet Archive basically
have to comply with the most restrictive copyright laws of
any country in the world. Unless they can block access from
some countries.
Quot obviously untrue. They have to comply with the most
restrcive laws of any country _they have a presence in_. The
rest of the world will be told by courts that have actual
authority of them (which is to say, US courts) to go fuck
themselves.
It is true that Google only has to comply with, say, the laws of
Germany about Nazi-related stuff because Google does business in
Germany. Or with the laws of European countries about the "right
to be forgotten" because they have a presence there.
When it comes to _copyright_ law, though, having a business
presence in a country is *not* required, just that the servers
can be accessed.
If you can provide a link to case law, you won't look like you're
full of shit.

But you can't, because it doesn't exist, and you *are* full of
shit.

As usual.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Greg Goss
2017-07-18 03:15:50 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Quot obviously untrue. They have to comply with the most restrcive
laws of any country _they have a presence in_. The rest of the world
will be told by courts that have actual authority of them (which is
to say, US courts) to go fuck themselves.
Someone in the thread suggested that putting the WHOLE issue up might
constitute continuing the press run.

That's not how the law SHOULD work, but there are a lot of corners
where the law acts in non-obvious ways, so it's vaguely possible.

More likely, it's a Youtube kinda thing. Put it up till someone tells
them to take each particular story down.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
J. Clarke
2017-07-18 03:31:25 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Quot obviously untrue. They have to comply with the most restrcive
laws of any country _they have a presence in_. The rest of the world
will be told by courts that have actual authority of them (which is
to say, US courts) to go fuck themselves.
Someone in the thread suggested that putting the WHOLE issue up might
constitute continuing the press run.
If the entity putting it up is not the holder of the copyright on the whole
issue though, then the holder of _that_ copyright can come after it. If
the original holder was a business that is now defunct then figuring out
who holds the copyright might in itself become a major undertaking.
Post by Greg Goss
That's not how the law SHOULD work, but there are a lot of corners
where the law acts in non-obvious ways, so it's vaguely possible.
More likely, it's a Youtube kinda thing. Put it up till someone tells
them to take each particular story down.
That could be too.
h***@gmail.com
2017-07-18 03:32:06 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Quot obviously untrue. They have to comply with the most restrcive
laws of any country _they have a presence in_. The rest of the world
will be told by courts that have actual authority of them (which is
to say, US courts) to go fuck themselves.
Someone in the thread suggested that putting the WHOLE issue up might
constitute continuing the press run.
That's not how the law SHOULD work, but there are a lot of corners
where the law acts in non-obvious ways, so it's vaguely possible.
electronic publishing rights are a separate sale so unless the author sold all rights to the magazine it's unlikely.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-18 05:40:40 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Quot obviously untrue. They have to comply with the most
restrcive laws of any country _they have a presence in_. The
rest of the world will be told by courts that have actual
authority of them (which is to say, US courts) to go fuck
themselves.
Someone in the thread suggested that putting the WHOLE issue up
might constitute continuing the press run.
That's not how the law SHOULD work, but there are a lot of
corners where the law acts in non-obvious ways, so it's vaguely
possible.
I can see a lawyer arguing that. I can also see his client regretting
believing him.
Post by Greg Goss
More likely, it's a Youtube kinda thing. Put it up till someone
tells them to take each particular story down.
That'd be my guess, unless there actually is some legit arrangement
here.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
David Johnston
2017-07-17 18:41:33 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
What country's copyright law would you hallucinate would apply to a
US published magazine? Seriously. Either give a straight answer to
that question, or STFU, or I'll keep asking it until you do.
As long as that magazine never crosses the U.S. borders, U.S. copyright
law. But for it to be imported into some other country, it would have
to be in compliance with the copyright laws of that country as well.
That is so very, very wrong. No. It doesn't. The person downloading copyrighted material or other sanctionable material <cough>porn<cough> may be in trouble with their local courts but their problem isn't the sites problem. That's what made the web such a boon to pornography lovers everywhere. It doesn't matter what local obscenity laws say because they can no longer restrict your ability to access Japanese schoolgirl vore porn or whatever. The distributors can't be shut down because they're legal where they are, the imports can no longer be intercepted at the border, and the only way local cops will ever notice is when your computer repair place rats you out.
Quadibloc
2017-07-17 21:59:03 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
That is so very, very wrong. No. It doesn't. The person
downloading copyrighted material or other sanctionable material
<cough>porn<cough> may be in trouble with their local courts but
their problem isn't the sites problem.
Ever heard of a chap named Kim Dotcom? Although he took credit
card payments for premium hosting, so maybe that counts as a
business presence...

John Savard
David Johnston
2017-07-17 22:13:34 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by David Johnston
That is so very, very wrong. No. It doesn't. The person
downloading copyrighted material or other sanctionable material
<cough>porn<cough> may be in trouble with their local courts but
their problem isn't the sites problem.
Ever heard of a chap named Kim Dotcom? Although he took credit
card payments for premium hosting, so maybe that counts as a
business presence...
John Savard
Megaupload was ignoring _everyone's_ copyright laws. That included the jurisdiction he was in.
Titus G
2017-07-18 07:52:40 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Quadibloc
Post by David Johnston
That is so very, very wrong. No. It doesn't. The person
downloading copyrighted material or other sanctionable material
<cough>porn<cough> may be in trouble with their local courts but
their problem isn't the sites problem.
Ever heard of a chap named Kim Dotcom? Although he took credit
card payments for premium hosting, so maybe that counts as a
business presence...
John Savard
Megaupload was ignoring _everyone's_ copyright laws. That included the jurisdiction he was in.
Incorrect.
Since he was arrested at his home in front of wife and small children by
the NZ terrorist squad using helicopters and automatic rifles, the NZ
courts have ruled that Dotcom had broken no NZ laws. They ruled that our
5 eyes spies broke NZ law by illegally spying on a NZ citizen and
sharing that data with a foreign government. Following discovery of
government irregularities in his immigration documentation, "visits"
from foreign officials to NZ officials coinciding with significant
events, it has been suggested that he was enticed to NZ for extradition
to that foreign country.

A NZ citizen and resident has broken no NZ law but has had all his
assets seized by a foreign government. NZ MPs and PM have acted
illegally on behalf of a foreign power.

