Discussion:
Do you immediately re-read a story after you first read it?
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D B Davis
2017-06-30 02:38:16 UTC
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Part of my re-invention/reboot entails making my book reviews better.
It turns out that a book report is a synopsis. And a book /review/ is a
synopsis colored by opinion.

Diablo Valley College describes itself as a feeder college to UC
Berkeley. They offer a paper on How to Write a Book Report/Review [1].
Their How-to suggests reading a story once to get a general
understanding, and then reading it again while making notes for the
Report/Review.

Note.

1. https://www.dvc.edu/academics/ed/english/learningresources/pdfs/How-to-write-a-book-report.pdf

Thank you,

--
Don
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-06-30 04:22:31 UTC
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In article <***@crcomp.net>, D B Davis <***@crcomp.net> wrote:

[schnipped]

I frequently do, depending on how good the book is.

I distinctly remember finishing Willis's _To Say Nothing of the
Dog_ for the first time, and thinking, "Oh, I wish I had already
read this twice, or maybe three times, so that I can understand
all the subtle foreshadowings." So I read it again, and I
*think* once more.

On the other hand, I reread a lot anyway. I grade books based on
their rereadability, as follows:

A = read it in one sitting, immediately turned around and read it
again. And again, if time permitted.
B = read it, waited a bit, read it again, continue to read it at
yearly-or-so intervals.
C = read it, kept it on the shelves, reread it less often than
once/year.
D = read it, never tempted to read it again.
F = couldn't finish it even once. (Loud cries of disgust and
fling-against-the-wall optional.)


One of the things I do besides reading (and rereading) is playing
an online game, _The Lord of the Rings Online._ (Needless to
say, _LotR_ itself rates an A.) The story line of the game
follows that of the books closely, and at the moment our
top-level characters are fighting the Battle of the Black Gate.
And on the beta server we're looking at a test copy of Mordor
itself, after the Ring falls.

And there's been a thread on the LotRO forums, discussing players
who like testing the new build white it's in beta, and those who
don't. The latter make comments like "it takes all the fun out
of it, knowing what's going to happen." One must assume they've
never read the books; and I surmise that they never read a book
twice. Humankind is strangely diverse.

Me, I have ten characters, from about level 75 to level 105, the
latter doing the beta test and getting ready to jump into Mordor
in the live game as soon as it launches. And to make one more
new character, and take her through the long path from Ered Luin
at level 1 to Mordor to wherever we'll be by the time she reaches
level cap (probably a couple of years). And I will enjoy, well,
most of it. Angmar, with its blasted landscape, is the land of
you-can't-get-there-from-here, and Southern Mirkwood is nearly as
irksome.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Robert Carnegie
2017-06-30 09:29:48 UTC
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Post by D B Davis
Part of my re-invention/reboot entails making my book reviews better.
It turns out that a book report is a synopsis. And a book /review/ is a
synopsis colored by opinion.
Diablo Valley College describes itself as a feeder college to UC
Berkeley. They offer a paper on How to Write a Book Report/Review [1].
Their How-to suggests reading a story once to get a general
understanding, and then reading it again while making notes for the
Report/Review.
Note.
1. https://www.dvc.edu/academics/ed/english/learningresources/pdfs/How-to-write-a-book-report.pdf
Reading for pleasure, not criticism: I won't
/immediately/ re-read all of a story, but I may do
soon after the first encounter. /Immediately/,
I may return to particular passages in a story.
But then I'll set it aside, to re-enjoy it properly
later on.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-07-01 14:52:24 UTC
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I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Michael F. Stemper
2017-07-01 16:31:10 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I think that the only time I ever did it was in the summer of '64. I
reached the final page of _Tunnel in the Sky_ and immediately returned
to the first page.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Nostalgia just ain't what it used to be.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-07-01 16:48:11 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I think that the only time I ever did it was in the summer of '64. I
reached the final page of _Tunnel in the Sky_ and immediately returned
to the first page.
The only one I remember at the moment (though I know there were a
couple of others) was _A Fire Upon the Deep_.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Chris Buckley
2017-07-03 20:50:59 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I think that the only time I ever did it was in the summer of '64. I
reached the final page of _Tunnel in the Sky_ and immediately returned
to the first page.
The only one I remember at the moment (though I know there were a
couple of others) was _A Fire Upon the Deep_.
I re-read immediately a bit more often than that - once or twice a
year (out of a couple hundred books read or re-read).

