Discussion:
The Martian Chronicler falls short
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a425couple
2018-04-28 15:50:48 UTC
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One of many relevant in
"Past predictions about the future that were way, way off"

was this one

"The Martian Chronicler falls short

Responsible for dozens upon dozens of short stories, as well as classic
novels like Fahrenheit 451 and several film adaptations and
inspirations, Ray Bradbury made science fiction cool, or at least
mainstream. The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains" or "The Veldt,"
but have probably heard of The Butterfly Effect (loosely inspired by his
story "A Sound of Thunder") as well as his disquieting Disney adaptation
Something Wicked This Way Comes. Then there's his highly influential
sci-fi saga The Martian Chronicles, which document colonial life on the
planet Mars (not on Bruno or Veronica, just to clarify).

Speaking of which, Bradbury's often terrifying and prescient
conceptualization of the future sometimes got a little bit ahead of
itself. Back in 1950, the prolific author predicted that nuclear war
would force us onto Mars by the 2000s. Fortunately, we were too busy
"drinking beer and watching soap operas," to quote Mr. Bradbury, to make
the colonization of Mars happen. Hey, at least we launched that rover
thingy, right?

Colonization technology may be in its infancy, but NASA and other
high-tech companies are working on landing humans on the red planet.
Bradbury's futurism, if a tad optimistic, continues to inspire future
generations to reach for the stars and the red planet, if they're not
wasting their life reaching for craft ales and viral cat videos,
instead. Thanks, Ray."

Read More:
http://www.grunge.com/47611/past-predictions-future-way-way/?utm_campaign=clip

Read More:
http://www.grunge.com/47611/past-predictions-future-way-way/?utm_campaign=clip

http://www.grunge.com/47611/past-predictions-future-way-way/

also (with some decent graphics),

"Popular Science pops off
from visualoop.com
Vintage Infographic The Spaceman (c. 1920)

Throughout its 144-year history, Popular Science spent the majority of
its time covering interesting topics from the world of science and
technology. The long-running magazine has also, on numerous occasions,
peered into the future — with limited degrees of success.

Back in 1963, Pop Sci ran a feature about "Tomorrow's Man." The two
doctors that wrote it seemed to think the future human, with its
adaptable body type, was ready for some major hardware upgrades. Looking
like a reject from a Borg/Pulp Fiction gimp cosplay crossover, the
Tomorrow Man is decked out in a cybernetic flight helmet with goggles
and a breathing tube. He rides his atomic tricycle to victory over the
world of common sense (and good taste), armed with his "atom chaser" and
video antennas, solar light replicator (what exactly happens to the sun
in this future?), atomic jet pack, and a kooky "digital computer"
strapped to his side — at least that came true. To be honest, we're
looking more like the Tusken Raider of tomorrow.

Even better, apparently their prediction was made before the days of
Radiation is bad, mmmkay?, so the future human is decked out in atomic
and gamma-powered gear. Basically, our future selves are either on the
verge of species-wide cancer epidemic or about to turn into the
Incredible Hulk."

Read More:
http://www.grunge.com/47611/past-predictions-future-way-way/?utm_campaign=clip
D B Davis
2018-04-28 16:32:14 UTC
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Followup to rasw because on a good day news.eternal-september.org may
allow me to post to two groups, but never three.
Post by a425couple
One of many relevant in
"Past predictions about the future that were way, way off"
was this one
"The Martian Chronicler falls short
Responsible for dozens upon dozens of short stories, as well as classic
novels like Fahrenheit 451 and several film adaptations and
inspirations, Ray Bradbury made science fiction cool, or at least
mainstream. The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains" or "The Veldt,"
but have probably heard of The Butterfly Effect (loosely inspired by his
story "A Sound of Thunder") as well as his disquieting Disney adaptation
Something Wicked This Way Comes. Then there's his highly influential
sci-fi saga The Martian Chronicles, which document colonial life on the
planet Mars (not on Bruno or Veronica, just to clarify).
Speaking of which, Bradbury's often terrifying and prescient
conceptualization of the future sometimes got a little bit ahead of
itself. Back in 1950, the prolific author predicted that nuclear war
would force us onto Mars by the 2000s. Fortunately, we were too busy
"drinking beer and watching soap operas," to quote Mr. Bradbury, to make
the colonization of Mars happen. Hey, at least we launched that rover
thingy, right?
Colonization technology may be in its infancy, but NASA and other
high-tech companies are working on landing humans on the red planet.
Bradbury's futurism, if a tad optimistic, continues to inspire future
generations to reach for the stars and the red planet, if they're not
wasting their life reaching for craft ales and viral cat videos,
instead. Thanks, Ray."
Bradbury's a favorite of mine, probably because he evokes E A Poe in my
mind. Short stories are my thing and _Martian Chronicles_ (MC) fires on
all eight cylinders for me. YMMV.
Bradbury used to keep a file cabinet full of partially written
stories that he polished as the spirit moved him. The theme of the MC
collection is the colonization of Mars. Other than that, the stories
stand-alone. ♂

