Discussion:
Another request for help ....
(too old to reply)
The Zygon
2018-02-28 05:42:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I recently asked for help in identifying the name and author of a novel and was helped within 24 hours. Again, thanks to everyone who contributed to that. That extremely quick turnaround has made me bold enough to ask for help again - but this time I fear the task may be impossible. But here goes.

I once read a book about an alien visitation which I enjoyed very much. But I cannot even remember the story. I only remembered that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying "Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to. Sometimes, even to suggest that it may not be speaking the whole truth. I also remember vaguely that its "mother ship" was parked on the dark side of the moon. There is not much else I can remember.
==
So as not to keep pestering this list for help, let me do the rest all at once.

I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against. Anything like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.

I have already read The Last Dancer by Daniel Keys Moran.

Please recommend any good reads you know along those lines.

Thanks all for any help you can give, and I promise (a) not to ask for any more help and (b) try to help in any way I can, anyone asking general or specific questions as I did.


Regards
The Zygon
Titus G
2018-02-28 19:48:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
So as not to keep pestering this list for help,
You are not pestering. There are many here with almost cyclopedic
knowledge of SF who enjoy answering such questions (and I enjoy reading
their answers).
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-02-28 21:29:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Titus G
Post by The Zygon
So as not to keep pestering this list for help,
You are not pestering. There are many here with almost cyclopedic
INVOKE NOT THE CYCLOPEDES!
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-02-28 21:46:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
Post by The Zygon
So as not to keep pestering this list for help,
You are not pestering. There are many here with almost cyclopedic
INVOKE NOT THE CYCLOPEDES!
You're saying Butch Malahide is actually mythical, and that's how he
gets so many YASIDs? Well that explains a few things.

Cheers - Jaimie (who's finest moment was beating Butch to it
once. Once!)
--
"The more wrong a guy gets, the louder he yells at the person trying to
help him. Which, inevitably, makes him even wronger. But less helped."
-- Merlin Mann
Robert Woodward
2018-03-01 06:18:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
Post by The Zygon
So as not to keep pestering this list for help,
You are not pestering. There are many here with almost cyclopedic
INVOKE NOT THE CYCLOPEDES!
You're saying Butch Malahide is actually mythical, and that's how he
gets so many YASIDs? Well that explains a few things.
Cheers - Jaimie (who's finest moment was beating Butch to it
once. Once!)
While I was logging on in the evening (this was before I retired) and
saw YASID after YASID that I could have answered, but had been
pre-empted by people who lived in the Eastern or Central time zones or
weren't working for one reason or another.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Gene Wirchenko
2018-03-01 18:27:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 28 Feb 2018 22:18:10 -0800, Robert Woodward
<***@drizzle.com> wrote:

[snip]
Post by Robert Woodward
While I was logging on in the evening (this was before I retired) and
saw YASID after YASID that I could have answered, but had been
pre-empted by people who lived in the Eastern or Central time zones or
weren't working for one reason or another.
I have seen similar things on technical groups. I live in
British Columbia. Most of the rest of the continent sees things
before I do.

It is an interesting effect, and you are the only other person I
have read mentioning it.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-02-28 21:07:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
Post by The Zygon
So as not to keep pestering this list for help,
You are not pestering. There are many here with almost
cyclopedic
INVOKE NOT THE CYCLOPEDES!
Is a cyclopede like a centiped, only with wheels instead of feet?
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-03-01 05:40:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
Post by The Zygon
So as not to keep pestering this list for help,
You are not pestering. There are many here with almost cyclopedic
INVOKE NOT THE CYCLOPEDES!
Please do so. The entertainment level of group rises rapidly at that point.

Lynn
The Zygon
2018-03-01 00:29:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Do you guys ever just talk about science fiction, here? I enjoy talking about sci fi with people who have read a lot of it.

I am currently rereading The Far Arena, by Richard Ben Sapir. As far as great sci fi go, it is not even worth a mention. But I just love that book. This is probably my 5th re-reading.

I read dozens of the The Destroyer novels when I was a young man. I loved for the dialogue. The story line was largely irrelevant. I read the for the conversations between Chiun and Remo. In fact, every time Chiun spoke, it was a gem. I feel the same say about The Far Arena. The dialogue is just fantastic.


Regards
The Zygon
Robert Carnegie
2018-03-01 03:32:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)

As for long-lived outsiders... there's your vampires,
there's your, excuse me, "Wandering Jew", Mary Shelley's
"The Mortal Immortal" - it's been going while, either
soloists or duellists; have you heard of "Highlander"?

James White's novel _Star Surgeon_ is an extremely
old-fashioned (1959) entry in his "Sector General"
(inter)galactic space hospital series that features
a very long-lived alien space-travelling altruist
whose people like to settle on a lesser species'
planet an improve their society, by individual effort,
over many generations of the lessers. But the book isn't
exclusively about the alien's health issue, or its mission,
which does not go especially well.

I think when I started writing this, I had another story
in mind to mention as well. Perhaps it'll come back to me.
David Johnston
2018-03-01 03:46:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
There's no problem as long as you understand that it's only "dark" in
the sense that we can't see it.
The Zygon
2018-03-01 04:16:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
There's no problem as long as you understand that it's only "dark" in
the sense that we can't see it.
==
Yes, the side permanently facing away from earth.

Astronomers sometimes refer to it as "the dark side".
The Zygon
2018-03-01 04:18:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
There's no problem as long as you understand that it's only "dark" in
the sense that we can't see it.
Yes, I realize that there is almost nothing there which could be called a clue. That particular phrase would have to stand out in a person's mind, they way it did for me, for it to likely nudge anyone's memory.
Greg Goss
2018-03-01 06:47:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
There's no problem as long as you understand that it's only "dark" in
the sense that we can't see it.
From he album in question: "There is no dark side of the moon,
really. Matter of fact, it's all dark."

