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Scientific fantasy
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Bill Gill
2018-09-03 13:11:02 UTC
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In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.

So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.

Any books that have used this device?

Bill
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-03 14:42:44 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
The closest thing I can think of isn't very close: it's the late
Asimov story whose title I can't recall, in which a cabal of bad
guys offer a biologist lots of money in order to devise a plague
that will kill off *only part of* the human race, thus making
life easier for the rest of it (they think).

I can't remember if there is any specific pre-Trumpian
expectation on the part of the cabal that the plague will leave
all the descendants of Northern Europeans alive, which getting
rid of all those other guys; but that is certainly implied.

Because the biologist turns on them and designs a plague that
will specifically kill anybody with DNA sufficiently similar to
his own. He appears in their board room and explains that he's
infected himself, he's dying, and now they're all next.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Christian Weisgerber
2018-09-03 19:27:05 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
The closest thing I can think of isn't very close: it's the late
Asimov story whose title I can't recall, in which a cabal of bad
guys offer a biologist lots of money in order to devise a plague
that will kill off *only part of* the human race, thus making
life easier for the rest of it (they think).
I can't remember if there is any specific pre-Trumpian
expectation on the part of the cabal that the plague will leave
all the descendants of Northern Europeans alive, which getting
rid of all those other guys; but that is certainly implied.
Back during the Cold War people were pointing out that it was
impossible to engineer a plague that would only kill communists...
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
Sjouke Burry
2018-09-03 20:38:42 UTC
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Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
The closest thing I can think of isn't very close: it's the late
Asimov story whose title I can't recall, in which a cabal of bad
guys offer a biologist lots of money in order to devise a plague
that will kill off *only part of* the human race, thus making
life easier for the rest of it (they think).
I can't remember if there is any specific pre-Trumpian
expectation on the part of the cabal that the plague will leave
all the descendants of Northern Europeans alive, which getting
rid of all those other guys; but that is certainly implied.
Back during the Cold War people were pointing out that it was
impossible to engineer a plague that would only kill communists...
But.. butt.. but if you give a country a communist government ,
that in itself will act as a deadly plague, will it?
Pol Pot supplied us with with a real life example.
Has there been an estimated death toll from the cultural revolution of
China?
Quadibloc
2018-09-04 08:08:33 UTC
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Post by Sjouke Burry
But.. butt.. but if you give a country a communist government ,
that in itself will act as a deadly plague, will it?
Pol Pot supplied us with with a real life example.
Has there been an estimated death toll from the cultural revolution of
China?
The deaths of the innocent people in those countries, though, doesn't stop the
governments of those countries from being a danger to other countries. One needs
a plague that includes the leadership.

John Savard
J. Clarke
2018-09-04 23:55:42 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Sjouke Burry
But.. butt.. but if you give a country a communist government ,
that in itself will act as a deadly plague, will it?
Pol Pot supplied us with with a real life example.
Has there been an estimated death toll from the cultural revolution of
China?
The deaths of the innocent people in those countries, though, doesn't stop the
governments of those countries from being a danger to other countries. One needs
a plague that includes the leadership.
Now, identify a gene that makes one want to be a politician and you
may be on to somthing.
Post by Quadibloc
John Savard
Quadibloc
2018-09-05 00:34:58 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Now, identify a gene that makes one want to be a politician and you
may be on to somthing.
Well, that sort of thing is a whole other issue.

Troubled with crime in the streets? Instead of trying to slaughter people with
dark skin, look for genes that promote impulsive behavior - and one could correct
the genes instead of murdering their carriers.

Some people look at how almost all the world's poor countries have incompetent,
corrupt, or tyrannical governments, and conclude that the people there must be
mentally inferior by reason of race. Others will say those governments were
inflicted on them by the evil CIA.

Some reflection has led me to a more sensible theory.

There is an old saying that the last person you want as President or Prime
Minister or whatever is someone who _wants_ to be the same. Sometimes it's used
in references to the Greek scheme of filling certain political positions by
lottery.

Since our electoral democracies in the industrialized world work pretty well,
this remark, though embodying an obvious truth, is seen as little more than a
clever quip.

But what if it had considerably more practical significance than it is given
credit for - and it only fails to be the downfall of our democracies because of
institutional safeguards... which have not been properly passed on to the Third
World so that they can construct lasting democracies. (Of course, in a
desperately poor country, it's hard to stamp out corruption, so it may not be as
simple as copying a blueprint.)

John Savard
Greg Goss
2018-09-05 04:23:22 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Troubled with crime in the streets? Instead of trying to slaughter people with
dark skin, look for genes that promote impulsive behavior - and one could correct
the genes instead of murdering their carriers.
Are you familiar with the lead hypothesis? Lead seems to cripple the
forethought area of the brain, leading to just such impulsive
behaviour. Kevin Drum has published a number of graphs that relate
the banning of automotiive (and paint) lead with crime rate collapse
twenty years later.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Quadibloc
2018-09-05 05:17:09 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Are you familiar with the lead hypothesis? Lead seems to cripple the
forethought area of the brain, leading to just such impulsive
behaviour. Kevin Drum has published a number of graphs that relate
the banning of automotiive (and paint) lead with crime rate collapse
twenty years later.
I've seen that mentioned here before. Which, of course, lends itself to an even
more sinister interpretation of events in Michigan.

John Savard
Greg Goss
2018-09-05 06:41:29 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Greg Goss
Are you familiar with the lead hypothesis? Lead seems to cripple the
forethought area of the brain, leading to just such impulsive
behaviour. Kevin Drum has published a number of graphs that relate
the banning of automotiive (and paint) lead with crime rate collapse
twenty years later.
I've seen that mentioned here before. Which, of course, lends itself to an even
more sinister interpretation of events in Michigan.
The water was bad, but surprisingly, not as bad as the air once was.
Loading Image...
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-09-05 05:42:05 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Quadibloc
Troubled with crime in the streets? Instead of trying to slaughter people with
dark skin, look for genes that promote impulsive behavior - and one could correct
the genes instead of murdering their carriers.
Are you familiar with the lead hypothesis? Lead seems to cripple the
forethought area of the brain, leading to just such impulsive
behaviour. Kevin Drum has published a number of graphs that relate
the banning of automotiive (and paint) lead with crime rate collapse
twenty years later.
Abortion was also legalized around the same time.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
J. Clarke
2018-09-06 00:18:18 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Quadibloc
Troubled with crime in the streets? Instead of trying to slaughter people with
dark skin, look for genes that promote impulsive behavior - and one could correct
the genes instead of murdering their carriers.
Are you familiar with the lead hypothesis? Lead seems to cripple the
forethought area of the brain, leading to just such impulsive
behaviour. Kevin Drum has published a number of graphs that relate
the banning of automotiive (and paint) lead with crime rate collapse
twenty years later.
There's also a correlation with Roe v. Wade.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-03 23:33:35 UTC
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Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
The closest thing I can think of isn't very close: it's the late
Asimov story whose title I can't recall, in which a cabal of bad
guys offer a biologist lots of money in order to devise a plague
that will kill off *only part of* the human race, thus making
life easier for the rest of it (they think).
I can't remember if there is any specific pre-Trumpian
expectation on the part of the cabal that the plague will leave
all the descendants of Northern Europeans alive, which getting
rid of all those other guys; but that is certainly implied.
Back during the Cold War people were pointing out that it was
impossible to engineer a plague that would only kill communists...
Well, they got that right.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Cryptoengineer
2018-09-03 15:49:07 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I don't think we're there yet. A virus which had to check many
different points in the genome before replicating is difficult to
envisage.

pt
Bernard Peek
2018-09-03 15:58:25 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Give it time. Questions of this sort regularly come up on Quora. My
answer is that it's technically feasible now to create a virus that
targets genes prevalent in specific parts of the world. But as with most
other biological weapons it could randomly mutate to target different
genetic markers.
--
Bernard Peek
***@shrdlu.com
Bill Gill
2018-09-03 17:24:47 UTC
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Post by Bernard Peek
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Give it time. Questions of this sort regularly come up on Quora. My
answer is that it's technically feasible now to create a virus that
targets genes prevalent in specific parts of the world. But as with most
other biological weapons it could randomly mutate to target different
genetic markers.
The mutation of the virus is one thing I thought of also. There is
no guarantee that it wouldn't manage to spread.