These details are readily available from our paper of record, The NZ Herald.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-18 05:42:15 UTC
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On Monday, July 17, 2017 at 12:41:37 PM UTC-6, David Johnston
Post by David Johnston
That is so very, very wrong. No. It doesn't. The person
downloading copyrighted material or other sanctionable material
<cough>porn<cough> may be in trouble with their local courts
but their problem isn't the sites problem.
Ever heard of a chap named Kim Dotcom? Although he took credit
card payments for premium hosting, so maybe that counts as a
business presence...
That is a case driven more by politics than law, and the legal end of
it far more complicated than you are capable of understanding.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
J. Clarke
2017-07-17 09:22:52 UTC
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In article <***@69.16.179.42>, ***@gmail.com
says...
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
In article
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and
includes early
stories from
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-gala
xy- fre e-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or
Hugo or Nebula award winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line,
they will appear chronologically --
https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought
First Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under
copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has
died (if human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody
cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights
today belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs.
And nothing written that recently is likely to ever be in
the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading
for a serious spanking.
Or there's something that you don't know and they do about copyright.
Like that they have more than first rights. Or they don't know
shit.
Do feel free to explain what to not follow the link to the
relevant part of the US Code, not read it, and be incapable of
understanding it. You know what's what you'll do.
https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17
Yep, you show you don't know anything about law either. First,
that is not the normal form of a legal citation, and second what
leads you to believe that the US Code will shed any light on
this particular situation? Why don't you do like a real lawyer
and plug Lexis/Nexus and find the relevant case law, since
you're so sure you're right?
What country's copyright law would you hallucinate would apply to a
US published magazine? Seriously. Either give a straight answer to
that question, or STFU, or I'll keep asking it until you do.
And you call other people stupid.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 16:38:51 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
In article
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and
includes early
stories from
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-g
ala xy- fre e-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine,
or Hugo or Nebula award winners from that time
period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line,
they will appear chronologically --
https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought
First Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still
under copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the
early fifties. Possibly whoever is now the
rights-holder has died (if human) or dissolved if a
corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights
today belong to the writers, individually, or their
heirs. And nothing written that recently is likely to
ever be in the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're
heading for a serious spanking.
Or there's something that you don't know and they do about copyright.
Like that they have more than first rights. Or they don't
know shit.
Do feel free to explain what to not follow the link to the
relevant part of the US Code, not read it, and be incapable
of understanding it. You know what's what you'll do.
https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17
Yep, you show you don't know anything about law either.
First, that is not the normal form of a legal citation, and
second what leads you to believe that the US Code will shed
any light on this particular situation? Why don't you do
like a real lawyer and plug Lexis/Nexus and find the relevant
case law, since you're so sure you're right?
What country's copyright law would you hallucinate would apply
to a US published magazine? Seriously. Either give a straight
answer to that question, or STFU, or I'll keep asking it until
you do.
And you call other people stupid.
You didn't answer my question. And you won't. *Ever*. Because you
are too cowardly to admit you're full of shit.

As usual.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Greg Goss
2017-07-17 03:11:19 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And nothing
written that recently is likely to ever be in the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading for a
serious spanking.
Not Galaxy, but a lot of the other magazines bought first and second
rights. When I was a kid, there were often cut-price SF magazines
with badly cut'n'pasted stories from the so-called golden age as if it
were new stuff. Supposedly they bought the second-publication rights
from the smoking wreckage of various older magazine companies.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 04:57:04 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And nothing
written that recently is likely to ever be in the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading for
a serious spanking.
Not Galaxy, but a lot of the other magazines bought first and
second rights. When I was a kid, there were often cut-price SF
magazines with badly cut'n'pasted stories from the so-called
golden age as if it were new stuff. Supposedly they bought the
second-publication rights from the smoking wreckage of various
older magazine companies.
An entirely plausible theory, and one that would only require
permission from a single entity (maybe).

One does wonder, though.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2017-07-25 20:30:51 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And nothing
written that recently is likely to ever be in the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading for a
serious spanking.
Not Galaxy, but a lot of the other magazines bought first and second
rights.
Some bought both first rights and non-exclusive reprint rights. I
recall that Asimov's did that for awhile.
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
Quadibloc
2017-07-17 04:22:52 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First
Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died (if
human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And nothing
written that recently is likely to ever be in the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading for a
serious spanking.
There are some science-fiction magazines online on the Internet Archive
where a specific story or novel has been excised at the request of the
copyright holder.

Thus, *apparently* first serial rights being held by Galaxy doesn't
mean that the republication of an issue of Galaxy as a whole doesn't
violate copyrights on the stories within it, being subject only to the
copyright on the issue itself.

After all, Paramount had to remove some music from DVD versions of some
Star Trek episodes due to the rights being limited to the episode as
shown on television.

So I think we can exclude some provision of copyright law that causes
copyright of things included in other works to be subsumed, as there
are clear cases that show copyright law doesn't work that way.

John Savard
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 05:09:25 UTC
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On Sunday, July 16, 2017 at 6:23:21 PM UTC-6, Gutless Umbrella
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First
Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under
copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died
(if human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And
nothing written that recently is likely to ever be in the
public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading
for a serious spanking.
There are some science-fiction magazines online on the Internet
Archive where a specific story or novel has been excised at the
request of the copyright holder.
Thus, *apparently* first serial rights being held by Galaxy
doesn't mean that the republication of an issue of Galaxy as a
whole doesn't violate copyrights on the stories within it, being
subject only to the copyright on the issue itself.
And doesn't mean that it does, either.

In short, despite how fucking stupid Clarke is while msaturbating
furiously over how much his ass stings after I spank him, it's
*complicated*.

It's possible that whoever owns the rights to Galaxy has the
necessary rights to do this, but I'm very skeptical. There's
nothing on the engadget web site to inspire me to believe they've
talked to a qualified copyright attorney about this.
After all, Paramount had to remove some music from DVD versions
of some Star Trek episodes due to the rights being limited to
the episode as shown on television.
So I think we can exclude some provision of copyright law that
causes copyright of things included in other works to be
subsumed, as there are clear cases that show copyright law
doesn't work that way.
That's not entirely coherent, but you appear to be saying that
individusl copyrights of stories are independant of the copyright
of the magazine as a whole, and if so, that is correct. If not, I
have no idea what you're on about.

