Discussion:
[review] Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
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James Nicoll
2018-06-27 15:15:07 UTC
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Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri

https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Carl Fink
2018-06-30 22:23:12 UTC
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On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
>
> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper

Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
Zelazny's Amber stories?
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read John Grant's book, Corrupted Science: http://a.co/9UsUoGu
Dedicated to ... Carl Fink!
James Nicoll
2018-06-30 22:25:55 UTC
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In article <***@panix2.panix.com>,
Carl Fink <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
>On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
>> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
>>
>> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
>
>Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
>Zelazny's Amber stories?

Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-07-01 00:54:37 UTC
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In article <ph901j$2dn$***@reader1.panix.com>,
James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
>In article <***@panix2.panix.com>,
>Carl Fink <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
>>On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
>>> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
>>>
>>> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
>>
>>Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
>>Zelazny's Amber stories?
>
>Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.

My take on Amber is as follows: about the first half of _Nine
Princes_ is great. As soon as Corwin arrives in Amber, it
devolves into palace politics, and the other nine-and-a-half are
nothing but.

Still, they made him some money, which (as Mahbub Ali pointed
out) is the need of everyone.


--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Titus G
2018-07-01 02:57:36 UTC
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On 01/07/18 10:25, James Nicoll wrote:
> In article <***@panix2.panix.com>, Carl Fink
> <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
>> On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
>>> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
>>>
>>> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
>>
>> Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was
>> reviewing Zelazny's Amber stories?
>
> Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.

Ditto. I didn't finish the first.
Jack Bohn
2018-07-01 11:28:19 UTC
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James Nicoll wrote:
> In article <***@panix2.panix.com>,
> Carl Fink <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
> >On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
> >> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
> >>
> >> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
> >
> >Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
> >Zelazny's Amber stories?
>
> Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.

Ah, but those Nine Boston Brahmins of Ambah!

--
-Jack
William Hyde
2018-07-01 18:55:19 UTC
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On Saturday, June 30, 2018 at 6:25:57 PM UTC-4, James Nicoll wrote:
> In article <***@panix2.panix.com>,
> Carl Fink <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
> >On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
> >> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
> >>
> >> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
> >
> >Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
> >Zelazny's Amber stories?
>
> Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.

I saw the first Amber book as Zelazny's take on Moorcock's standard 1960s fantasy. But Moorcock was cranking most of that stuff out at high speed (for reasons of pecuniary survival) and it showed, while Amber was written with far more care. So as I liked even Moorcock's fluffiest books (1), I really liked the first Amber book.

As to the rest of the series, well, I pushed through to the "courts of chaos" (to me the second best of the bunch) and was glad it was over. When a second Amber series came out, I avoided it (but got one volume on the SFBC negative option, read it, meh).

I've not done a reread of books two and beyond.

(1) A late reread of some of his stuff showed that there was more to it than I'd noticed the first time around. I haven't pursued this though, as my tastes have changed.


William Hyde
h***@gmail.com
2018-07-02 01:13:06 UTC
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On Monday, July 2, 2018 at 4:55:22 AM UTC+10, William Hyde wrote:
> On Saturday, June 30, 2018 at 6:25:57 PM UTC-4, James Nicoll wrote:
> > In article <***@panix2.panix.com>,
> > Carl Fink <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
> > >On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
> > >> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
> > >>
> > >> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
> > >
> > >Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
> > >Zelazny's Amber stories?
> >
> > Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.
>
> I saw the first Amber book as Zelazny's take on Moorcock's standard 1960s fantasy. But Moorcock was cranking most of that stuff out at high speed (for reasons of pecuniary survival) and it showed, while Amber was written with far more care. So as I liked even Moorcock's fluffiest books (1), I really liked the first Amber book.

The Moorcock I've read always made me feel like he was directly pushing every character exactly where he wanted them to be and there was never the illusion of free will for the characters
>
> As to the rest of the series, well, I pushed through to the "courts of chaos" (to me the second best of the bunch) and was glad it was over. When a second Amber series came out, I avoided it (but got one volume on the SFBC negative option, read it, meh).

I much preferred the first series to the second series.