Bill
Quadibloc
2018-09-04 11:06:22 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
The mutation of the virus is one thing I thought of also. There is
no guarantee that it wouldn't manage to spread.
These days, though, despite the technology perhaps coming closer to reality, as
a plot device, it's harder to take seriously because of the current geopolitical
situation.

If the mad scientist is white, and his goal is to make the world a safe,
peaceful place for white people of European descent, no matter how many
innocents he has to kill to achieve this...

If his problem is the apparent menace of the starving billions of the world's
poor countries... a virus that took out non-Europeans would take care of India
and Africa... but what about Latin America?

If his problem is the military menace poised by large dictatorships... such a
virus might take out China, but what about Russia?

In the opposite direction, it's credible for someone in Africa, say, to think
that white people are to blame for all his problems - but wrapping a story
around that would seem to be more likely to encourage racism than to condemn it.

Thus, the notion in the movie version of Moonraker, or Rainbow Six, or another
work where the bad guys were hiding underwater recently mentioned here, of just
killing everyone except those hiding in an isolated enclave is one that still
remains plausible.

John Savard
Quadibloc
2018-09-04 17:09:49 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
If his problem is the apparent menace of the starving billions of the world's
poor countries... a virus that took out non-Europeans would take care of India
and Africa... but what about Latin America?
If his problem is the military menace poised by large dictatorships... such a
virus might take out China, but what about Russia?
One specific motive for a racially-based bioweapon does seem to be out.

If the villain's motive is despair that civilization and technology won't
survive because of certain bad regimes...

not only is an attempt to have civilization survive by leaving only whites of
European descent survive doomed to be ineffective...

but a bioweapon designed to kill everyoen except the Japanese, another enclave
of high-tech civilization... would leave their close relatives the Koreans
alive... which wouldn't be a bad thing, unless one remembers that North Korea
would still be around;

and a bioweapon designed to kill everyone who wasn't Jewish... would leave the
Arabs around.

Of course, other motives might work. Thus, North Korea might see South Korea as
a pushover without the Americans around to protect it.

John Savard
Quadibloc
2018-09-05 01:50:10 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
One specific motive for a racially-based bioweapon does seem to be out.
If the villain's motive is despair that civilization and technology won't
survive because of certain bad regimes...
not only is an attempt to have civilization survive by leaving only whites of
European descent survive doomed to be ineffective...
but a bioweapon designed to kill everyoen except the Japanese, another enclave
of high-tech civilization... would leave their close relatives the Koreans
alive... which wouldn't be a bad thing, unless one remembers that North Korea
would still be around;
and a bioweapon designed to kill everyone who wasn't Jewish... would leave the
Arabs around.
I just realized that if one could make the bioweapon a bit more selective, a
little mileage could still be obtained from this plot device.

The horrible plague that swept to the world might have eliminated the looming
dangers of thermonuclear war, global warming, or world-wide tyranny, but at what
a price. Almost all of humanity was exterminated, except for those of Scots
descent.

The hunt was on for the madman responsible for this massive genocide.

Finally, his laboratory was located - and there was the mad scientist who
devised the plague, dead from his own invention.

"Aye, but we should not hae been surprised that this would be the end of it.
After all, nae true Scotsman would hae done something like this!", constable
MacDougall said to his partner.

John Savard
Moriarty
2018-09-05 02:50:06 UTC
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On Wednesday, September 5, 2018 at 11:50:12 AM UTC+10, Quadibloc wrote:

<snip>
Post by Quadibloc
I just realized that if one could make the bioweapon a bit more selective, a
little mileage could still be obtained from this plot device.
The horrible plague that swept to the world might have eliminated the looming
dangers of thermonuclear war, global warming, or world-wide tyranny, but at what
a price. Almost all of humanity was exterminated, except for those of Scots
descent.
The hunt was on for the madman responsible for this massive genocide.
Finally, his laboratory was located - and there was the mad scientist who
devised the plague, dead from his own invention.
"Aye, but we should not hae been surprised that this would be the end of it.
After all, nae true Scotsman would hae done something like this!", constable
MacDougall said to his partner.
Snerk!

-Moriarty
D B Davis
2018-09-05 13:04:20 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
One specific motive for a racially-based bioweapon does seem to be out.
If the villain's motive is despair that civilization and technology won't
survive because of certain bad regimes...
not only is an attempt to have civilization survive by leaving only whites of
European descent survive doomed to be ineffective...
but a bioweapon designed to kill everyoen except the Japanese, another enclave
of high-tech civilization... would leave their close relatives the Koreans
alive... which wouldn't be a bad thing, unless one remembers that North Korea
would still be around;
and a bioweapon designed to kill everyone who wasn't Jewish... would leave the
Arabs around.
I just realized that if one could make the bioweapon a bit more selective, a
little mileage could still be obtained from this plot device.
The horrible plague that swept to the world might have eliminated the looming
dangers of thermonuclear war, global warming, or world-wide tyranny, but at what
a price. Almost all of humanity was exterminated, except for those of Scots
descent.
The hunt was on for the madman responsible for this massive genocide.
Finally, his laboratory was located - and there was the mad scientist who
devised the plague, dead from his own invention.
"Aye, but we should not hae been surprised that this would be the end of it.
After all, nae true Scotsman would hae done something like this!", constable
MacDougall said to his partner.
Know two Scotsman who need a clue. :0)



Thank you,
--
Don
David Johnston
2018-09-04 17:22:32 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Bill Gill
The mutation of the virus is one thing I thought of also. There is
no guarantee that it wouldn't manage to spread.
These days, though, despite the technology perhaps coming closer to reality, as
a plot device, it's harder to take seriously because of the current geopolitical
situation.
If the mad scientist is white, and his goal is to make the world a safe,
peaceful place for white people of European descent, no matter how many
innocents he has to kill to achieve this...
If his problem is the apparent menace of the starving billions of the world's
poor countries... a virus that took out non-Europeans would take care of India
and Africa... but what about Latin America?
What about it? A majority of the Latin American population are
noticeably nonwhite.
Quadibloc
2018-09-05 00:37:55 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
What about it? A majority of the Latin American population are
noticeably nonwhite.
But there are lots of white ones, and they're Roman Catholics too.

I mean, once you accept a "breed like rabbits" stereotype, it doesn't really
matter all that much how _many_ rabbits you start with.

John Savard
David Johnston
2018-09-05 01:11:56 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by David Johnston
What about it? A majority of the Latin American population are
noticeably nonwhite.
But there are lots of white ones, and they're Roman Catholics too.
I mean, once you accept a "breed like rabbits" stereotype, it doesn't really
matter all that much how _many_ rabbits you start with.
Oh right. I forgot that you're the guy who insists on complete
solutions for everything so it always ends up with genocide or vat girls.
Steve Dodds
2018-09-03 16:05:34 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I can't help but think of The white plague by Frank Herbert. A
biologist creates a virus that only targets a certain race.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-03 17:08:38 UTC
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Post by Steve Dodds
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I can't help but think of The white plague by Frank Herbert. A
biologist creates a virus that only targets a certain race.
Which essentially is what happened in the Asimov story.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Juho Julkunen
2018-09-03 22:16:13 UTC
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Post by Steve Dodds
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I can't help but think of The white plague by Frank Herbert. A
biologist creates a virus that only targets a certain race.
Are you sure about that? The biologist targets England, Ireland, and
Libya specifically, but ISTR the virus is happy to infect anyone. (It
only kills women, but men act as carriers.)

The _Sixth Column_, now...
--
Juho Julkunen
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-03 23:50:31 UTC
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Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Steve Dodds
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I can't help but think of The white plague by Frank Herbert. A
biologist creates a virus that only targets a certain race.
Are you sure about that? The biologist targets England, Ireland, and
Libya specifically, but ISTR the virus is happy to infect anyone. (It
only kills women, but men act as carriers.)
The _Sixth Column_, now...
Yeah, but that wasn't a virus. That was the "additional spectra"
invented, to the best of my knowledge, by Campbell before giving
the outline to Heinlein to write. Pure handwavium.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Quadibloc
2018-09-04 08:10:05 UTC
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Post by Steve Dodds
I can't help but think of The white plague by Frank Herbert. A
biologist creates a virus that only targets a certain race.
Well, he was hoping to limit its effects to the Irish, but the virus itself was
only limited to killing women.