Thank you,
--
Don
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-28 17:02:28 UTC
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Post by a425couple
One of many relevant in
"Past predictions about the future that were way, way off"
was this one
"The Martian Chronicler falls short
Responsible for dozens upon dozens of short stories, as well as classic
novels like Fahrenheit 451 and several film adaptations and
inspirations, Ray Bradbury made science fiction cool, or at least
mainstream. The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains" or "The Veldt,"
but have probably heard of The Butterfly Effect (loosely inspired by his
story "A Sound of Thunder") as well as his disquieting Disney adaptation
Something Wicked This Way Comes. Then there's his highly influential
sci-fi saga The Martian Chronicles, which document colonial life on the
planet Mars (not on Bruno or Veronica, just to clarify).
Which got a magnificent TV adaptation.

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&field-keywords=The+Martian+Chronicles
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Cryptoengineer
2018-04-29 03:30:00 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a425couple
One of many relevant in
"Past predictions about the future that were way, way off"
was this one
"The Martian Chronicler falls short
Responsible for dozens upon dozens of short stories, as well as
classic novels like Fahrenheit 451 and several film adaptations and
inspirations, Ray Bradbury made science fiction cool, or at least
mainstream. The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains" or "The Veldt,"
but have probably heard of The Butterfly Effect (loosely inspired by
his story "A Sound of Thunder") as well as his disquieting Disney
adaptation Something Wicked This Way Comes. Then there's his highly
influential sci-fi saga The Martian Chronicles, which document
colonial life on the planet Mars (not on Bruno or Veronica, just to
clarify).
Which got a magnificent TV adaptation.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&
field-keywords=The+Martian+Chronicles
Indeed. I recall it well. I didn't realize it had been released.

pt
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-29 04:05:45 UTC
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Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a425couple
One of many relevant in
"Past predictions about the future that were way, way off"
was this one
"The Martian Chronicler falls short
Responsible for dozens upon dozens of short stories, as well as
classic novels like Fahrenheit 451 and several film adaptations and
inspirations, Ray Bradbury made science fiction cool, or at least
mainstream. The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains" or "The Veldt,"
but have probably heard of The Butterfly Effect (loosely inspired by
his story "A Sound of Thunder") as well as his disquieting Disney
adaptation Something Wicked This Way Comes. Then there's his highly
influential sci-fi saga The Martian Chronicles, which document
colonial life on the planet Mars (not on Bruno or Veronica, just to
clarify).
Which got a magnificent TV adaptation.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&
field-keywords=The+Martian+Chronicles
Indeed. I recall it well. I didn't realize it had been released.
Oh yes, for some time now. I have a Laser Disc of it (remember
them??) but no player. I think I'll have to get the DVD the next
time I have a little cash. The Martians were authentically
beautiful. And I particularly remember Roddy MacDowell as a
young priest....
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
D B Davis
2018-04-29 12:19:47 UTC
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Followup to rec.arts.sf.written because news.eternal-september.org
doesn't allow me to post to more than one or two groups.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a425couple
One of many relevant in
"Past predictions about the future that were way, way off"
was this one
"The Martian Chronicler falls short
Responsible for dozens upon dozens of short stories, as well as
classic novels like Fahrenheit 451 and several film adaptations and
inspirations, Ray Bradbury made science fiction cool, or at least
mainstream. The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains" or "The Veldt,"
but have probably heard of The Butterfly Effect (loosely inspired by
his story "A Sound of Thunder") as well as his disquieting Disney
adaptation Something Wicked This Way Comes. Then there's his highly
influential sci-fi saga The Martian Chronicles, which document
colonial life on the planet Mars (not on Bruno or Veronica, just to
clarify).
Which got a magnificent TV adaptation.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&
field-keywords=The+Martian+Chronicles
Indeed. I recall it well. I didn't realize it had been released.
Oh yes, for some time now. I have a Laser Disc of it (remember
them??) but no player. I think I'll have to get the DVD the next
time I have a little cash. The Martians were authentically
beautiful. And I particularly remember Roddy MacDowell as a
young priest....
The TV episode where Roddy MacDowell appears is a Hollywood treatment of
"The Fire Balloons" (Bradbury). "The Fire Balloons" doesn't appear in
_The Martian Chronicles_, instead it's in _The Illustrated Man_.
The two missionaries, at least superficially, look like they belong
to a Spanish mission in California. Their appearance makes it easy for
me to imagine them both as Catholic priests. But the Bradbury actually
portrays them as Episcopalian Fathers.
BTW, my new usenet software application enables me to now post UTF-8
characters. It's a shame that Brian M Scott apparently stopped posting
to rasw because he likes to use UTF-8. It's my understanding that google
groups also enables the use of UTF-8.
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ♂

