Discussion:
Do SF fans not like the present?
(too old to reply)
a***@gmail.com
2017-07-01 09:48:58 UTC
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Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds. SF (speculative fiction) includes both science fiction, and fantasy, one which is usually set in a futuristic world, and the other which may be set in a medieval or historical world. Do SF writers and readers not care about the present, and want to fantasise about different times?

I am naturally sceptical of people claiming that life was much better in the distant past. Today, an ordinary person, living in developed world living standards, has better quality of life, than kings from five hundred years ago. Most people are better off living in the present, but unfortunately the world is under the grip of the global shadow government, which is hidden, opaque, and unaccountable. For some, the past means freedom from global communications and travel networks, which enables global tyranny. But, by living in the past, will we only end up substituting global for local tyranny?

The future holds promise for better quality of life, with advances in healthcare, computers, communications etc. I am again sceptical of those who have a dystopian vision of the future. As science and technology advances, they will amplify our ability to help or hurt the Earth. We also need to advance morally, to save our planet and species. I hope, a day will come, when there will be an open and accountable world government. We must not allow secretive local and global governments to take away our rights and freedoms.

I am unhappy with my present situation, where I am denied my basic rights by shadow governments. So I dream of a future, when I will be relatively free.

Abhinav Lal
Writer & Investor

"The only true freedom is to be found in death"
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-01 14:13:10 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Post by a***@gmail.com
I am naturally sceptical of people claiming that life was much better in
the distant past.
Consicer the Society for Creative Anachronism (founded in 1966,
when the Vietnam War was going on), whose guiding principle is to
recreate the Middle Ages, not as they were, but as they should
have been.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
a***@gmail.com
2017-07-03 10:28:51 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison for me. Only the human imagination can set me free.

In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality. In LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
I am naturally sceptical of people claiming that life was much better in
the distant past.
Consicer the Society for Creative Anachronism (founded in 1966,
when the Vietnam War was going on), whose guiding principle is to
recreate the Middle Ages, not as they were, but as they should
have been.
I wouldn't mind escaping to the Middle Ages _temporarily_, for a week or two. But I wouldn't like to live like an average person. I would like to live in the king's castle, serving as philosopher, funded by the King. Lifespans were about half or less, in those days, due to many factors including poor sanitation and poor medical science. I wouldn't want to fall sick in the Middle Ages.

If you had a choice, which time period would you like to live in temporarily and permanently. I have hope for the future, but the planet may be unrecognisable in the far future. I would take my chances about 500 years in the future.

Abhinav Lal
Writer & Investor
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-03 14:27:43 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison for
me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
In his essay "On Fairy-Stories," which I recommend to everyone,
J. R. R. Tolkien mentions that some people scorn fantasy as
"escape literature." But then he says, "The people who discourage
thoughts of escape are jailors."
Post by a***@gmail.com
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality.
Only eventually. Look at the centuries over which Saruman
deceived everybody, including Gandalf.

In
Post by a***@gmail.com
LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the
ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
If you definte "casualty" as "killed in combat." One out of nine
is slightly worse than the classical definition of "decimate,"
which is deliberately to kill one in ten of your opponents in
order to shatter their morale. Note also that Gandalf was killed
in combat, but but he was raised from the dead, so perhaps he
doesn't count; and that Frodo was so wounded in spirit that he
could never be healed in Middle-earth, so that he was sent to Tol
Eressea so that he could be healed there before he died.

For casualties outside the members of the Fellowship, take a look
at _RotK_, "The Battle of the Pelennor Fields," with its long
list of the dead, including Halbarad.

(In _The Lord of the Rings Online,_ after the battle, there is a
sequence in which many slain Rangers (whom the players have come to
know as individuals during the course of the game) are burnt on
a pyre; Aragorn names them one by one, and when he comes to
Halbarad, he says, "I have lost my right arm.")

War is hell, and Tolkien, who fought in WWI and lost all but one
of his close friends in it, knew that, and described the War of
the Ring accordingly.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Robert Bannister
2017-07-04 00:45:09 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison for
me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
In his essay "On Fairy-Stories," which I recommend to everyone,
J. R. R. Tolkien mentions that some people scorn fantasy as
"escape literature." But then he says, "The people who discourage
thoughts of escape are jailors."
Post by a***@gmail.com
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality.
Only eventually. Look at the centuries over which Saruman
deceived everybody, including Gandalf.
In
Post by a***@gmail.com
LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the
ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
If you definte "casualty" as "killed in combat." One out of nine
is slightly worse than the classical definition of "decimate,"
which is deliberately to kill one in ten of your opponents in
order to shatter their morale.
Not one's opponents. It was used by senior military commanders as a
punishment of their own troops, usually for things like mutiny,
desertion or cowardice.

