Discussion:
More prose that makes you go, hmmm
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-05-08 22:35:19 UTC
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So, I'm reading:

I was about to sign off when alarms started going off on
the sonic fence pylons and the iso-pad in my tool belt. I
had just enough time to spit out an old Earth epitaph,
"Shit!"

and I'm thinking, "no". But then, "yes".
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What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Carnegie
2018-05-08 22:50:37 UTC
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On Tuesday, 8 May 2018 23:35:22 UTC+1, Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
> So, I'm reading:
>
> I was about to sign off when alarms started going off on
> the sonic fence pylons and the iso-pad in my tool belt. I
> had just enough time to spit out an old Earth epitaph,
> "Shit!"
>
> and I'm thinking, "no". But then, "yes".

I'm thinking "epithet", but at least Wikipedia reports
that using that to mean "a dirty word, and especially
a word of prejudice" is or was considered un-classy.
Strictly it seems to refer to an auxiliary name or
personal adjective, like "Doc" in "E. E. 'Doc' Smith",
or I guess "Good" in "Good King Wenceslas".
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-05-09 00:51:00 UTC
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In article <561fdafc-c507-4803-a45c-***@googlegroups.com>,
Robert Carnegie <***@excite.com> wrote:
>On Tuesday, 8 May 2018 23:35:22 UTC+1, Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
>> So, I'm reading:
>>
>> I was about to sign off when alarms started going off on
>> the sonic fence pylons and the iso-pad in my tool belt. I
>> had just enough time to spit out an old Earth epitaph,
>> "Shit!"
>>
>> and I'm thinking, "no". But then, "yes".
>
>I'm thinking "epithet", but at least Wikipedia reports
>that using that to mean "a dirty word, and especially
>a word of prejudice" is or was considered un-classy.
>Strictly it seems to refer to an auxiliary name or
>personal adjective, like "Doc" in "E. E. 'Doc' Smith",
>or I guess "Good" in "Good King Wenceslas".

Or an ekename, from which we get "nickname." For instance, in
Tolkien's work, Elbereth, "Star-kindler," is an epithet of Varda.

In _The Lord of the Rings Online,_ the system carefully prevents
players from giving a character either a name already in use on
that server, or any name that appears, not only in _The Hobbit_
or _The Lord of the Rings_, for which the game has a license, but
also in _The Silmarillion,_ fopr which it doesn't. I found this
out when I tried to give my newest character's Lynx-companion the
name of a constellation in Quenya.

However ... Astaldo is an epithet of Tulkas, meaning "Valiant,"
and the system did not reject the feminine form, Astalde. Heh.

--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Steve Coltrin
2018-05-09 14:10:39 UTC
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begin fnord
***@loft.tnolan.com (Ted Nolan <tednolan>) writes:

> So, I'm reading:
>
> I was about to sign off when alarms started going off on
> the sonic fence pylons and the iso-pad in my tool belt. I
> had just enough time to spit out an old Earth epitaph,
> "Shit!"
>
> and I'm thinking, "no". But then, "yes".

I'm reminded of the Explorer Corps from James Alan Gardner's books,
in which 'going Oh Shit' is slang for dying in action - because an
Explorer's last words are usually "Oh, shit".

--
Steve Coltrin ***@omcl.org Google Groups killfiled here
"A group known as the League of Human Dignity helped arrange for Deuel
to be driven to a local livestock scale, where he could be weighed."
- Associated Press
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