Thank you,
--
Don
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-04-29 12:30:58 UTC
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Post by D B Davis
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ?
Thanks to the wonders of Usenet clients (and fonts), that'll render
usefully in about 5% of people's readers. Here it's a question mark.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
Never sleep with anyone crazier than you are.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-29 15:13:41 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by D B Davis
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ?
Thanks to the wonders of Usenet clients (and fonts), that'll render
usefully in about 5% of people's readers. Here it's a question mark.
For me also.
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Never sleep with anyone crazier than you are.
That's a paraphrase of Nelson Algren's "three rules" which begin,
"Never play cards with a man called Doc; never eat at a place
called Mom's ..."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Kevrob
2018-04-29 20:55:28 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by D B Davis
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ?
Thanks to the wonders of Usenet clients (and fonts), that'll render
usefully in about 5% of people's readers. Here it's a question mark.
For me also.
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Never sleep with anyone crazier than you are.
That's a paraphrase of Nelson Algren's "three rules" which begin,
"Never play cards with a man called Doc; never eat at a place
called Mom's ..."
When I lived in Milwaukee, one of the few 24-hour places to eat
was "Ma Fischer's," on the same block as the Oriental Landmark
Theater. It has long been owned by a Greek family, named Panos,
shortened from Panagiotopoulos.

One of the Panos kids was captain of the University of Wisconsin
football team, and played 7 seasons in the NFL.

"Ma," sold out to the Panos family in 1975, but there's now a
statue of the founder, outside the restaurant.

https://onmilwaukee.com/dining/articles/mafischerstatue.html

Classic "Greek diner food," with an enormous menu. Eating at
"Ma's" after the midnight showing of Rocky Horror, after bar time,
was always a trip.

Kevin R
Stephen Harker
2018-04-30 07:29:46 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by D B Davis
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ?
Thanks to the wonders of Usenet clients (and fonts), that'll render
usefully in about 5% of people's readers. Here it's a question mark.
Cheers - Jaimie
It worked fine in gnus (within gnu emacs).
--
Stephen Harker ***@netspace.net.au
http://sjharker.customer.netspace.net.au/
Robert Carnegie
2018-04-29 13:35:57 UTC
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Post by D B Davis
Followup to rec.arts.sf.written because news.eternal-september.org
doesn't allow me to post to more than one or two groups.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a425couple
One of many relevant in
"Past predictions about the future that were way, way off"
was this one
"The Martian Chronicler falls short
Responsible for dozens upon dozens of short stories, as well as
classic novels like Fahrenheit 451 and several film adaptations and
inspirations, Ray Bradbury made science fiction cool, or at least
mainstream. The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains" or "The Veldt,"
but have probably heard of The Butterfly Effect (loosely inspired by
his story "A Sound of Thunder") as well as his disquieting Disney
adaptation Something Wicked This Way Comes. Then there's his highly
influential sci-fi saga The Martian Chronicles, which document
colonial life on the planet Mars (not on Bruno or Veronica, just to
clarify).
Which got a magnificent TV adaptation.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&
field-keywords=The+Martian+Chronicles
Indeed. I recall it well. I didn't realize it had been released.
Oh yes, for some time now. I have a Laser Disc of it (remember
them??) but no player. I think I'll have to get the DVD the next
time I have a little cash. The Martians were authentically
beautiful. And I particularly remember Roddy MacDowell as a
young priest....
The TV episode where Roddy MacDowell appears is a Hollywood treatment of
"The Fire Balloons" (Bradbury). "The Fire Balloons" doesn't appear in
_The Martian Chronicles_, instead it's in _The Illustrated Man_.
The two missionaries, at least superficially, look like they belong
to a Spanish mission in California. Their appearance makes it easy for
me to imagine them both as Catholic priests. But the Bradbury actually
portrays them as Episcopalian Fathers.
BTW, my new usenet software application enables me to now post UTF-8
characters. It's a shame that Brian M Scott apparently stopped posting
to rasw because he likes to use UTF-8. It's my understanding that google
groups also enables the use of UTF-8.
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ♂
Thank you,
--
Don
UTF-8 is a Unicode encoding that includes plain ASCII - and I wondered
if you knew that your male symbol was being displayed! ☺
D B Davis
2018-04-29 16:32:37 UTC
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<snip>
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by D B Davis
BTW, my new usenet software application enables me to now post UTF-8
characters. It's a shame that Brian M Scott apparently stopped posting
to rasw because he likes to use UTF-8. It's my understanding that google
groups also enables the use of UTF-8.
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ♂
UTF-8 is a Unicode encoding that includes plain ASCII - and I wondered
if you knew that your male symbol was being displayed! ☺
My newsreader tin displays your smiley. My tin configuration calls vi to
edit followups. Although vi also knows about UTF-8 for reasons
unbeknownst to me when used as a tin editor vi displays �\x99\x82
instead of ☺ and �\x98� instead of ♂. (It ought to be interesting to
see how /that/ mess plays out during this next iteration.)
My M O is to just use vi enough to copy and paste the initial
followup into gedit, which is a far better editor. My new software then
allows me to post my final draft of a gedit followup with embedded
UTF-8 characters.
My UTF-8 posts to rasw are mostly to beta-test my new software and
for the (lame) lulz. Ultimately it will pay dividends in the math and
physics groups. People in those groups tend to be a little ...
different. More of them, or at least the ones worth paying attention to,
probably use UTF-8. (End mark change to celebrate new topic.) ⚛