Note also that Gandalf was killed
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
in combat, but but he was raised from the dead, so perhaps he
doesn't count; and that Frodo was so wounded in spirit that he
could never be healed in Middle-earth, so that he was sent to Tol
Eressea so that he could be healed there before he died.
For casualties outside the members of the Fellowship, take a look
at _RotK_, "The Battle of the Pelennor Fields," with its long
list of the dead, including Halbarad.
(In _The Lord of the Rings Online,_ after the battle, there is a
sequence in which many slain Rangers (whom the players have come to
know as individuals during the course of the game) are burnt on
a pyre; Aragorn names them one by one, and when he comes to
Halbarad, he says, "I have lost my right arm.")
War is hell, and Tolkien, who fought in WWI and lost all but one
of his close friends in it, knew that, and described the War of
the Ring accordingly.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
J. Clarke
2017-07-04 01:00:59 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison for
me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
In his essay "On Fairy-Stories," which I recommend to everyone,
J. R. R. Tolkien mentions that some people scorn fantasy as
"escape literature." But then he says, "The people who discourage
thoughts of escape are jailors."
Post by a***@gmail.com
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality.
Only eventually. Look at the centuries over which Saruman
deceived everybody, including Gandalf.
In
Post by a***@gmail.com
LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the
ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
If you definte "casualty" as "killed in combat." One out of nine
is slightly worse than the classical definition of "decimate,"
which is deliberately to kill one in ten of your opponents in
order to shatter their morale.
Not one's opponents. It was used by senior military commanders as a
punishment of their own troops, usually for things like mutiny,
desertion or cowardice.
Just a note on "casualty". Casualty does not equate to "killed in action".
In simplistic terms, if you can't keep on fighting because of your
injuries, you're a casualty. Often the injuries are repairable--the
paratrooper who broke his leg because he landed wrong is a casualty but
after spending some time in a cast he'll be back to jumping, for example.
Post by Robert Bannister
Note also that Gandalf was killed
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
in combat, but but he was raised from the dead, so perhaps he
doesn't count; and that Frodo was so wounded in spirit that he
could never be healed in Middle-earth, so that he was sent to Tol
Eressea so that he could be healed there before he died.
For casualties outside the members of the Fellowship, take a look
at _RotK_, "The Battle of the Pelennor Fields," with its long
list of the dead, including Halbarad.
(In _The Lord of the Rings Online,_ after the battle, there is a
sequence in which many slain Rangers (whom the players have come to
know as individuals during the course of the game) are burnt on
a pyre; Aragorn names them one by one, and when he comes to
Halbarad, he says, "I have lost my right arm.")
War is hell, and Tolkien, who fought in WWI and lost all but one
of his close friends in it, knew that, and described the War of
the Ring accordingly.
a425couple
2017-07-04 16:23:32 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison for me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality. In LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
I am naturally sceptical of people claiming that life was much better in
the distant past.
Consicer the Society for Creative Anachronism (founded in 1966,
when the Vietnam War was going on), whose guiding principle is to
recreate the Middle Ages, not as they were, but as they should
have been.
I wouldn't mind escaping to the Middle Ages _temporarily_, for a week or two. But I wouldn't like to live like an average person. I would like to live in the king's castle, serving as philosopher, funded by the King. Lifespans were about half or less, in those days, due to many factors including poor sanitation and poor medical science. I wouldn't want to fall sick in the Middle Ages.
Well, I am not fond of being forced to be hungry, or cold, or sick.
For 95% of people in the 14th Century life was real tough.

https://books.google.com/books?id=imogEp66Q-gC&pg=PA26&dq=famines+in+France&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiR6aD3ztzUAhVI1WMKHX1KAhMQ6AEILzAC#v=onepage&q=famines%20in%20France&f=false

Read Helen Robbins about famines, "For France she lists the years
1304, 1305, 1310, 1315, 1330-34, 1349-51, 1358-60, 1371, 1374-75,
and 1390 --- In the Paris region it is necessary to add 1322 and
1325 to the list.
By 1300, almost every child born in western Europe faced the
probability of extreme hunger at least one or twice during his
expected 30 to 35 years of life."