Which implies something metaphorical.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-03-01 14:51:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
There's no problem as long as you understand that it's only "dark" in
the sense that we can't see it.
From he album in question: "There is no dark side of the moon,
really. Matter of fact, it's all dark."
Which implies something metaphorical.
Well, no. In fact, the surface of the moon has rather low
albedo. Take a look at some pictures from Apollo landings, the
astronauts in their white pressure suits loping around on the
dark surface. If that weren't the case, the moon would be a lot
brighter (with reflected sunlight or earthlight) than it is.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Scott Lurndal
2018-03-01 16:10:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
Post by David Johnston
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
There's no problem as long as you understand that it's only "dark" in
the sense that we can't see it.
From he album in question: "There is no dark side of the moon,
really. Matter of fact, it's all dark."
Which implies something metaphorical.
Well, no. In fact, the surface of the moon has rather low
albedo. Take a look at some pictures from Apollo landings, the
astronauts in their white pressure suits loping around on the
dark surface. If that weren't the case, the moon would be a lot
brighter (with reflected sunlight or earthlight) than it is.
"Eclipse" closes on a chord of E major before giving way to
the same beating heart that can be heard on "Speak to Me" and from
1:37 on to the final phrase spoken by the inimitable Gerry O'Driscoll
by way of closing metaphor and conclusion: //There is no dark side
of the moon, really. As a matter of fact it's all dark.// In reality,
O'Driscoll's monologue continues: //And the thing that makes it look
alight is the sun.//. It's not difficult to see why Waters would not
have wanted to include this last phrase on the LP, its message sounding
altogether too positive to suit the concept of the album.

- Pink Floyd All the Songs The Story behind every track (pp 327)
The Zygon
2018-03-01 04:25:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
As for long-lived outsiders... there's your vampires,
there's your, excuse me, "Wandering Jew", Mary Shelley's
"The Mortal Immortal" - it's been going while, either
soloists or duellists; have you heard of "Highlander"?
James White's novel _Star Surgeon_ is an extremely
old-fashioned (1959) entry in his "Sector General"
(inter)galactic space hospital series that features
a very long-lived alien space-travelling altruist
whose people like to settle on a lesser species'
planet an improve their society, by individual effort,
over many generations of the lessers. But the book isn't
exclusively about the alien's health issue, or its mission,
which does not go especially well.
I think when I started writing this, I had another story
in mind to mention as well. Perhaps it'll come back to me.
==
Have you ever read "The Last Dancer" by Daniel Keys Moran? I am referring to stories of that type.

I also read a story once of some aliens who were stranded on earth over 200,000 years ago, and manipulated our history since then to get us to the point of practical fusion energy. Their plan was for us to build nuclear fusion rockets to get into space. I remember vaguely that one of them fell in love with the human race, went native, so to speak, and tried to wreck the plan to return home, knowing that an invasion force would follow.

This is a 1950's or 1960's story. If I recall correctly, the notion of building fusion rockets to for interstellar travel was fairly common then.
James Nicoll
2018-03-01 04:30:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
==
Have you ever read "The Last Dancer" by Daniel Keys Moran? I am
referring to stories of that type.
I also read a story once of some aliens who were stranded on earth over
200,000 years ago, and manipulated our history since then to get us to
the point of practical fusion energy. Their plan was for us to build
nuclear fusion rockets to get into space. I remember vaguely that one
of them fell in love with the human race, went native, so to speak, and
tried to wreck the plan to return home, knowing that an invasion force
And Having Writ... has a group of aliens desperate to kickstart WWI
because that's the fastest route to getting Earth to the tech level
needed to recover and repair their space craft (which in our time-
line was the Tunguska impactor). They are a rather naive lot, though,
so their plans go awry early and thoroughly.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Titus G
2018-03-01 05:41:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by James Nicoll
Post by The Zygon
==
Have you ever read "The Last Dancer" by Daniel Keys Moran? I am
referring to stories of that type.
I do not know it.
Post by James Nicoll
Post by The Zygon
I also read a story once of some aliens who were stranded on earth over
200,000 years ago, and manipulated our history since then to get us to
the point of practical fusion energy. Their plan was for us to build
nuclear fusion rockets to get into space. I remember vaguely that one
of them fell in love with the human race, went native, so to speak, and
tried to wreck the plan to return home, knowing that an invasion force
And Having Writ... has a group of aliens desperate to kickstart WWI
because that's the fastest route to getting Earth to the tech level
needed to recover and repair their space craft (which in our time-
line was the Tunguska impactor). They are a rather naive lot, though,
so their plans go awry early and thoroughly.
The Sirens of Titan, Kurt Vonnegut, fits that criteria and is the only
physical book of his that I have in a bookshelf. Although almost
eligible for a pension, it is still a brilliant read and includes a full
explanation of the purpose and history of earth.
(If I re-read it, I will read it on the kindle.)
Robert Carnegie
2018-03-01 08:05:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
As for long-lived outsiders... there's your vampires,
there's your, excuse me, "Wandering Jew", Mary Shelley's
"The Mortal Immortal" - it's been going while, either
soloists or duellists; have you heard of "Highlander"?
James White's novel _Star Surgeon_ is an extremely
old-fashioned (1959) entry in his "Sector General"
(inter)galactic space hospital series that features
a very long-lived alien space-travelling altruist
whose people like to settle on a lesser species'
planet an improve their society, by individual effort,
over many generations of the lessers. But the book isn't
exclusively about the alien's health issue, or its mission,
which does not go especially well.
I think when I started writing this, I had another story
in mind to mention as well. Perhaps it'll come back to me.
==
Have you ever read "The Last Dancer" by Daniel Keys Moran? I am referring to stories of that type.
I also read a story once of some aliens who were stranded on earth over 200,000 years ago, and manipulated our history since then to get us to the point of practical fusion energy. Their plan was for us to build nuclear fusion rockets to get into space. I remember vaguely that one of them fell in love with the human race, went native, so to speak, and tried to wreck the plan to return home, knowing that an invasion force would follow.
This is a 1950's or 1960's story. If I recall correctly, the notion of building fusion rockets to for interstellar travel was fairly common then.
I think Asimov - or maybe Arthur Clarke, or, actually, may have
been James White again - wrote a short where one long-lived alien
directed earthly affairs to produce a rocket which he could hijack
and personally ride (?) in order to reach or contact his parked
starship. But he was friendly. IIRC the rocket going off course
coincided with anomalies being noticed in his security clearance
file, and our point of view was the office where this was being
discussed.

