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[Because My Tears Are Delicious To You] Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1977 edited by Ben Bova
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James Nicoll
2018-06-03 02:15:11 UTC
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Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1977 edited by Ben Bova

https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/nothing-without-a-woman-or-a-girl
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
D B Davis
2018-06-03 15:09:24 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1977 edited by Ben Bova
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/nothing-without-a-woman-or-a-girl
incel? You've got to be kidding me? (No, they kid me not.) Apparently
incelesque "logic" is relatively common with some strains of murderous
psychopathy.
"The Screwfly Solution" (Raccoona AKA Alice Sheldon AKA Tiptree)
showcases Alice's own "brand" of misogyny. Sheldon's warped, but there's
something about her twisted writing that attracts me like a moth to a
flame. Others who can't stand the Sheldon heat need to get out of her
kitchen. ROTFL.
IIRC Silverberg writes about how "Tip" had three typewriters set up
in her study. One typewriter for "Tip," another for "Raccoona," and the
third for "Alice." The typewriters enabled "Tip" to get-into-character
in order to create characters, so to speak.



Thank you,
--
Don
b***@dontspam.silent.com
2018-06-03 20:27:34 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1977 edited by Ben Bova
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/nothing-without-a-woman-or-a-girl
There is a talk by Michael Ovenden on his "non-consensus science"
theory that a Saturn-sized planet between Mars and Jupiter exploded.

https://open.library.ubc.ca/collections/citraudio/items/1.0135218
Robert Carnegie
2018-06-03 21:58:37 UTC
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Post by b***@dontspam.silent.com
Post by James Nicoll
Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1977 edited by Ben Bova
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/nothing-without-a-woman-or-a-girl
There is a talk by Michael Ovenden on his "non-consensus science"
theory that a Saturn-sized planet between Mars and Jupiter exploded.
https://open.library.ubc.ca/collections/citraudio/items/1.0135218
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titius–Bode_law
refers to the 18th century prediction of a planet
between Mars and Jupiter so that planets would
scale nicely (less important in modern astrophysics),
the satisfaction of discovering Ceres in the indicated
space, and re-evaluation when lots more bodies were
found there, declared "minor planets" or "asteroids".

I presume that almost immediately, those asteroids -
there are others - were treated as either the equivalent
of a missing planet, prevented from coming together by
Jupiter's gravity, or the /wreckage/ of a missing planet.
It's certainly been used a number of times in science
fiction, not necessarily the best stuff. List time?

I know that a fifth planet had been destroyed in the
setting of W. E. Johns's 1950s _Kings of Space_ by
their own super-weapon, leaving convenient asteroids.
This mainly comes out in the sequels.

In a Doctor Who story, __Image of the Fendahl_,
the fifth planet had been destroyed by the Time Lords
because of the Fendahl.

It would be available to H. G. Wells, for instance
in _The War of the Worlds_, but I don't think it
came up that time. We assumed that the invaders
had originated on Mars.

A past celestial war was described in C. S. Lewis's
_Out of the Silent Planet_, but it might be "limited"
to blighting Mars and blockading Earth.

I think a fifth planet may have copped it in
the prequel parts of the Lensmen series, but
I dunno. Atlantis is involved, and the lost
fifth planet is basically Atlantis in space;
if you set aside Aquaman and Namor in comics,
who each rule a modern Atlantis undersea but
inhabited by unconcerned mermen, the only basic
"fact" of Atlantis is that it went splat overnight;
it's a fable of cosmic insecurity; geological,
anyway.

Anyway, the lost planet wasn't new in the 1970s,
and it isn't now.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-06-03 22:49:57 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
It would be available to H. G. Wells, for instance
in _The War of the Worlds_, but I don't think it
came up that time. We assumed that the invaders
had originated on Mars.
In H. G. Wells' original, Earth astronomers observed flashes and plumes
on Mars that corresponded with the launches of Martian canisters.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
h***@gmail.com
2018-06-03 23:42:05 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by b***@dontspam.silent.com
Post by James Nicoll
Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1977 edited by Ben Bova
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/nothing-without-a-woman-or-a-girl
There is a talk by Michael Ovenden on his "non-consensus science"
theory that a Saturn-sized planet between Mars and Jupiter exploded.
https://open.library.ubc.ca/collections/citraudio/items/1.0135218
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titius–Bode_law
refers to the 18th century prediction of a planet
between Mars and Jupiter so that planets would
scale nicely (less important in modern astrophysics),
the satisfaction of discovering Ceres in the indicated
space, and re-evaluation when lots more bodies were
found there, declared "minor planets" or "asteroids".
I presume that almost immediately, those asteroids -
there are others - were treated as either the equivalent
of a missing planet, prevented from coming together by
Jupiter's gravity, or the /wreckage/ of a missing planet.
It's certainly been used a number of times in science
fiction, not necessarily the best stuff. List time?
Background in Stranger in a Strange land, largely because of how it became no longer a planet.
iirc made an appearance in some other Heinlein, might be in Space Cadet where they investigate a missing ship in the asteroid belt.
Greg Goss
2018-06-04 04:23:39 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Anyway, the lost planet wasn't new in the 1970s,
and it isn't now.
Heinlein's "Space Cadet"s were on a research mission that discovered
that the people of the missing planet did it to themselves. I think
that it's mentioned in passing in several other of his juvies.