The Economy of Early Renaissance Europe, 1300-1460
By Harry A. Miskimin

Most people lived in like 10x20 cottages with dirt floors and
thatched roofs that housed plenty of pests and insects.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-04 16:55:24 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison
for me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
Post by a***@gmail.com
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality.
In LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the
ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
I am naturally sceptical of people claiming that life was much better in
the distant past.
Consicer the Society for Creative Anachronism (founded in 1966,
when the Vietnam War was going on), whose guiding principle is to
recreate the Middle Ages, not as they were, but as they should
have been.
I wouldn't mind escaping to the Middle Ages _temporarily_, for a week
or two. But I wouldn't like to live like an average person. I would
like to live in the king's castle, serving as philosopher, funded by the
King. Lifespans were about half or less, in those days, due to many
factors including poor sanitation and poor medical science. I wouldn't
want to fall sick in the Middle Ages.
Well, I am not fond of being forced to be hungry, or cold, or sick.
For 95% of people in the 14th Century life was real tough.
https://books.google.com/books?id=imogEp66Q-gC&pg=PA26&dq=famines+in+France&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiR6aD3ztzUAhVI1WMKHX1KAhMQ6AEILzAC#v=onepage&q=famines%20in%20France&f=false
Read Helen Robbins about famines, "For France she lists the years
1304, 1305, 1310, 1315, 1330-34, 1349-51, 1358-60, 1371, 1374-75,
and 1390 --- In the Paris region it is necessary to add 1322 and
1325 to the list.
By 1300, almost every child born in western Europe faced the
probability of extreme hunger at least one or twice during his
expected 30 to 35 years of life."
The Economy of Early Renaissance Europe, 1300-1460
By Harry A. Miskimin
Most people lived in like 10x20 cottages with dirt floors and
thatched roofs that housed plenty of pests and insects.
Unless you let the chickens into the house to eat them.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dimensional Traveler
2017-07-04 17:24:56 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison
for me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
Post by a***@gmail.com
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality.
In LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the
ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
I am naturally sceptical of people claiming that life was much better in
the distant past.
Consicer the Society for Creative Anachronism (founded in 1966,
when the Vietnam War was going on), whose guiding principle is to
recreate the Middle Ages, not as they were, but as they should
have been.
I wouldn't mind escaping to the Middle Ages _temporarily_, for a week
or two. But I wouldn't like to live like an average person. I would
like to live in the king's castle, serving as philosopher, funded by the
King. Lifespans were about half or less, in those days, due to many
factors including poor sanitation and poor medical science. I wouldn't
want to fall sick in the Middle Ages.
Well, I am not fond of being forced to be hungry, or cold, or sick.
For 95% of people in the 14th Century life was real tough.
https://books.google.com/books?id=imogEp66Q-gC&pg=PA26&dq=famines+in+France&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiR6aD3ztzUAhVI1WMKHX1KAhMQ6AEILzAC#v=onepage&q=famines%20in%20France&f=false
Read Helen Robbins about famines, "For France she lists the years
1304, 1305, 1310, 1315, 1330-34, 1349-51, 1358-60, 1371, 1374-75,
and 1390 --- In the Paris region it is necessary to add 1322 and
1325 to the list.
By 1300, almost every child born in western Europe faced the
probability of extreme hunger at least one or twice during his
expected 30 to 35 years of life."
The Economy of Early Renaissance Europe, 1300-1460
By Harry A. Miskimin
Most people lived in like 10x20 cottages with dirt floors and
thatched roofs that housed plenty of pests and insects.
Unless you let the chickens into the house to eat them.
Which then becomes a chicken shit problem.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Kevrob
2017-07-04 17:47:43 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Unless you let the chickens into the house to eat them.
Which then becomes a chicken shit problem.
Per "Monty Python & The Holy Grail"

Q "How do you know he's the king?"

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-07-04 21:13:25 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Unless you let the chickens into the house to eat them.
Which then becomes a chicken shit problem.
Per "Monty Python & The Holy Grail"
Q "How do you know he's the king?"
Yeah, I remember that one.

On the other hand, Yul Brynner, who played the King of Siam a
lot, used to say, "When you play a king, you don't act like a
king; the people around you act like you're a king."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Quadibloc
2017-07-05 02:07:02 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
On the other hand, Yul Brynner, who played the King of Siam a
lot, used to say, "When you play a king, you don't act like a
king; the people around you act like you're a king."
I don't know if anyone ever called him "the poor man's Yul Brynner", but the description popped to mind when the name of Michael Ansara came up. He appeared in Lost in Space, The Time Tunnel, and Star Trek.

And he was the real-life husband of Barbara Eden.

