Discussion:
Yay . . . bummer
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Joy Beeson
2017-05-15 01:03:46 UTC
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When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.

I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-05-15 02:23:58 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
There is software that can speed up audio without affecting the pitch.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Carnegie
2017-05-15 02:26:04 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
You may be able to play audio at varying speed,
unless we discussed it already and you can't.
For instance, the free download program "VLC"
can have media file playing rate adjusted by
x 0.1 increment, i.e. x 1.1, 1.2, etc.
It doesn't change pitch but it sounds like
it skips ahead several times a second.

A DVD player may also do this.
Robert Carnegie
2017-05-15 02:33:03 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
You may be able to play audio at varying speed,
unless we discussed it already and you can't.
For instance, the free download program "VLC"
can have media file playing rate adjusted by
x 0.1 increment, i.e. x 1.1, 1.2, etc.
It doesn't change pitch but it sounds like
it skips ahead several times a second.
A DVD player may also do this.
Oh - http://www.videolan.org/index.html
for the "authentic" version without added
extras - I hope.

Actually I haven't had a satisfactory
update since 2.1.5, but they may have fixed
the issue that I got when I tried - of the
computer apparently scanning all of a video
file from digital TV before playing it -
and anyway we're discussing audio-only data
(maybe with a few pictures), whose files
are much smaller.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-15 02:28:14 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
David DeLaney
2017-05-15 05:11:27 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
And I don't even enjoy that exception. This is quite probably part of why
deep down I feel social gatherings meant to allow folks to get together and
talk with each other at length are something to be avoided at all costs...

Dave
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
David Johnston
2017-05-15 05:54:37 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
That's why I like this chick.

Still not as fast as I can read but as fast as I can listen.
Peter Trei
2017-05-16 04:12:39 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
I listen to a lot of podcasts while driving. Ones which aren't dramas, and don't
have music or sound as their focus, I invariably listen at 1.5x, unless they are
very clear and slow speakers, when I listen at 2x (e.g. Science Friday).

1.5x has become very easy to listen to. 2x is harder.

Pt
Greg Goss
2017-05-17 15:24:48 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
I listen to a lot of podcasts while driving. Ones which aren't dramas, and don't
have music or sound as their focus, I invariably listen at 1.5x, unless they are
very clear and slow speakers, when I listen at 2x (e.g. Science Friday).
1.5x has become very easy to listen to. 2x is harder.
Back in 1981, my VCR had a feature to play at double speed with no
pitch change. It couldn't do 1.5.

I listened to news shows at double because the presenter always talks
clearly and slow enough. Interviews, usually not. The host was OK,
but not the guest.

I found that listening to more than an hour or two of double-speed
pushed me into an adrenaline overdrive. Doing that while driving
would be waiting for a trigger for road rage.

I listen to a lot of podcasts these days. I don't think that my
player does high-speed, and have never looked for it.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Kevrob
2017-05-17 16:46:29 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
I listen to a lot of podcasts while driving. Ones which aren't dramas, and don't
have music or sound as their focus, I invariably listen at 1.5x, unless they are
very clear and slow speakers, when I listen at 2x (e.g. Science Friday).
1.5x has become very easy to listen to. 2x is harder.
Back in 1981, my VCR had a feature to play at double speed with no
pitch change. It couldn't do 1.5.
I listened to news shows at double because the presenter always talks
clearly and slow enough. Interviews, usually not. The host was OK,
but not the guest.
I found that listening to more than an hour or two of double-speed
pushed me into an adrenaline overdrive. Doing that while driving
would be waiting for a trigger for road rage.
I listen to a lot of podcasts these days. I don't think that my
player does high-speed, and have never looked for it.
--
My on-the PC recording software, Total Recorder,* will record at
normal speed, but can play back at various speeds. I used to
play back all-talk programming at higher speeds, and use other
controls to skip through commercials. Nowadays I make mp3 files
of things like news programs and play them back on my phone while
I sit on the bus, reading. I've cut my talk show listening
way down from a decade or so ago, as life is too short.

Kevin R

* Professional edition. It can record not only from inputs, like a
line in from a radio's headphone jack, but it can record from the
soundcard. Updates are free. I bought it for $40 back in the 90s and
I still get version updates, no charge. Money well spent!

It is PC only, but is excellent for allowing scheduled, timed recording
and scheduled playback. It works like a "radio DVR." I think the Mac
version would be something like Audacity?

