Discussion:
_Deceptions: A Cainsville Novel_ by Kelley Armstrong
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Lynn McGuire
2017-04-13 18:17:41 UTC
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_Deceptions: A Cainsville Novel_ by Kelley Armstrong

https://www.amazon.com/Deceptions-Cainsville-Novel-Kelley-Armstrong/dp/1101984295/

Book number 3 of a 5 book urban fantasy series. I read the very nicely
formatted trade paperback. I will buy and read the fourth book in the
series. I have no idea if there will be more books in the series.

We are very slowly moving along a path here. I am not sure where we are
going but, I am enjoying the journey.

My rating: 4 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 4.6 out of 5 stars (152 reviews)

Lynn
Scott Lurndal
2017-04-14 12:40:37 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
_Deceptions: A Cainsville Novel_ by Kelley Armstrong
https://www.amazon.com/Deceptions-Cainsville-Novel-Kelley-Armstrong/dp/1101984295/
Book number 3 of a 5 book urban fantasy series. I read the very nicely
formatted trade paperback. I will buy and read the fourth book in the
series. I have no idea if there will be more books in the series.
We are very slowly moving along a path here. I am not sure where we are
going but, I am enjoying the journey.
Maybe you could describe the path, just a bit? The above is somewhat
content-free.

I mean, really, who cares if it's a trade paperback? That's certainly
not the first, nor the second nor even the fourth consideration when I'm
looking for the next book to buy.
Lynn McGuire
2017-04-14 21:20:59 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Deceptions: A Cainsville Novel_ by Kelley Armstrong
https://www.amazon.com/Deceptions-Cainsville-Novel-Kelley-Armstrong/dp/1101984295/
Book number 3 of a 5 book urban fantasy series. I read the very nicely
formatted trade paperback. I will buy and read the fourth book in the
series. I have no idea if there will be more books in the series.
We are very slowly moving along a path here. I am not sure where we are
going but, I am enjoying the journey.
Maybe you could describe the path, just a bit? The above is somewhat
content-free.
I mean, really, who cares if it's a trade paperback? That's certainly
not the first, nor the second nor even the fourth consideration when I'm
looking for the next book to buy.
Please note that the marketing blurb at Big River is quite good and much
better than I could write. I would invite you to read that.

I care about the printed matter of the book. My eyes are getting worse
as I get closer to 60. And, I like nice paper.

Thanks,
Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2017-04-15 10:32:07 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Deceptions: A Cainsville Novel_ by Kelley Armstrong
https://www.amazon.com/Deceptions-Cainsville-Novel-Kelley-Armstrong/dp/1101984295/
Book number 3 of a 5 book urban fantasy series. I read the very nicely
formatted trade paperback. I will buy and read the fourth book in the
series. I have no idea if there will be more books in the series.
We are very slowly moving along a path here. I am not sure where we are
going but, I am enjoying the journey.
Maybe you could describe the path, just a bit? The above is somewhat
content-free.
I mean, really, who cares if it's a trade paperback? That's certainly
not the first, nor the second nor even the fourth consideration when I'm
looking for the next book to buy.
Please note that the marketing blurb at Big River is quite good and much
better than I could write. I would invite you to read that.
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.

A blurb can misrepresent a book to the extent
of making it seem to be "about" the character
who disappears permanently (in effect) on
page 50.
Post by Lynn McGuire
I care about the printed matter of the book. My eyes are getting worse
as I get closer to 60. And, I like nice paper.
Thanks,
Lynn
Greg Goss
2017-04-15 16:19:29 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.

Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make the
point that that WAS the point.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-04-15 17:05:09 UTC
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Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make the
point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about fat
superheroes.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2017-04-15 17:28:22 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make the
point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about fat
superheroes.
You people have odd ideas about what makes a trailer work for most
people. I understood right away what "Galaxy Quest" was doing, and I
loved the teaser trailer for "The Incredibles."
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-04-15 20:19:13 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make the
point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about fat
superheroes.
You people have odd ideas about what makes a trailer work for most
people. I understood right away what "Galaxy Quest" was doing, and I
loved the teaser trailer for "The Incredibles."
Well, my point is that that teaser would have kept at least one
family from seeing the film had I not intervened. I, myself had
seen it anyway because I saw almost anything animated back then,
but that teaser had really lowered my expectations going in.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2017-04-15 20:32:28 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make the
point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about fat
superheroes.
You people have odd ideas about what makes a trailer work for most
people. I understood right away what "Galaxy Quest" was doing, and I
loved the teaser trailer for "The Incredibles."
Well, my point is that that teaser would have kept at least one
family from seeing the film had I not intervened. I, myself had
seen it anyway because I saw almost anything animated back then,
but that teaser had really lowered my expectations going in.
And MY point is that the teaser told me that my sense of humor and
general sensibility aligned really well with the filmmakers', even
though that scene isn't in the movie. It may have turned away some
potential viewers, but I'm pretty sure it drew in at least as many.
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-04-15 20:42:20 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make the
point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about fat
superheroes.
You people have odd ideas about what makes a trailer work for most
people. I understood right away what "Galaxy Quest" was doing, and I
loved the teaser trailer for "The Incredibles."
Well, my point is that that teaser would have kept at least one
family from seeing the film had I not intervened. I, myself had
seen it anyway because I saw almost anything animated back then,
but that teaser had really lowered my expectations going in.
And MY point is that the teaser told me that my sense of humor and
general sensibility aligned really well with the filmmakers', even
though that scene isn't in the movie. It may have turned away some
potential viewers, but I'm pretty sure it drew in at least as many.
OK, I accept that. Certainly the film did well and is now almost
universally accepted as a classic. I sure hope the sequel lives up
to it after the letdown of "Tomorrowland".
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Lawrence Watt-Evans
2017-04-15 21:38:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make the
point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about fat
superheroes.
You people have odd ideas about what makes a trailer work for most
people. I understood right away what "Galaxy Quest" was doing, and I
loved the teaser trailer for "The Incredibles."
Well, my point is that that teaser would have kept at least one
family from seeing the film had I not intervened. I, myself had
seen it anyway because I saw almost anything animated back then,
but that teaser had really lowered my expectations going in.
And MY point is that the teaser told me that my sense of humor and
general sensibility aligned really well with the filmmakers', even
though that scene isn't in the movie. It may have turned away some
potential viewers, but I'm pretty sure it drew in at least as many.
OK, I accept that. Certainly the film did well and is now almost
universally accepted as a classic. I sure hope the sequel lives up
to it after the letdown of "Tomorrowland".
I did not see "Tomorrowland," and my reasoning may be relevant.

I loved the first trailer, and was looking forward to the film, but
apparently this was not the usual reaction, because the SECOND trailer
they released completely destroyed my interest -- it turned the focus
from the girl to George Clooney and ignored everything I'd found
appealing in the first trailer, demoting the movie from "I wanna see
it" to "I'll wait for word of mouth."

And the word of mouth was mostly negative, so I've never seen it.
--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
Cryptoengineer
2017-04-16 03:13:44 UTC
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Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
In article
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
In article
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make
the point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about
fat superheroes.
You people have odd ideas about what makes a trailer work for most
people. I understood right away what "Galaxy Quest" was doing, and
I loved the teaser trailer for "The Incredibles."
Well, my point is that that teaser would have kept at least one
family from seeing the film had I not intervened. I, myself had
seen it anyway because I saw almost anything animated back then,
but that teaser had really lowered my expectations going in.
And MY point is that the teaser told me that my sense of humor and
general sensibility aligned really well with the filmmakers', even
though that scene isn't in the movie. It may have turned away some
potential viewers, but I'm pretty sure it drew in at least as many.
OK, I accept that. Certainly the film did well and is now almost
universally accepted as a classic. I sure hope the sequel lives up
to it after the letdown of "Tomorrowland".
I did not see "Tomorrowland," and my reasoning may be relevant.
I loved the first trailer, and was looking forward to the film, but
apparently this was not the usual reaction, because the SECOND trailer
they released completely destroyed my interest -- it turned the focus
from the girl to George Clooney and ignored everything I'd found
appealing in the first trailer, demoting the movie from "I wanna see
it" to "I'll wait for word of mouth."
And the word of mouth was mostly negative, so I've never seen it.
I enjoyed the film. Especially the firt 30 minutes or so.

