Discussion:
Science fiction ages quickly, while fantasy ages slowly
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a***@gmail.com
2017-04-10 17:47:17 UTC
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As science and technology advances, science fiction stories can quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy stories age slowly, as they are usually based on medieval world's with magic.

Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances with time, so most present day stories age at a rate between science fiction and fantasy.

Abhinav Lal
Writer & Investor
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-10 21:42:13 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
As science and technology advances, science fiction stories can quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy stories age slowly, as they are usually based on medieval world's with magic.
Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances with time, so most present day stories age at a rate between science fiction and fantasy.
A different point of view is that fantasy whose
setting is "medieval" - the sort with tragically
afflicted princesses and clever unskilled
labourers - is outdated straight away. Even
when you're reading it on Twitter.

Science fiction stories even from last year are
liable to leave out some invention that the
writer didn't foresee (Pokemon Go, transsexual
bathrooms), so, read quickly.

Present-day stories are usually about eighteen
months behind reality; for instance,
<https://www.commentarymagazine.com/literary/911-novels/>
starts in the year 2003, with William Gibson's
_Pattern Recognition_ (I haven't verified
the reference, or, I think, read the book.)
And yet today we have 3-D printing, which may
make a difference to that. It's faster, yes?
J. Clarke
2017-04-11 01:01:27 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a***@gmail.com
As science and technology advances, science fiction stories can quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy stories age slowly, as they are usually based on medieval world's with magic.
Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances with time, so most present day stories age at a rate between science fiction and fantasy.
A different point of view is that fantasy whose
setting is "medieval" - the sort with tragically
afflicted princesses and clever unskilled
labourers - is outdated straight away. Even
when you're reading it on Twitter.
Science fiction stories even from last year are
liable to leave out some invention that the
writer didn't foresee (Pokemon Go, transsexual
bathrooms), so, read quickly.
Present-day stories are usually about eighteen
months behind reality; for instance,
<https://www.commentarymagazine.com/literary/911-novels/>
starts in the year 2003, with William Gibson's
_Pattern Recognition_ (I haven't verified
the reference, or, I think, read the book.)
And yet today we have 3-D printing, which may
make a difference to that. It's faster, yes?
Make a difference to what? Faster than what?
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-11 19:54:43 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a***@gmail.com
As science and technology advances, science fiction stories can quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy stories age slowly, as they are usually based on medieval world's with magic.
Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances with time, so most present day stories age at a rate between science fiction and fantasy.
A different point of view is that fantasy whose
setting is "medieval" - the sort with tragically
afflicted princesses and clever unskilled
labourers - is outdated straight away. Even
when you're reading it on Twitter.
Science fiction stories even from last year are
liable to leave out some invention that the
writer didn't foresee (Pokemon Go, transsexual
bathrooms), so, read quickly.
Present-day stories are usually about eighteen
months behind reality; for instance,
<https://www.commentarymagazine.com/literary/911-novels/>
starts in the year 2003, with William Gibson's
_Pattern Recognition_ (I haven't verified
the reference, or, I think, read the book.)
And yet today we have 3-D printing, which may
make a difference to that. It's faster, yes?
Make a difference to what? Faster than what?
Well, to write a book responding to current events,
you have to make a beginning, a middle, an end -
that's work that takes a lot of time.

But with a 3-D printer, you can produce the
beginning, middle and end /simultaneously/.
Print the book vertically!

