Discussion:
Some Impressions of Graydon Saunders's Novels
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Robert Woodward
2018-04-28 05:11:29 UTC
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I have some doubts of whether the Commonweals (either one) could
survive. Usually, the result of a nation being split into two is that
both parts will fall (the ratio of frontier to be defended versus
population gets worse).

As for _The Human Dress_, I want to identify the dinosaurs, but I am
having difficulties. Either Graydon has dinosaurs that aren't known to
science or I know even less on the subject that I thought. For example,
the featherheads, as described, are obviously very large theropods,
probably members of the Coelurosauria clade. The problem is that the
arms, as described, are too long to be Tyrannosaurus and AFAIK, nothing
else in that clade is as large. BTW, the springers might be
Tyrannosauroids (the largest are approaching Tyrannosaurus in size).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
‹-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-28 05:58:48 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
I have some doubts of whether the Commonweals (either one) could
survive. Usually, the result of a nation being split into two is that
both parts will fall (the ratio of frontier to be defended versus
population gets worse).
As for _The Human Dress_, I want to identify the dinosaurs, but I am
having difficulties. Either Graydon has dinosaurs that aren't known to
science or I know even less on the subject that I thought. For example,
the featherheads, as described, are obviously very large theropods,
probably members of the Coelurosauria clade. The problem is that the
arms, as described, are too long to be Tyrannosaurus and AFAIK, nothing
else in that clade is as large. BTW, the springers might be
Tyrannosauroids (the largest are approaching Tyrannosaurus in size).
Back in March, when I was putting my review together, Graydon
told me, "It's the Very Late Cretaceous and magic works, so you
get an idea of dinosaurs that our purely material biomechanics
won't support. (There is no way to get a 12 ton biped to run
that fast, for example.) Giants are dinosaurs with an implausible
amount of extra coolness added. :)

"There is a general pattern of small becomes large with
theropods, when you get large theropods, though, so
featherheads are some sort of gigantic, hyper-carnivorous
troodontid. (Springers are tyrannosaurs.)"

Hope that helps some.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
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