Kevin R
Gary R. Schmidt
2017-05-18 03:35:21 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
I listen to a lot of podcasts while driving. Ones which aren't dramas, and don't
have music or sound as their focus, I invariably listen at 1.5x, unless they are
very clear and slow speakers, when I listen at 2x (e.g. Science Friday).
1.5x has become very easy to listen to. 2x is harder.
Back in 1981, my VCR had a feature to play at double speed with no
pitch change. It couldn't do 1.5.
I listened to news shows at double because the presenter always talks
clearly and slow enough. Interviews, usually not. The host was OK,
but not the guest.
I found that listening to more than an hour or two of double-speed
pushed me into an adrenaline overdrive. Doing that while driving
would be waiting for a trigger for road rage.
I listen to a lot of podcasts these days. I don't think that my
player does high-speed, and have never looked for it.
--
My on-the PC recording software, Total Recorder,* will record at
normal speed, but can play back at various speeds. I used to
play back all-talk programming at higher speeds, and use other
controls to skip through commercials. Nowadays I make mp3 files
of things like news programs and play them back on my phone while
I sit on the bus, reading. I've cut my talk show listening
way down from a decade or so ago, as life is too short.
Kevin R
* Professional edition. It can record not only from inputs, like a
line in from a radio's headphone jack, but it can record from the
soundcard. Updates are free. I bought it for $40 back in the 90s and
I still get version updates, no charge. Money well spent!
It is PC only, but is excellent for allowing scheduled, timed recording
and scheduled playback. It works like a "radio DVR." I think the Mac
version would be something like Audacity?
Audacity is also for PC's, it's something I occasionally use to snip
bits from video.

But for playback I always recommend VideoLan, aka VLC, if you can think
of something you want to do while playing back video or audio, VLC
probably already does it (Rule 34, IRL!).

Cheers,
Gary B-)
--
When men talk to their friends, they insult each other.
They don't really mean it.
When women talk to their friends, they compliment each other.
They don't mean it either.
Peter Trei
2017-05-19 04:36:16 UTC
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Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
I listen to a lot of podcasts while driving. Ones which aren't dramas, and don't
have music or sound as their focus, I invariably listen at 1.5x, unless they are
very clear and slow speakers, when I listen at 2x (e.g. Science Friday).
1.5x has become very easy to listen to. 2x is harder.
Back in 1981, my VCR had a feature to play at double speed with no
pitch change. It couldn't do 1.5.
I listened to news shows at double because the presenter always talks
clearly and slow enough. Interviews, usually not. The host was OK,
but not the guest.
I found that listening to more than an hour or two of double-speed
pushed me into an adrenaline overdrive. Doing that while driving
would be waiting for a trigger for road rage.
I listen to a lot of podcasts these days. I don't think that my
player does high-speed, and have never looked for it.
--
My on-the PC recording software, Total Recorder,* will record at
normal speed, but can play back at various speeds. I used to
play back all-talk programming at higher speeds, and use other
controls to skip through commercials. Nowadays I make mp3 files
of things like news programs and play them back on my phone while
I sit on the bus, reading. I've cut my talk show listening
way down from a decade or so ago, as life is too short.
Kevin R
* Professional edition. It can record not only from inputs, like a
line in from a radio's headphone jack, but it can record from the
soundcard. Updates are free. I bought it for $40 back in the 90s and
I still get version updates, no charge. Money well spent!
It is PC only, but is excellent for allowing scheduled, timed recording
and scheduled playback. It works like a "radio DVR." I think the Mac
version would be something like Audacity?
Audacity is also for PC's, it's something I occasionally use to snip
bits from video.
But for playback I always recommend VideoLan, aka VLC, if you can think
of something you want to do while playing back video or audio, VLC
probably already does it (Rule 34, IRL!).
I wish. At least the mobile version lacks a feature I find a must have for podcasts:
15 second back and forward buttons. This lets you rehear bits you missed, and skip boring
bits, like credits.

Pt
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2017-05-19 09:53:47 UTC
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On Thu, 18 May 2017 21:36:16 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
But for playback I always recommend VideoLan, aka VLC, if you can think
of something you want to do while playing back video or audio, VLC
probably already does it (Rule 34, IRL!).
15 second back and forward buttons. This lets you rehear bits you missed, and skip boring
bits, like credits.
The mobile version has a very limited UI, but on iOS a swipe right skips
30 seconds and left skips back 10 seconds.