The latest issues seem to be 1976, and in 1976, renewal was still
required, so anything not renewed would have expired in 2004. In
theory, perhaps not a single story in the 355 issues had a renewal
notice filed. But I wouldn't bet my retirement fund on it.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Quadibloc
2017-07-17 05:15:27 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
you appear to be saying that
individusl copyrights of stories are independant of the copyright
of the magazine as a whole, and if so, that is correct.
Yes, that was what I was saying.

John Savard
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 16:39:23 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
you appear to be saying that
individusl copyrights of stories are independant of the
copyright of the magazine as a whole, and if so, that is
correct.
Yes, that was what I was saying.
It would have been easier to just agree with me, instead of repeating
what I said incoherently.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Jerry Brown
2017-07-17 08:34:41 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Jul 2017 21:22:52 -0700 (PDT), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
After all, Paramount had to remove some music from DVD versions of some
Star Trek episodes due to the rights being limited to the episode as
shown on television.
[*]
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Scott Lurndal
2017-07-17 12:43:09 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
After all, Paramount had to remove some music from DVD versions of some
Star Trek episodes due to the rights being limited to the episode as
shown on television.
The classic example of this being _W.K.R.P. in Cincinatti_ which
is pretty much unwatchable with the replacement soundtrack.
Greg Goss
2017-07-18 03:32:25 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
After all, Paramount had to remove some music from DVD versions of some
Star Trek episodes due to the rights being limited to the episode as
shown on television.
So I think we can exclude some provision of copyright law that causes
copyright of things included in other works to be subsumed, as there
are clear cases that show copyright law doesn't work that way.
The LP version of Hitchhiker's Guide had a large diatribe on the back
explaining why they had to gather the scripts and the actors together
and re-record the thing that they already had audio for, but no
rights.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-18 05:46:03 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Quadibloc
After all, Paramount had to remove some music from DVD versions
of some Star Trek episodes due to the rights being limited to
the episode as shown on television.
So I think we can exclude some provision of copyright law that
causes copyright of things included in other works to be
subsumed, as there are clear cases that show copyright law
doesn't work that way.
The LP version of Hitchhiker's Guide had a large diatribe on the
back explaining why they had to gather the scripts and the
actors together and re-record the thing that they already had
audio for, but no rights.
The audio recording has its own, separate copyright. Derviative, so
you need permission from the original copyright holder, too, but
whoever created the recording *also* has a copyright on *that*.

That's one of the simpler ways copyright can be complicated.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
William Hyde
2017-07-17 19:49:54 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died (if
human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And nothing
written that recently is likely to ever be in the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading for a
serious spanking.
When I first started bringing SF collections home from the library, my Mother commented that she'd read these stories long ago.

Not in Astounding, or Amazing, or any other SF magazine, but in a magazine-like supplement put out by a Toronto newspaper in the 30s and 40s. Asimov in his memoirs gives great detail on his literary earnings in these years, but there's not a word of this. Nor are supplementary payments from up North mentioned by Pohl or DelRey in their memoirs.

I find it difficult to believe that the publishers (Ziff-Davis, Street and Smith, et al.) were not paid for these stories. It seems likely, though of course I can't know for sure, that the authors didn't get any extra for it.

On the other hand Astounding's publishers, in the 1940s, let Asimov sell film rights to a few stories to Orson Wells for $250 and didn't take a cut though Asimov says they had the right. That's a lot more money than they would get for reselling a story to a Toronto newspaper.

Novels very definitely seem to have been sold on a "first serial rights" basis. Serialized in Galaxy, hardcover by Doubleday a few months later was a the procedure for several of Asimov's novels. Hard to believe that short stories were sold on a different basis.

Given this, I can't figure out just who had what rights over this material.

William Hyde
Garrett Wollman
2017-07-17 20:05:11 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Novels very definitely seem to have been sold on a "first serial rights"
basis. Serialized in Galaxy, hardcover by Doubleday a few months later
was a the procedure for several of Asimov's novels. Hard to believe
that short stories were sold on a different basis.
Given this, I can't figure out just who had what rights over this material.
I seem to recall (don't have my library nearby to check) that a lot of
the early stories were assigned outright to the magazine publisher.
(You'll see when those stories are collected that they have copyright
notices listing the original publisher, not the author.) But it would
surprise me if this practice lasted as late as the 1970s, at least for
anyone with a literary agent, with the probable exception of media
franchises.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
William Hyde
2017-07-17 20:14:12 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by William Hyde
Novels very definitely seem to have been sold on a "first serial rights"
basis. Serialized in Galaxy, hardcover by Doubleday a few months later
was a the procedure for several of Asimov's novels. Hard to believe
that short stories were sold on a different basis.
Given this, I can't figure out just who had what rights over this material.
I seem to recall (don't have my library nearby to check) that a lot of
the early stories were assigned outright to the magazine publisher.
(You'll see when those stories are collected that they have copyright
notices listing the original publisher, not the author.) But it would
surprise me if this practice lasted as late as the 1970s,
Asimov comments that, starting in the 60s, he had to spend time making copyright renewal applications for stories he wrote 25 years earlier. So either he had copyright from the start or Street and Smith gave it to him.

William Hyde
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-17 20:14:16 UTC
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On Sunday, July 16, 2017 at 8:23:21 PM UTC-4, Gutless Umbrella
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died
(if human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And
nothing written that recently is likely to ever be in the
public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading
for a serious spanking.
When I first started bringing SF collections home from the
library, my Mother commented that she'd read these stories long
ago.
Not in Astounding, or Amazing, or any other SF magazine, but in
a magazine-like supplement put out by a Toronto newspaper in the
30s and 40s. Asimov in his memoirs gives great detail on his
literary earnings in these years, but there's not a word of
this. Nor are supplementary payments from up North mentioned by
Pohl or DelRey in their memoirs.
I find it difficult to believe that the publishers (Ziff-Davis,
Street and Smith, et al.) were not paid for these stories. It
seems likely, though of course I can't know for sure, that the
authors didn't get any extra for it.
On the other hand Astounding's publishers, in the 1940s, let
Asimov sell film rights to a few stories to Orson Wells for $250
and didn't take a cut though Asimov says they had the right.
That's a lot more money than they would get for reselling a
story to a Toronto newspaper.
Novels very definitely seem to have been sold on a "first serial
rights" basis. Serialized in Galaxy, hardcover by Doubleday a
few months later was a the procedure for several of Asimov's
novels. Hard to believe that short stories were sold on a
different basis.
Given this, I can't figure out just who had what rights over
this material.
And therein lies the problem with collections like this: every deal
is unique, and ic can be literally impossible to figure out who has
the right to what years later.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Greg Goss
2017-07-18 03:37:24 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
And therein lies the problem with collections like this: every deal
is unique, and ic can be literally impossible to figure out who has
the right to what years later.
There is a computer game I enjoy. The apparent rights owner went
broke in the nineties, and an open-source group took over the
decompiled game as "abandonware", designed their own artwork and music
(apparently more worried about bits of the game than the overall work)
for it and continued upgrading it.

