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[Because My Tears Are Delicious To You] The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
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James Nicoll
2018-08-26 13:50:01 UTC
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The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke

https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
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D B Davis
2018-08-26 17:01:22 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
The “The Nine Billion Names of God” and “The Wall of Darkness” are known
to me. "Nine Billion" is trippy in a Nepalese way. "Wall" hammers home
the notion of life as an existential prison.



Thank you,
--
Don
m***@sky.com
2018-08-26 18:27:44 UTC
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The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
James says

“Refugee” • (1955) • short story

A young man imprisoned by convention leaps on a chance to escape.

Comments

I hadn’t noticed that the British royal family is unwilling to let heirs do risky things (in the military at least). Perhaps this is an instance of different times, different mores.

(end quote)
It might be interesting to compare the British royal family with the "Devil's bargain" of being Vor described in Komarr. They were and are potential target of terrorist attacks, although there are arguments that they have never been direct targets (the IRA may have feared reprisals, but they did assassinate Lord Mountbatten of Burma, Prince Phillip's uncle. It is perhaps fortunate that they are descendants of the Prophet - though I expect that a number of descendants of the Prophet have already been killed in the name of Islam). Prince Charles is thought to have rebelled against an education at Gordonstoun which heavily emphasized strenuous outdoor activities for their character building effects, but Prince Charles played Polo at a high level long after anybody with any sense would have stopped (assuming they were silly enough to take the sport up in the first place).

Nevertheless, their role in life - whether they like it or not - is to carry on the family business of being something between a figurehead and a genuine leader. I think they are under a great deal of political and personal pressure not to do anything that would seriously interfere with that, whether it be going too far outside social norms (probably being brought up explicitly _not_ to follow in the footsteps of Edward VII) or taking a really serious risk.

Many people in the UK with professional level educations assume that the Royal Family are stupid. I note that many of these same people like to assume that education is a universal panacea. I would point out that there has been no lack of money to educate the Royal Family - perhaps there is scope for a version of "Refugee" in which the future heir mysteriously vanishes and is later revealed to be publishing papers in theoretical physics under an assumed name (I count 24 entries a.k.a for Prince Charles at https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q43274 - I think he has used Charles Wales now and then as a half-hearted attempt at incognito)
Default User
2018-08-26 20:41:43 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
I thought I had probably read this, but some of the stories weren't
familiar. Among them "The Wall of Darkness". Here's some discussion of
that, with spoilers:

<https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/63411/what-is-the-geometry-of-the-universe-in-the-wall-of-darkness-by-arthur-c-clark>



Brian
Jerry Brown
2018-08-27 06:58:00 UTC
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On Sun, 26 Aug 2018 20:41:43 -0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
I thought I had probably read this, but some of the stories weren't
familiar. Among them "The Wall of Darkness". Here's some discussion of
<https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/63411/what-is-the-geometry-of-the-universe-in-the-wall-of-darkness-by-arthur-c-clark>
It struck me that the protagonist blowing up the structure just means
that someone else will try again in a few years, perhaps noting that
the last person who tried must have been mad because he destroyed his
creation.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Jerry Brown
2018-08-27 10:21:53 UTC
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On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 07:58:00 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
On Sun, 26 Aug 2018 20:41:43 -0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
I thought I had probably read this, but some of the stories weren't
familiar. Among them "The Wall of Darkness". Here's some discussion of
<https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/63411/what-is-the-geometry-of-the-universe-in-the-wall-of-darkness-by-arthur-c-clark>
It struck me that the protagonist blowing up the structure just means
that someone else will try again in a few years, perhaps noting that
the last person who tried must have been mad because he destroyed his
creation.
That said, I did enjoy this story.

After ACC's death I reread his complete short stories out of respect
and found it a largely disagreeable experience, especially the White
Hart ones which I'd loved as a teenager (late 70s) but "now" found
horribly twee. "The Wall of Darkness" was one which I actually enjoyed
more this time around.

I was so concerned that I'd "grown out of" ACC's SF that I took a
break halfway through to re-read my favourite of his, "The City and
the Stars", which I still found to be as awe-inspiring as ever. I'm
also in the minority who prefer it to "Against the Fall of Night".