The re-read immediately books fall into two categories. The first is
awesome books. _A Fire Upon the Deep_ was definitely one. _Anathem_
was another. The most recent is Lee's _Ninefox Gambit_. The other
category is books that emotionally get things right - just hit an
emotional chord within me that I don't want to leave. Example would be
McKinley's _SunShine_ or McKillip's _Riddlemaster_ series. The most recent
would be Wells _The Murderbot Diaries: All Systems Red_.

Chris
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2017-07-03 23:24:01 UTC
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Post by Chris Buckley
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I think that the only time I ever did it was in the summer of '64. I
reached the final page of _Tunnel in the Sky_ and immediately returned
to the first page.
The only one I remember at the moment (though I know there were a
couple of others) was _A Fire Upon the Deep_.
I re-read immediately a bit more often than that - once or twice a
year (out of a couple hundred books read or re-read).
One of the best compliments I was paid was someone telling me they got
to the end of _Grand Central Arena_ and immediately went back and
started re-reading.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Greg Goss
2017-07-06 01:37:32 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
One of the best compliments I was paid was someone telling me they got
to the end of _Grand Central Arena_ and immediately went back and
started re-reading.
I might have for Boundary. Doing that isn't something I remember
about a book.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Greg Goss
2017-07-06 01:34:58 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I think that the only time I ever did it was in the summer of '64. I
reached the final page of _Tunnel in the Sky_ and immediately returned
to the first page.
The only one I remember at the moment (though I know there were a
couple of others) was _A Fire Upon the Deep_.
I don't remember specifically doing that. I probably did it for
"Fire" and for that other Vinge "Marooned". Probably Citizen of the
Galaxy. Perhaps 1632. Ringworld Engineers was reas as a magazine
serial. Re-reading "immediately" takes on a different nature there.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
lal_truckee
2017-07-01 18:47:01 UTC
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Post by Michael F. Stemper
I think that the only time I ever did it was in the summer of '64. I
reached the final page of _Tunnel in the Sky_ and immediately returned
to the first page.
Roderick, Walker L. is still not black upon second and subsequent readings.
J. Clarke
2017-07-01 19:12:10 UTC
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Post by lal_truckee
Post by Michael F. Stemper
I think that the only time I ever did it was in the summer of '64. I
reached the final page of _Tunnel in the Sky_ and immediately returned
to the first page.
Roderick, Walker L. is still not black upon second and subsequent readings.
It's weird. I have a distinct recollection of Rod describing Caroline to
Helen and saying that she's "darker than you" with of course the
implication that his sister is a reasonable standard for darkness. This
was, for me, an "aha" moment. However having paid for a Kindle copy just
so I can do a proper full text search, I find that the passage is "bigger
than you".

I suspect it's something I dreamed--I have a rather mundane dream life in
which I live in a house enough like the one I inhabit in the real world
that sometimes I find myself real-world-searching for objects that only
exist in the dream world, so perhaps it was a dream-world "aha" moment.
Default User
2017-07-01 16:34:13 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I used to reread sometimes mostly due to running out of new books. When the advent of the online catalog at the library and closing of the independent bookstores near me switched my book acquisition strategy that essentially ceased. I did recently reread the Ancillary series. That's a story that had stuck with me, and I wanted to review some themes that I was mulling.


Brian
William Hyde
2017-07-01 20:47:51 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I read Lafferty's "Past Master" at age 14 and hated it intensely. Two weeks later, feeling that I'd missed something, I read it and loved it.


William Hyde
Titus G
2017-07-02 01:07:37 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I read Lafferty's "Past Master" at age 14 and hated it intensely. Two weeks later, feeling that I'd missed something, I read it and loved it.
I have (sped) re-read parts of R A Lafferty's short stories to relive
the laughter.
D B Davis
2017-07-02 03:25:24 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I read Lafferty's "Past Master" at age 14 and hated it intensely. Two
weeks later, feeling that I'd missed something, I read it and loved
it.
If it's that good it needs to be read by me. It's on order and ought to
be here within a week.

Thomases More and Becket are my ecclesiastical heroes. So much so that
this follow up is being composed on a workstation named Thomas in their
honor. IMHO Henry II and Thomas Becket foreshadowed Henry VIII and
Thomas More.

Thank you,

--
Don
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-02 03:40:59 UTC
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Post by D B Davis
Post by William Hyde
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I read Lafferty's "Past Master" at age 14 and hated it intensely. Two
weeks later, feeling that I'd missed something, I read it and loved
it.
If it's that good it needs to be read by me. It's on order and ought to
be here within a week.
Thomases More and Becket are my ecclesiastical heroes. So much so that
this follow up is being composed on a workstation named Thomas in their
honor. IMHO Henry II and Thomas Becket foreshadowed Henry VIII and
Thomas More.
Hm. Interesting point. You could write a historical essay on
that topic.