By the way, I got the other story I was going to mention; again
not exactly as specified, but have you read Alan Dean Foster,
_The Man Who Used the Universe_?

If you want it set in Earth history then that's another miss.

There's several Star Trek episodes that do involve people who
experienced Earth history, and in _Doctor Who_ arguably the
title character herself, as well as - er - Zygons. Oh, you know.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-03-01 14:59:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
Post by The Zygon
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
As for long-lived outsiders... there's your vampires,
there's your, excuse me, "Wandering Jew", Mary Shelley's
"The Mortal Immortal" - it's been going while, either
soloists or duellists; have you heard of "Highlander"?
James White's novel _Star Surgeon_ is an extremely
old-fashioned (1959) entry in his "Sector General"
(inter)galactic space hospital series that features
a very long-lived alien space-travelling altruist
whose people like to settle on a lesser species'
planet an improve their society, by individual effort,
over many generations of the lessers. But the book isn't
exclusively about the alien's health issue, or its mission,
which does not go especially well.
I think when I started writing this, I had another story
in mind to mention as well. Perhaps it'll come back to me.
==
Have you ever read "The Last Dancer" by Daniel Keys Moran? I am
referring to stories of that type.
Post by The Zygon
I also read a story once of some aliens who were stranded on earth
over 200,000 years ago, and manipulated our history since then to get us
to the point of practical fusion energy. Their plan was for us to build
nuclear fusion rockets to get into space. I remember vaguely that one
of them fell in love with the human race, went native, so to speak, and
tried to wreck the plan to return home, knowing that an invasion force
would follow.
Post by The Zygon
This is a 1950's or 1960's story. If I recall correctly, the notion
of building fusion rockets to for interstellar travel was fairly common
then.
I think Asimov - or maybe Arthur Clarke, or, actually, may have
been James White again - wrote a short where one long-lived alien
directed earthly affairs to produce a rocket which he could hijack
and personally ride (?) in order to reach or contact his parked
starship. But he was friendly. IIRC the rocket going off course
coincided with anomalies being noticed in his security clearance
file, and our point of view was the office where this was being
discussed.
By the way, I got the other story I was going to mention; again
not exactly as specified, but have you read Alan Dean Foster,
_The Man Who Used the Universe_?
There's always the year-long arc in _Doctor Who_ featuring The
Silence, who as they said, "have been ruling your world since the
wheel and the fire," and urging humankind to build up to the
Apollo program. (I won't go into why, that's an even longer
arc.) Their schtik was a perception filter such that as soon as
you looked away from one, you couldn't remember what they looked
like or even that they'd been there. But they could implant
posthypnotic suggestions.

Mind you, the television audience could see them just fine. They
looked like Munch's _The Scream._
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Michael F. Stemper
2018-03-01 18:44:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by The Zygon
Post by Robert Carnegie
As for long-lived outsiders... there's your vampires,
there's your, excuse me, "Wandering Jew", Mary Shelley's
"The Mortal Immortal" - it's been going while, either
soloists or duellists; have you heard of "Highlander"?
I also read a story once of some aliens who were stranded on earth over 200,000 years ago, and manipulated our history since then to get us to the point of practical fusion energy. Their plan was for us to build nuclear fusion rockets to get into space. I remember vaguely that one of them fell in love with the human race, went native, so to speak, and tried to wreck the plan to return home, knowing that an invasion force would follow.
I think Asimov - or maybe Arthur Clarke, or, actually, may have
been James White again - wrote a short where one long-lived alien
directed earthly affairs to produce a rocket which he could hijack
and personally ride (?) in order to reach or contact his parked
starship. But he was friendly. IIRC the rocket going off course
coincided with anomalies being noticed in his security clearance
file, and our point of view was the office where this was being
discussed.
Asimov. "Does a Bee Care?"