I am considering a reread of Rama (the original and no further), but
am worried that I'll have an even more James-type experience than with
the shorts.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Michael F. Stemper
2018-08-27 12:46:15 UTC
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Post by Jerry Brown
I was so concerned that I'd "grown out of" ACC's SF that I took a
break halfway through to re-read my favourite of his, "The City and
the Stars", which I still found to be as awe-inspiring as ever. I'm
also in the minority who prefer it to "Against the Fall of Night".
I am another member of this minority. I find _The City and the Stars_
far superior to _Against the Fall of Night_. It's not often that a
rewrite improves things, but it certainly did here.

The writing in Night seems flat to me by comparison.
--
Michael F. Stemper
What happens if you play John Cage's "4'33" at a slower tempo?
Jerry Brown
2018-08-29 18:38:33 UTC
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On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 07:46:15 -0500, "Michael F. Stemper"
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Jerry Brown
I was so concerned that I'd "grown out of" ACC's SF that I took a
break halfway through to re-read my favourite of his, "The City and
the Stars", which I still found to be as awe-inspiring as ever. I'm
also in the minority who prefer it to "Against the Fall of Night".
I am another member of this minority. I find _The City and the Stars_
far superior to _Against the Fall of Night_. It's not often that a
rewrite improves things, but it certainly did here.
Glad I'm not alone then.
Post by Michael F. Stemper
The writing in Night seems flat to me by comparison.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
a425couple
2018-08-28 22:17:17 UTC
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Post by Jerry Brown
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 07:58:00 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
On Sun, 26 Aug 2018 20:41:43 -0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
I thought I had probably read this, but some of the stories weren't
familiar. Among them "The Wall of Darkness". Here's some discussion of
<https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/63411/what-is-the-geometry-of-the-universe-in-the-wall-of-darkness-by-arthur-c-clark>
It struck me that the protagonist blowing up the structure just means
that someone else will try again in a few years, perhaps noting that
the last person who tried must have been mad because he destroyed his
creation.
That said, I did enjoy this story.
After ACC's death I reread his complete short stories out of respect
and found it a largely disagreeable experience, especially the White
Hart ones which I'd loved as a teenager (late 70s) but "now" found
horribly twee. "The Wall of Darkness" was one which I actually enjoyed
more this time around.
I was so concerned that I'd "grown out of" ACC's SF that I took a
break halfway through to re-read my favourite of his, "The City and
the Stars", which I still found to be as awe-inspiring as ever. I'm
also in the minority who prefer it to "Against the Fall of Night".
I am considering a reread of Rama (the original and no further), but
am worried that I'll have an even more James-type experience than with
the shorts.
I definitely enjoyed a recent reread of "Rendezvous with Rama".
I also enjoyed rereading "The Fountains of Paradise."

I was not that fond of "Against the Fall of Night".
Jerry Brown
2018-08-29 18:38:09 UTC
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On Tue, 28 Aug 2018 15:17:17 -0700, a425couple
Post by a425couple
Post by Jerry Brown
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 07:58:00 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
On Sun, 26 Aug 2018 20:41:43 -0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
I thought I had probably read this, but some of the stories weren't
familiar. Among them "The Wall of Darkness". Here's some discussion of
<https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/63411/what-is-the-geometry-of-the-universe-in-the-wall-of-darkness-by-arthur-c-clark>
It struck me that the protagonist blowing up the structure just means
that someone else will try again in a few years, perhaps noting that
the last person who tried must have been mad because he destroyed his
creation.
That said, I did enjoy this story.
After ACC's death I reread his complete short stories out of respect
and found it a largely disagreeable experience, especially the White
Hart ones which I'd loved as a teenager (late 70s) but "now" found
horribly twee. "The Wall of Darkness" was one which I actually enjoyed
more this time around.
I was so concerned that I'd "grown out of" ACC's SF that I took a
break halfway through to re-read my favourite of his, "The City and
the Stars", which I still found to be as awe-inspiring as ever. I'm
also in the minority who prefer it to "Against the Fall of Night".
I am considering a reread of Rama (the original and no further), but
am worried that I'll have an even more James-type experience than with
the shorts.
I definitely enjoyed a recent reread of "Rendezvous with Rama".
I think I'll give it a go then.
Post by a425couple
I also enjoyed rereading "The Fountains of Paradise."
I recall that I didn't care for the occasional cutaways to the
historic King of "Ceylon-with-the-Serial-Numbers-Filed-Off".
Post by a425couple
I was not that fond of "Against the Fall of Night".
I read it several years after TCatS (which as I said above still blows
me away) and found it an interesting experience, but not one I'm
likely to repeat.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
p***@hotmail.com
2018-08-27 01:09:06 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
--
In reference to your comments on the story _Take a Deep Breath_:

My understanding is that the process by which blood absorbs oxygen in atmosphere works efficiently in reverse in vacuum. A human exposed to vacuum would probably pass out faster than the protagonist does in the story. Clarke is generally good on such details, so it’s likely just a case of Science Marches On.