John Savard
Lynn McGuire
2018-09-03 16:27:32 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
Shoot yes, _Emergence_ by David Palmer has 99.9% of the human race
killed using a targeted virus. And it has just been republished.
https://www.amazon.com/Emergence-David-R-Palmer/dp/194881806X/

Lynn
Bill Gill
2018-09-03 17:27:12 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
Shoot yes, _Emergence_ by David Palmer has 99.9% of the human race
killed using a targeted virus.  And it has just been republished.
    https://www.amazon.com/Emergence-David-R-Palmer/dp/194881806X/
Lynn
In that case though it was to take out everybody who wasn't part of
the government that propagated the virus. As I recall they expected
to survive by going into a sealed shelter.

Still a good book. I recommend it.

Bill
Juho Julkunen
2018-09-03 22:21:33 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
Shoot yes, _Emergence_ by David Palmer has 99.9% of the human race
killed using a targeted virus. And it has just been republished.
https://www.amazon.com/Emergence-David-R-Palmer/dp/194881806X/
If it kills 99.9% of the human race, how targeted was it really? It
sounds rather like the exact opposite of what was asked for.
--
Juho Julkunen
Lynn McGuire
2018-09-03 23:05:32 UTC
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Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
Shoot yes, _Emergence_ by David Palmer has 99.9% of the human race
killed using a targeted virus. And it has just been republished.
https://www.amazon.com/Emergence-David-R-Palmer/dp/194881806X/
If it kills 99.9% of the human race, how targeted was it really? It
sounds rather like the exact opposite of what was asked for.
The virus was targeted to Homo Sapiens. The Homo post hominems were not
affected but there were only a couple of thousand of them.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2018-09-03 16:54:31 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-09-03 17:11:27 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
It strikes me that it could be done right now fairly easily for the
right people. Just find out what someone is deadly allergic to, salt it
into a meal and only the victim gets taken out.

I would be surprised if this hadn't figured into several murder mysteries,
though without figuring out the allergy from DNA..
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Bill Gill
2018-09-03 17:28:19 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
It strikes me that it could be done right now fairly easily for the
right people. Just find out what someone is deadly allergic to, salt it
into a meal and only the victim gets taken out.
I would be surprised if this hadn't figured into several murder mysteries,
though without figuring out the allergy from DNA..
That is really the idea that I had. Not necessarily a virus.

Bill
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-03 19:36:05 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
It strikes me that it could be done right now fairly easily for the
right people. Just find out what someone is deadly allergic to, salt it
into a meal and only the victim gets taken out.
I would be surprised if this hadn't figured into several murder mysteries,
though without figuring out the allergy from DNA..
I can think of one offhand, someone poisoned by a nut allergy. I
forget the author's pseudonym for that one; she started out as
Mary Monica Pulver (_Murder at the War_) and now writes as Monica
Ferris.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2018-09-03 21:12:15 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
It strikes me that it could be done right now fairly easily for the
right people. Just find out what someone is deadly allergic to, salt it
into a meal and only the victim gets taken out.
I would be surprised if this hadn't figured into several murder mysteries,
though without figuring out the allergy from DNA..
I can think of one offhand, someone poisoned by a nut allergy. I
forget the author's pseudonym for that one; she started out as
Mary Monica Pulver (_Murder at the War_) and now writes as Monica
Ferris.
BTW, I told the hospital about my almond allergy. So, the hospital
banned ALL nuts from my food orderings. I was mildly torqued. Not as
torqued as I was by the heart healthy scrambled eggs, those were nasty.

Lynn
Kevrob
2018-09-03 21:41:40 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
BTW, I told the hospital about my almond allergy. So, the hospital
banned ALL nuts from my food orderings. I was mildly torqued. Not as
torqued as I was by the heart healthy scrambled eggs, those were nasty.
I've been told it is always a good sign when the patient is
up to complaining about the food.

Good to hear, I suppose?

Kevin R
Lynn McGuire
2018-09-03 21:51:25 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
BTW, I told the hospital about my almond allergy. So, the hospital
banned ALL nuts from my food orderings. I was mildly torqued. Not as
torqued as I was by the heart healthy scrambled eggs, those were nasty.
I've been told it is always a good sign when the patient is
up to complaining about the food.
Good to hear, I suppose?
Kevin R
I left the hospital last Friday. The operation on Thursday was a
success (no more afib, he fried everything in sight). Now I am healing
at home and sore as all get out.

And yes, when you care about the food, time to leave. They made me wait
a few hours since I dropped a couple of pints of blood in the o/r and a
pint in my room so they thought about giving me a pint or two out the
door. But, my blood hematocrit was good enough so they let me leave.

Lynn
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-03 23:36:01 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
BTW, I told the hospital about my almond allergy. So, the
hospital banned ALL nuts from my food orderings. I was mildly
torqued. Not as torqued as I was by the heart healthy
scrambled eggs, those were nasty.
I've been told it is always a good sign when the patient is
up to complaining about the food.
Good to hear, I suppose?
Kevin R
I left the hospital last Friday. The operation on Thursday was
a success (no more afib, he fried everything in sight). Now I
am healing at home and sore as all get out.
And yes, when you care about the food, time to leave. They made
me wait a few hours since I dropped a couple of pints of blood
in the o/r and a pint in my room so they thought about giving me
a pint or two out the door. But, my blood hematocrit was good
enough so they let me leave.
A friend of mine had open hear surgery. They had to restart his
heart four or five times. Said he felt like he'd been run over by a
truck.

I'd offer my sympathies, but you'd probably take it wrong.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Michael F. Stemper
2018-09-05 19:17:16 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
BTW, I told the hospital about my almond allergy. So, the hospital
banned ALL nuts from my food orderings. I was mildly torqued. Not as
torqued as I was by the heart healthy scrambled eggs, those were nasty.
I've been told it is always a good sign when the patient is
up to complaining about the food.
The ObSFW for patients complaining about their food would be Chapter 18
of _Galactic Patrol_, which details Kinnison's first convalescence in a
Patrol hospital.

All he got was dry toast, tea, and "an occasional anemic soft-boiled
egg". (Except the one time the gave him a poached egg.) He was less
than pleased, and he let it be known.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Galatians 3:28
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-09-05 19:48:58 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
BTW, I told the hospital about my almond allergy. So, the
hospital banned ALL nuts from my food orderings. I was mildly
torqued. Not as torqued as I was by the heart healthy
scrambled eggs, those were nasty.
I've been told it is always a good sign when the patient is
up to complaining about the food.
The ObSFW for patients complaining about their food would be
Chapter 18 of _Galactic Patrol_, which details Kinnison's first
convalescence in a Patrol hospital.
All he got was dry toast, tea, and "an occasional anemic
soft-boiled egg". (Except the one time the gave him a poached
egg.) He was less than pleased, and he let it be known.
I have only ever had one meal in a hospital[1], after my bicycle
accident so many, many years ago. One meal, in three days. Because
they didn't want to feed me until after the surgery to put a pin in
my arm, and they didn't want to do the surgery until they were
certain the concussion wouldn't be a problem. OK, I suppose that
made sense to them. I was only half conscious on pain killers the
whole time, so I hardly noticed.

So after the surgery, I get one meal before they send me home
(because hospitals are full of sick people, and it's best if they
get you out as soon as possible, as noted in [1]). Now, at this
point, I have *just* had surgery on my left forearm, and was told
not to life anything heavier than a pencil for six weeks. And the
right arm basically doesn't work at all, due to bruising in the
shoulder so severe they were worried about nerve damage. Now, the
doctors, and nurses, and everyone else, were *wonderful*[1] -
except the orderly who brought this meal. He drops it on the tray
over the bed, and leaves. I nearly had to lap it up like a dog.

So I have a complaint about hospital meals, but it's not about the
food (which I have no memory of whatsoever).