<http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?46102>

Additionally, although less benignly, there's the Doctor Who episode,
"City of Death".
--
Michael F. Stemper
Deuteronomy 24:17
Greg Goss
2018-03-02 02:46:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
I think Asimov - or maybe Arthur Clarke, or, actually, may have
been James White again - wrote a short where one long-lived alien
directed earthly affairs to produce a rocket which he could hijack
and personally ride (?) in order to reach or contact his parked
starship. But he was friendly.
In one of the Fleet of Worlds novels by Niven / Lerner, a stranded Pak
tries the same thing.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
The Zygon
2018-03-02 04:41:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
I think Asimov - or maybe Arthur Clarke, or, actually, may have
been James White again - wrote a short where one long-lived alien
directed earthly affairs to produce a rocket which he could hijack
and personally ride (?) in order to reach or contact his parked
starship. But he was friendly.
In one of the Fleet of Worlds novels by Niven / Lerner, a stranded Pak
tries the same thing.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
==
"Protector" by Larry Niven?
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2018-03-02 09:11:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 1 Mar 2018 20:41:49 -0800 (PST), The Zygon
Post by The Zygon
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
I think Asimov - or maybe Arthur Clarke, or, actually, may have
been James White again - wrote a short where one long-lived alien
directed earthly affairs to produce a rocket which he could hijack
and personally ride (?) in order to reach or contact his parked
starship. But he was friendly.
In one of the Fleet of Worlds novels by Niven / Lerner, a stranded Pak
tries the same thing.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
==
"Protector" by Larry Niven?
You've not met the Fleet of Worlds series? Under Niven's paternal hand,
Lerner writes the flip side of many of the later Known Space stories in
a continuous framework. It's not _Down in Flames_ but covers stuff like
yes, the Puppeteers definitely know about tides ("Neutron Star") and
lots more retro-reinterpretation. They're pretty fun.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"Hard as nails, hard as nails - So would you be if you lived one hundred
and eighty years on sunflower seeds and biscuit crumbs." - Polynesia
The Zygon
2018-03-02 23:28:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by The Zygon
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
I think Asimov - or maybe Arthur Clarke, or, actually, may have
been James White again - wrote a short where one long-lived alien
directed earthly affairs to produce a rocket which he could hijack
and personally ride (?) in order to reach or contact his parked
starship. But he was friendly.
In one of the Fleet of Worlds novels by Niven / Lerner, a stranded Pak
tries the same thing.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
==
"Protector" by Larry Niven?
You've not met the Fleet of Worlds series? Under Niven's paternal hand,
Lerner writes the flip side of many of the later Known Space stories in
a continuous framework. It's not _Down in Flames_ but covers stuff like
yes, the Puppeteers definitely know about tides ("Neutron Star") and
lots more retro-reinterpretation. They're pretty fun.
Cheers - Jaimie
--
"Hard as nails, hard as nails - So would you be if you lived one hundred
and eighty years on sunflower seeds and biscuit crumbs." - Polynesia
==
I have read two books from the Fleet of World's series. It is just that the story line you summarized read like "Protector". The story of a Pak called Psst Pok.
Default User
2018-03-02 23:43:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
I have read two books from the Fleet of World's series. It is just
that the story line you summarized read like "Protector". The story
of a Pak called Psst Pok.
He didn't live long enough to do much controlling of human history.
Brennan, on the other hand . . .


Brian
J. Clarke
2018-03-03 02:56:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 2 Mar 2018 15:28:14 -0800 (PST), The Zygon
Post by The Zygon
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by The Zygon
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
I think Asimov - or maybe Arthur Clarke, or, actually, may have
been James White again - wrote a short where one long-lived alien
directed earthly affairs to produce a rocket which he could hijack
and personally ride (?) in order to reach or contact his parked
starship. But he was friendly.
In one of the Fleet of Worlds novels by Niven / Lerner, a stranded Pak
tries the same thing.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
==
"Protector" by Larry Niven?
You've not met the Fleet of Worlds series? Under Niven's paternal hand,
Lerner writes the flip side of many of the later Known Space stories in
a continuous framework. It's not _Down in Flames_ but covers stuff like
yes, the Puppeteers definitely know about tides ("Neutron Star") and
lots more retro-reinterpretation. They're pretty fun.
Cheers - Jaimie
--
"Hard as nails, hard as nails - So would you be if you lived one hundred
and eighty years on sunflower seeds and biscuit crumbs." - Polynesia
==
I have read two books from the Fleet of World's series. It is just that the story line you summarized read like "Protector". The story of a Pak called Psst Pok.
Phssthpok and I don't recall him needing a ride from anybody.
Default User
2018-03-03 04:47:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 2 Mar 2018 15:28:14 -0800 (PST), The Zygon
Post by The Zygon
I have read two books from the Fleet of World's series. It is just
that the story line you summarized read like "Protector". The
story of a Pak called Psst Pok.
Phssthpok and I don't recall him needing a ride from anybody.
Right, he rode a ramjet in to rescue the lost colony. As I recall he
expected to die relatively soon after arrival.


Brian
J. Clarke
2018-03-03 11:25:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 3 Mar 2018 04:47:28 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 2 Mar 2018 15:28:14 -0800 (PST), The Zygon
Post by The Zygon
I have read two books from the Fleet of World's series. It is just
that the story line you summarized read like "Protector". The
story of a Pak called Psst Pok.
Phssthpok and I don't recall him needing a ride from anybody.
Right, he rode a ramjet in to rescue the lost colony. As I recall he
expected to die relatively soon after arrival.
I don't recall him expecting to, but he was Pak--while they were
almost immortal in terms of aging, they tended to die violent deaths
at the hands of other Pak, so perhaps he was expecting one of the new
Protectors who would arise when he got fresh Tree Of Life growing to
do him in.
Default User
2018-03-03 15:15:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 3 Mar 2018 04:47:28 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
Phssthpok and I don't recall him needing a ride from anybody.
Right, he rode a ramjet in to rescue the lost colony. As I recall he
expected to die relatively soon after arrival.
I don't recall him expecting to, but he was Pak--while they were
almost immortal in terms of aging, they tended to die violent deaths
at the hands of other Pak, so perhaps he was expecting one of the new
Protectors who would arise when he got fresh Tree Of Life growing to
do him in.
I'll have to look it up, but my recollection is that he expected the
first new Protector to kill him, which is what happened. Not an
important point, at any rate he wasn't expecting to go back to Pak Home.