A decade or so after going open-source, the game is still going
strong,so apparently whoever owns it doesn't KNOW he owns it.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-18 05:44:30 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
And therein lies the problem with collections like this: every
deal is unique, and ic can be literally impossible to figure out
who has the right to what years later.
There is a computer game I enjoy. The apparent rights owner
went broke in the nineties, and an open-source group took over
the decompiled game as "abandonware", designed their own artwork
and music (apparently more worried about bits of the game than
the overall work) for it and continued upgrading it.
A decade or so after going open-source, the game is still going
strong,so apparently whoever owns it doesn't KNOW he owns it.
Or doesn't care. Or there is no entity that does. If nobody bought
the rights at the bankruptcy sale, I'm not sure there even is a
copyright any more.

But that's only comprable to a single story in a single issue, not
355 stories from 26 years.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Default User
2017-07-18 18:11:09 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
There is a computer game I enjoy. The apparent rights owner went
broke in the nineties, and an open-source group took over the
decompiled game as "abandonware", designed their own artwork and music
(apparently more worried about bits of the game than the overall work)
for it and continued upgrading it.
A decade or so after going open-source, the game is still going
strong,so apparently whoever owns it doesn't KNOW he owns it.
Some of the abandonware sites have the original binary files and such. I actually got two games from one of them, Starflight 1 & 2, but I don't feel bad about it. I bought those back in the early 90s, but they're on 5.25" floppies. Even if I had a drive, and there don't seem to be a lot of USB versions out there, the disks might not be any good by now.


Brian
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-18 19:40:21 UTC
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Post by Default User
Post by Greg Goss
There is a computer game I enjoy. The apparent rights owner
went broke in the nineties, and an open-source group took over
the decompiled game as "abandonware", designed their own
artwork and music (apparently more worried about bits of the
game than the overall work) for it and continued upgrading it.
A decade or so after going open-source, the game is still going
strong,so apparently whoever owns it doesn't KNOW he owns it.
Some of the abandonware sites have the original binary files and
such. I actually got two games from one of them, Starflight 1 &
2, but I don't feel bad about it. I bought those back in the
early 90s, but they're on 5.25" floppies. Even if I had a drive,
and there don't seem to be a lot of USB versions out there, the
disks might not be any good by now.
I feel obligated to point out that Starflight (both) is available
from gog.com for $5.99, in a form that is a) legal, b) guaranteed
malware free, and c) optomized to run on modern versions of Windows
through DOSBOX.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Juho Julkunen
2017-07-18 22:01:08 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Post by Greg Goss
There is a computer game I enjoy. The apparent rights owner
went broke in the nineties, and an open-source group took over
the decompiled game as "abandonware", designed their own
artwork and music (apparently more worried about bits of the
game than the overall work) for it and continued upgrading it.
A decade or so after going open-source, the game is still going
strong,so apparently whoever owns it doesn't KNOW he owns it.
Some of the abandonware sites have the original binary files and
such. I actually got two games from one of them, Starflight 1 &
2, but I don't feel bad about it. I bought those back in the
early 90s, but they're on 5.25" floppies. Even if I had a drive,
and there don't seem to be a lot of USB versions out there, the
disks might not be any good by now.
I feel obligated to point out that Starflight (both) is available
from gog.com for $5.99, in a form that is a) legal, b) guaranteed
malware free, and c) optomized to run on modern versions of Windows
through DOSBOX.
I was just about to point this out, as I recently bought them there.

Digital distribution and DOS emulators, GOG.com and DOSBox in
particular, has revived many once-dead digital games, and I think I've
managed to update my entire library of abandonware to legal copies.
Some of them have been released to public domain over the years, many
others are once again available for purchase.

I didn't feel particularly bad about downloading abandonware when it
was literally impossible to obtain a legal copy, as letting old games
vanish is very much a shame, but these days it is rarely necessary.
--
Juho Julkunen
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-18 23:02:16 UTC
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Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
On Monday, July 17, 2017 at 10:37:45 PM UTC-5, Greg Goss
Post by Greg Goss
There is a computer game I enjoy. The apparent rights owner
went broke in the nineties, and an open-source group took
over the decompiled game as "abandonware", designed their
own artwork and music (apparently more worried about bits of
the game than the overall work) for it and continued
upgrading it.
A decade or so after going open-source, the game is still
going strong,so apparently whoever owns it doesn't KNOW he
owns it.
Some of the abandonware sites have the original binary files
and such. I actually got two games from one of them,
Starflight 1 & 2, but I don't feel bad about it. I bought
those back in the early 90s, but they're on 5.25" floppies.
Even if I had a drive, and there don't seem to be a lot of
USB versions out there, the disks might not be any good by
now.
I feel obligated to point out that Starflight (both) is
available from gog.com for $5.99, in a form that is a) legal,
b) guaranteed malware free, and c) optomized to run on modern
versions of Windows through DOSBOX.
I was just about to point this out, as I recently bought them
there.
As did I.
Post by Juho Julkunen
Digital distribution and DOS emulators, GOG.com and DOSBox in
particular, has revived many once-dead digital games, and I
think I've managed to update my entire library of abandonware to
legal copies. Some of them have been released to public domain
over the years, many others are once again available for
purchase.
I was very happy to see X-Com there, since OpenXCom didn't get
along well with my video driver.
Post by Juho Julkunen
I didn't feel particularly bad about downloading abandonware
when it was literally impossible to obtain a legal copy, as
letting old games vanish is very much a shame, but these days it
is rarely necessary.
There aren't too many games from those days that are really worth
bothering with, but most of the ones that are, are available
legally now.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Juho Julkunen
2017-07-19 17:50:14 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Juho Julkunen
Digital distribution and DOS emulators, GOG.com and DOSBox in
particular, has revived many once-dead digital games, and I
I was very happy to see X-Com there, since OpenXCom didn't get
along well with my video driver.
X-Com has been pretty well available, with retro publications and
various collections. I think I've bought it three times over the years,
only the last one being digital.