John Savard

J. Clarke
2017-07-04 17:48:37 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison for me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality. In LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
I am naturally sceptical of people claiming that life was much better in
the distant past.
Consicer the Society for Creative Anachronism (founded in 1966,
when the Vietnam War was going on), whose guiding principle is to
recreate the Middle Ages, not as they were, but as they should
have been.
I wouldn't mind escaping to the Middle Ages _temporarily_, for a week or two. But I wouldn't like to live like an average person. I would like to live in the king's castle, serving as philosopher, funded by the King. Lifespans were about half or less, in those days, due to many factors including poor sanitation and poor medical science. I wouldn't want to fall sick in the Middle Ages.
Well, I am not fond of being forced to be hungry, or cold, or sick.
For 95% of people in the 14th Century life was real tough.
https://books.google.com/books?id=imogEp66Q-gC&pg=PA26&dq=famines+in+France&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiR6aD3ztzUAhVI1WMKHX1KAhMQ6AEILzAC#v=onepage&q=famines%20in%20France&f=false
Read Helen Robbins about famines, "For France she lists the years
1304, 1305, 1310, 1315, 1330-34, 1349-51, 1358-60, 1371, 1374-75,
and 1390 --- In the Paris region it is necessary to add 1322 and
1325 to the list.
By 1300, almost every child born in western Europe faced the
probability of extreme hunger at least one or twice during his
expected 30 to 35 years of life."
Personally I'm not interested in reading anything by any historian who
trots out the old "expected 30-35 years of life" quarter-truth. Especially
if their selling point is something statistical in nature.
Post by a425couple
The Economy of Early Renaissance Europe, 1300-1460
By Harry A. Miskimin
Most people lived in like 10x20 cottages with dirt floors and
thatched roofs that housed plenty of pests and insects.
a425couple
2017-07-04 20:57:08 UTC
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Post by J. Clarke
Post by a425couple
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison for me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality. In LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
I am naturally sceptical of people claiming that life was much better in
the distant past.
Consicer the Society for Creative Anachronism (founded in 1966,
when the Vietnam War was going on), whose guiding principle is to
recreate the Middle Ages, not as they were, but as they should
have been.
I wouldn't mind escaping to the Middle Ages _temporarily_, for a week or two. But I wouldn't like to live like an average person. I would like to live in the king's castle, serving as philosopher, funded by the King. Lifespans were about half or less, in those days, due to many factors including poor sanitation and poor medical science. I wouldn't want to fall sick in the Middle Ages.
Well, I am not fond of being forced to be hungry, or cold, or sick.
For 95% of people in the 14th Century life was real tough.
https://books.google.com/books?id=imogEp66Q-gC&pg=PA26&dq=famines+in+France&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiR6aD3ztzUAhVI1WMKHX1KAhMQ6AEILzAC#v=onepage&q=famines%20in%20France&f=false
Read Helen Robbins about famines, "For France she lists the years
1304, 1305, 1310, 1315, 1330-34, 1349-51, 1358-60, 1371, 1374-75,
and 1390 --- In the Paris region it is necessary to add 1322 and
1325 to the list.
By 1300, almost every child born in western Europe faced the
probability of extreme hunger at least one or twice during his
expected 30 to 35 years of life."
Personally I'm not interested in reading anything by any historian who
trots out the old "expected 30-35 years of life" quarter-truth. Especially
if their selling point is something statistical in nature.
Well,,,, what kind of statement would you be interested in?

How about,
"Archaeological evidence indicates that Anglo-Saxons back in the Early
Middle Ages (400 to 1000 A.D.) lived short lives and were buried in
cemeteries, much like Englishmen today. Field workers unearthed 65
burials (400 to 1000 A.D.) from Anglo-Saxon cemeteries in England and
found none who lived past 45. This site and this site has similar
statistics.

Kings did better. The mean life expectancy of kings of Scotland and
England, reigning from 1000 A.D. to 1600 A.D. were 51 and 48 years,
respectively. Their monks did not fare as well. In the Carmelite Abbey,
only five percent survived past 45. This site says wealthier people
would have a life expectancy of more than forty years."

http://www.sarahwoodbury.com/life-expectancy-in-the-middle-ages/
David Johnston
2017-07-04 16:45:39 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Some people prefer fantasy over reality, and like to spend their free
time immersing themselves in imaginary worlds.
Well, the present is not being terribly pleasant at the moment.
Right now I would rather read _The Lord of the Rings_ than the
news. (I diligently read the news anyway, but not for fun.)
Fantasy can be much better than reality. The earth is like a prison for me. Only the human imagination can set me free.
In LOTR, it is mostly clear, who is good or evil, unlike in reality. In LOTR, there is only one casualty from the original fellowship of the ring, despite the world being in a state of war.
One fatality. If you don't count Gandalf. Several more casualties as in people who were injured so seriously as to be taken out of the fight. Which out of nine is actually pretty typical of the ratios you'll see in real combat.
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