I do not have a copy of the story at hand, but as long as the protagonist is
not described as being conscious for more than about ten seconds (similar to
what was shown in a similar situation in _2001: A Space Odyssey_), Clarke
was correct. Once blood is no longer being oxygenated in the lungs, there
remains about a ten second supply of oxygenated blood in the blood vessels
between the lungs and the brain. In aviation medicine the length of time
a pilot can function effectively following a loss of pressure is known as
the "time of useful consciousness" and has been extensively studied in
altitude chamber experiments. As one might expect, time of useful consciousness
is shorter for higher altitudes, but it levels off at 10 to 15 seconds (there
is a lot of variation between individuals) above about 50,000 feet, at which
height there is no longer any effective oxygenation. In 1965 in a
vacuum chamber mishap a man lost all pressure in his suit and did remain
conscious for about ten seconds and recovered after pressure was restored in
the chamber, which took about a minute.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
J. Clarke
2018-08-27 03:59:01 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
--
My understanding is that the process by which blood absorbs oxygen in atmosphere works efficiently in reverse in vacuum. A human exposed to vacuum would probably pass out faster than the protagonist does in the story. Clarke is generally good on such details, so it’s likely just a case of Science Marches On.
Why would it work in reverse in a vacuum? It's a chemical
reaction--hemoglobin releases oxygen in the presence of CO2 and high
Ph. Vacuum does not produce those conditions.
I do not have a copy of the story at hand, but as long as the protagonist is
not described as being conscious for more than about ten seconds (similar to
what was shown in a similar situation in _2001: A Space Odyssey_), Clarke
was correct. Once blood is no longer being oxygenated in the lungs, there
remains about a ten second supply of oxygenated blood in the blood vessels
between the lungs and the brain. In aviation medicine the length of time
a pilot can function effectively following a loss of pressure is known as
the "time of useful consciousness" and has been extensively studied in
altitude chamber experiments. As one might expect, time of useful consciousness
is shorter for higher altitudes, but it levels off at 10 to 15 seconds (there
is a lot of variation between individuals) above about 50,000 feet, at which
height there is no longer any effective oxygenation. In 1965 in a
vacuum chamber mishap a man lost all pressure in his suit and did remain
conscious for about ten seconds and recovered after pressure was restored in
the chamber, which took about a minute.
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
a425couple
2018-08-27 23:12:46 UTC
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Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
--
My understanding is that the process by which blood absorbs oxygen in atmosphere works efficiently in reverse in vacuum. A human exposed to vacuum would probably pass out faster than the protagonist does in the story. Clarke is generally good on such details, so it’s likely just a case of Science Marches On.
I do not have a copy of the story at hand, but as long as the protagonist is
not described as being conscious for more than about ten seconds (similar to
what was shown in a similar situation in _2001: A Space Odyssey_), Clarke
was correct. Once blood is no longer being oxygenated in the lungs, there
remains about a ten second supply of oxygenated blood in the blood vessels
between the lungs and the brain. In aviation medicine the length of time
a pilot can function effectively following a loss of pressure is known as
the "time of useful consciousness" and has been extensively studied in
altitude chamber experiments. As one might expect, time of useful consciousness
is shorter for higher altitudes, but it levels off at 10 to 15 seconds (there
is a lot of variation between individuals) above about 50,000 feet, at which
height there is no longer any effective oxygenation. In 1965 in a
vacuum chamber mishap a man lost all pressure in his suit and did remain
conscious for about ten seconds and recovered after pressure was restored in
the chamber, which took about a minute.
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
That same idea / action (surviving is space with out a proper suit)
(besides the well remembered 2001: A Space Odyssey) was also in
an Arthur Clarke book I posted about on 6-30-2017, "Earthlight".

Here is some of the Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthlight
"1955 - Earthlight is a science fiction adventure story set on
the Moon, where a government agent is looking for a suspected spy
- destructing space ship - - able to rescue all but one
of the crew who have to make the 40 second crossing without space
suits."
Quadibloc
2018-08-27 03:22:03 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
Why is this one in the "tears" category?