I have OpenXCom as well, though it has its issues. Have you played
Xenonauts?
--
Juho Julkunen
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-19 18:06:59 UTC
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Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Juho Julkunen
Digital distribution and DOS emulators, GOG.com and DOSBox in
particular, has revived many once-dead digital games, and I
I was very happy to see X-Com there, since OpenXCom didn't get
along well with my video driver.
X-Com has been pretty well available, with retro publications
and various collections. I think I've bought it three times over
the years, only the last one being digital.
For a while, the only way to buy it online was throught Steam, and
I will never install Steam on my computer.
Post by Juho Julkunen
I have OpenXCom as well, though it has its issues.
It also has an extensive mod system, and lets you play isolated
tactical scenarios without having to mess with the campaign game,
which is nice.
Post by Juho Julkunen
Have you
played Xenonauts?
I don't think I'd ever heard of it before now, but may well pick it
up. Looks pretty good.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Default User
2017-07-19 19:18:59 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Juho Julkunen
Have you
played Xenonauts?
I don't think I'd ever heard of it before now, but may well pick it
up. Looks pretty good.
I prefer strategy games, so I've been playing this open-source game quite a bit:

http://www.freeorion.org/index.php/Main_Page

Unfortunately, they don't have a port for iOs, so I can't play it on my freebie iPad that I mentioned in the ereader thread.


Brian
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-19 22:26:01 UTC
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On Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at 1:07:04 PM UTC-5, Gutless
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Juho Julkunen
Have you
played Xenonauts?
I don't think I'd ever heard of it before now, but may well
pick it up. Looks pretty good.
I prefer strategy games, so I've been playing this open-source
http://www.freeorion.org/index.php/Main_Page
Unfortunately, they don't have a port for iOs, so I can't play
it on my freebie iPad that I mentioned in the ereader thread.
I presume that's something inspired by Master of Orion? I still play
the original, when I'm bored, and there's nothing on TV.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Default User
2017-07-20 15:08:40 UTC
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Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
http://www.freeorion.org/index.php/Main_Page
I presume that's something inspired by Master of Orion? I still play
the original, when I'm bored, and there's nothing on TV.
Definitely some inspiration, as do many "4X" games that are around. I read over the Wikipedia description, and a number of the features are common, but with some significant differences.

In fact, the current game is very different from its own origins. The original open-source project started back in 2003 and got a simple game going. Later, a new group of developers came along and really revamped it. Part of their mission was to reduce what they call "micromanagement".

A major feature, that I don't recall seeing elsewhere, is the idea "supply-connected" systems. To move around their map, systems are connected by starlanes. The usual way to travel is following the lanes. Each colony or outpost can extend supply a certain number of jumps along the lanes connected to it, depending on some planetary characteristics and specific technologies that have been researched.

When planets are able to connect up their supply lines, they can share resources. So instead of only being able to use the production points at the world where they are generated, they are pooled and available at any supply-connected world. Generally, you try to have your entire empire supply-connected.

A later development was to extend that concept to colonization. Instead of needing colony ships that travel from the source planet to the target, you can put an outpost on the target and then any supply-connected world can colonize it.

One problem with the game is that the AI opponents aren't very good once you reach a decent skill level. That only gets worse when they add cool new features. A human player will pick up the new capability through normal learning, but someone has to go change the AI programming to handle it.

It's free to use, so it doesn't cost anything to noodle around with except time.


Brian
Default User
2017-07-19 15:00:14 UTC
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Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Default User
Some of the abandonware sites have the original binary files and
such. I actually got two games from one of them, Starflight 1 &
2, but I don't feel bad about it. I bought those back in the
early 90s, but they're on 5.25" floppies. Even if I had a drive,
and there don't seem to be a lot of USB versions out there, the
disks might not be any good by now.
I feel obligated to point out that Starflight (both) is available
from gog.com for $5.99, in a form that is a) legal, b) guaranteed
malware free, and c) optomized to run on modern versions of Windows
through DOSBOX.
I was just about to point this out, as I recently bought them there.
I got these about ten years back, shortly after I was reminded of the titles:

<https://groups.google.com/d/msg/comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.action/Irhwn_PpT7s/PT5MxD-TgwUJ>

I'm still not sure where that box of floppies is. I know I had it when I moved in 1999, and I didn't throw it out, so it must be somewhere in the bedroom that got designated as storage. It would have been easier to remember if I could have looked at the disks.