[1]Actually, that's not really true. My mother was in a car
accident when I was a year old, and they put me in the kid's ward
because my parents were divorced at the time and there was nothing
else to do. Of course, I caught the flu from the sicks kids, and
was there a couple of days after my mother was sent home. But I
have no memory of it.

[2]It was a Kaiser hospital, in the early 90s, when, in California,
it was very, very difficult to sue HMOs for mistakes. If you were a
member. Which I wasn't. And it's highly illegal to turn someone
away from the emergency room, especially when they're seriously
injured and bleeding from an ear. And Kaiser had had . . . problems
with that before, the biggest being the press coverage of people
dying in their ERs. So I had the head of every department treat me.
The head of orthopedic surgery put the pin in, the head of
neurology kept an eye on my shoulder until he was *certain* there
was no nerve damage. Their accountants were drooling morons, but
the medical care was first rate.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-03 23:35:11 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 08:11:02 -0500, Bill Gill
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that
was once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair
is a common item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person
that had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was
specific to that person? This being equivalent to the
magician using hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out
Neanderthals.
It strikes me that it could be done right now fairly easily
for the right people. Just find out what someone is deadly
allergic to, salt it into a meal and only the victim gets
taken out.
I would be surprised if this hadn't figured into several
murder mysteries, though without figuring out the allergy from
DNA..
I can think of one offhand, someone poisoned by a nut allergy.
I forget the author's pseudonym for that one; she started out
as Mary Monica Pulver (_Murder at the War_) and now writes as
Monica Ferris.
BTW, I told the hospital about my almond allergy. So, the
hospital banned ALL nuts from my food orderings.
Seems like that would reduce the odds of stupid mistakes. Which, in
a hospital, is a good thing.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-03 23:39:16 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
It strikes me that it could be done right now fairly easily for the
right people. Just find out what someone is deadly allergic to, salt it
into a meal and only the victim gets taken out.
I would be surprised if this hadn't figured into several murder mysteries,
though without figuring out the allergy from DNA..
I can think of one offhand, someone poisoned by a nut allergy. I
forget the author's pseudonym for that one; she started out as
Mary Monica Pulver (_Murder at the War_) and now writes as Monica
Ferris.
BTW, I told the hospital about my almond allergy. So, the hospital
banned ALL nuts from my food orderings. I was mildly torqued. Not as
torqued as I was by the heart healthy scrambled eggs, those were nasty.
Annoying. But I can see their point: if you know you're allergic
to almonds, what other nuts might you be allergic to and not know
it (yet)? And you were in a vulnerable state pre-op, and another
one post-op.

When I was in the hospital to have my parathyroid removed, and
again to have my pacemaker implanted (overnight stay each time),
I told the hospital staff that because of my diabetes I was on a
very low-carb diet. So what I got for breakfast in the morning
was their "low-carb" breakfast, about 65 carbs total. I managed
to pick out bits of it and take in no more than my usual 10 or
so. I then took their menu along with me to show to my
endocrinologist, and we both had a good laugh over it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Greg Goss
2018-09-04 14:26:38 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
When I was in the hospital to have my parathyroid removed, and
again to have my pacemaker implanted (overnight stay each time),
I told the hospital staff that because of my diabetes I was on a
very low-carb diet. So what I got for breakfast in the morning
was their "low-carb" breakfast, about 65 carbs total. I managed
to pick out bits of it and take in no more than my usual 10 or
so. I then took their menu along with me to show to my
endocrinologist, and we both had a good laugh over it.
I was in the hospital for a week recently. The slip that came with my
meal was labeled "mid-dia" which I guess means "middling diabetic". I
take two drugs, but nothing injected.

The slip that came with each meal listed the carb content of each
serviing, which would make it easieir if I were to pick out stuff.

They brought around a very light mid-evening snack for me but not my
roommate. When she asked she was told "You're not diabetic." Are we
supposed to eat a few berries and a yoghurt or something mid-evening?
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-09-04 14:43:45 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
When I was in the hospital to have my parathyroid removed, and
again to have my pacemaker implanted (overnight stay each time),
I told the hospital staff that because of my diabetes I was on a
very low-carb diet. So what I got for breakfast in the morning
was their "low-carb" breakfast, about 65 carbs total. I managed
to pick out bits of it and take in no more than my usual 10 or
so. I then took their menu along with me to show to my
endocrinologist, and we both had a good laugh over it.
I was in the hospital for a week recently. The slip that came with my
meal was labeled "mid-dia" which I guess means "middling diabetic". I
take two drugs, but nothing injected.
The slip that came with each meal listed the carb content of each
serviing, which would make it easieir if I were to pick out stuff.
They brought around a very light mid-evening snack for me but not my
roommate. When she asked she was told "You're not diabetic." Are we
supposed to eat a few berries and a yoghurt or something mid-evening?
Diabetics are supposed to eat more, smaller meals rather than fewer
larger meals to help avoid glucose spikes.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-04 14:47:10 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
When I was in the hospital to have my parathyroid removed, and
again to have my pacemaker implanted (overnight stay each time),
I told the hospital staff that because of my diabetes I was on a
very low-carb diet. So what I got for breakfast in the morning
was their "low-carb" breakfast, about 65 carbs total. I managed
to pick out bits of it and take in no more than my usual 10 or
so. I then took their menu along with me to show to my
endocrinologist, and we both had a good laugh over it.
I was in the hospital for a week recently. The slip that came with my
meal was labeled "mid-dia" which I guess means "middling diabetic". I
take two drugs, but nothing injected.
The last time I was in the hospital for longer than overnight was
in 1998, when I had pancreatitis and was NPO for most of a month.
They did check my blood sugar from time to time, and gave me a
bit of insulin when they thought I needed it.
Post by Greg Goss
The slip that came with each meal listed the carb content of each
serviing, which would make it easieir if I were to pick out stuff.
Yes, so did the ones I got for breakfast, which is why I was able
to pick items that wouldn't send me into the stratosphere.
Post by Greg Goss
They brought around a very light mid-evening snack for me but not my
roommate. When she asked she was told "You're not diabetic." Are we
supposed to eat a few berries and a yoghurt or something mid-evening?
Ask your endocrinologist. I can imagine that, while you were in
for a week and having I don't know what kind of stresses, the
doctors decided you needed a little pick-me-up in the evening. I
*hope* this was after having looked at your particular blood
sugars, not as general procedure for any diabetic.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Greg Goss
2018-09-05 01:54:33 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
They brought around a very light mid-evening snack for me but not my
roommate. When she asked she was told "You're not diabetic." Are we
supposed to eat a few berries and a yoghurt or something mid-evening?
Ask your endocrinologist. I can imagine that, while you were in
for a week and having I don't know what kind of stresses, the
doctors decided you needed a little pick-me-up in the evening. I
*hope* this was after having looked at your particular blood
sugars, not as general procedure for any diabetic.
They checked my sugar levels routinely, maybe six times a day. I
don't have an endocrinologist yet. My GP has me on two oral
medications twice a day, but nothing injected yet.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-05 02:21:50 UTC
Reply
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
They brought around a very light mid-evening snack for me but not my
roommate. When she asked she was told "You're not diabetic." Are we
supposed to eat a few berries and a yoghurt or something mid-evening?
Ask your endocrinologist. I can imagine that, while you were in
for a week and having I don't know what kind of stresses, the
doctors decided you needed a little pick-me-up in the evening. I
*hope* this was after having looked at your particular blood
sugars, not as general procedure for any diabetic.
They checked my sugar levels routinely, maybe six times a day.
Good.
I
Post by Greg Goss
don't have an endocrinologist yet. My GP has me on two oral
medications twice a day, but nothing injected yet.
Well, should it ever come to that, the needles are very thin and,
unless you happen to stick on right into a nerve fibre, don't
hurt enough to notice.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-03 20:59:00 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that
was once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a
common item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was
specific to that person? This being equivalent to the magician
using hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out
Neanderthals.
It strikes me that it could be done right now fairly easily for
the right people. Just find out what someone is deadly allergic
to, salt it into a meal and only the victim gets taken out.
I would be surprised if this hadn't figured into several murder
mysteries, though without figuring out the allergy from DNA..
I saw that episode of Law & Order. And the episode of CSI. And so
on.