John Savard
David Goldfarb
2018-08-27 05:08:04 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
Why is this one in the "tears" category?
Because, like all the other books in the category, it's one he read
while a teenager. Not all such books necessarily make him weep today.
--
David Goldfarb |"Backward, turn backward, O time in your flight!
***@gmail.com | I've thought of a comeback I needed last night."
***@ocf.berkeley.edu | -- Dorothy Parker
James Nicoll
2018-08-27 13:33:27 UTC
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Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Quadibloc
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
Why is this one in the "tears" category?
Because, like all the other books in the category, it's one he read
while a teenager. Not all such books necessarily make him weep today.
Some are pleasant surprises: The Jupiter Theft still had crap physics
but I'd forgotten the effort the author put into his aliens.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
a425couple
2018-08-27 23:27:40 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
As to your,
“A Question of Residence” • (1956) • short story
It’s clear why someone would want to be the first to reach the Moon but
why would someone want to be last one to return to the Earth?
Comment
Hint: Clarke was more or less a voluntary tax exile from the UK."

I think it was not so much a question of taxes, as it was
his personal desire to be free of UK intrusive morality laws,
as in avoiding the fate of Allan Turing. Involuntary Gynaecomastia
is not fun.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-27 23:57:08 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
As to your,
“A Question of Residence” • (1956) • short story
It’s clear why someone would want to be the first to reach the Moon but
why would someone want to be last one to return to the Earth?
Comment
Hint: Clarke was more or less a voluntary tax exile from the UK."
I think it was not so much a question of taxes, as it was
his personal desire to be free of UK intrusive morality laws,
as in avoiding the fate of Allan Turing. Involuntary Gynaecomastia
is not fun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke
He may have not wanted to put that in a story though.
Sri Lanka isn't consistently open minded either.

The tax may be a factor; well done any writer in the genre
having that amongst their professional problems.
William Hyde
2018-08-28 19:46:26 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a425couple
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
As to your,
“A Question of Residence” • (1956) • short story
It’s clear why someone would want to be the first to reach the Moon but
why would someone want to be last one to return to the Earth?
Comment
Hint: Clarke was more or less a voluntary tax exile from the UK."
I think it was not so much a question of taxes, as it was
his personal desire to be free of UK intrusive morality laws,
as in avoiding the fate of Allan Turing. Involuntary Gynaecomastia
is not fun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke
He may have not wanted to put that in a story though.
Sri Lanka isn't consistently open minded either.
The tax may be a factor; well done any writer in the genre
having that amongst their professional problems.
Clarke wasn't making remotely enough money to need a tax shelter in 1956.

He was, however, very interested in diving at this time, and he and his (business) partner Mike Wilson, after a few dives in the Channel, decided that a tropical location was required for this. ACC wrote several books about their dives in one of which he discusses the move from the UK to (then) Ceylon.

Though the reason Mr Savard gives may well have been as important a factor. I don't think we know.

William Hyde
a425couple
2018-08-28 21:13:47 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a425couple
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
As to your,
“A Question of Residence” • (1956) • short story
It’s clear why someone would want to be the first to reach the Moon but
why would someone want to be last one to return to the Earth?
Comment
Hint: Clarke was more or less a voluntary tax exile from the UK."
I think it was not so much a question of taxes, as it was
his personal desire to be free of UK intrusive morality laws,
as in avoiding the fate of Allan Turing. Involuntary Gynaecomastia
is not fun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke
He may have not wanted to put that in a story though.
Sri Lanka isn't consistently open minded either.
The tax may be a factor; well done any writer in the genre
having that amongst their professional problems.
Clarke wasn't making remotely enough money to need a tax shelter in 1956.
He was, however, very interested in diving at this time, and he and his (business) partner Mike Wilson, after a few dives in the Channel, decided that a tropical location was required for this. ACC wrote several books about their dives in one of which he discusses the move from the UK to (then) Ceylon.
Though the reason Mr Savard gives may well have been as important a factor. I don't think we know.
William Hyde
from
https://theamericanscholar.org/the-grasshopper-and-his-space-odyssey/#.W4W4s-hKiUk