Brian
David Johnston
2017-07-17 20:30:30 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died (if
human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
If the magazine only bought first rights, then the rights today
belong to the writers, individually, or their heirs. And nothing
written that recently is likely to ever be in the public domain.
Either they didn't only buy first rights, or they're heading for a
serious spanking.
When I first started bringing SF collections home from the library, my Mother commented that she'd read these stories long ago.
Not in Astounding, or Amazing, or any other SF magazine, but in a magazine-like supplement put out by a Toronto newspaper in the 30s and 40s. Asimov in his memoirs gives great detail on his literary earnings in these years, but there's not a word of this. Nor are supplementary payments from up North mentioned by Pohl or DelRey in their memoirs.
I find it difficult to believe that the publishers (Ziff-Davis, Street and Smith, et al.) were not paid for these stories. It seems likely, though of course I can't know for sure, that the authors didn't get any extra for it.
On the other hand Astounding's publishers, in the 1940s, let Asimov sell film rights to a few stories to Orson Wells for $250 and didn't take a cut though Asimov says they had the right. That's a lot more money than they would get for reselling a story to a Toronto newspaper.
Novels very definitely seem to have been sold on a "first serial rights" basis. Serialized in Galaxy, hardcover by Doubleday a few months later was a the procedure for several of Asimov's novels. Hard to believe that short stories were sold on a different basis.
Given this, I can't figure out just who had what rights over this material.
William Hyde
One thing I know is that these downloads have been popping up in my searches for old science fiction for several years now.
J. Clarke
2017-07-17 00:47:55 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early
stories from
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they will appear
chronologically -- https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First Serial Rights?
Surely stuff from 1976 is still under copyright?
Good question. But Galaxy started publishing in the early
fifties. Possibly whoever is now the rights-holder has died (if
human) or dissolved if a corporation) and nobody cares?
Interesting question. Is there any time limit on how long a magazine can
keep an issue in print or how many copies they can circulate? Can they
offer reprints of the entire magazine at some point without paying further
royalties? Does ending a printing run mean that they can't restart the
same run again years later? Can they transfer the rights to do so?
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I started reading Galaxy (and Astounding and F&SF) when I
was a smallish kid (born 1942), because my mother bought them.
I had years and years of the Big Three, neatly sorted by date and
stored in shoeboxes. When I went off to college, my parents put
them all in an old Army footlocker and stored them under the
house, where they rotted.
So it's nice to have these back.
Ahasuerus
2017-07-20 16:15:12 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they will appear
chronologically -- https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First Serial
Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under copyright?
archive.org has a lot of recent material which is most likely under
copyright. Their copyright policy is explained at the bottom of
https://archive.org/about/terms.php
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-07-20 16:38:58 UTC
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On Sunday, July 16, 2017 at 6:05:16 PM UTC-4, Ted Nolan
In article
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes
early stories from heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-fr
ee-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo
or Nebula award winners from that time period?
Oh, gosh. The list is too long.
I'll have to look this up. Thanks.
....
Unfortunately, they aren't in chronological order.
If you select "Date Published" on the "Sort By" line, they
will appear chronologically --
https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine?&sort=date
How is this possible? I thought magazines only bought First
Serial Rights? Surely stuff from 1976 is still under copyright?
archive.org has a lot of recent material which is most likely
under copyright. Their copyright policy is explained at the
bottom of https://archive.org/about/terms.php
So, basically, they don't care about copyright violations until
they get caught. Not actually a big surprise.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Jack Bohn
2017-07-17 01:00:01 UTC
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Raw Message
At the end of the sorted list (whether ascending or descending) are unsorted or incomplete scans. The one labelled v37n09 is the Dec 1976 issue if anyone wants to see the proper typographic setup of Pohl's _Gateway_.
--
-Jack
D B Davis
2017-07-16 17:53:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
The SF collection at archive.org experienced rapid growth during the
past few years. AFAIK _Omni_'s the only magazine that they made
available at first then later removed at the publisher's request.

"Our Man in Peking" (Howard) is one of my favorite _Galaxy_ stories. It
appears in the Februrary 1967 edition and contains classic chemtrail
before there was chemtrail. It also offers up sinister spook business.
Here's my favorite parts of the story.

spoiler space


The bomber howled and bucked through updrafts. Dr. West knew
the aircraft was laying a trail of aerosol fog across the
formerly desolate mountains of South Central China.

"They should have told us," the Major blurted. "I'm a
professional. I should have been given the chance to
volunteer. The Colonel and me, we're going to complete
this spray run on the chance that the Air Force did
agree to - sell us out. You C.I.A. spook, we've decided
to complete the spraying mission.

The Major waved the almost prehistoric .45 automatic
ineffectually. "Now do you feel better or worse?"

Dr. West surreptitiously had managed to raise his
thumb from the button. At first his thumb had not wanted
to release the button, as if it had an over-trained
one-track mind of its own. The flickering red light
stayed on, and Dr. West knew the spraying was
continuing anyway. Probably if he never had pressed the
button, a back-up mechanism would have initiated the
spraying. Probably he was not only expendable; he was
superfluous.

...

When the couch was brought, Dr. West was afraid to sleep.
What was going on in Mao III's head? The man had not spoken
or moved since -
"I move. I speak," Mao III said. "What do you wish to
speak about?"206198

*Sleep until I awaken you.* Dr. West lay there staring up at
the triumphantly grinning faces of the Harvard Circle.
Dr. George Bruning, boy wonder, geophysicist, astronaut,
political climber, and buddy of the President.
Dr. Sam Wynoski, chemopsychiatrist.
Dr. Fred Gatson, bacteriologist and ladder climber.
Dr. Einar Johansen, neurosurgeon and electric eel fancier.
Dr. Tom Randolph, parapsychologist.
You C.I.A. master minds, Dr. West thought so gently that
Mao III did not awaken, you've succeeded in planting your man
in Peking.
But am I your man? You may have implanted general guidelines
such as "love America." But you could never prepare me for all
of the quick and unexpected decisions a new dictator must make.
I have a feeling I am free now - to do what I want. Soon we'll
find out.

Thank you,

--
Don
j***@specsol.spam.sux.com
2017-07-16 18:23:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Bob Clark
Now we know where you got your scientific and engineering training.
--
Jim Pennino
Greg Goss
2017-07-16 18:56:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
I think a fair number of Niven's stuff came through Galaxy, didn't it?

Was Rammer / Children of the State a Galaxy novel?
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Ahasuerus
2017-07-16 19:48:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
I think a fair number of Niven's stuff came through Galaxy, didn't it?
Right -- http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pe.cgi?452
Greg Goss
2017-07-16 21:18:46 UTC
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Raw Message
(or did he?)
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Greg Goss
I think a fair number of Niven's stuff came through Galaxy, didn't it?
Right -- http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pe.cgi?452
I hate it when a reply comes through before my actual post does. Or
maybe I killfiled myself?
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-16 19:40:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
I think a fair number of Niven's stuff came through Galaxy, didn't it?
I seem to remember reading a lot of his early works in If,
Galaxy-s sibling. But a look at ISFDB would give you a better
idea.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
The Starmaker
2017-07-16 19:11:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Bob Clark
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Starmaker
2017-07-16 19:37:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Bob Clark
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GALAXY SCIENCE FICTION



That might not have been
enough if the people' had not moved
next door with their daughter.

Perhaps that had been the start
of his awareness of his job, his
marriage, his life.

ONE night — it was so long ago —
he had gone out for a long
walk. In the moonlight, he realized
that he had come out to get away
from the nagging of his wife's tele-
vision set. He walked, hands in
pockets, blowing steam from his
mouth into the cold air.