(only if you want to)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Kevrob
2017-07-02 19:31:20 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by D B Davis
Post by William Hyde
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I read Lafferty's "Past Master" at age 14 and hated it intensely. Two
weeks later, feeling that I'd missed something, I read it and loved
it.
If it's that good it needs to be read by me. It's on order and ought to
be here within a week.
Thomases More and Becket are my ecclesiastical heroes. So much so that
this follow up is being composed on a workstation named Thomas in their
honor. IMHO Henry II and Thomas Becket foreshadowed Henry VIII and
Thomas More.
Hm. Interesting point. You could write a historical essay on
that topic.
(only if you want to)
Is this what the Library of Congress' "Thomas" is doing in its
retirement, nearly a year ago?

https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-16-004/thomas-gov-to-retire-july-5/2016-04-28/

Kevin R
William Hyde
2017-07-02 20:30:00 UTC
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Post by D B Davis
Post by William Hyde
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I read Lafferty's "Past Master" at age 14 and hated it intensely. Two
weeks later, feeling that I'd missed something, I read it and loved
it.
If it's that good it needs to be read by me. It's on order and ought to
be here within a week.
Hope you like it. It is one of his shorter and more traditional novels. Nothing like "Arrive at Easterwine".
Post by D B Davis
Thomases More and Becket are my ecclesiastical heroes.
Well, this is Lafferty's recreation of More. Not the more of "A man for all seasons" and definitely not the More of history.

At age 14 that didn't bother me, at age 24 it probably would have, now it wouldn't matter to me at all.

William Hyde
D B Davis
2017-07-02 23:20:02 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Post by D B Davis
Post by William Hyde
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I read Lafferty's "Past Master" at age 14 and hated it intensely. Two
weeks later, feeling that I'd missed something, I read it and loved
it.
If it's that good it needs to be read by me. It's on order and ought to
be here within a week.
Hope you like it. It is one of his shorter and more traditional novels.
Nothing like "Arrive at Easterwine".
Post by D B Davis
Thomases More and Becket are my ecclesiastical heroes.
Well, this is Lafferty's recreation of More. Not the more of
"A man for all seasons" and definitely not the More of history.
At age 14 that didn't bother me, at age 24 it probably would have, now
it wouldn't matter to me at all.
You bring up an excellent point. The problem with the Great Man (GM)
theory of history is that the GM is Gumby. [1] GM Gumby can be
stretched, along with the truth, into any caricature that fits an
agenda. In the end we get the Lafferty More, the _A Man For All Seasons_
More, the Catholic Church More, the Tudor Historian More, ...

Note.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gumby

Thank you,

--
Don
The Starmaker
2017-07-02 19:48:23 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
i have to re read a sentence after i read the sentence. by the time i
get to the end of the paragraph...i'm done. no way
am i going to re read the paragraph or go to the next paragraph..
The Starmaker
2017-07-04 17:00:14 UTC
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Post by The Starmaker
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
i have to re read a sentence after i read the sentence. by the time i
get to the end of the paragraph...i'm done. no way
am i going to re read the paragraph or go to the next paragraph..
I like short stories...like what you people call ...a one line
quotation.



i notice e-books are getting...smaller.
The Starmaker
2017-07-04 17:10:47 UTC
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Post by The Starmaker
Post by The Starmaker
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
i have to re read a sentence after i read the sentence. by the time i
get to the end of the paragraph...i'm done. no way
am i going to re read the paragraph or go to the next paragraph..
I like short stories...like what you people call ...a one line
quotation.
i notice e-books are getting...smaller.
That means you people are writing less pages because you know people
cannot see the pages.


A novel can be five pages today.


you wouldn't know until you download the e-book.


but the price is still the same...


One chapter today suffice a completed finished ebook.


I can write a chapter, but it on a ebook, and sell it on amazon.


I just need a great cover...and lots of pr.


Maybe I can write a science fiction book, NASA kidnapped children on
Mars!


Who wants pre-orders?


SCIENCEfiction
The Starmaker
2017-07-04 22:23:19 UTC
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Post by The Starmaker
Post by The Starmaker
Post by The Starmaker
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
i have to re read a sentence after i read the sentence. by the time i
get to the end of the paragraph...i'm done. no way
am i going to re read the paragraph or go to the next paragraph..
I like short stories...like what you people call ...a one line
quotation.
i notice e-books are getting...smaller.
That means you people are writing less pages because you know people
cannot see the pages.
A novel can be five pages today.
you wouldn't know until you download the e-book.
but the price is still the same...
One chapter today suffice a completed finished ebook.
I can write a chapter, but it on a ebook, and sell it on amazon.
I just need a great cover...and lots of pr.
Maybe I can write a science fiction book, NASA kidnapped children on
Mars!
Who wants pre-orders?
SCIENCEfiction
In other words...Today, there is no need to come up with a 600 page book
since most sales are e-books and nobody can see a 600 page hardcover
book on a ebook (unless you have a mock-up which looks like a 600 page).