Thank you,
--
Don
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-29 15:09:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by D B Davis
BTW, my new usenet software application enables me to now post UTF-8
characters. It's a shame that Brian M Scott apparently stopped posting
to rasw because he likes to use UTF-8. It's my understanding that google
groups also enables the use of UTF-8.
I believe Brian still posts. Not as frequently as of yore, but
that's true of all of us.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Cryptoengineer
2018-04-29 23:52:07 UTC
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Permalink
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Post by D B Davis
Followup to rec.arts.sf.written because news.eternal-september.org
doesn't allow me to post to more than one or two groups.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a425couple
One of many relevant in
"Past predictions about the future that were way, way off"
was this one
"The Martian Chronicler falls short
Responsible for dozens upon dozens of short stories, as well as
classic novels like Fahrenheit 451 and several film adaptations and
inspirations, Ray Bradbury made science fiction cool, or at least
mainstream. The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains" or "The
Veldt," but have probably heard of The Butterfly Effect (loosely
inspired by his story "A Sound of Thunder") as well as his
disquieting Disney adaptation Something Wicked This Way Comes. Then
there's his highly influential sci-fi saga The Martian Chronicles,
which document colonial life on the planet Mars (not on Bruno or
Veronica, just to clarify).
Which got a magnificent TV adaptation.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-
tv& field-keywords=The+Martian+Chronicles
Indeed. I recall it well. I didn't realize it had been released.
Oh yes, for some time now. I have a Laser Disc of it (remember
them??) but no player. I think I'll have to get the DVD the next
time I have a little cash. The Martians were authentically
beautiful. And I particularly remember Roddy MacDowell as a
young priest....
The TV episode where Roddy MacDowell appears is a Hollywood treatment
of "The Fire Balloons" (Bradbury). "The Fire Balloons" doesn't appear
in _The Martian Chronicles_, instead it's in _The Illustrated Man_.
The two missionaries, at least superficially, look like they belong
to a Spanish mission in California. Their appearance makes it easy for
me to imagine them both as Catholic priests. But the Bradbury actually
portrays them as Episcopalian Fathers.
BTW, my new usenet software application enables me to now post UTF-8
characters. It's a shame that Brian M Scott apparently stopped posting
to rasw because he likes to use UTF-8. It's my understanding that
google groups also enables the use of UTF-8.
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ♂
It renders correctly in Google Groups.

In xnews, my preferred newsreader, its a lowercase 'a' with a circumflex
accent, followed by a bold character consisting two vertical bars.

In this post, as I type this, the quoted version is the same accented
a, but now followed by small 'TM' symbol well above the text line, and
a comma.

pt
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-30 13:27:48 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by D B Davis
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ♂
It renders correctly in Google Groups.
In xnews, my preferred newsreader, its a lowercase 'a' with a circumflex
accent, followed by a bold character consisting two vertical bars.
In this post, as I type this, the quoted version is the same accented
a, but now followed by small 'TM' symbol well above the text line, and
a comma.
And in my version of trn, it's lowercase-a-with-circumflex,
ctrl-Y. ctrl-B.