So, faster!
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-04-11 20:17:59 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a***@gmail.com
As science and technology advances, science fiction stories can
quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy stories age slowly,
as they are usually based on medieval world's with magic.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a***@gmail.com
Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances with
time, so most present day stories age at a rate between science fiction
and fantasy.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
A different point of view is that fantasy whose
setting is "medieval" - the sort with tragically
afflicted princesses and clever unskilled
labourers - is outdated straight away. Even
when you're reading it on Twitter.
Science fiction stories even from last year are
liable to leave out some invention that the
writer didn't foresee (Pokemon Go, transsexual
bathrooms), so, read quickly.
Present-day stories are usually about eighteen
months behind reality; for instance,
<https://www.commentarymagazine.com/literary/911-novels/>
starts in the year 2003, with William Gibson's
_Pattern Recognition_ (I haven't verified
the reference, or, I think, read the book.)
And yet today we have 3-D printing, which may
make a difference to that. It's faster, yes?
Make a difference to what? Faster than what?
Well, to write a book responding to current events,
you have to make a beginning, a middle, an end -
that's work that takes a lot of time.
But with a 3-D printer, you can produce the
beginning, middle and end /simultaneously/.
Print the book vertically!
So, faster!
Um, obviously if you want *fast* you need
a 4-D printer.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-04-11 21:41:02 UTC
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In article
Post by a***@gmail.com
In article
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a***@gmail.com
As science and technology advances, science fiction
stories can
quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy stories age
slowly, as they are usually based on medieval world's with
magic.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a***@gmail.com
Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances
with
time, so most present day stories age at a rate between science
fiction and fantasy.
Post by Robert Carnegie
A different point of view is that fantasy whose
setting is "medieval" - the sort with tragically
afflicted princesses and clever unskilled
labourers - is outdated straight away. Even
when you're reading it on Twitter.
Science fiction stories even from last year are
liable to leave out some invention that the
writer didn't foresee (Pokemon Go, transsexual
bathrooms), so, read quickly.
Present-day stories are usually about eighteen
months behind reality; for instance,
<https://www.commentarymagazine.com/literary/911-novels/>
starts in the year 2003, with William Gibson's
_Pattern Recognition_ (I haven't verified
the reference, or, I think, read the book.)
And yet today we have 3-D printing, which may
make a difference to that. It's faster, yes?
Make a difference to what? Faster than what?
Well, to write a book responding to current events,
you have to make a beginning, a middle, an end -
that's work that takes a lot of time.
But with a 3-D printer, you can produce the
beginning, middle and end /simultaneously/.
Print the book vertically!
So, faster!
Um, obviously if you want *fast* you need
a 4-D printer.
I supposed with a 5-D printer, you could produce _all_ your books
at the same time.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Gene Wirchenko
2017-04-13 02:19:57 UTC
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On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 14:41:02 -0700, Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
[snip]
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Um, obviously if you want *fast* you need
a 4-D printer.
I supposed with a 5-D printer, you could produce _all_ your books
at the same time.
And shelves. Do not forget shelves!

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Jerry Brown
2017-04-13 17:29:48 UTC
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Post by Gene Wirchenko
On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 14:41:02 -0700, Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
[snip]
Post by Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Um, obviously if you want *fast* you need
a 4-D printer.
I supposed with a 5-D printer, you could produce _all_ your books
at the same time.
And shelves. Do not forget shelves!
There is an example of 5-D bookshelves towards the end of
Interstellar.
Post by Gene Wirchenko
Sincerely,
Gene Wirchenko
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Gutless Umbrella Carrying Sissy
2017-04-11 21:40:37 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
In article
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by a***@gmail.com
As science and technology advances, science fiction stories
can quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy
stories age slowly, as they are usually based on medieval
world's with magic.
Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances
with time, so most present day stories age at a rate
between science fiction and fantasy.
A different point of view is that fantasy whose
setting is "medieval" - the sort with tragically
afflicted princesses and clever unskilled
labourers - is outdated straight away. Even
when you're reading it on Twitter.
Science fiction stories even from last year are
liable to leave out some invention that the
writer didn't foresee (Pokemon Go, transsexual
bathrooms), so, read quickly.
Present-day stories are usually about eighteen
months behind reality; for instance,
<https://www.commentarymagazine.com/literary/911-novels/>
starts in the year 2003, with William Gibson's
_Pattern Recognition_ (I haven't verified
the reference, or, I think, read the book.)
And yet today we have 3-D printing, which may
make a difference to that. It's faster, yes?
Make a difference to what? Faster than what?
Well, to write a book responding to current events,
you have to make a beginning, a middle, an end -
that's work that takes a lot of time.
But with a 3-D printer, you can produce the
beginning, middle and end /simultaneously/.
Print the book vertically!
So, faster!
I see you're back to posting ot usenet while drinking heavily
again.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
m***@sky.com
2017-04-12 04:30:39 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
As science and technology advances, science fiction stories can quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy stories age slowly, as they are usually based on medieval world's with magic.
Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances with time, so most present day stories age at a rate between science fiction and fantasy.
Abhinav Lal
Writer & Investor
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its portrayals of and comments on people in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work, but so far I have been unsuccessful in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing people working together in project teams using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on. I think you are going to have trouble talking about the to and fro of an organization doing computer systems development using people it has to recruit and maintain if you action takes place in a medieval fortress where people have to live the lives they were brought up to live.