At the lock screen it has wind forward/back buttons, but they're 60
seconds. There don't appear to be any way to set them different.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"Some people think that noise abatement should be a higher priority
for ATC. I say safety is noise abatement. You have no idea how much
noise it makes to have a 737 fall out of the sky after an accident."
-- anonymous air traffic controller
Gary R. Schmidt
2017-05-19 12:45:32 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
Post by Gary R. Schmidt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Oh, gosh, yes. That's why I Will Not listen to podcasts, even if
I would otherwise be interested in the topic. With the exception
of those speeded-up voices at the end of commercials, telling you
all the things they have to admit to or face fraud/false
advertising charges (the equivalent of the fine print that they
hope you will not read), people cannot talk as fast as I read.
I listen to a lot of podcasts while driving. Ones which aren't dramas, and don't
have music or sound as their focus, I invariably listen at 1.5x, unless they are
very clear and slow speakers, when I listen at 2x (e.g. Science Friday).
1.5x has become very easy to listen to. 2x is harder.
Back in 1981, my VCR had a feature to play at double speed with no
pitch change. It couldn't do 1.5.
I listened to news shows at double because the presenter always talks
clearly and slow enough. Interviews, usually not. The host was OK,
but not the guest.
I found that listening to more than an hour or two of double-speed
pushed me into an adrenaline overdrive. Doing that while driving
would be waiting for a trigger for road rage.
I listen to a lot of podcasts these days. I don't think that my
player does high-speed, and have never looked for it.
--
My on-the PC recording software, Total Recorder,* will record at
normal speed, but can play back at various speeds. I used to
play back all-talk programming at higher speeds, and use other
controls to skip through commercials. Nowadays I make mp3 files
of things like news programs and play them back on my phone while
I sit on the bus, reading. I've cut my talk show listening
way down from a decade or so ago, as life is too short.
Kevin R
* Professional edition. It can record not only from inputs, like a
line in from a radio's headphone jack, but it can record from the
soundcard. Updates are free. I bought it for $40 back in the 90s and
I still get version updates, no charge. Money well spent!
It is PC only, but is excellent for allowing scheduled, timed recording
and scheduled playback. It works like a "radio DVR." I think the Mac
version would be something like Audacity?
Audacity is also for PC's, it's something I occasionally use to snip
bits from video.
But for playback I always recommend VideoLan, aka VLC, if you can think
of something you want to do while playing back video or audio, VLC
probably already does it (Rule 34, IRL!).
15 second back and forward buttons. This lets you rehear bits you missed, and skip boring
bits, like credits.
Bloody good idea! I've just raised a feature request for it on the VLC
forum. :-)

Cheers,
Gary B-)
--
When men talk to their friends, they insult each other.
They don't really mean it.
When women talk to their friends, they compliment each other.
They don't mean it either.
Mike Spencer
2017-05-16 05:52:17 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
[snip]
...people cannot talk as fast as I read.
Listening to Thomas King's audiobook narration of his _Green Grass,
Running Water_ is *better* than reading the book. The speed, cadence
and inflections of his unique delivery add a whole dimension or
stratum to the text. Reading the book at usual speed is good but the
audiobook is better.

With a good book, you're not frantically trying to find out what comes
next with all possble speed, not trying get to the end as quickly as
possible.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Don Bruder
2017-05-15 03:34:22 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
They vary. Some are about like listening to a speak-n-spell, others are
quite good. Some seem like the reader is on crack, some like he's
nodding on H. Depends on both the narrator(s), and the outfit that
produces them.
--
If the door is baroque don't be Haydn. Come around Bach and jiggle the Handel.
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2017-05-15 09:48:43 UTC
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On Sun, 14 May 2017 22:03:46 -0300, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
Yeah. Audio information density is so low even at normal speech speed,
and some readers are trained to read out very slowly.

I listen to podcasts a lot while driving, and that's more at usual
conversational speed - and I tend to run those at about 1.3x normal
speed otherwise I have enough space in between words to start thinking
about related things. The app I use (Overcast, iPhone) keeps the same
pitch and has a "trim silences" feature also which also helps.

But when not driving (or grocery shopping, cycling, or whatever other
thing is using up my primary attention) I can't speed up audio input
enough to absorb my whole attention without it going too fast to be
intelligible.

I used to know a blind chap who had a screen reader running at about 6x
speed, which while just a burble to me is clearly a trainable ability.
Perhaps not always useful if you have to shut off your eyes in order to
have brain space to do it...