Brian
J. Clarke
2018-03-03 17:28:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 3 Mar 2018 15:15:40 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 3 Mar 2018 04:47:28 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
Phssthpok and I don't recall him needing a ride from anybody.
Right, he rode a ramjet in to rescue the lost colony. As I recall he
expected to die relatively soon after arrival.
I don't recall him expecting to, but he was Pak--while they were
almost immortal in terms of aging, they tended to die violent deaths
at the hands of other Pak, so perhaps he was expecting one of the new
Protectors who would arise when he got fresh Tree Of Life growing to
do him in.
I'll have to look it up, but my recollection is that he expected the
first new Protector to kill him, which is what happened. Not an
important point, at any rate he wasn't expecting to go back to Pak Home.
Remembering further, he originally was in the Library and had stopped
eating because all his relatives were dead and he didn't have anything
to Protect, he being a Protector and all. Then he found out about
this colonization attempt and that gave him a reason to live.
Post by Default User
Brian
Default User
2018-03-03 19:46:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 3 Mar 2018 15:15:40 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 3 Mar 2018 04:47:28 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
Phssthpok and I don't recall him needing a ride from anybody.
Right, he rode a ramjet in to rescue the lost colony. As I
recall he >> > expected to die relatively soon after arrival.
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
I don't recall him expecting to, but he was Pak--while they were
almost immortal in terms of aging, they tended to die violent
deaths >> at the hands of other Pak, so perhaps he was expecting one
of the new >> Protectors who would arise when he got fresh Tree Of
Life growing to >> do him in.
Post by Default User
I'll have to look it up, but my recollection is that he expected the
first new Protector to kill him, which is what happened. Not an
important point, at any rate he wasn't expecting to go back to Pak Home.
Remembering further, he originally was in the Library and had stopped
eating because all his relatives were dead and he didn't have anything
to Protect, he being a Protector and all. Then he found out about
this colonization attempt and that gave him a reason to live.
Correct, but not what I was getting at. I went and read some relative
passages. Once Phssthpok finds Brennan and gets him to eat the root and
start the change, Phssthpok starts running through the probabilities:

"Did the breeder have children? If so, he would take the secret for his
own, using tree-of-life to make protectors of his own descendants. That
was all right."

"Probably he would kill Phssthpok to keep the secret. That was all
right too.

Later Brennan describes killing Phssthpok to Garner and Sohl.

"I think he died believing he'd succeeded. He half-expected me to kill
him."


Brian
The Zygon
2018-03-06 07:06:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 3 Mar 2018 04:47:28 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
Phssthpok and I don't recall him needing a ride from anybody.
Right, he rode a ramjet in to rescue the lost colony. As I recall he
expected to die relatively soon after arrival.
I don't recall him expecting to, but he was Pak--while they were
almost immortal in terms of aging, they tended to die violent deaths
at the hands of other Pak, so perhaps he was expecting one of the new
Protectors who would arise when he got fresh Tree Of Life growing to
do him in.
I'll have to look it up, but my recollection is that he expected the
first new Protector to kill him, which is what happened. Not an
important point, at any rate he wasn't expecting to go back to Pak Home.
Remembering further, he originally was in the Library and had stopped
eating because all his relatives were dead and he didn't have anything
to Protect, he being a Protector and all. Then he found out about
this colonization attempt and that gave him a reason to live.
Post by Default User
Brian
That is what I remember.
Default User
2018-03-06 18:37:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Default User
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 3 Mar 2018 04:47:28 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
I'll have to look it up, but my recollection is that he expected
the first new Protector to kill him, which is what happened. Not
an important point, at any rate he wasn't expecting to go back to
Pak Home.
Remembering further, he originally was in the Library and had
stopped eating because all his relatives were dead and he didn't
have anything to Protect, he being a Protector and all. Then he
found out about this colonization attempt and that gave him a
reason to live.
That is what I remember.
As I said elsewhere, this is true but irrelevant. It wasn't what I was
discussing at all. See my other message for clarification of the parts
I meant.


Brian
Greg Goss
2018-03-03 03:03:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by The Zygon
Post by Greg Goss
In one of the Fleet of Worlds novels by Niven / Lerner, a stranded Pak
tries the same thing.
"Protector" by Larry Niven?
You've not met the Fleet of Worlds series? Under Niven's paternal hand,
Lerner writes the flip side of many of the later Known Space stories in
a continuous framework. It's not _Down in Flames_ but covers stuff like
yes, the Puppeteers definitely know about tides ("Neutron Star") and
lots more retro-reinterpretation. They're pretty fun.
==
I have read two books from the Fleet of World's series. It is just that the story line you summarized read like "Protector". The story of a Pak called Psst Pok.
The galaxy is blowing up. They know that at least one colony world
got a bit of a foothold out THATTAWAY, so they're following along.

The entire home planet has pretty much been torn down to bedrock to
build a desperation fleet heading off in that same direction. By
aiming slightly to one side of the original colony, they're going to
run into the Puppeteers instead ...
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
-dsr-
2018-03-01 16:20:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
Have you ever read "The Last Dancer" by Daniel Keys Moran? I am referring to stories of that type.
It occurs to me that you might not be aware that:

1. That's part of a series
2. Daniel Keys Moran is again writing that series.

See http://www.immunityinc.com/resources/daniel-keys-moran-mirror.html
and https://www.danielkeysmoran.com/

www.fsand.com appears to be down, currently.

-dsr-
David DeLaney
2018-03-04 21:50:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by -dsr-
Post by The Zygon
Have you ever read "The Last Dancer" by Daniel Keys Moran? I am referring
to stories of that type.
1. That's part of a series
2. Daniel Keys Moran is again writing that series.
See http://www.immunityinc.com/resources/daniel-keys-moran-mirror.html
and https://www.danielkeysmoran.com/
www.fsand.com appears to be down, currently.
His _The Armageddon Blues_ might also interest you, though it takes place on a
different line of The Great Wheel.

https://www.danielkeysmoran.com/index.html has some pages with snippets and
shorts from the Continuing Time's history, as well as a timeline and outline
for the stories (many of which it appears he's never gonna get around to
writing, alas).