"From Clarke’s writings one could get the impression that he had
settled in Sri Lanka because of the skin-diving opportunities.
That played a role in his decision, but there was more to it.
In 1952 the British mathematician Alan Turing was convicted of
gross indecency—under the same Victorian law that had been used
in 1895 to convict Oscar Wilde—and forced to take female hormones,
a supposed cure for homosexuality. Turing committed suicide in 1954
by eating a poisoned apple. It was not coincidental that Clarke
chose to make Sri Lanka his home soon afterward. He once told me
that if he’d had the chance he would have urged Turing to immigrate
to the island."
William Hyde
2018-08-29 21:12:17 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Post by William Hyde
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a425couple
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
As to your,
“A Question of Residence” • (1956) • short story
It’s clear why someone would want to be the first to reach the Moon but
why would someone want to be last one to return to the Earth?
Comment
Hint: Clarke was more or less a voluntary tax exile from the UK."
I think it was not so much a question of taxes, as it was
his personal desire to be free of UK intrusive morality laws,
as in avoiding the fate of Allan Turing. Involuntary Gynaecomastia
is not fun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke
He may have not wanted to put that in a story though.
Sri Lanka isn't consistently open minded either.
The tax may be a factor; well done any writer in the genre
having that amongst their professional problems.
Clarke wasn't making remotely enough money to need a tax shelter in 1956.
He was, however, very interested in diving at this time, and he and his (business) partner Mike Wilson, after a few dives in the Channel, decided that a tropical location was required for this. ACC wrote several books about their dives in one of which he discusses the move from the UK to (then) Ceylon.
Though the reason Mr Savard gives may well have been as important a factor. I don't think we know.
William Hyde
from
https://theamericanscholar.org/the-grasshopper-and-his-space-odyssey/#.W4W4s-hKiUk
"From Clarke’s writings one could get the impression that he had
settled in Sri Lanka because of the skin-diving opportunities.
That played a role in his decision, but there was more to it.
In 1952 the British mathematician Alan Turing was convicted of
gross indecency—under the same Victorian law that had been used
in 1895 to convict Oscar Wilde—and forced to take female hormones,
a supposed cure for homosexuality. Turing committed suicide in 1954
by eating a poisoned apple. It was not coincidental that Clarke
chose to make Sri Lanka his home soon afterward. He once told me
that if he’d had the chance he would have urged Turing to immigrate
to the island."
Turns out we do know. And so do I, now.

William Hyde
Robert Carnegie
2018-08-30 00:28:33 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Post by William Hyde
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a425couple
Post by James Nicoll
The Other Side of the Sky by Arthur C. Clarke
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/whole-worlds-upside-down
As to your,
“A Question of Residence” • (1956) • short story
It’s clear why someone would want to be the first to reach the Moon but
why would someone want to be last one to return to the Earth?
Comment
Hint: Clarke was more or less a voluntary tax exile from the UK."
I think it was not so much a question of taxes, as it was
his personal desire to be free of UK intrusive morality laws,
as in avoiding the fate of Allan Turing. Involuntary Gynaecomastia
is not fun.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke
He may have not wanted to put that in a story though.
Sri Lanka isn't consistently open minded either.
The tax may be a factor; well done any writer in the genre
having that amongst their professional problems.
Clarke wasn't making remotely enough money to need a tax shelter in 1956.
He was, however, very interested in diving at this time, and he and his (business) partner Mike Wilson, after a few dives in the Channel, decided that a tropical location was required for this. ACC wrote several books about their dives in one of which he discusses the move from the UK to (then) Ceylon.
Though the reason Mr Savard gives may well have been as important a factor. I don't think we know.
William Hyde
from
https://theamericanscholar.org/the-grasshopper-and-his-space-odyssey/#.W4W4s-hKiUk
"From Clarke’s writings one could get the impression that he had
settled in Sri Lanka because of the skin-diving opportunities.
That played a role in his decision, but there was more to it.
In 1952 the British mathematician Alan Turing was convicted of
gross indecency—under the same Victorian law that had been used
in 1895 to convict Oscar Wilde—and forced to take female hormones,
a supposed cure for homosexuality. Turing committed suicide in 1954
by eating a poisoned apple. It was not coincidental that Clarke
chose to make Sri Lanka his home soon afterward. He once told me
that if he’d had the chance he would have urged Turing to immigrate
to the island."
Turns out we do know. And so do I, now.
William Hyde
If true. Perhaps I should recognise the writer and
not suspect him of being gossipy?

Clarke also may have considered himself well on the way
to being a movie mogul, by this account, which brings
us back to tax.

Un-regular income also is a problem tax-wise, still so.
If <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pay-as-you-earn_tax>
is understood by me, in 1944 Britain's war government
imposed income-tax on many more people by skimming from
regular wage payments. But a writer may earn this year,
spend this year, then be taxed next year on the money
that, if careless about this, they no longer have.

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