"Alone," He looked at the ave-
nues ahead. "By God, I'm alone.
Not another pedestrian in miles."


---

Now, here is the problem with this writing...the minute I get to the Big Words "pedestrian", i have to spend hours trying to figure out
what the word "pedestrian" means. Best to just thow it away, why contune reading????




"Distantly, on crosstown arter-
ies,..."


Now I burn the book! This is a magzine for Martians, not earthlings like me...

"crosstown arteries"????


Who talks like that?


Why do you guys write books if you cannot communite with your readers?





I'll show you How To Write a science fiction book Today!



Grab a Headline like..."Kidnapped Children On Mars"


Create a one chapter ebook (nobody counts ebook pages)

Find a monster online...
Loading Image...&w=1484&op=resize&opt=1&filter=antialias&t=20170517


Loading Image.../revision/latest?cb=20150513040534


You can write a science fiction ebook every thiry days just using NASA's Headlines!


What is science fiction but just Fake Science, right? And NASA comes up wit it every fuckin day!



Never have writers block ever again!


The Starmaker (and i never read a science fiction book...too many big words.)



"crosstown arteries"????



I cannot go around talking to girls like that! I'll never get in there with that kind of talk!





"pedestrian"???? Ever heard a Brooklyn Gangster use that word?


Hey buddy, whach out for the "pedestrian"!

What?

"pedestrian"

whatthefuckisdat?


"that fuckin old lady crossing the street you goombah!"

"But, Lefty..she no wearin no "pedestrian"!?"


Go back to fukin third grade!

I went there three times already!!!!

Get the fuck out of the car!
The Starmaker
2017-07-17 07:29:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Starmaker
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Bob Clark
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GALAXY SCIENCE FICTION
That might not have been
enough if the people' had not moved
next door with their daughter.
Perhaps that had been the start
of his awareness of his job, his
marriage, his life.
ONE night — it was so long ago —
he had gone out for a long
walk. In the moonlight, he realized
that he had come out to get away
from the nagging of his wife's tele-
vision set. He walked, hands in
pockets, blowing steam from his
mouth into the cold air.
"Alone," He looked at the ave-
nues ahead. "By God, I'm alone.
Not another pedestrian in miles."
---
Now, here is the problem with this writing...the minute I get to the Big Words "pedestrian", i have to spend hours trying to figure out
what the word "pedestrian" means. Best to just thow it away, why contune reading????
"Distantly, on crosstown arter-
ies,..."
Now I burn the book! This is a magzine for Martians, not earthlings like me...
"crosstown arteries"????
Who talks like that?
Why do you guys write books if you cannot communite with your readers?
I'll show you How To Write a science fiction book Today!
Grab a Headline like..."Kidnapped Children On Mars"
Create a one chapter ebook (nobody counts ebook pages)
Find a monster online...
https://images.washingtonpost.com/?url=http://img.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2015/04/11b.-Tardigrade_SciSource_BS9660_final2.jpg&w=1484&op=resize&opt=1&filter=antialias&t=20170517
https://vignette3.wikia.nocookie.net/interesting-animals/images/8/89/Tardigrade.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150513040534
You can write a science fiction ebook every thirty days just using NASA's Headlines!
What is science fiction but just Fake Science, right? And NASA comes up wit it every fuckin day!
Never have writers block ever again!
Now, here is how you market/promote your sf ebook..

You hijack the news headline like: "Kidnapped Children On Mars" from NASA's news release or the Washington Post science news Headlines.

That way your ebook title is already making headlines...at the same time you release the ebook on Amazon for preorders even before you begin to
write the one chapter book (since it should take you less than 30 to write one chapter)...

Remember...in todays world, ebook sales are higher than hardcover books sales.





and please...stop wit this "crosstown arteries" ....it's sounds bloody stupid.
The Starmaker
2017-07-19 15:50:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Starmaker
Post by The Starmaker
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Bob Clark
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GALAXY SCIENCE FICTION
That might not have been
enough if the people' had not moved
next door with their daughter.
Perhaps that had been the start
of his awareness of his job, his
marriage, his life.
ONE night — it was so long ago —
he had gone out for a long
walk. In the moonlight, he realized
that he had come out to get away
from the nagging of his wife's tele-
vision set. He walked, hands in
pockets, blowing steam from his
mouth into the cold air.
"Alone," He looked at the ave-
nues ahead. "By God, I'm alone.
Not another pedestrian in miles."
---
Now, here is the problem with this writing...the minute I get to the Big Words "pedestrian", i have to spend hours trying to figure out
what the word "pedestrian" means. Best to just thow it away, why contune reading????
"Distantly, on crosstown arter-
ies,..."
Now I burn the book! This is a magzine for Martians, not earthlings like me...
"crosstown arteries"????
Who talks like that?
Why do you guys write books if you cannot communite with your readers?
I'll show you How To Write a science fiction book Today!
Grab a Headline like..."Kidnapped Children On Mars"
Create a one chapter ebook (nobody counts ebook pages)
Find a monster online...
https://images.washingtonpost.com/?url=http://img.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2015/04/11b.-Tardigrade_SciSource_BS9660_final2.jpg&w=1484&op=resize&opt=1&filter=antialias&t=201705
Post by The Starmaker
https://vignette3.wikia.nocookie.net/interesting-animals/images/8/89/Tardigrade.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150513040534
You can write a science fiction ebook every thirty days just using NASA's Headlines!
What is science fiction but just Fake Science, right? And NASA comes up wit it every fuckin day!
Never have writers block ever again!
Now, here is how you market/promote your sf ebook..
You hijack the news headline like: "Kidnapped Children On Mars" from NASA's news release or the Washington Post science news Headlines.
That way your ebook title is already making headlines...at the same time you release the ebook on Amazon for preorders even before you begin to
write the one chapter book (since it should take you less than 30 to write one chapter)...
Remember...in todays world, ebook sales are higher than hardcover books sales.
and please...stop wit this "crosstown arteries" ....it's sounds bloody stupid.
another 'Fake Science News You Can Use' is

"Very Peculiar Radio Signals"

"Astronomers don't know what's causing these weird radio waves from a nearby star"

https://news.google.com/news/search/section/q/star%20signal/star%20signal?hl=en&ned=us


I hope you already finished the other ebook on



"Congressman asks scientists if they've found ancient civilizations on Mars"



Fake News You Can Use -- It's SCIENCEfiction



https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/07/congressman-asks-scientists-if-theyve-found-ancient-civilizations-on-mars/


Is there..."some people" there?