As for progress in our understanding of human behavior: I used to think we were just comparatively bad at learning about this. In my more pessimistic moments I now believe that we are actively stopping ourselves from learning about ourselves, for fear of having to acknowledge its political implications.
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-12 20:18:24 UTC
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Post by m***@sky.com
Post by a***@gmail.com
As science and technology advances, science fiction stories can quickly become outdated. While traditional fantasy stories age slowly, as they are usually based on medieval world's with magic.
Of course, our understanding of human behaviour advances with time, so most present day stories age at a rate between science fiction and fantasy.
Abhinav Lal
Writer & Investor
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its portrayals of and comments on people in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work, but so far I have been unsuccessful in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing people working together in project teams using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on. I think you are going to have trouble talking about the to and fro of an organization doing computer systems development using people it has to recruit and maintain if you action takes place in a medieval fortress where people have to live the lives they were brought up to live.
Of course there's this series -
<http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Literature/WizBiz?from=Main.WizBiz>
Post by m***@sky.com
As for progress in our understanding of human behavior: I used to think we were just comparatively bad at learning about this. In my more pessimistic moments I now believe that we are actively stopping ourselves from learning about ourselves, for fear of having to acknowledge its political implications.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-04-13 00:43:40 UTC
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Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its portrayals of and comments on people
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work, but so far I have been unsuccessful
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing people working together in project teams
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on.
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
h***@gmail.com
2017-04-13 01:12:55 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its portrayals of and comments on people
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work, but so far I have been unsuccessful
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing people working together in project teams
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on.
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
and another of his earlier books in the series has a completely accurate view of powerpoint
Dimensional Traveler
2017-04-13 02:47:08 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its portrayals of and comments on people
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work, but so far I have been unsuccessful
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing people working together in project teams
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on.
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
and another of his earlier books in the series has a completely accurate view of powerpoint
I've started the Laundry series, just finished The Jennifer Morgue last
night. The Hero's description of what it was like to have his car eject
had me laughing and giggling uncontrollably for a good 15 minutes.
"There's a very loud noise in my ear, not unlike a cat sneezing, if the
cat is the size of the Great Sphinx of Giza and it's just inhaled three
tons of snuff." Going on from there to include a couple of elephants,
"Look ma, no gravity!" and a baby hippo.

(I really want to know how Stross knows what a Great Sphinx size cat
sneezing out three tons of snuff sounds like.)
--
Some days you just don't have enough middle fingers!
Mart van de Wege
2017-04-13 21:30:01 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
(I really want to know how Stross knows what a Great Sphinx size cat
sneezing out three tons of snuff sounds like.)
Charlie has a cat with delusions of Sphinxhood:
https://twitter.com/antipope_cats

Cute kitty, and Charlie seems to not regret picking her up from the
shelter, but boy, does he complain a lot about her overactive antics and
aggressive play interrupting his work. And for an author with an online
presence like Stross, that means us fans get to chuckle along with him.

Mart
--
"We will need a longer wall when the revolution comes."
--- AJS, quoting an uncertain source.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-04-15 13:57:22 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its
portrayals of and comments on people
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work,
but so far I have been unsuccessful
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing
people working together in project teams
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on.
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
and another of his earlier books in the series has a completely
accurate view of powerpoint
I've started the Laundry series, just finished The Jennifer Morgue last
night. The Hero's description of what it was like to have his car eject
had me laughing and giggling uncontrollably for a good 15 minutes.
"There's a very loud noise in my ear, not unlike a cat sneezing, if the
cat is the size of the Great Sphinx of Giza and it's just inhaled three
tons of snuff." Going on from there to include a couple of elephants,
"Look ma, no gravity!" and a baby hippo.
(I really want to know how Stross knows what a Great Sphinx size cat
sneezing out three tons of snuff sounds like.)
There are questions it is best not to ask.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
David Mitchell
2017-04-13 04:22:38 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its portrayals of and comments on people
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work, but so far I have been unsuccessful
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing people working together in project teams
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on.
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
and another of his earlier books in the series has a completely accurate view of powerpoint
Rule 34 is a police procedural, if the police had proper procedures.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-04-13 04:24:26 UTC
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Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its
portrayals of and comments on people
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work,
but so far I have been unsuccessful
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing
people working together in project teams
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum,
and so on.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
and another of his earlier books in the series has a completely accurate view of powerpoint
Powerpoint corrupts absolutely?
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2017-04-14 01:55:17 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its
portrayals of and comments on people
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work,
but so far I have been unsuccessful
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing
people working together in project teams
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum,
and so on.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
and another of his earlier books in the series has a completely accurate view of powerpoint
Powerpoint corrupts absolutely?
Full on mind-wipe and infestation by Things from the Dungeon Dimensions,
yes.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
C makes it easy to shoot yourself in the foot; C++ makes it
harder, but when you do, it blows away your whole leg.
-- Bjarne Stroustrup
Kevrob
2017-04-14 16:15:40 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Powerpoint corrupts absolutely?
Full on mind-wipe and infestation by Things from the Dungeon Dimensions,
yes.
Does it have to be Absolute Powerpoint to corrupt absolutely?