It's actually a fairly common gimmick in cop shows.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-03 17:10:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
Um ... at what period in prehistory is this supposed to have
happened? Because if it's supposed to be ~present-day, it's
going to have the same effect as some of the other stories
mentioned: it will target mainly Europeans.

(I may have a few Neanderthal codons lying around somewhere
myself; my mother had hazel eyes, so does my daughter, and we
both had red hair as children.)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2018-09-03 17:51:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
Um ... at what period in prehistory is this supposed to have
happened? Because if it's supposed to be ~present-day, it's
going to have the same effect as some of the other stories
mentioned: it will target mainly Europeans.
The Neanderthals in question own a nice juicy planet in a parallel
universe.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
(I may have a few Neanderthal codons lying around somewhere
myself; my mother had hazel eyes, so does my daughter, and we
both had red hair as children.)
Greg Goss
2018-09-03 19:47:15 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by J. Clarke
Robert J. Sawyer, "Hybrids", plague intended to wipe out Neanderthals.
Um ... at what period in prehistory is this supposed to have
happened? Because if it's supposed to be ~present-day, it's
going to have the same effect as some of the other stories
mentioned: it will target mainly Europeans.
The Hominids trilogy involves a meeting between alternate universes.
In ours, we killed off the Neanderthals. In the other one, we died
off instead.

I misplaced my second and third book part way through the second one
"Humans". I think I may have left it in a bar where I often read. I
remeber answering "whatcha reading" wiith "shh. I'm studying the
target group," before showing the title.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
David Johnston
2018-09-03 17:38:41 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Genetically engineering a virus to be lethal to just one person and not
anyone else, not even their close kin seems like more trouble than it
would be worth. If you want to limit collateral, then it would just be
simpler to not make it contagious.
Lynn McGuire
2018-09-03 18:21:29 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I seem to recall a Star Trek (original) episode where the clones showed
up to kill Spock, Kirk, or McCoy. They were able to foil the killer
clones by interspersing each other between the targeted person.

Lynn
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-03 21:03:05 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that
was once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is
a common item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was
specific to that person?  This being equivalent to the
magician using hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I seem to recall a Star Trek (original) episode where the clones
showed up to kill Spock, Kirk, or McCoy. They were able to foil
the killer clones by interspersing each other between the
targeted person.
"That Which Survives."

http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/That_Which_Survives_(episode)

(And it's Kirk, McCoy and Sulu. Spock is dramatically necessary to
figure out what's wrong with the ship.)

Never went into details of how it targeted a specific person, only
that it did.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-09-03 21:08:26 UTC
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Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that
was once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is
a common item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was
specific to that person?  This being equivalent to the
magician using hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I seem to recall a Star Trek (original) episode where the clones
showed up to kill Spock, Kirk, or McCoy. They were able to foil
the killer clones by interspersing each other between the
targeted person.
"That Which Survives."
http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/That_Which_Survives_(episode)
(And it's Kirk, McCoy and Sulu. Spock is dramatically necessary to
figure out what's wrong with the ship.)
Never went into details of how it targeted a specific person, only
that it did.
Thanks ! And a good writer never explains all of the secrets.

Lynn
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-03 23:32:33 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that
was once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair
is a common item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was
specific to that person?  This being equivalent to the
magician using hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I seem to recall a Star Trek (original) episode where the
clones showed up to kill Spock, Kirk, or McCoy. They were
able to foil the killer clones by interspersing each other
between the targeted person.
"That Which Survives."
http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/That_Which_Survives_(episode)
(And it's Kirk, McCoy and Sulu. Spock is dramatically necessary
to figure out what's wrong with the ship.)
Never went into details of how it targeted a specific person,
only that it did.
Thanks ! And a good writer never explains all of the secrets.
Unless it's a story about explaining those secrets, of course.

(But in the case of Star Trek, well, I wouldn't call any of their
scripts, except may City on the Edge of Forever (the Ellison one
they didn't actually film, not the heavily modified one they did),
world class sf writing.)
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-09-03 21:26:55 UTC
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Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that
was once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is
a common item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was
specific to that person?  This being equivalent to the
magician using hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I seem to recall a Star Trek (original) episode where the clones
showed up to kill Spock, Kirk, or McCoy. They were able to foil
the killer clones by interspersing each other between the
targeted person.
"That Which Survives."
http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/That_Which_Survives_(episode)
(And it's Kirk, McCoy and Sulu. Spock is dramatically necessary to
figure out what's wrong with the ship.)
Never went into details of how it targeted a specific person, only
that it did.
It was Clarke Law science even to the Federation.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-03 23:33:28 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that
was once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair
is a common item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was
specific to that person?  This being equivalent to the
magician using hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I seem to recall a Star Trek (original) episode where the
clones showed up to kill Spock, Kirk, or McCoy. They were
able to foil the killer clones by interspersing each other
between the targeted person.
"That Which Survives."
http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/That_Which_Survives_(episode)
(And it's Kirk, McCoy and Sulu. Spock is dramatically necessary
to figure out what's wrong with the ship.)
Never went into details of how it targeted a specific person,
only that it did.
It was Clarke Law science even to the Federation.
So where many other things that they figured out as they went
along. It all depends on what story they're telling.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Christian Weisgerber
2018-09-03 19:22:49 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?
A virus that is triggered by a person's DNA. Isn't this idea so common
that it is clichéd by now?
Post by Bill Gill
Any books that have used this device?
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.

I don't remember any specific books. Maybe something by Greg Egan?
He wrote a bunch of stories with dark biotech, e.g. "The Moat" about
people who are subtly engineering themselves into a separate cryptic
species, or "The Moral Virologist" about an attempt to create a
plague against sexual promiscuity; I vaguely remember that the
latter backfires badly.
--
Christian "naddy" Weisgerber ***@mips.inka.de
J. Clarke
2018-09-03 21:56:44 UTC
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On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 19:22:49 -0000 (UTC), Christian Weisgerber
Post by Christian Weisgerber
Post by Bill Gill
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?
A virus that is triggered by a person's DNA. Isn't this idea so common
that it is clichéd by now?
Post by Bill Gill
Any books that have used this device?
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
I completely forgot about that one. What a way to keep the lovers
separated.
Post by Christian Weisgerber
I don't remember any specific books. Maybe something by Greg Egan?
He wrote a bunch of stories with dark biotech, e.g. "The Moat" about
people who are subtly engineering themselves into a separate cryptic
species, or "The Moral Virologist" about an attempt to create a
plague against sexual promiscuity; I vaguely remember that the
latter backfires badly.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-03 23:38:34 UTC
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Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
What was the show about, anyway? I watched a couple of episodes, but
I kinda lost the ability to track what was going on every time
Jessica Alba showed up in the bicycle pants.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-09-03 23:58:24 UTC
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Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
What was the show about, anyway? I watched a couple of episodes, but
I kinda lost the ability to track what was going on every time
Jessica Alba showed up in the bicycle pants.
I'd say you kept track of the most important part of the show.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
J. Clarke
2018-09-04 05:25:15 UTC
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On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 16:58:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
What was the show about, anyway? I watched a couple of episodes, but
I kinda lost the ability to track what was going on every time
Jessica Alba showed up in the bicycle pants.
I'd say you kept track of the most important part of the show.
However, getting to the question, the story line was that the
government was bioengineering super-soldiers. One group of them took
exception to this and staged a jailbreak. Max, Jessica Alba's
character, was one of the escapess. She got away with it in part
because she was living in a semi-post-apocalyptic world--terrorists
set of an EMP that wiped out the US communication network and it still
wasn't back up to the point that the government was able to easily
track down its missing super-soldiers.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-04 05:51:58 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 16:58:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
What was the show about, anyway? I watched a couple of
episodes, but I kinda lost the ability to track what was going
on every time Jessica Alba showed up in the bicycle pants.
I'd say you kept track of the most important part of the show.
However, getting to the question, the story line was that the
government was bioengineering super-soldiers. One group of them
took exception to this and staged a jailbreak. Max, Jessica
Alba's character, was one of the escapess. She got away with it
in part because she was living in a semi-post-apocalyptic
world--terrorists set of an EMP that wiped out the US
communication network and it still wasn't back up to the point
that the government was able to easily track down its missing
super-soldiers.
I'm glad I was distracted by the bicycle pants. That sounds more
than a little stupid.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Magewolf
2018-09-04 16:50:46 UTC
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Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 16:58:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
What was the show about, anyway? I watched a couple of
episodes, but I kinda lost the ability to track what was going
on every time Jessica Alba showed up in the bicycle pants.
I'd say you kept track of the most important part of the show.
However, getting to the question, the story line was that the
government was bioengineering super-soldiers. One group of them
took exception to this and staged a jailbreak. Max, Jessica
Alba's character, was one of the escapess. She got away with it
in part because she was living in a semi-post-apocalyptic
world--terrorists set of an EMP that wiped out the US
communication network and it still wasn't back up to the point
that the government was able to easily track down its missing
super-soldiers.
I'm glad I was distracted by the bicycle pants. That sounds more
than a little stupid.
It started off more than a little stupid and then it got worse.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-09-04 17:44:02 UTC
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Post by Magewolf
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 3 Sep 2018 16:58:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
What was the show about, anyway? I watched a couple of
episodes, but I kinda lost the ability to track what was
going on every time Jessica Alba showed up in the bicycle
pants.
I'd say you kept track of the most important part of the
show.
However, getting to the question, the story line was that the
government was bioengineering super-soldiers. One group of
them took exception to this and staged a jailbreak. Max,
Jessica Alba's character, was one of the escapess. She got
away with it in part because she was living in a
semi-post-apocalyptic world--terrorists set of an EMP that
wiped out the US communication network and it still wasn't
back up to the point that the government was able to easily
track down its missing super-soldiers.
I'm glad I was distracted by the bicycle pants. That sounds
more than a little stupid.
It started off more than a little stupid and then it got worse.
I only watched a couple of episodes. Jessica Alba in bicycle pants
is certainly charming, but there's better porn out there.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Quadibloc
2018-09-05 00:25:55 UTC
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Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
I only watched a couple of episodes. Jessica Alba in bicycle pants
is certainly charming, but there's better porn out there.
But the plots are probably even stupider!