But as I type this, using vi, I'm seeing backslash-xe2,
backslash-x99, backslash-x82.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Greg Goss
2018-04-30 14:22:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by D B Davis
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ♂
It renders correctly in Google Groups.
In xnews, my preferred newsreader, its a lowercase 'a' with a circumflex
accent, followed by a bold character consisting two vertical bars.
In this post, as I type this, the quoted version is the same accented
a, but now followed by small 'TM' symbol well above the text line, and
a comma.
And in my version of trn, it's lowercase-a-with-circumflex,
ctrl-Y. ctrl-B.
But as I type this, using vi, I'm seeing backslash-xe2,
backslash-x99, backslash-x82.
The original showed as a question mark. Most of the replies show it
as a-circumflex TM
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Lynn McGuire
2018-05-01 18:57:33 UTC
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On 4/29/2018 7:19 AM, D B Davis wrote:
...
Post by D B Davis
BTW, my new usenet software application enables me to now post UTF-8
characters. It's a shame that Brian M Scott apparently stopped posting
to rasw because he likes to use UTF-8. It's my understanding that google
groups also enables the use of UTF-8.
It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ♂
UTF-8 works fine in Thunderbird x86 version 52.7.0 on Windows 7 x64.

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2018-05-01 18:59:52 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
...
     BTW, my new usenet software application enables me to now post UTF-8
characters. It's a shame that Brian M Scott apparently stopped posting
to rasw because he likes to use UTF-8. It's my understanding that google
groups also enables the use of UTF-8.
     It enables me to close each of my posts with an end mark. The
character at the end of this paragraph is my end mark for the time
being. It's the UTF-8 symbol for Mars, which doubles as the medical
symbol for male. ♂
UTF-8 works fine in Thunderbird x86 version 52.7.0 on Windows 7 x64.
Lynn
I should point out that Windows 7 x64 (and x86) are natively UTF-16 so
the programmer has to convert on the fly constantly between UTF-8 and
UTF-16. We just recently did some work in our software to add UTF-8
support which was quite interesting in a teeth pulling kind of way.

Lynn

Moriarty
2018-05-01 00:54:10 UTC
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On Sunday, April 29, 2018 at 2:30:04 PM UTC+10, Dorothy J Heydt wrote:

<The Martian Chronicles>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Which got a magnificent TV adaptation.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&
field-keywords=The+Martian+Chronicles
Indeed. I recall it well. I didn't realize it had been released.
Oh yes, for some time now. I have a Laser Disc of it (remember
them??) but no player.
Have you considered selling it? There are collectors out there willing to pay good money for ancient tech. The two copies I see on ebay are going for close to $100.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/MARTIAN-CHRONICLES-Laserdisc-Box-Set-of-3-Ray-Bradbury-Sci-Fi-TV-Sealed-LD/312100749522?hash=item48aaa780d2:g:TDAAAOSwQ7hawV5B

This would give you enough for...
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I think I'll have to get the DVD the next
time I have a little cash.
...with plenty of change leftover.

-Moriarty
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-05-01 05:25:46 UTC
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Post by Moriarty
<The Martian Chronicles>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Which got a magnificent TV adaptation.
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&
field-keywords=The+Martian+Chronicles
Indeed. I recall it well. I didn't realize it had been released.
Oh yes, for some time now. I have a Laser Disc of it (remember
them??) but no player.
Have you considered selling it? There are collectors out there willing
to pay good money for ancient tech. The two copies I see on ebay are
going for close to $100.
Hm. I would be willing to sell it if I could find

(a) the disk itself, which is in a box somewhere, and

(b) a buyer.

If I ever come across (a) in the course of cleaning up the house
(a very slow process, considering my age and my CFS), I'll
attempt (b).
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Johnny1A
2018-04-29 05:52:54 UTC
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Post by a425couple
"The Martian Chronicler falls short
The average reader may not be familiar with his classic
dystopian stories such as "There Will Come Soft Rains"
I remember that one well. It left a major impression on me when I first read _The Martian Chronicles_, when I was still pretty young. In reread the impression is greater, but it takes an adult to fully appreciate The Martian Chronicles.
Quadibloc
2018-04-29 20:33:29 UTC
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Saw the original article.

http://blog.modernmechanix.com/must-tomorrows-man-look-like-this/

The Tusken Raider was a comical image, representing the opposite of
what the article was saying would be in our future.
J. Clarke
2018-04-29 21:41:48 UTC
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On Sun, 29 Apr 2018 13:33:29 -0700 (PDT), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Saw the original article.
http://blog.modernmechanix.com/must-tomorrows-man-look-like-this/
The Tusken Raider was a comical image, representing the opposite of
what the article was saying would be in our future.
Another vison of cyborgs:

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