>
> I've not done a reread of books two and beyond.
>
> (1) A late reread of some of his stuff showed that there was more to it than I'd noticed the first time around. I haven't pursued this though, as my tastes have changed.
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2018-07-02 18:18:15 UTC
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On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 18:13:06 -0700 (PDT), ***@gmail.com wrote:

>On Monday, July 2, 2018 at 4:55:22 AM UTC+10, William Hyde wrote:
>> On Saturday, June 30, 2018 at 6:25:57 PM UTC-4, James Nicoll wrote:
>> > In article <***@panix2.panix.com>,
>> > Carl Fink <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
>> > >On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
>> > >> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
>> > >>
>> > >> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
>> > >
>> > >Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
>> > >Zelazny's Amber stories?
>> >
>> > Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.
>>
>> I saw the first Amber book as Zelazny's take on Moorcock's standard 1960s fantasy. But Moorcock was cranking most of that stuff out at high speed (for reasons of pecuniary survival) and it showed, while Amber was written with far more care. So as I liked even Moorcock's fluffiest books (1), I really liked the first Amber book.
>
>The Moorcock I've read always made me feel like he was directly pushing every character exactly where he wanted them to be and there was never the illusion of free will for the characters
>>
>> As to the rest of the series, well, I pushed through to the "courts of chaos" (to me the second best of the bunch) and was glad it was over. When a second Amber series came out, I avoided it (but got one volume on the SFBC negative option, read it, meh).
>
>I much preferred the first series to the second series.

He wrote the second series for money, plain and simple -- he had a
family to support. I think it shows.


--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
My latest novel is Stone Unturned: A Legend of Ethshar.
See http://www.ethshar.com/StoneUnturned.shtml
Carl Fink
2018-07-02 18:40:43 UTC
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On 2018-07-02, Lawrence Watt-Evans <***@gmail.com> wrote:

> He wrote the second series for money, plain and simple -- he had a
> family to support. I think it shows.

I only met Zelazny once, and that was one of the things he said, that his
current output was very much meant to put his kids through college.
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read John Grant's book, Corrupted Science: http://a.co/9UsUoGu
Dedicated to ... Carl Fink!
Robert Carnegie
2018-07-02 20:47:05 UTC
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On Monday, 2 July 2018 19:18:17 UTC+1, Lawrence Watt-Evans wrote:
> On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 18:13:06 -0700 (PDT), ***@gmail.com wrote:
>
> >On Monday, July 2, 2018 at 4:55:22 AM UTC+10, William Hyde wrote:
> >> On Saturday, June 30, 2018 at 6:25:57 PM UTC-4, James Nicoll wrote:
> >> > In article <***@panix2.panix.com>,
> >> > Carl Fink <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
> >> > >On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
> >> > >> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
> >> > >>
> >> > >> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
> >> > >
> >> > >Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
> >> > >Zelazny's Amber stories?
> >> >
> >> > Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.
> >>
> >> I saw the first Amber book as Zelazny's take on Moorcock's standard 1960s fantasy. But Moorcock was cranking most of that stuff out at high speed (for reasons of pecuniary survival) and it showed, while Amber was written with far more care. So as I liked even Moorcock's fluffiest books (1), I really liked the first Amber book.
> >
> >The Moorcock I've read always made me feel like he was directly pushing every character exactly where he wanted them to be and there was never the illusion of free will for the characters
> >>
> >> As to the rest of the series, well, I pushed through to the "courts of chaos" (to me the second best of the bunch) and was glad it was over. When a second Amber series came out, I avoided it (but got one volume on the SFBC negative option, read it, meh).
> >
> >I much preferred the first series to the second series.
>
> He wrote the second series for money, plain and simple -- he had a
> family to support. I think it shows.

Did I mention what Samuel Johnson said about that, already?
Condemning myself, of course - if you call this activity
"writing". If you look at it as "shooting the breeze
over coffee", that's Johnson himself.

I think the newer Amber stories are enjoyable even when
I choose to deny myself the supplementary pleasure of
despising them - not that you're doing it, but it seems
that almost everyone else is.
Greg Goss
2018-07-03 06:15:01 UTC
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Robert Carnegie <***@excite.com> wrote:

>Did I mention what Samuel Johnson said about that, already?
>Condemning myself, of course - if you call this activity
>"writing". If you look at it as "shooting the breeze=20
>over coffee", that's Johnson himself.