Cheers - Jaimie
--
I think I'm too sarcastic to believe in myself. -- Nietzsche
Carl Fink
2017-05-15 10:50:24 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
I listen to podcasts a lot while driving, and that's more at usual
conversational speed - and I tend to run those at about 1.3x normal
speed otherwise I have enough space in between words to start thinking
about related things. The app I use (Overcast, iPhone) keeps the same
pitch and has a "trim silences" feature also which also helps.
Same here, except my player only has 1.25X. Faster than that is not
understandable to me while driving--requires concentration at the level of
reading a book, which is not OK when I want to be alert to visual stimuli at
the same time.
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-15 12:00:46 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On Sun, 14 May 2017 22:03:46 -0300, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
Yeah. Audio information density is so low even at normal speech speed,
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.

Or even someone who spoke a different variety of English. I can
remember, the one time I went to Britain, (a) a noisy breakfast
room in which I had the hell of a time understanding the
waitress's Yorkshire accent, and (b) an even noiser pub in
Glasgow where I couldn't understand a damn thing. :)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2017-05-15 13:41:17 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On Sun, 14 May 2017 22:03:46 -0300, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
Yeah. Audio information density is so low even at normal speech speed,
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
I must find those olde James Burke series, I was too young to really
understand them at the time (born early 70s) but they still fascinated
me. I was a logical "this is caused by that" kid so they resonated well.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Or even someone who spoke a different variety of English. I can
remember, the one time I went to Britain, (a) a noisy breakfast
room in which I had the hell of a time understanding the
waitress's Yorkshire accent, and (b) an even noiser pub in
Glasgow where I couldn't understand a damn thing. :)
I *live* in Yorkshire and have the same trouble! But to be fair, it's a
long way from my primary dialect.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"Hard as nails, hard as nails - So would you be if you lived one hundred
and eighty years on sunflower seeds and biscuit crumbs." - Polynesia
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-15 18:05:47 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On Sun, 14 May 2017 22:03:46 -0300, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
Yeah. Audio information density is so low even at normal speech speed,
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
I must find those olde James Burke series, I was too young to really
understand them at the time (born early 70s) but they still fascinated
me. I was a logical "this is caused by that" kid so they resonated well.
Okay; there are three _Connections_ series. They are available
on DVD, last I heard, but they're rather expensive. There was
also one called _The Day the Universe Changed._ But the one with
the jackhammer was called _The Real Thing,_ and I haven't seen it
listed anywhere. Darn it.
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Or even someone who spoke a different variety of English. I can
remember, the one time I went to Britain, (a) a noisy breakfast
room in which I had the hell of a time understanding the
waitress's Yorkshire accent, and (b) an even noiser pub in
Glasgow where I couldn't understand a damn thing. :)
I *live* in Yorkshire and have the same trouble! But to be fair, it's a
long way from my primary dialect.
Well, it's a lovely sound! I just don't understand it very well.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Steve Coltrin
2017-05-15 23:33:34 UTC
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begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Okay; there are three _Connections_ series. They are available
on DVD, last I heard, but they're rather expensive. There was
also one called _The Day the Universe Changed._ But the one with
the jackhammer was called _The Real Thing,_ and I haven't seen it
listed anywhere. Darn it.
This may be it (I'm not in a place right now where I can watch it):


--
Steve Coltrin ***@omcl.org Google Groups killfiled here
"A group known as the League of Human Dignity helped arrange for Deuel
to be driven to a local livestock scale, where he could be weighed."
- Associated Press
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-16 00:24:45 UTC
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Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Okay; there are three _Connections_ series. They are available
on DVD, last I heard, but they're rather expensive. There was
also one called _The Day the Universe Changed._ But the one with
the jackhammer was called _The Real Thing,_ and I haven't seen it
listed anywhere. Darn it.
http://youtu.be/XWuUdJo9ubM
Yes, it looks like it ... some of it anyway. The track at the
bottom gives a total length of ~3 hours, and I seem to remember
it was six episodes. So it may be only part of it.

As soon as the sound gets fixed on my computer (tomorrow,
probably, my husband has to instal a new cable) I'll look through
it and see how much there is of it.

Mind, it's transcribed from a wonky tape (Beta or VHS, I can't
tell), but it's better than nothing. Thanks!
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2017-05-19 10:16:17 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
I must find those olde James Burke series, I was too young to really
understand them at the time (born early 70s) but they still fascinated
me. I was a logical "this is caused by that" kid so they resonated well.
Okay; there are three _Connections_ series. They are available
on DVD, last I heard, but they're rather expensive. There was
also one called _The Day the Universe Changed._ But the one with
the jackhammer was called _The Real Thing,_ and I haven't seen it
listed anywhere. Darn it.
Much is also on YouTube. I didn't know about either _Day_ or _Real_,
thank you for those!