John Savard
Wolffan
2018-09-05 00:29:34 UTC
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On Tuesday, September 4, 2018 at 11:44:06 AM UTC-6, Jibini Kula Tumbili
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
I only watched a couple of episodes. Jessica Alba in bicycle pants
is certainly charming, but there's better porn out there.
But the plots are probably even stupider!
having seen a few episodes of Dark Angel... no, they’re not.
John Savard
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-05 05:30:36 UTC
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On Tuesday, September 4, 2018 at 11:44:06 AM UTC-6, Jibini Kula
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
I only watched a couple of episodes. Jessica Alba in bicycle
pants is certainly charming, but there's better porn out there.
But the plots are probably even stupider!
That's the point. Nobody watches porn for the story.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Joe Bernstein
2018-09-05 18:14:17 UTC
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Post by Magewolf
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
I'm glad I was distracted by the bicycle pants. That sounds more
than a little stupid.
It started off more than a little stupid and then it got worse.
I remember liking the show well enough (admittedly, partly for the
obvious reason) and thought I'd written about why in my log, but
turns out no, except for the way it waffles about whether it's
actually set in Seattle (as opposed to J. Random Pacific Northwest
Town with Space Needle) and misuses local geography [1].

As moderately unsuccessful sci-fi shows go, <Dollhouse> with Eliza
Dushku offers rather more non-prurient rewards.

Joe Bernstein

[1] Nobody, describing an attempt to cover Seattle geographically,
has ever referred to the area "south of Seneca" except in that show.
They have to have picked that street by throwing darts at a list of
streets - nobody would pick it by looking at an actual map.
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
Robert Carnegie
2018-09-05 19:23:27 UTC
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Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Magewolf
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
I'm glad I was distracted by the bicycle pants. That sounds more
than a little stupid.
It started off more than a little stupid and then it got worse.
I remember liking the show well enough (admittedly, partly for the
obvious reason) and thought I'd written about why in my log, but
turns out no, except for the way it waffles about whether it's
actually set in Seattle (as opposed to J. Random Pacific Northwest
Town with Space Needle) and misuses local geography [1].
As moderately unsuccessful sci-fi shows go, <Dollhouse> with Eliza
Dushku offers rather more non-prurient rewards.
Joe Bernstein
[1] Nobody, describing an attempt to cover Seattle geographically,
has ever referred to the area "south of Seneca" except in that show.
They have to have picked that street by throwing darts at a list of
streets - nobody would pick it by looking at an actual map.
--
IIRC, the setting has paramilitary checkpoints inside
and around the city; it's inconvenient to cross those
boundary points too often. Maybe failing utilities, too.
But, point taken.
J. Clarke
2018-09-06 00:20:59 UTC
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On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 18:14:17 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Magewolf
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
I'm glad I was distracted by the bicycle pants. That sounds more
than a little stupid.
It started off more than a little stupid and then it got worse.
I remember liking the show well enough (admittedly, partly for the
obvious reason) and thought I'd written about why in my log, but
turns out no, except for the way it waffles about whether it's
actually set in Seattle (as opposed to J. Random Pacific Northwest
Town with Space Needle) and misuses local geography [1].
As moderately unsuccessful sci-fi shows go, <Dollhouse> with Eliza
Dushku offers rather more non-prurient rewards.
However the premise of Dollhouse made no sense at all.
Post by Joe Bernstein
Joe Bernstein
[1] Nobody, describing an attempt to cover Seattle geographically,
has ever referred to the area "south of Seneca" except in that show.
They have to have picked that street by throwing darts at a list of
streets - nobody would pick it by looking at an actual map.
Maybe in the broken world of the show "South of Seneca" meant
something that it doesn't mean in our world.
David Johnston
2018-09-06 03:13:23 UTC
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Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Magewolf
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
I'm glad I was distracted by the bicycle pants. That sounds more
than a little stupid.
It started off more than a little stupid and then it got worse.
I remember liking the show well enough (admittedly, partly for the
obvious reason) and thought I'd written about why in my log, but
turns out no, except for the way it waffles about whether it's
actually set in Seattle (as opposed to J. Random Pacific Northwest
Town with Space Needle) and misuses local geography [1].
As moderately unsuccessful sci-fi shows go, <Dollhouse> with Eliza
Dushku offers rather more non-prurient rewards.
That was one of the problems with it. A show about a super-prostitute
probably should have more prurience.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-09-04 05:50:40 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Christian Weisgerber
It was used in the TV show _Dark Angel_.
What was the show about, anyway? I watched a couple of
episodes, but I kinda lost the ability to track what was going
on every time Jessica Alba showed up in the bicycle pants.
I'd say you kept track of the most important part of the show.
The most entertaining, certainly.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Greg Goss
2018-09-03 19:43:04 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Weber's compulsion nanotech in the Honorverse requires a sample as a
starting point. I don't remember if that's a requirement for it to
work, or is necessary to mask the remnants of the agent from
discovery.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Robert Woodward
2018-09-04 04:42:01 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Weber's compulsion nanotech in the Honorverse requires a sample as a
starting point. I don't remember if that's a requirement for it to
work, or is necessary to mask the remnants of the agent from
discovery.
A more general form (created by the Honorverse boss villains) is used as
a kill switch (one example is one that needs a periodic continue signal
- when that expires so does the carrier). That was specifically tied to
the carrier's DNA, but, IIRC, that was to hide its existence.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Robert Carnegie
2018-09-03 20:12:02 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
On TV <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugs_%28TV_series%29>
I think it came up one or maybe two times - either a
poison that kills a particular family, or a pandemic
virus that is fatal to specific people and a sniffle
to anyone else. Or nanites.