Another series catches my eye, though it has the fault of being high-magic epic
fantasy instead of science fiction: The Malazan Book of the Fallen, Steven
Erickson (and Ian Esslemont, writing a separate sub-series dealing with
Shadowdancer and Cotillion). Ten-thick-book series, completed, meets a great
msny of your specs other than not being SF: What would the world be like if
sorcery existed ... and there WERE Elder Races of the type many fantasy novels
contain, who were there long before Man? What might history look like? What
sort of history do immortal mages produce, anyway? How old can a grudge BE?
And what if mortals or immortals could, effectively, become Gods?

[Similar kind of setting, but focused less on history and archeology and more
on community, society, economics, and partly on learning to be an epic sorcerer
is the Commonweal series, Graydon Saunders [e-book only].]

Dave, offering choices for food
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
The Zygon
2018-03-01 04:55:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
As for long-lived outsiders... there's your vampires,
there's your, excuse me, "Wandering Jew", Mary Shelley's
"The Mortal Immortal" - it's been going while, either
soloists or duellists; have you heard of "Highlander"?
James White's novel _Star Surgeon_ is an extremely
old-fashioned (1959) entry in his "Sector General"
(inter)galactic space hospital series that features
a very long-lived alien space-travelling altruist
whose people like to settle on a lesser species'
planet an improve their society, by individual effort,
over many generations of the lessers. But the book isn't
exclusively about the alien's health issue, or its mission,
which does not go especially well.
I think when I started writing this, I had another story
in mind to mention as well. Perhaps it'll come back to me.
Your altruistic alien story reminds me of Heinlein's "The Star Beast". It poses the interesting question, "Who is the pet?" The answer was a surprise.
Lynn McGuire
2018-03-06 20:31:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
Post by Robert Carnegie
I can't identify your story, but I hope you understand
a practical difficulty in leaving your vehicle parked
on "the dark side of the moon" - unless you're staying
less than two weeks. It appears anyway in various
stories, British rock concept albums, etc. :-)
As for long-lived outsiders... there's your vampires,
there's your, excuse me, "Wandering Jew", Mary Shelley's
"The Mortal Immortal" - it's been going while, either
soloists or duellists; have you heard of "Highlander"?
James White's novel _Star Surgeon_ is an extremely
old-fashioned (1959) entry in his "Sector General"
(inter)galactic space hospital series that features
a very long-lived alien space-travelling altruist
whose people like to settle on a lesser species'
planet an improve their society, by individual effort,
over many generations of the lessers. But the book isn't
exclusively about the alien's health issue, or its mission,
which does not go especially well.
I think when I started writing this, I had another story
in mind to mention as well. Perhaps it'll come back to me.
Your altruistic alien story reminds me of Heinlein's "The Star Beast". It poses the interesting question, "Who is the pet?" The answer was a surprise.
I love TSB. One of my all time top ten books. That and Heinlein's COTG
book are serious awesome.

Lynn

Joe Bernstein
2018-03-01 04:49:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
I once read a book about an alien visitation which I enjoyed very
much. But I cannot even remember the story. I only remembered
that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying
"Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to.
Sometimes, even to suggest that it may not be speaking the whole
truth. I also remember vaguely that its "mother ship" was parked
on the dark side of the moon. There is not much else I can
remember.
This strongly reminds me of A. E. van Vogt's "Co-operate - or Else!",
otherwise known as the first few chapters of <War against the Rull>.
But I'm not sure.

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein, writer <***@gmail.com>
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-03-01 05:04:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by The Zygon
I once read a book about an alien visitation which I enjoyed very
much. But I cannot even remember the story. I only remembered
that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying
"Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to.
Sometimes, even to suggest that it may not be speaking the whole
truth. I also remember vaguely that its "mother ship" was parked
on the dark side of the moon. There is not much else I can
remember.
This strongly reminds me of A. E. van Vogt's "Co-operate - or Else!",
otherwise known as the first few chapters of <War against the Rull>.
But I'm not sure.
Joe Bernstein
No, I don't think so.

That one is about a human and alien shipwrecked on a hostile planet.
And the alien is from a formidable, but low-tech, species that doesn't
have spaceships. Great story though.
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by The Zygon
that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying
"Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to.
"Cool story, bro" :-)
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
The Zygon
2018-03-02 04:44:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by The Zygon
I once read a book about an alien visitation which I enjoyed very
much. But I cannot even remember the story. I only remembered
that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying
"Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to.
Sometimes, even to suggest that it may not be speaking the whole
truth. I also remember vaguely that its "mother ship" was parked
on the dark side of the moon. There is not much else I can
remember.
This strongly reminds me of A. E. van Vogt's "Co-operate - or Else!",
otherwise known as the first few chapters of <War against the Rull>.
But I'm not sure.
Joe Bernstein
No, I don't think so.
That one is about a human and alien shipwrecked on a hostile planet.
And the alien is from a formidable, but low-tech, species that doesn't
have spaceships. Great story though.
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by The Zygon
that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying
"Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to.
"Cool story, bro" :-)
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
==
They were formidable and high tech. The had interstellar travel. They also implied that they could travel through time. They visited earth and threatened to go back in time and eat our ancestors.
Lynn McGuire
2018-03-01 05:55:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
I recently asked for help in identifying the name and author of a novel and was helped within 24 hours. Again, thanks to everyone who contributed to that. That extremely quick turnaround has made me bold enough to ask for help again - but this time I fear the task may be impossible. But here goes.
I once read a book about an alien visitation which I enjoyed very much. But I cannot even remember the story. I only remembered that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying "Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to. Sometimes, even to suggest that it may not be speaking the whole truth. I also remember vaguely that its "mother ship" was parked on the dark side of the moon. There is not much else I can remember.
==
So as not to keep pestering this list for help, let me do the rest all at once.
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against. Anything like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
I have already read The Last Dancer by Daniel Keys Moran.
Please recommend any good reads you know along those lines.
Thanks all for any help you can give, and I promise (a) not to ask for any more help and (b) try to help in any way I can, anyone asking general or specific questions as I did.
Regards
The Zygon
Aliens who have lived among humans for a long time or on the dark side
of the Moon:

1. _Enterprise Stardust (Perry Rhodan, #1)_ by Scheer and Koenig
https://www.amazon.com/Enterprise-Stardust-Perry-Rhodan-1/dp/4411659700/

2. _Mutineer's Moon (Dahak Series)_ by David Weber
(my favorite SF space opera book of all time !)
https://www.amazon.com/Mutineers-Moon-Dahak-David-Weber/dp/0671720856/

3. _Agent to the Stars_ by John Scalzi
https://www.amazon.com/Agent-Stars-John-Scalzi/dp/0765357003/

4. _A Soldier's Duty (Theirs Not to Reason Why)_ by Jean Johnson
https://www.amazon.com/Soldiers-Duty-Theirs-Not-Reason/dp/0441020631/

An interesting sideline short story of aliens freeing the Earthers and
the Moon:
1. _Who Needs Enemies?_ by Alan Dean Foster
https://www.amazon.com/Needs-Enemies-Alan-Dean-Foster/dp/0345316576/

Lynn
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-03-01 06:54:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
Post by The Zygon
I recently asked for help in identifying the name and author of a
novel and was helped within 24 hours. Again, thanks to everyone who
contributed to that. That extremely quick turnaround has made me bold
enough to ask for help again - but this time I fear the task may be
impossible. But here goes.
Post by The Zygon
I once read a book about an alien visitation which I enjoyed very
much. But I cannot even remember the story. I only remembered that I
enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying "Good story!"
It said so when it thought it was being lied to. Sometimes, even to
suggest that it may not be speaking the whole truth. I also remember
vaguely that its "mother ship" was parked on the dark side of the moon.
There is not much else I can remember.
Post by The Zygon
==
So as not to keep pestering this list for help, let me do the rest all
at once.
Post by The Zygon
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any
such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or
just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for
cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against.
Anything like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
Post by The Zygon
I have already read The Last Dancer by Daniel Keys Moran.
Please recommend any good reads you know along those lines.
Thanks all for any help you can give, and I promise (a) not to ask for
any more help and (b) try to help in any way I can, anyone asking
general or specific questions as I did.
Post by The Zygon
Regards
The Zygon
Aliens who have lived among humans for a long time or on the dark side
1. _Enterprise Stardust (Perry Rhodan, #1)_ by Scheer and Koenig
https://www.amazon.com/Enterprise-Stardust-Perry-Rhodan-1/dp/4411659700/
2. _Mutineer's Moon (Dahak Series)_ by David Weber
(my favorite SF space opera book of all time !)
https://www.amazon.com/Mutineers-Moon-Dahak-David-Weber/dp/0671720856/
3. _Agent to the Stars_ by John Scalzi
https://www.amazon.com/Agent-Stars-John-Scalzi/dp/0765357003/
4. _A Soldier's Duty (Theirs Not to Reason Why)_ by Jean Johnson
https://www.amazon.com/Soldiers-Duty-Theirs-Not-Reason/dp/0441020631/
An interesting sideline short story of aliens freeing the Earthers and
1. _Who Needs Enemies?_ by Alan Dean Foster
https://www.amazon.com/Needs-Enemies-Alan-Dean-Foster/dp/0345316576/
Lynn
_A Mirror For Observers_ Edgar Pangborn

You could add the "Atlan" sequence to Perry Rhodan, though as I recall
we saw very little of his life between Atlantis and the advent of Rhodan's
New Power.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
The Zygon
2018-03-02 04:56:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by The Zygon
I recently asked for help in identifying the name and author of a novel and was helped within 24 hours. Again, thanks to everyone who contributed to that. That extremely quick turnaround has made me bold enough to ask for help again - but this time I fear the task may be impossible. But here goes.
I once read a book about an alien visitation which I enjoyed very much. But I cannot even remember the story. I only remembered that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying "Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to. Sometimes, even to suggest that it may not be speaking the whole truth. I also remember vaguely that its "mother ship" was parked on the dark side of the moon. There is not much else I can remember.
==
So as not to keep pestering this list for help, let me do the rest all at once.
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against. Anything like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
I have already read The Last Dancer by Daniel Keys Moran.
Please recommend any good reads you know along those lines.
Thanks all for any help you can give, and I promise (a) not to ask for any more help and (b) try to help in any way I can, anyone asking general or specific questions as I did.
Regards
The Zygon
Aliens who have lived among humans for a long time or on the dark side
1. _Enterprise Stardust (Perry Rhodan, #1)_ by Scheer and Koenig
https://www.amazon.com/Enterprise-Stardust-Perry-Rhodan-1/dp/4411659700/
2. _Mutineer's Moon (Dahak Series)_ by David Weber
(my favorite SF space opera book of all time !)
https://www.amazon.com/Mutineers-Moon-Dahak-David-Weber/dp/0671720856/
3. _Agent to the Stars_ by John Scalzi
https://www.amazon.com/Agent-Stars-John-Scalzi/dp/0765357003/
4. _A Soldier's Duty (Theirs Not to Reason Why)_ by Jean Johnson
https://www.amazon.com/Soldiers-Duty-Theirs-Not-Reason/dp/0441020631/
An interesting sideline short story of aliens freeing the Earthers and
1. _Who Needs Enemies?_ by Alan Dean Foster
https://www.amazon.com/Needs-Enemies-Alan-Dean-Foster/dp/0345316576/
Lynn
Thanks!
Lynn McGuire
2018-03-02 23:00:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by The Zygon
I recently asked for help in identifying the name and author of a novel and was helped within 24 hours. Again, thanks to everyone who contributed to that. That extremely quick turnaround has made me bold enough to ask for help again - but this time I fear the task may be impossible. But here goes.
I once read a book about an alien visitation which I enjoyed very much. But I cannot even remember the story. I only remembered that I enjoyed it very much and the alien had a habit of saying "Good story!" It said so when it thought it was being lied to. Sometimes, even to suggest that it may not be speaking the whole truth. I also remember vaguely that its "mother ship" was parked on the dark side of the moon. There is not much else I can remember.
==
So as not to keep pestering this list for help, let me do the rest all at once.
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against. Anything like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
I have already read The Last Dancer by Daniel Keys Moran.
Please recommend any good reads you know along those lines.
Thanks all for any help you can give, and I promise (a) not to ask for any more help and (b) try to help in any way I can, anyone asking general or specific questions as I did.
Regards
The Zygon
Aliens who have lived among humans for a long time or on the dark side
1. _Enterprise Stardust (Perry Rhodan, #1)_ by Scheer and Koenig
https://www.amazon.com/Enterprise-Stardust-Perry-Rhodan-1/dp/4411659700/
2. _Mutineer's Moon (Dahak Series)_ by David Weber
(my favorite SF space opera book of all time !)
https://www.amazon.com/Mutineers-Moon-Dahak-David-Weber/dp/0671720856/
3. _Agent to the Stars_ by John Scalzi
https://www.amazon.com/Agent-Stars-John-Scalzi/dp/0765357003/
4. _A Soldier's Duty (Theirs Not to Reason Why)_ by Jean Johnson
https://www.amazon.com/Soldiers-Duty-Theirs-Not-Reason/dp/0441020631/
An interesting sideline short story of aliens freeing the Earthers and
1. _Who Needs Enemies?_ by Alan Dean Foster
https://www.amazon.com/Needs-Enemies-Alan-Dean-Foster/dp/0345316576/
Lynn
Thanks!
You are welcome. I have a couple of more on the edge of the brain that
I cannot remember at the moment.