I visited the New York World's Fair in several times in 1964-1965,
I was 6 or 7, and enjoyed the heck out of it. I could step
out my front door in Fresh Meadows, and see the 'pillar of light'
every night.

The early parts of the film was a nostalgia trip for me, and
the best representation of a positive future I'd seen in a very
long time.

pt
J. Clarke
2017-04-16 10:13:17 UTC
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Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
In article
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
In article
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make
the point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about
fat superheroes.
You people have odd ideas about what makes a trailer work for most
people. I understood right away what "Galaxy Quest" was doing, and
I loved the teaser trailer for "The Incredibles."
Well, my point is that that teaser would have kept at least one
family from seeing the film had I not intervened. I, myself had
seen it anyway because I saw almost anything animated back then,
but that teaser had really lowered my expectations going in.
And MY point is that the teaser told me that my sense of humor and
general sensibility aligned really well with the filmmakers', even
though that scene isn't in the movie. It may have turned away some
potential viewers, but I'm pretty sure it drew in at least as many.
OK, I accept that. Certainly the film did well and is now almost
universally accepted as a classic. I sure hope the sequel lives up
to it after the letdown of "Tomorrowland".
I did not see "Tomorrowland," and my reasoning may be relevant.
I loved the first trailer, and was looking forward to the film, but
apparently this was not the usual reaction, because the SECOND trailer
they released completely destroyed my interest -- it turned the focus
from the girl to George Clooney and ignored everything I'd found
appealing in the first trailer, demoting the movie from "I wanna see
it" to "I'll wait for word of mouth."
And the word of mouth was mostly negative, so I've never seen it.
I enjoyed the film. Especially the firt 30 minutes or so.
I visited the New York World's Fair in several times in 1964-1965,
I was 6 or 7, and enjoyed the heck out of it. I could step
out my front door in Fresh Meadows, and see the 'pillar of light'
every night.
The early parts of the film was a nostalgia trip for me, and
the best representation of a positive future I'd seen in a very
long time.
I must have been 11 or 12, only got to spend one day at the fair and only
saw the parts that my parents wanted to see so missed some of the "good
stuff", or so I felt at the time (don't press me for details--it was a long
time ago in an America far, far away).

Somewhere in the '60s we lost that future. I wish somebody would figure
out a way to bring it back.

Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-04-16 05:57:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
In article
Post by Lawrence Watt-Evans
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Robert Carnegie
That a book lives up to its blurb can't be taken
as read. If this is a good one, then well done
to them.
I never saw Galaxy Quest on the big screen because the marketing
material made it seem silly to me.
Of course it was silly, but the marketing material failed to make the
point that that WAS the point.
The original trailer for "The Incredibles" was very bad. I had to
convice a friend to go see it and it wasn't a silly movie about fat
superheroes.
You people have odd ideas about what makes a trailer work for most
people. I understood right away what "Galaxy Quest" was doing, and I
loved the teaser trailer for "The Incredibles."
Well, my point is that that teaser would have kept at least one
family from seeing the film had I not intervened. I, myself had
seen it anyway because I saw almost anything animated back then,
but that teaser had really lowered my expectations going in.
And MY point is that the teaser told me that my sense of humor and
general sensibility aligned really well with the filmmakers', even
though that scene isn't in the movie. It may have turned away some
potential viewers, but I'm pretty sure it drew in at least as many.
OK, I accept that. Certainly the film did well and is now almost
universally accepted as a classic. I sure hope the sequel lives up
to it after the letdown of "Tomorrowland".
I did not see "Tomorrowland," and my reasoning may be relevant.
I loved the first trailer, and was looking forward to the film, but
apparently this was not the usual reaction, because the SECOND trailer
they released completely destroyed my interest -- it turned the focus
from the girl to George Clooney and ignored everything I'd found
appealing in the first trailer, demoting the movie from "I wanna see
it" to "I'll wait for word of mouth."
And the word of mouth was mostly negative, so I've never seen it.
I felt let down by the second trailer as well, but saw it anyway.
It wasn't horrible, but it wasn't very good. I would have loved to
see the movie the first trailer suggested..
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
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