Discussion:
YASID: Hiding among us
(too old to reply)
Default User
2017-02-28 22:50:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that either aliens or advanced humans are living among the general populace. Even though they have superior abilities, one of those is the ability to remain unnoticed.

The narrator is being told this by someone else, and is skeptical at least at first. The other asks him who the best pitcher on the local baseball team is. When answered, "Jones" the other person says, "You know Smith has a better record."

At the end of the story, the narrator is watching "Smith" pitch, where he gives up a home run but without any expression as you might expect. Presumably "Smith" has done it on purpose for cover.


Brian
Mike Van Pelt
2017-03-01 01:01:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that
either aliens or advanced humans are living among the general
populace. Even though they have superior abilities, one of those
is the ability to remain unnoticed.
I don't recall baseball, but Zenna Henderson's "The People"
stories were about several settlements of aliens who were
stranded on Earth back in the late 1800s/early 1900s.
There are two books of short stories, "Pilgrimage", and
"The People: No Different Flesh."
--
"The urge to save humanity is almost | Mike Van Pelt
always a false front for the urge to rule." | mvp at calweb.com
-- H.L. Mencken | KE6BVH
Don Kuenz
2017-03-01 03:16:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that
either aliens or advanced humans are living among the general
populace. Even though they have superior abilities, one of those
is the ability to remain unnoticed.
I don't recall baseball, but Zenna Henderson's "The People"
stories were about several settlements of aliens who were
stranded on Earth back in the late 1800s/early 1900s.
There are two books of short stories, "Pilgrimage", and
"The People: No Different Flesh."
Although "Eight O'Clock in the Morning" (Nelson) was first published in
November 1963, it also lacks baseball. But it does have aliens with
superior abilities living on Earth. The aliens keep the people of Earth
hypnotized to remain unaware of the aliens. The story begins on the day
that George Nada wakes up from their hypnosis.

Thank you,

--
Don Kuenz KB7RPU
Cryptoengineer
2017-03-01 03:09:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that
either aliens or advanced humans are living among the general
populace. Even though they have superior abilities, one of those is
the ability to remain unnoticed.
The narrator is being told this by someone else, and is skeptical at
least at first. The other asks him who the best pitcher on the local
baseball team is. When answered, "Jones" the other person says, "You
know Smith has a better record."
At the end of the story, the narrator is watching "Smith" pitch, where
he gives up a home run but without any expression as you might expect.
Presumably "Smith" has done it on purpose for cover.
Brian
I think I recall this. In my memory, they weren't aliens, but but
some kind of mutant homo superior, with amazing mental and physical
skills, but also a talent, not always wanted, of being nigh-impossible
to remember. One, at least, played baseball to build up a paper trail
of his accomplishements far outshining Babe Ruth or Mickey Mantel, but
to baseball fans, was thought of, if at all, as a third string player.

The narrator is normal human, a reporter, but the homo superior has
no worries about telling him, since he knows (with some sadness) that
the reporter will forget all about the story when he leaves.

pt
Titus G
2017-03-01 05:25:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that
either aliens or advanced humans are living among the general
populace. Even though they have superior abilities, one of those is
the ability to remain unnoticed.
The narrator is being told this by someone else, and is skeptical at
least at first. The other asks him who the best pitcher on the local
baseball team is. When answered, "Jones" the other person says, "You
know Smith has a better record."
At the end of the story, the narrator is watching "Smith" pitch, where
he gives up a home run but without any expression as you might expect.
Presumably "Smith" has done it on purpose for cover.
Brian
I think I recall this. In my memory, they weren't aliens, but but
some kind of mutant homo superior, with amazing mental and physical
skills, but also a talent, not always wanted, of being nigh-impossible
to remember. One, at least, played baseball to build up a paper trail
of his accomplishements far outshining Babe Ruth or Mickey Mantel, but
to baseball fans, was thought of, if at all, as a third string player.
The narrator is normal human, a reporter, but the homo superior has
no worries about telling him, since he knows (with some sadness) that
the reporter will forget all about the story when he leaves.
I also recall this but can't remember title nor author. I think it may
have been set in the 1950's or perhaps 60's?
Stephen Harker
2017-03-01 06:26:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Titus G
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that
either aliens or advanced humans are living among the general
populace. Even though they have superior abilities, one of those is
the ability to remain unnoticed.
The narrator is being told this by someone else, and is skeptical at
least at first. The other asks him who the best pitcher on the local
baseball team is. When answered, "Jones" the other person says, "You
know Smith has a better record."
At the end of the story, the narrator is watching "Smith" pitch, where
he gives up a home run but without any expression as you might expect.
Presumably "Smith" has done it on purpose for cover.
I think I recall this. In my memory, they weren't aliens, but but
some kind of mutant homo superior, with amazing mental and physical
skills, but also a talent, not always wanted, of being nigh-impossible
to remember. One, at least, played baseball to build up a paper trail
of his accomplishements far outshining Babe Ruth or Mickey Mantel, but
to baseball fans, was thought of, if at all, as a third string player.
The narrator is normal human, a reporter, but the homo superior has
no worries about telling him, since he knows (with some sadness) that
the reporter will forget all about the story when he leaves.
I also recall this but can't remember title nor author. I think it may
have been set in the 1950's or perhaps 60's?
I *think* this is _Nobody Bothers Gus_ Astoundig Science Fiction,
November 1955 by Paul Janvier (Algis Budrys)
(http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?190312). Unfortunately my old
magazines ae not immediately available, so I can't check it.
--
Stephen Harker ***@netspace.net.au
http://sjharker.customer.netspace.net.au/
Butch Malahide
2017-03-01 12:21:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Stephen Harker
I *think* this is _Nobody Bothers Gus_ Astoundig Science Fiction,
November 1955 by Paul Janvier (Algis Budrys)
(http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?190312). Unfortunately my old
magazines ae not immediately available, so I can't check it.
Thanks to the Internet Archive you can check it here:

https://archive.org/stream/Astounding_v56n03_1955-11_UnkSc-cape1736#page/n65/mode/2up
Default User
2017-03-01 18:27:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Stephen Harker
I *think* this is _Nobody Bothers Gus_ Astoundig Science Fiction,
November 1955 by Paul Janvier (Algis Budrys)
(http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?190312). Unfortunately my old
magazines ae not immediately available, so I can't check it.
I kind of mangled the details (shocking for a YASID), but that's the one.


Brian
Carl Fink
2017-03-01 13:53:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
I think I recall this. In my memory, they weren't aliens, but but
some kind of mutant homo superior, with amazing mental and physical
skills, but also a talent, not always wanted, of being nigh-impossible
to remember. One, at least, played baseball to build up a paper trail
of his accomplishements far outshining Babe Ruth or Mickey Mantel, but
to baseball fans, was thought of, if at all, as a third string player.
It's based on a common SF-of-the-era misconception of evolution, in which
new capabilities like "can't be noticed" camouflage psychic powers suddenly
appear full-blown with no intermediates, even though they're actually
disadvantages to their carriers.

Compare to, say, *Slan*.
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
Greg Goss
2017-03-02 15:41:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Carl Fink
Post by Cryptoengineer
I think I recall this. In my memory, they weren't aliens, but but
some kind of mutant homo superior, with amazing mental and physical
skills, but also a talent, not always wanted, of being nigh-impossible
to remember. One, at least, played baseball to build up a paper trail
of his accomplishements far outshining Babe Ruth or Mickey Mantel, but
to baseball fans, was thought of, if at all, as a third string player.
It's based on a common SF-of-the-era misconception of evolution, in which
new capabilities like "can't be noticed" camouflage psychic powers suddenly
appear full-blown with no intermediates, even though they're actually
disadvantages to their carriers.
Compare to, say, *Slan*.
Or "A Gift From Earth." where the "don't notice me" trait is
definitely anti-darwinian. Till he learns that he can invert the
power.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Robert Woodward
2017-03-01 06:17:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that either
aliens or advanced humans are living among the general populace. Even though
they have superior abilities, one of those is the ability to remain
unnoticed.
The narrator is being told this by someone else, and is skeptical at least at
first. The other asks him who the best pitcher on the local baseball team is.
When answered, "Jones" the other person says, "You know Smith has a better
record."
At the end of the story, the narrator is watching "Smith" pitch, where he
gives up a home run but without any expression as you might expect.
Presumably "Smith" has done it on purpose for cover.
It is an Algis Budrys story, "Nobody Bothers Gus" (Astounding SF,
November 1955 issue).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Peter Trei
2017-03-01 13:54:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that either
aliens or advanced humans are living among the general populace. Even though
they have superior abilities, one of those is the ability to remain
unnoticed.
The narrator is being told this by someone else, and is skeptical at least at
first. The other asks him who the best pitcher on the local baseball team is.
When answered, "Jones" the other person says, "You know Smith has a better
record."
At the end of the story, the narrator is watching "Smith" pitch, where he
gives up a home run but without any expression as you might expect.
Presumably "Smith" has done it on purpose for cover.
It is an Algis Budrys story, "Nobody Bothers Gus" (Astounding SF,
November 1955 issue).
Bingo!

pt
Anthony Nance
2017-03-01 15:03:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that either
aliens or advanced humans are living among the general populace. Even though
they have superior abilities, one of those is the ability to remain
unnoticed.
The narrator is being told this by someone else, and is skeptical at least at
first. The other asks him who the best pitcher on the local baseball team is.
When answered, "Jones" the other person says, "You know Smith has a better
record."
At the end of the story, the narrator is watching "Smith" pitch, where he
gives up a home run but without any expression as you might expect.
Presumably "Smith" has done it on purpose for cover.
It is an Algis Budrys story, "Nobody Bothers Gus" (Astounding SF,
November 1955 issue).
Good catch. The "secret aliens among earthlings" theme is something
Budrys touches on in other works (in somewhat different ways), including
The Falling Torch, Michaelmas, and the very good and underappreciated
Hard Landing.

Tony
Default User
2017-03-01 18:22:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Default User
This was a short story, probably 50s or 60s. The premise is that either
aliens or advanced humans are living among the general populace. Even though
they have superior abilities, one of those is the ability to remain
unnoticed.
The narrator is being told this by someone else, and is skeptical at least at
first. The other asks him who the best pitcher on the local baseball team is.
When answered, "Jones" the other person says, "You know Smith has a better
record."
At the end of the story, the narrator is watching "Smith" pitch, where he
gives up a home run but without any expression as you might expect.
Presumably "Smith" has done it on purpose for cover.
It is an Algis Budrys story, "Nobody Bothers Gus" (Astounding SF,
November 1955 issue).
That title sounds right. I will check out the link someone else produced, but I think that's the one.


Brian
Loading...