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"I have an asteroid named after me. Isaac Asimov's got one too.
It's smaller and more eccentric." -- Arthur C. Clarke
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-19 10:25:53 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
I must find those olde James Burke series, I was too young to really
understand them at the time (born early 70s) but they still fascinated
me. I was a logical "this is caused by that" kid so they resonated well.
Okay; there are three _Connections_ series. They are available
on DVD, last I heard, but they're rather expensive. There was
also one called _The Day the Universe Changed._ But the one with
the jackhammer was called _The Real Thing,_ and I haven't seen it
listed anywhere. Darn it.
Much is also on YouTube. I didn't know about either _Day_ or _Real_,
thank you for those!
Well, I found a YouTube copy of _The Real Thing, which *claims*
to be all six episodes.



It appears to be a copy of a very bad VHS tape. I haven't looked
at it yet, because for some unknown reason I can't get *sound*
out of YouTube at the moment. It appears to be something
somewhere in the software, because I can get sound on some other
sources (The Lord of the Rings Online, e.g.).

But if you can get sound from YouTube, and are willing to cope
with a messy VHS transcription, the above link appears to have
all six episodes.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2017-05-19 10:58:41 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
I must find those olde James Burke series, I was too young to really
understand them at the time (born early 70s) but they still fascinated
me. I was a logical "this is caused by that" kid so they resonated well.
Okay; there are three _Connections_ series. They are available
on DVD, last I heard, but they're rather expensive. There was
also one called _The Day the Universe Changed._ But the one with
the jackhammer was called _The Real Thing,_ and I haven't seen it
listed anywhere. Darn it.
Much is also on YouTube. I didn't know about either _Day_ or _Real_,
thank you for those!
Well, I found a YouTube copy of _The Real Thing, which *claims*
to be all six episodes.
http://youtu.be/2uNI6dseVg4
It appears to be a copy of a very bad VHS tape. I haven't looked
at it yet, because for some unknown reason I can't get *sound*
out of YouTube at the moment. It appears to be something
somewhere in the software, because I can get sound on some other
sources (The Lord of the Rings Online, e.g.).
But if you can get sound from YouTube, and are willing to cope
with a messy VHS transcription, the above link appears to have
all six episodes.
Works fine with audio here, so you can look forward to that when you've
got your wires fixed! Appears to be what the 3 hour video that Steve
Coltrin posted was put together from.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"I love the way that Microsoft follows standards.
In much the same manner as fish follow migrating caribou."
- Paul Tomblin, ASR
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-19 13:36:29 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
I must find those olde James Burke series, I was too young to really
understand them at the time (born early 70s) but they still fascinated
me. I was a logical "this is caused by that" kid so they resonated well.
Okay; there are three _Connections_ series. They are available
on DVD, last I heard, but they're rather expensive. There was
also one called _The Day the Universe Changed._ But the one with
the jackhammer was called _The Real Thing,_ and I haven't seen it
listed anywhere. Darn it.
Much is also on YouTube. I didn't know about either _Day_ or _Real_,
thank you for those!
Well, I found a YouTube copy of _The Real Thing, which *claims*
to be all six episodes.
http://youtu.be/2uNI6dseVg4
It appears to be a copy of a very bad VHS tape. I haven't looked
at it yet, because for some unknown reason I can't get *sound*
out of YouTube at the moment. It appears to be something
somewhere in the software, because I can get sound on some other
sources (The Lord of the Rings Online, e.g.).
But if you can get sound from YouTube, and are willing to cope
with a messy VHS transcription, the above link appears to have
all six episodes.
Works fine with audio here, so you can look forward to that when you've
got your wires fixed! Appears to be what the 3 hour video that Steve
Coltrin posted was put together from.
OK, I'll look forward. It isn't my wires (apparently), since the
same PC can get audio from some sources and not others.

But just in case, Hal has just got in a new cable and is going to
take the whole spaghettiform tangle apart and put it all back
together. It's a hodgepodge that permits both the PC and a
Raspberry Pi to sound through either speakers or headphones.
Why it'll let some media through and not others is a mystery.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
-dsr-
2017-05-16 00:33:27 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
On Sun, 14 May 2017 22:03:46 -0300, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
Yeah. Audio information density is so low even at normal speech speed,
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
I must find those olde James Burke series, I was too young to really
understand them at the time (born early 70s) but they still fascinated
me. I was a logical "this is caused by that" kid so they resonated well.
I believe that Connections and Connections^2 are both available in their
entirety on Youtube, as well as a bunch of other stuff.