Lynn
David Duffy
2018-03-02 04:41:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any
such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or
just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for
cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against. Anything
like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
Keith Laumer _The Long Twilight__
Kage Baker _The Company_ series
Wesley Chu _Tao_ series

I presume you have read EE Smith.
The Zygon
2018-03-02 05:21:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Duffy
Post by The Zygon
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any
such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or
just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for
cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against. Anything
like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
Keith Laumer _The Long Twilight__
Kage Baker _The Company_ series
Wesley Chu _Tao_ series
I presume you have read EE Smith.
Yes, I have read EE Smith. He is on my re-read list.
The Zygon
2018-03-02 05:29:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
The Zygon
Post by The Zygon
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any
such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or
just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for
cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against. Anything
like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
Keith Laumer _The Long Twilight__
Kage Baker _The Company_ series
Wesley Chu _Tao_ series
I presume you have read EE Smith.
==
Thanks!
a***@yahoo.com
2018-03-02 15:39:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any such who lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or just a personal conflict between two immortals, using human beings for cannon fodder or one fighting for human beings and one against. Anything like that. Ageless beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
I have already read The Last Dancer by Daniel Keys Moran.
Please recommend any good reads you know along those lines.
Maybe The Boat of a Million Years by Poul Anderson.
David DeLaney
2018-03-04 21:38:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Zygon
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any such who
lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or just a personal
conflict between two immortals, using human beings for cannon fodder or one
fighting for human beings and one against. Anything like that. Ageless
beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
I have already read The Last Dancer by Daniel Keys Moran.
Please recommend any good reads you know along those lines.
This does not exactly fit the parameters you're outlining... but I think you
might quite enjoy the long-running webcomic Schlock Mercenary, a space opera
focusing on Schlock's captain's (Tagon) crew and assignments. The humans are
out living among the galaxy's other races, not vice versa ... but there ARE
long-running conflicts, secrets nobody was meant to discover, a good long
historical background which is relevant at the oddest moments, oh, and they
manage to restart a class of war that had been being contained for a Long Time
by the first-appearing major set of Bad Guys through their transport system.

Petey and the other AIs count as "ageless", though some are relatively very
young ... as do several other varied people and things they meet along the
way. Problems of self and identity are dealt with, as are the Maxims of
Highly Successful Pirates.

Large archive to digest, so set some time aside if you can!

Dave, you will believe a blob can PEW PEW PEW
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Lynn McGuire
2018-03-06 01:57:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David DeLaney
Post by The Zygon
I like to read sci fi stories about alien beings or immortals or any such who
lived among human beings for millennia, fighting some war or just a personal
conflict between two immortals, using human beings for cannon fodder or one
fighting for human beings and one against. Anything like that. Ageless
beings fighting agelessly across the ages.
I have already read The Last Dancer by Daniel Keys Moran.
Please recommend any good reads you know along those lines.
This does not exactly fit the parameters you're outlining... but I think you
might quite enjoy the long-running webcomic Schlock Mercenary, a space opera
focusing on Schlock's captain's (Tagon) crew and assignments. The humans are
out living among the galaxy's other races, not vice versa ... but there ARE
long-running conflicts, secrets nobody was meant to discover, a good long
historical background which is relevant at the oddest moments, oh, and they
manage to restart a class of war that had been being contained for a Long Time
by the first-appearing major set of Bad Guys through their transport system.
Petey and the other AIs count as "ageless", though some are relatively very
young ... as do several other varied people and things they meet along the
way. Problems of self and identity are dealt with, as are the Maxims of
Highly Successful Pirates.
Large archive to digest, so set some time aside if you can!
Dave, you will believe a blob can PEW PEW PEW
https://www.schlockmercenary.com/

Lynn
Loading...