Discussion:
_Wolfbane_ by Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth
Add Reply
Lynn McGuire
2017-07-04 20:41:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
_Wolfbane_ by Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth
https://www.amazon.com/Wolfbane-Frederik-Pohl/dp/1479421677/

A singular book with no prequel or sequel first published in 1957. I
read the 1976 MMPB that my daughter bought for me in Half Price Books.
I would call the book a novella instead of a novel since it is only 140
pages.

It has been 250 years since the Earth has been ripped by its orbit
around the Sun by a wandering planet with "aliens" propelling it to an
unknown destination. They set the Moon afire somehow to replace the
Sun's warmth on a five year (1865 day) cycle. Each of the four seasons
has been stretched to over a year as the Moon's warmth waxes and then
wanes. 85% of the Earths population has been reduced since the warmth
of the summer gives way to a glaciation of almost the entire planet on
every five year cycle.

I was tempted to give the story three stars but the ending moved it back
up to four stars. I could say more but there is a rather serious hook
at the end that I could easily spoil.

My rating: 4 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 3.8 out of 5 stars (11 reviews)

Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2017-07-05 07:13:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Wolfbane_ by Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth
https://www.amazon.com/Wolfbane-Frederik-Pohl/dp/1479421677/
A singular book with no prequel or sequel first published in 1957. I
read the 1976 MMPB that my daughter bought for me in Half Price Books.
I would call the book a novella instead of a novel since it is only 140
pages.
It has been 250 years since the Earth has been ripped by its orbit
around the Sun by a wandering planet with "aliens" propelling it to an
unknown destination. They set the Moon afire somehow to replace the
Sun's warmth on a five year (1865 day) cycle. Each of the four seasons
has been stretched to over a year as the Moon's warmth waxes and then
wanes. 85% of the Earths population has been reduced since the warmth
of the summer gives way to a glaciation of almost the entire planet on
every five year cycle.
I was tempted to give the story three stars but the ending moved it back
up to four stars. I could say more but there is a rather serious hook
at the end that I could easily spoil.
I suppose if the "aliens" steal Earth from
the Solar System without cresting an external
energy source, then everyone just dies and
the story is pretty short.

Logically, the aliens could detect planets of
a star remotely (we can) but probably not moons,
so, if this is what they do for a living, how
do they manage it on a planet without a large
moon? Maybe ignite the planet they came in on.
Finding Earth's Moon must be a lucky bonus?
Dimensional Traveler
2017-07-05 15:04:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Wolfbane_ by Frederik Pohl and C.M. Kornbluth
https://www.amazon.com/Wolfbane-Frederik-Pohl/dp/1479421677/
A singular book with no prequel or sequel first published in 1957. I
read the 1976 MMPB that my daughter bought for me in Half Price Books.
I would call the book a novella instead of a novel since it is only 140
pages.
It has been 250 years since the Earth has been ripped by its orbit
around the Sun by a wandering planet with "aliens" propelling it to an
unknown destination. They set the Moon afire somehow to replace the
Sun's warmth on a five year (1865 day) cycle. Each of the four seasons
has been stretched to over a year as the Moon's warmth waxes and then
wanes. 85% of the Earths population has been reduced since the warmth
of the summer gives way to a glaciation of almost the entire planet on
every five year cycle.
I was tempted to give the story three stars but the ending moved it back
up to four stars. I could say more but there is a rather serious hook
at the end that I could easily spoil.
I suppose if the "aliens" steal Earth from
the Solar System without cresting an external
energy source, then everyone just dies and
the story is pretty short.
Logically, the aliens could detect planets of
a star remotely (we can) but probably not moons,
so, if this is what they do for a living, how
do they manage it on a planet without a large
moon? Maybe ignite the planet they came in on.
Finding Earth's Moon must be a lucky bonus?
Moons are almost certainly common in solar systems. If they can sling
Earth around it shouldn't be too much trouble to grab a moon from a gas
giant and put it in orbit around the target planet to burn.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Loading...