Hogan's work is pretty jumbled in my memory, but at least one of them
featured such an explosion scattering debris across the solar system.
I have the impression that the moon was moved to its current position
by the disaster, though you have the Velikovsky-defeating
responsibliity of circularizing the orbit after capture.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
h***@gmail.com
2018-06-04 04:29:07 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
Anyway, the lost planet wasn't new in the 1970s,
and it isn't now.
Heinlein's "Space Cadet"s were on a research mission that discovered
that the people of the missing planet did it to themselves.
iirc they were actually sent on a rescue mission for a missing spaceship and found that it had made the discovery before events caught up with it...
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-06-04 04:30:35 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
Anyway, the lost planet wasn't new in the 1970s,
and it isn't now.
Heinlein's "Space Cadet"s were on a research mission that discovered
that the people of the missing planet did it to themselves. I think
that it's mentioned in passing in several other of his juvies.
Hogan's work is pretty jumbled in my memory, but at least one of them
featured such an explosion scattering debris across the solar system.
I have the impression that the moon was moved to its current position
by the disaster, though you have the Velikovsky-defeating
responsibliity of circularizing the orbit after capture.
That's the "Giants" series, including his breakthrough first book
_Inherit The Stars_. In retrospect, I think it was also his best.

One of the Winstons concerned the missing planet as well.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Sjouke Burry
2018-06-04 20:44:44 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
Anyway, the lost planet wasn't new in the 1970s,
and it isn't now.
Heinlein's "Space Cadet"s were on a research mission that discovered
that the people of the missing planet did it to themselves. I think
that it's mentioned in passing in several other of his juvies.
Hogan's work is pretty jumbled in my memory, but at least one of them
featured such an explosion scattering debris across the solar system.
I have the impression that the moon was moved to its current position
by the disaster, though you have the Velikovsky-defeating
responsibliity of circularizing the orbit after capture.
Also in the Perry rhodan series,about 200.000 years in the past,
The planet was called Zeut i think, google.....

CREST-Datei - Perry Rhodan - Zeut
www.crest-datei.de/index.php?Thema=pr&Rubrik=welten...zeut
Translate this page
Ehemals der 5. Planet des Sol-Systems, von den Takerern Taimon genannt.
Er wurde im Haluter-Krieg zerstört, ungefähr im Jahr 50.068 v.Chr. Die
dabei ...
Robert Carnegie
2018-06-04 20:47:53 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
Anyway, the lost planet wasn't new in the 1970s,
and it isn't now.
Heinlein's "Space Cadet"s were on a research mission that discovered
that the people of the missing planet did it to themselves. I think
that it's mentioned in passing in several other of his juvies.
Hogan's work is pretty jumbled in my memory, but at least one of them
featured such an explosion scattering debris across the solar system.
I have the impression that the moon was moved to its current position
by the disaster, though you have the Velikovsky-defeating
responsibliity of circularizing the orbit after capture.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Points for both the Heinlein references, and Hogan.
In what seems to be the relevant part of Wikipedia's
article on Velikovsky, I don't see this planet
mentioned, but planets keep popping out of gas giants
and falling into the Sun, so it's hard to keep track.
And he is named in the article on "Phaeton".
Greg Goss
2018-06-07 03:00:56 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
[velikovskianism reference]
Points for both the Heinlein references, and Hogan.
In what seems to be the relevant part of Wikipedia's
article on Velikovsky, I don't see this planet
mentioned, but planets keep popping out of gas giants
and falling into the Sun, so it's hard to keep track.
And he is named in the article on "Phaeton".
He claimed that Venus originated in Jupiter and was circularized
later.

The "good" phaeton article seems to have aged off the web when I went
looking for it a couple of weeks ago.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Robert Carnegie
2018-06-03 22:15:55 UTC
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Post by b***@dontspam.silent.com
Post by James Nicoll
Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1977 edited by Ben Bova
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/nothing-without-a-woman-or-a-girl
There is a talk by Michael Ovenden on his "non-consensus science"
theory that a Saturn-sized planet between Mars and Jupiter exploded.
https://open.library.ubc.ca/collections/citraudio/items/1.0135218
Oh, here's an article all about that planet.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaeton_%28hypothetical_planet%29>
"Hypothetical" seem generous.

And a link to a list of its appearances in sci-fi.
NO PEEKING before posting what you remember.
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