In Marvel Comics' _Fantastic Four_, I think Maximus
the Mad, would-be king of the Inhumans, invented a machine
whose vibrations were deadly to homo sapiens worldwide...
but when he turned it on, all the Inhumans started
collapsing too. Because, y'know. No: apparently
I misremembered. He turned it on and nothing happened.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximus_%28comics%29>
Gene Wirchenko
2018-09-03 22:37:24 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Yes. Not mentioned by any of the others yet is one novel of
which I can not remember the author or title. It ends with a junior
having found something that can kill anyone with a specific DNA.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Mike Dworetsky
2018-09-04 07:58:44 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
Not a virus, but in Robert A. Heinlein's 1949 novel Sixth Column (based on
earlier serialisation with collaboration by John Campbell), the conquered
Americans fight back with a "death ray" that targets "Pan-Asians" through
their genetic makeup or something, but leaves Caucasians (and African
descendants?) unharmed. I can't recall how he dealt with Americans of
Chinese or Japanese descent, or for that matter American Natives (Indians)
whose descent is from asian ancestors of about 12,000 years ago.
--
Mike Dworetsky

(Remove pants sp*mbl*ck to reply)
David Johnston
2018-09-04 15:11:12 UTC
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Post by Mike Dworetsky
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
Not a virus, but in Robert A. Heinlein's 1949 novel Sixth Column (based
on earlier serialisation with collaboration by John Campbell), the
conquered Americans fight back with a "death ray" that targets
"Pan-Asians" through their genetic makeup or something, but leaves
Caucasians (and African descendants?) unharmed.  I can't recall how he
dealt with Americans of Chinese or Japanese descent, or for that matter
American Natives (Indians) whose descent is from asian ancestors of
about 12,000 years ago.
Simple. They died. Omelettes and eggs you know.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-04 18:21:11 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Mike Dworetsky
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them.  Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person?  This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
Not a virus, but in Robert A. Heinlein's 1949 novel Sixth Column (based
on earlier serialisation with collaboration by John Campbell), the
conquered Americans fight back with a "death ray" that targets
"Pan-Asians" through their genetic makeup or something, but leaves
Caucasians (and African descendants?) unharmed.  I can't recall how he
dealt with Americans of Chinese or Japanese descent, or for that matter
American Natives (Indians) whose descent is from asian ancestors of
about 12,000 years ago.
Simple. They died. Omelettes and eggs you know.
And that may have been Campbell's original intention. Heinlein
toned down Campbell's prejudices a lot in the finished novel.
The rebels' techniques were certainly set to target Asians, but
(since they could stun as easily as killing), mostly to knock
them out so their prospective victims could escape.

The ones who killed off Asians were the Pan-Asians, who killed
every Asian who didn't follow their rule. This included all
Asian-Americans, except one who escaped the annihilation of his
family and joined the rebellion.

In the event that there's any spoilerphobe who hasn't read _Sixth
Column_, I'll omit further details.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2018-09-04 20:37:31 UTC
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Post by Mike Dworetsky
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
Not a virus, but in Robert A. Heinlein's 1949 novel Sixth Column (based on
earlier serialisation with collaboration by John Campbell), the conquered
Americans fight back with a "death ray" that targets "Pan-Asians" through
their genetic makeup or something, but leaves Caucasians (and African
descendants?) unharmed. I can't recall how he dealt with Americans of
Chinese or Japanese descent, or for that matter American Natives (Indians)
whose descent is from asian ancestors of about 12,000 years ago.
This sounds like a science demonstration - I don't
watch but I think I've seen it done in a clip of
_The Big Bang Theory_ - where a laser beam is shone
through a series of balloons and causes only the one
of corresponding colour to burst. I don't suppose
that's the point they were making!...
Leo Sgouros
2018-09-04 17:30:18 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
Any books that have used this device?
Bill
I have read the thread and would like to add a TV show episode.


"Just out of curiosity, what kind of defence technologies|are we talking about? Space guns? Force fields? Motherships?"

"This is an example of a bioweapon we can make available to you.
A living, radioactive genetic material that may be designed to attack and destroy only the specific DNA of your enemy."

Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=stargate-sg-1&episode=s05e10


It should be noted that the individual assigned for the negotiations, as I recall, was interested in this weapon.


"It's similar to an ancient Celtic text I found in Wales."
Daniel Jackson
Leif Roar Moldskred
2018-09-06 10:30:04 UTC
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Post by Leo Sgouros
I have read the thread and would like to add a TV show episode.
"Just out of curiosity, what kind of defence technologies|are we talking about? Space guns? Force fields? Motherships?"
"This is an example of a bioweapon we can make available to you.
A living, radioactive genetic material that may be designed to attack and destroy only the specific DNA of your enemy."
Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=stargate-sg-1&episode=s05e10
Somewhat more sci-magical, there's the Genetic Bomb from the TV show Killjoys
which, when primed with someone's blood, can destroy the target's entire
bloodline. I don't recall if there was stated any limit on how far back up
the ancestor tree it goes.
--
Leif Roar Moldskred
Warning: be very certain of your nominal parents' fidelity before use.
Scott Lurndal
2018-09-06 12:58:02 UTC
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Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Leo Sgouros
I have read the thread and would like to add a TV show episode.
"Just out of curiosity, what kind of defence technologies|are we talking about? Space guns? Force fields? Motherships?"
"This is an example of a bioweapon we can make available to you.
A living, radioactive genetic material that may be designed to attack and destroy only the specific DNA of your enemy."
Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=stargate-sg-1&episode=s05e10
Somewhat more sci-magical, there's the Genetic Bomb from the TV show Killjoys
which, when primed with someone's blood, can destroy the target's entire
bloodline. I don't recall if there was stated any limit on how far back up
the ancestor tree it goes.
I wonder if they "borrowed" that idea from Jim Butcher's Dresden Files?
Moriarty
2018-09-06 21:49:41 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Leo Sgouros
I have read the thread and would like to add a TV show episode.
"Just out of curiosity, what kind of defence technologies|are we talking about? Space guns? Force fields? Motherships?"
"This is an example of a bioweapon we can make available to you.
A living, radioactive genetic material that may be designed to attack and destroy only the specific DNA of your enemy."
Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=stargate-sg-1&episode=s05e10
Somewhat more sci-magical, there's the Genetic Bomb from the TV show Killjoys
which, when primed with someone's blood, can destroy the target's entire
bloodline. I don't recall if there was stated any limit on how far back up
the ancestor tree it goes.
I wonder if they "borrowed" that idea from Jim Butcher's Dresden Files?
Before Butcher did it, it was a plotline in the Order of the Stick webcomic. The party mage cast a Familicide spell at a black dragon, reasoning that killing a dragon would invite vengeance from its relatives, so best kill them too.

-Moriarty
Bill Gill
2018-09-06 13:20:02 UTC
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Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Leo Sgouros
I have read the thread and would like to add a TV show episode.
"Just out of curiosity, what kind of defence technologies|are we talking about? Space guns? Force fields? Motherships?"
"This is an example of a bioweapon we can make available to you.
A living, radioactive genetic material that may be designed to attack and destroy only the specific DNA of your enemy."
Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=stargate-sg-1&episode=s05e10
Somewhat more sci-magical, there's the Genetic Bomb from the TV show Killjoys
which, when primed with someone's blood, can destroy the target's entire
bloodline. I don't recall if there was stated any limit on how far back up
the ancestor tree it goes.
The entire bloodline would include many people who would not be
considered as relatives, because they were so remote. Just a
grandparent could be pretty widespread. Going back 5 or 6
generations would really spread it extremely wide. Ultimately of
course going back far enough would be every body in the world.

Bill
Leo Sgouros
2018-09-06 18:04:52 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Leo Sgouros
I have read the thread and would like to add a TV show episode.
"Just out of curiosity, what kind of defence technologies|are we talking about? Space guns? Force fields? Motherships?"
"This is an example of a bioweapon we can make available to you.
A living, radioactive genetic material that may be designed to attack and destroy only the specific DNA of your enemy."
Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=stargate-sg-1&episode=s05e10
Somewhat more sci-magical, there's the Genetic Bomb from the TV show Killjoys
which, when primed with someone's blood, can destroy the target's entire
bloodline. I don't recall if there was stated any limit on how far back up
the ancestor tree it goes.
The entire bloodline would include many people who would not be
considered as relatives, because they were so remote. Just a
grandparent could be pretty widespread. Going back 5 or 6
generations would really spread it extremely wide. Ultimately of
course going back far enough would be every body in the world.
Bill
Well, reality aside ( ;-)), this story features a gun that wipes out a person's entire ancestry.
http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/flower-mercy-needle-chain/

Another gun mentioned is

“This one kills the commander of whoever is shot,” Kerang says, “if that’s anyone at all. Admirals, ministers, monks. Schoolteachers. It’s a peculiar sort of loyalty test.”
Quadibloc
2018-09-06 21:52:53 UTC
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Post by Leo Sgouros
Well, reality aside ( ;-)), this story features a gun that wipes out a person's entire ancestry.
http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/flower-mercy-needle-chain/
There is the Ultimate Annihilator, once pointed at Galactus, that simply kills the
individual pointed at... but backdating the killing to the individual's
conception, and erasing from history everything he did.