Kevin R

{Doesn't have to use even the regular kind, thank ghu!}
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-04-15 13:58:08 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its
portrayals of and comments on people
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work,
but so far I have been unsuccessful
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing
people working together in project teams
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum,
and so on.
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
and another of his earlier books in the series has a completely accurate
view of powerpoint
Powerpoint corrupts absolutely?
Is used to eat souls and turn viewers into brainwashed zombies.

I wish it DID work that way, it'd be so much easier to get through
those end-of-project presentations.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
m***@sky.com
2017-04-13 04:56:31 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its portrayals of and comments on people
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work, but so far I have been unsuccessful
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing people working together in project teams
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on.
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
I have read and enjoyed the Laundry Novels leading up to the Rhesus Factor. I have the Rhesus Factor down on my "to buy" list due to comments seen here, but I haven't bought it yet - most recently it lost out to "Challenges of the Deep" - Thanks for that!. To the extent that they cover modern organizational life they show amusing caricatures from the point of view of a UK left wing Guardian reader with a cynical contempt for capitalism and its supporting institutions. It's not where I would look for E.E.Smith type enthusiasm for the future and I happen to find it less entertaining than - for example - the Guns and God libertarianism of Correia and Ringo's Monster Hunter Memoirs series (I find the original Monster Hunters OK but Monster Hunter Memoirs great fun).

PS - you seem to have answered a number of questions and unwrapped a number of presents in Challenges of the Deep. This seems to be about the time when E.E.Smith would introduce a larger playing field and a set of new and much more powerful villains who were only hidden puppet masters in what we have seen so far.
David Goldfarb
2017-04-13 05:28:03 UTC
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CHART. The title of the book is _The Rhesus Chart_. Not "Factor".
--
David Goldfarb |
***@gmail.com | Horace Gerstenblut n'existe pas.
***@ocf.berkeley.edu |
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-04-15 13:59:57 UTC
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Post by David Goldfarb
CHART. The title of the book is _The Rhesus Chart_. Not "Factor".
Damn biology interfering again.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-04-15 13:59:34 UTC
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Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by m***@sky.com
I'd love to recent find Science Fiction as interesting for its portrayals of and comments on people
in post-industrial revolution work as the best of E.E.Smith's work, but so far I have been unsuccessful
in finding it. I would especially like to see something showing people working together in project teams
using the organizational methods computer people call Agile, Scrum, and so on.
Have you not read Charlie Stross' novels? One of the Laundry Series,
the Rhesus Factor, actually focuses on such a group.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
I have read and enjoyed the Laundry Novels leading up to the Rhesus Factor. I have the Rhesus Factor down on my "to buy" list due to comments seen here, but I haven't bought it yet - most recently it lost out to "Challenges of the Deep" - Thanks for that!. To the extent that they cover modern organizational life they show amusing caricatures from the point of view of a UK left wing Guardian reader with a cynical contempt for capitalism and its supporting institutions. It's not where I would look for E.E.Smith type enthusiasm for the future and I happen to find it less entertaining than - for example - the Guns and God libertarianism of Correia and Ringo's Monster Hunter Memoirs series (I find the original Monster Hunters OK but Monster Hunter Memoirs great fun).
PS - you seem to have answered a number of questions and unwrapped a number of presents in Challenges of the Deep. This seems to be about the time when E.E.Smith would introduce a larger playing field and a set of new and much more powerful villains who were only hidden puppet masters in what we have seen so far.
Thanks for reading! And being chosen over Charlie is a fine compliment
indeed!

Indeed, the playing field for the Arena is still much larger than our
heroes -- or, to be honest, most of the other residents of the Arena --
imagine.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
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