For a while I was reading Charlie Daniels' ("The Devil Went Down to
Georgia") blog.

A paraphrase from deep memory:

"People ask me "When will you retire?". I answer like this. What
would I do if I retired? Maybe I'd travel some. What would I do when
I visited some city? Probably hang out in bars. I like bars. What
would I do in a bar? Maybe I'd see if they let me sing. I like
singing. I like bar crowds.

"My accountant says that if I don't retire, I get to deduct the costs
of doing all this."
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2018-07-03 14:49:48 UTC
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On Tue, 03 Jul 2018 00:15:01 -0600, Greg Goss <***@gossg.org> wrote:

>Robert Carnegie <***@excite.com> wrote:
>
>>Did I mention what Samuel Johnson said about that, already?
>>Condemning myself, of course - if you call this activity
>>"writing". If you look at it as "shooting the breeze=20
>>over coffee", that's Johnson himself.
>
>For a while I was reading Charlie Daniels' ("The Devil Went Down to
>Georgia") blog.
>
>A paraphrase from deep memory:
>
>"People ask me "When will you retire?". I answer like this. What
>would I do if I retired? Maybe I'd travel some. What would I do when
>I visited some city? Probably hang out in bars. I like bars. What
>would I do in a bar? Maybe I'd see if they let me sing. I like
>singing. I like bar crowds.
>
>"My accountant says that if I don't retire, I get to deduct the costs
>of doing all this."

I saw Terry Pratchett speak a couple of weeks before his Alzheimer's
diagnosis, and he remarked that if he retired, he might, like so many
other folks, write a book.




--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
My latest novel is Stone Unturned: A Legend of Ethshar.
See http://www.ethshar.com/StoneUnturned.shtml
p***@hotmail.com
2018-07-03 16:24:06 UTC
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On Monday, July 2, 2018 at 3:47:08 PM UTC-5, Robert Carnegie wrote:
> On Monday, 2 July 2018 19:18:17 UTC+1, Lawrence Watt-Evans wrote:
> > On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 18:13:06 -0700 (PDT), ***@gmail.com wrote:
> >
> > >On Monday, July 2, 2018 at 4:55:22 AM UTC+10, William Hyde wrote:
> > >> On Saturday, June 30, 2018 at 6:25:57 PM UTC-4, James Nicoll wrote:
> > >> > In article <***@panix2.panix.com>,
> > >> > Carl Fink <***@finknetwork.com> wrote:
> > >> > >On 2018-06-27, James Nicoll <***@panix.com> wrote:
> > >> > >> Empire of Sand (The Books of Ambha, book 1) by Tasha Suri
> > >> > >>
> > >> > >> https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/sounds-like-a-whisper
> > >> > >
> > >> > >Did anyone else, for a fraction of a second, think James was reviewing
> > >> > >Zelazny's Amber stories?
> > >> >
> > >> > Man, did I bounce hard off the Amber books.
> > >>
> > >> I saw the first Amber book as Zelazny's take on Moorcock's standard 1960s fantasy. But Moorcock was cranking most of that stuff out at high speed (for reasons of pecuniary survival) and it showed, while Amber was written with far more care. So as I liked even Moorcock's fluffiest books (1), I really liked the first Amber book.
> > >
> > >The Moorcock I've read always made me feel like he was directly pushing every character exactly where he wanted them to be and there was never the illusion of free will for the characters
> > >>
> > >> As to the rest of the series, well, I pushed through to the "courts of chaos" (to me the second best of the bunch) and was glad it was over. When a second Amber series came out, I avoided it (but got one volume on the SFBC negative option, read it, meh).
> > >
> > >I much preferred the first series to the second series.
> >
> > He wrote the second series for money, plain and simple -- he had a
> > family to support. I think it shows.
>
> Did I mention what Samuel Johnson said about that, already?
> Condemning myself, of course - if you call this activity
> "writing". If you look at it as "shooting the breeze
> over coffee", that's Johnson himself.
>
> I think the newer Amber stories are enjoyable even when
> I choose to deny myself the supplementary pleasure of
> despising them - not that you're doing it, but it seems
> that almost everyone else is.

"Orchids have very little food value and are hard to grow
in this climate. It amuses the Great Tyrant to resent the
expense of feeding orchids to slaves."

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
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