This is what the Congressman should have told NASA...

"What difference does it make if i said thousand or billion, just answer the fucking question!!!!"


Here is how you handle NASA people, everytime they don't answer the question...SLAP THEM!


The Congressman should say to NASA..."Come over here, let me slap you."
The Starmaker
2017-07-19 17:41:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Starmaker
Post by The Starmaker
Post by The Starmaker
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Bob Clark
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GALAXY SCIENCE FICTION
That might not have been
enough if the people' had not moved
next door with their daughter.
Perhaps that had been the start
of his awareness of his job, his
marriage, his life.
ONE night — it was so long ago —
he had gone out for a long
walk. In the moonlight, he realized
that he had come out to get away
from the nagging of his wife's tele-
vision set. He walked, hands in
pockets, blowing steam from his
mouth into the cold air.
"Alone," He looked at the ave-
nues ahead. "By God, I'm alone.
Not another pedestrian in miles."
---
Now, here is the problem with this writing...the minute I get to the Big Words "pedestrian", i have to spend hours trying to figure out
what the word "pedestrian" means. Best to just thow it away, why contune reading????
"Distantly, on crosstown arter-
ies,..."
Now I burn the book! This is a magzine for Martians, not earthlings like me...
"crosstown arteries"????
Who talks like that?
Why do you guys write books if you cannot communite with your readers?
I'll show you How To Write a science fiction book Today!
Grab a Headline like..."Kidnapped Children On Mars"
Create a one chapter ebook (nobody counts ebook pages)
Find a monster online...
https://images.washingtonpost.com/?url=http://img.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2015/04/11b.-Tardigrade_SciSource_BS9660_final2.jpg&w=1484&op=resize&opt=1&filter=antialias&t=20
Post by The Starmaker
Post by The Starmaker
https://vignette3.wikia.nocookie.net/interesting-animals/images/8/89/Tardigrade.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150513040534
You can write a science fiction ebook every thirty days just using NASA's Headlines!
What is science fiction but just Fake Science, right? And NASA comes up wit it every fuckin day!
Never have writers block ever again!
Now, here is how you market/promote your sf ebook..
You hijack the news headline like: "Kidnapped Children On Mars" from NASA's news release or the Washington Post science news Headlines.
That way your ebook title is already making headlines...at the same time you release the ebook on Amazon for preorders even before you begin to
write the one chapter book (since it should take you less than 30 to write one chapter)...
Remember...in todays world, ebook sales are higher than hardcover books sales.
and please...stop wit this "crosstown arteries" ....it's sounds bloody stupid.
another 'Fake Science News You Can Use' is
"Very Peculiar Radio Signals"
"Astronomers don't know what's causing these weird radio waves from a nearby star"
https://news.google.com/news/search/section/q/star%20signal/star%20signal?hl=en&ned=us
I hope you already finished the other ebook on
"Congressman asks scientists if they've found ancient civilizations on Mars"
Fake News You Can Use -- It's SCIENCEfiction
https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/07/congressman-asks-scientists-if-theyve-found-ancient-civilizations-on-mars/
Is there..."some people" there?
This is what the Congressman should have told NASA...
"What difference does it make if i said thousand or billion, just answer the fucking question!!!!"
Here is how you handle NASA people, everytime they don't answer the question...SLAP THEM!
The Congressman should say to NASA..."Come over here, let me slap you."




CONGRESSMAN ASKS NASA IF THERE’S AN ANCIENT CIVILIZATION ON MARS. FOR REAL.
http://www.newsweek.com/mars-congressman-lost-space-ancient-civilisation-life-638944





"billions of years?" How old is Mars?? billions and billions??? oh, just 4? that's billions??? what kind of math does nasa use????


thousand of years ago would be how many years?



a 100? 80?? 50??? ....4????
Ingo Siekmann
2017-07-17 08:37:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Hallo,
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Thanks for sharing it.

Bye
Ingo
Butch Malahide
2017-07-18 04:09:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Bob Clark
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Unfortunately, the works of certain authors, such as Poul Anderson
and Harlan Ellison, have been removed from the archive.
Robert Carnegie
2017-07-18 18:54:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Butch Malahide
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
Bob Clark
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finally, nanotechnology can now fulfill its potential to revolutionize
21st-century technology, from the space elevator, to private, orbital
launchers, to 'flying cars'.
Nanotech: from air to space.
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/nanotech-from-air-to-space/x/13319568/
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Unfortunately, the works of certain authors, such as Poul Anderson
and Harlan Ellison, have been removed from the archive.
Harly surprising.
Kay Shapero
2017-07-20 07:07:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Clark
Issues of Galaxy science fiction magazine from the 50's to the 70's have
Seminal sci-fi magazine 'Galaxy' is now free online
The archive contains issues from 1950 - 1976 and includes early stories from
heavy-hitting authors.
07.14.17 in Internet
https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/14/seminal-sci-fi-galaxy-free-online/
Anyone have any favorite stories from the magazine, or Hugo or Nebula award
winners from that time period?
A favorite memory of my childhood was the Christmas morning I found a
copy of Galaxy and a large orange in my sock (we were allowed to go
pillage those early if we didn't bug the adults until later). Best
Christmas Sock Ever! There was a Cordwainer Smith novella (one of the
Casher O'Neill stories - I forget which one) and a lot of other stuff I
enjoyed but do not recall. I don't see the cover on the archive (early
'60s fwiw), but what the heck. Back I go to rereading Schmitz's "The
Second Night of Summer" from December 1950. Thanks for the link!
--
Kay Shapero
Address munged, try my first name at kayshapero dot net.
Kay Shapero
2017-07-20 07:30:19 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Kay Shapero
'60s fwiw), but what the heck. Back I go to rereading Schmitz's "The
Second Night of Summer" from December 1950. Thanks for the link!
And am reminded of why it's fun to go find the earliest magazine version
of something - there were a number of changes made when it was reprinted
in later collections. Improvements imho.
--
Kay Shapero
Address munged, try my first name at kayshapero dot net.
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