Today, you can fill a book with just a few pages....they'll download it
and read it.

In other words, today you can get away with a thin book.
Scott Lurndal
2017-07-04 18:00:36 UTC
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Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
I rarely do that. A book has to be incredibly good to manage that.
I'll often re-read selected portions of certain books, often several times.

Most recently, it's been _Battle_, _Skirmish_ and _Oracle_ by M. West.
m***@sky.com
2017-07-01 17:43:22 UTC
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Post by D B Davis
Part of my re-invention/reboot entails making my book reviews better.
It turns out that a book report is a synopsis. And a book /review/ is a
synopsis colored by opinion.
Diablo Valley College describes itself as a feeder college to UC
Berkeley. They offer a paper on How to Write a Book Report/Review [1].
Their How-to suggests reading a story once to get a general
understanding, and then reading it again while making notes for the
Report/Review.
Note.
1. https://www.dvc.edu/academics/ed/english/learningresources/pdfs/How-to-write-a-book-report.pdf
Thank you,
--
Don
I like to do this if I have enjoyed the book, partly because I have a horror of leaving a wasteful trail of skimmed and only part-completed books behind me. However, if the suspense in the book amounts to "is the author ever going to get around to writing something worthwhile?" I give myself a pass. With a good book, I think you can appreciate it again on a second reading. Most recently I have done it to books that I enjoyed but don't claim to be great literature, such as D.J. Holmes's Empire Rising books.

(I did get fed up enough with aristocratic heroes that I've been re-reading two of Len Deighton's Harry Palmer books - The Ipcress File and Funeral In Berlin. I would have gone for SF, but I don't know of an SF equivalent, or even a modern equivalent. One view of Harry Palmer is that he represents the generation of non-upper class children who got a good education from newly created state Grammar Schools and could therefore compete on at least equal terms with upper class idiots. Grammar Schools have been politically unfashionable in the UK mainland for decades, so perhaps no more Harry Palmers. To my mind Palmer's real advantage is that he has a strong enough disdain for upper class lifestyles that he can live on a 1950s civil service salary without being forced into corruption to pay for what, in the 1950s, were luxuries. Stross's Bob Howard is left wing, but doesn't have Palmer's amused contempt. I'm not even sure that Palmer is left wing. I suspect that in the terms of the UK today a non-communist security cleared ex-soldier with 1950s attitudes would be made to feel very unwelcome by most politicians to the left of Trump)
William Hyde
2017-07-03 20:48:20 UTC
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Post by m***@sky.com
Post by D B Davis
Part of my re-invention/reboot entails making my book reviews better.
It turns out that a book report is a synopsis. And a book /review/ is a
synopsis colored by opinion.
Diablo Valley College describes itself as a feeder college to UC
Berkeley. They offer a paper on How to Write a Book Report/Review [1].
Their How-to suggests reading a story once to get a general
understanding, and then reading it again while making notes for the
Report/Review.
Note.
1. https://www.dvc.edu/academics/ed/english/learningresources/pdfs/How-to-write-a-book-report.pdf
Thank you,
--
Don
I like to do this if I have enjoyed the book, partly because I have a horror of leaving a wasteful trail of skimmed and only part-completed books behind me. However, if the suspense in the book amounts to "is the author ever going to get around to writing something worthwhile?" I give myself a pass. With a good book, I think you can appreciate it again on a second reading. Most recently I have done it to books that I enjoyed but don't claim to be great literature, such as D.J. Holmes's Empire Rising books.
(I did get fed up enough with aristocratic heroes that I've been re-reading two of Len Deighton's Harry Palmer books - The Ipcress File and Funeral In Berlin. I would have gone for SF, but I don't know of an SF equivalent, or even a modern equivalent.
Elijah Bailey? Asimov in general is no fan of aristocracy.

Bernard Samson was educated at state schools in the UK and Germany, and is definitely not upper class.

His wife is, however, and this is a theme leading up to the (to me) big spoiler of the series.

William Hyde
Kevrob
2017-07-04 17:27:42 UTC
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Post by William Hyde
Elijah Bailey? Asimov in general is no fan of aristocracy.
Slippery Jim DiGriz was born to porcuswine farmers. That may be
middle class, but not aristocratic.

Kevin R
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