-dsr-
David DeLaney
2017-05-15 21:05:38 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
Or even someone who spoke a different variety of English. I can
remember, the one time I went to Britain, (a) a noisy breakfast
room in which I had the hell of a time understanding the
waitress's Yorkshire accent, and (b) an even noiser pub in
Glasgow where I couldn't understand a damn thing. :)
Well, Glasgow, say no more, say no more.

You can tell the 70% thing, because it turns out to be not too difficult to
stand facing someone, watching them talk, and say what they're saying _along
with them_. -Really- simultaneous translation, in a sense.

Dave, helped a bit by their conversation turning into a sputtering "Hey! How
are you doing... Stop th... Okay, banana watermelon schnauzer ... HOW ARE YOU
DOING THAT? STOP READING MY MIND!!"
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
gatekeeper.vic.com/~dbd - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-05-15 22:22:49 UTC
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Post by David DeLaney
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Human spoken languages are about 70 percent redundant. James
Burke did a sequence once in which two actors were talking to one
another, interrupted intermittently by a jack-hammer, and you
could understand them. Note: they were speaking English, which
is my first language. Someone whose first language was not
English might have had more trouble.
Or even someone who spoke a different variety of English. I can
remember, the one time I went to Britain, (a) a noisy breakfast
room in which I had the hell of a time understanding the
waitress's Yorkshire accent, and (b) an even noiser pub in
Glasgow where I couldn't understand a damn thing. :)
Well, Glasgow, say no more, say no more.
I could understand *one* Glaswegian saying one thing at a time.
A whole pub-full, and I was lost. :)
Post by David DeLaney
You can tell the 70% thing, because it turns out to be not too difficult to
stand facing someone, watching them talk, and say what they're saying _along
with them_. -Really- simultaneous translation, in a sense.
Yes. That's another thing Burke had his actors do in _The Real
Thing_: one recited a long speech (rather quickly) and
deliberately made some mistakes in pronunciation, and the other
actor followed him at about half a second's lapse, and
automatically corrected the words he had mispronounced.

Alas, even IMDB reports that it is nearly impossible to find
anywhere.
Post by David DeLaney
Dave, helped a bit by their conversation turning into a sputtering "Hey! How
are you doing... Stop th... Okay, banana watermelon schnauzer ... HOW ARE YOU
DOING THAT? STOP READING MY MIND!!"
Heh.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
The Starmaker
2017-05-15 18:25:00 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
you're not suppose to be ...knitting while reading.


put on disco music to keep up with your knitting...stupid.
Michael R N Dolbear
2017-05-16 01:25:27 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
When I returned _Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen_ to the library, I
noticed that they have a Proto zoa Five Early Short Stories, which I
haven't read . . . but only in audiobook.

It's also an ebook.
Post by Joy Beeson
I checked out an audiobook of a novel once, intending to listen to it
while knitting. I didn't get three chapters in before I could no
longer stand the ssslllooowww pppaaaccceee ooooffff tttthhhheeee
rrrreeeeaaaaadddddddiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnggggggggggg.

Those Early Short Stories are all in the Dreamweaver's Dilemma collection if
your library can obtain that.
--
Mike D
Joy Beeson
2017-05-22 03:03:07 UTC
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I saw a map display the last time I stopped at a Marathon station for
a rest-and-pizza break. But when I looked closer, it was an old map
case that they were recycling as a brochure dispenser. I don't get
out of printing snippets of on-line maps before every ride.

I've been using HereWeGo to print out map snippets because Google Maps
doesn't draw in the minor roads; it indicates them by leaving off a
very narrow streak of the pale-grey background shading. HereWeGo's
minor road lines were very thin and not very dark, but at least they
were present.

But the last time I opened the HereWeGo site, all I got was a notice
that the web designer had decided that allowing browsers that run on
XP to read the site was beneath his dignity. Bummer.

But it doesn't matter. I tried the site on another computer, and
discovered that the downgrade had also eliminated the small-roads
marks; they were now a narrow streak of missing background shading
exactly like Google.

-------------------------------

Wouldn't removing the roads entail re-drawing all the maps in the
database? Seems like a lot of trouble and expense to go to.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
Greg Goss
2017-05-22 04:40:30 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
Wouldn't removing the roads entail re-drawing all the maps in the
database? Seems like a lot of trouble and expense to go to.
I assume that roads and borders are stored as descriptors of some kind
and how to display 'em is a decision made at render time.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
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