John Savard
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-09-06 21:59:39 UTC
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Post by Leo Sgouros
Post by Leo Sgouros
Well, reality aside ( ;-)), this story features a gun that wipes out a
person's entire ancestry.
Post by Leo Sgouros
http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/flower-mercy-needle-chain/
There is the Ultimate Annihilator, once pointed at Galactus, that simply kills the
individual pointed at... but backdating the killing to the individual's
conception, and erasing from history everything he did.
John Savard
Hmm. I know of the incident, but somehow have never read those cruicil
issues.

Sounds like Richards should have used it. Other than the fact that at that
time comic book heroes didn't kill people, I can't think of a reason not to.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Kevrob
2018-09-07 01:59:12 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Leo Sgouros
Post by Leo Sgouros
Well, reality aside ( ;-)), this story features a gun that wipes out a
person's entire ancestry.
Post by Leo Sgouros
http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/flower-mercy-needle-chain/
There is the Ultimate Annihilator, once pointed at Galactus, that simply kills the
individual pointed at... but backdating the killing to the individual's
conception, and erasing from history everything he did.
John Savard
Hmm. I know of the incident, but somehow have never read those cruicil
issues.
(!)

The "Galactus Trilogy" is perhaps _the_ prime example of Stan
Lee/Jack Kirby STFnal comics work from the 60s. Now, maybe you
don't read 60s Marvels at all. I didn't read it "off the stands,"
myself, as I was more of a Superman/Green Lantern/Adam Strange
afficianado.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galactus_Trilogy

I did catch the cartoon version on ABC-TV, back in `67.

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2v8trh
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Sounds like Richards should have used it. Other than the fact that at that
time comic book heroes didn't kill people, I can't think of a reason not to.
--
Richards uses the dingus as a bargaining chip. It shows up
in minute 15+ in the video. Or, you can see the page here:

https://www.cbr.com/a-year-of-cool-comics-day-50/

It's been reprinted, often.

`Nuff Said!

Kevin R
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-09-07 02:34:04 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Leo Sgouros
Post by Leo Sgouros
Well, reality aside ( ;-)), this story features a gun that wipes out a
person's entire ancestry.
Post by Leo Sgouros
http://www.lightspeedmagazine.com/fiction/flower-mercy-needle-chain/
There is the Ultimate Annihilator, once pointed at Galactus, that simply kills the
individual pointed at... but backdating the killing to the individual's
conception, and erasing from history everything he did.
John Savard
Hmm. I know of the incident, but somehow have never read those cruicil
issues.
(!)
The "Galactus Trilogy" is perhaps _the_ prime example of Stan
Lee/Jack Kirby STFnal comics work from the 60s. Now, maybe you
don't read 60s Marvels at all. I didn't read it "off the stands,"
myself, as I was more of a Superman/Green Lantern/Adam Strange
afficianado.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galactus_Trilogy
I did catch the cartoon version on ABC-TV, back in `67.
https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2v8trh
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Sounds like Richards should have used it. Other than the fact that at that
time comic book heroes didn't kill people, I can't think of a reason not to.
--
Richards uses the dingus as a bargaining chip. It shows up
https://www.cbr.com/a-year-of-cool-comics-day-50/
It's been reprinted, often.
And I am definitely going to read it at some point.

Man, the FF got shafted movie-wise. They would have been great in the
Thanos story.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Kevrob
2018-09-07 11:55:16 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
The "Galactus Trilogy" is perhaps _the_ prime example of Stan
Lee/Jack Kirby STFnal comics work from the 60s. Now, maybe you
don't read 60s Marvels at all. I didn't read it "off the stands,"
myself, as I was more of a Superman/Green Lantern/Adam Strange
afficianado.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galactus_Trilogy
I did catch the cartoon version on ABC-TV, back in `67.
https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2v8trh
Richards uses the dingus as a bargaining chip. It shows up
https://www.cbr.com/a-year-of-cool-comics-day-50/
It's been reprinted, often.
And I am definitely going to read it at some point.
Man, the FF got shafted movie-wise. They would have been great in the
Thanos story.
Thanos is just Starlin's version of Kirby's Darkseid. Having the
FF tangle with him, rather than one of the many Lee/Kirby-created
villains, is a step-down from the heights.

The Fox/Disney Merger might result in a decent Fantastic Four movie,
some day.

Kevin R
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-09-07 16:43:34 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Kevrob
The "Galactus Trilogy" is perhaps _the_ prime example of Stan
Lee/Jack Kirby STFnal comics work from the 60s. Now, maybe you
don't read 60s Marvels at all. I didn't read it "off the stands,"
myself, as I was more of a Superman/Green Lantern/Adam Strange
afficianado.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galactus_Trilogy
I did catch the cartoon version on ABC-TV, back in `67.
https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2v8trh
Richards uses the dingus as a bargaining chip. It shows up
https://www.cbr.com/a-year-of-cool-comics-day-50/
It's been reprinted, often.
And I am definitely going to read it at some point.
Man, the FF got shafted movie-wise. They would have been great in the
Thanos story.
Thanos is just Starlin's version of Kirby's Darkseid. Having the
FF tangle with him, rather than one of the many Lee/Kirby-created
villains, is a step-down from the heights.
The Fox/Disney Merger might result in a decent Fantastic Four movie,
some day.
If they would have just done as Sony did with Spiderman and lend them
back the the Marvel Studio team..

(But please, not another origin story!)
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Bill Gill
2018-09-07 16:55:57 UTC
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Post by Leif Roar Moldskred
Post by Leo Sgouros
I have read the thread and would like to add a TV show episode.
"Just out of curiosity, what kind of defence technologies|are we talking about? Space guns? Force fields? Motherships?"
"This is an example of a bioweapon we can make available to you.
A living, radioactive genetic material that may be designed to attack and destroy only the specific DNA of your enemy."
Read more: https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/view_episode_scripts.php?tv-show=stargate-sg-1&episode=s05e10
Somewhat more sci-magical, there's the Genetic Bomb from the TV show Killjoys
which, when primed with someone's blood, can destroy the target's entire
bloodline. I don't recall if there was stated any limit on how far back up
the ancestor tree it goes.
I just found a new example, sort of. I am reading "The Dreaming Stars"
by Tim Pratt. This is the second of his Axiom series. In this one
Callie has penetrated an Axiom station. She is trying to find the
to turn off an invading swarm of nanites that is about to destroy
an inhabited planet. She has entered a simulation the Axiom are
running. The simulation is a war game where the top players, the
ones actually run by an Axiom, not a low level simulation, can
destroy an enemy with their top grade weapon. This weapon can also
destroy all of the individuals 'affinity mates'. That counts doesn't
it?

By the way I recommend Pratt's Axiom series. The first was "The
Wrong Stars."

Bill

Scott Lurndal
2018-09-05 12:58:56 UTC
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Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
_Sixth Column_, aka _The Day after Tomorrow_ could be interpreted that
way, if RAH had known about DNA then.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-05 13:57:10 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Bill Gill
In fantasy it is common for a magician to use something that was
once a part of a person to cast a spell on them. Hair is a common
item.
So, could an evil scientists use something from a person that
had some of their DNA in it to create a poison that was specific
to that person? This being equivalent to the magician using
hair to bespell them.
_Sixth Column_, aka _The Day after Tomorrow_ could be interpreted that
way, if RAH had known about DNA then.
Say, rather, that _Sixth Column_ could have been written using
DNA instead of "alternate spectra". It would still have been bad
science, full of handwavium, but it could have been done
(particularly in the 1940s).
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
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