Discussion:
"Fthagn to you too"
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Lynn McGuire
2018-04-04 02:03:32 UTC
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"Fthagn to you too"
http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=7934

"I learned something fascinating today."

"There is a spot in the South Pacific called the “Oceanic pole of
inaccessibility” or alternatively “Point Nemo” at 48°52.6?S 123°23.6?W.
It’s the point on the Earth’s ocean’s most distant from any land – 2,688
km (1,670 mi) from the Easter Islands, the Pitcairn Islands, and
Antarctica."

"There are two interesting things about this spot. One is that it’s used
as a satellite graveyard. It’s conventional, when you can do a
controlled de-orbit on your bird, to drop it at Point Nemo. Tioangong-1,
the Chinese sat that just crashed uncontrolled into a different section
of the South Pacific, was supposed to be dropped there. So were the
unmanned ISS resupply ships. A total of more than 263 spacecraft were
disposed of in this area between 1971 and 2016."

Fascinating.

Lynn
D B Davis
2018-04-04 03:58:38 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"Fthagn to you too"
http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=7934
"I learned something fascinating today."
"There is a spot in the South Pacific called the "Oceanic pole of
inaccessibility" or alternatively "Point Nemo" at 48deg 52.6min S
123deg 23.6min W.
Post by Lynn McGuire
It's the point on the Earth's ocean's most distant from any land 2,688
km (1,670 mi) from the Easter Islands, the Pitcairn Islands, and
Antarctica."
"There are two interesting things about this spot. One is that it's used
as a satellite graveyard. It's conventional, when you can do a
controlled de-orbit on your bird, to drop it at Point Nemo. Tioangong-1,
the Chinese sat that just crashed uncontrolled into a different section
of the South Pacific, was supposed to be dropped there. So were the
unmanned ISS resupply ships. A total of more than 263 spacecraft were
disposed of in this area between 1971 and 2016."
Fascinating.
Indeed. Take a gander at the sea lanes in the vicinity.

http://www.shiptraffic.net/2001/04/south-pacific-ocean-ship-traffic.html

Thank you,

--
Don
Gene Wirchenko
2018-04-04 20:50:37 UTC
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On Tue, 3 Apr 2018 21:03:32 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
"Fthagn to you too"
http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=7934
"I learned something fascinating today."
"There is a spot in the South Pacific called the “Oceanic pole of
inaccessibility” or alternatively “Point Nemo” at 48°52.6?S 123°23.6?W.
It’s the point on the Earth’s ocean’s most distant from any land – 2,688
km (1,670 mi) from the Easter Islands, the Pitcairn Islands, and
Antarctica."
"There are two interesting things about this spot. One is that it’s used
as a satellite graveyard. It’s conventional, when you can do a
controlled de-orbit on your bird, to drop it at Point Nemo. Tioangong-1,
the Chinese sat that just crashed uncontrolled into a different section
of the South Pacific, was supposed to be dropped there. So were the
unmanned ISS resupply ships. A total of more than 263 spacecraft were
disposed of in this area between 1971 and 2016."
Fascinating.
It would be a great place for aliens to put a station for
checking out our technology.

But then, they already know that. Or do not.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Quadibloc
2018-04-05 19:40:55 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"There is a spot in the South Pacific called the “Oceanic pole of
inaccessibility” or alternatively “Point Nemo” at 48°52.6?S 123°23.6?W.
It’s the point on the Earth’s ocean’s most distant from any land – 2,688
km (1,670 mi) from the Easter Islands, the Pitcairn Islands, and
Antarctica."
I was wondering whatever that had to do with the title of the post...

but this Wikipedia article notes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%27lyeh

that the location of R'lyeh given in "The Call of Cthulhu" by H. P. Lovecraft is
indeed very close to that of "Point Nemo". August Derleth gave slightly
different coordinates - in a story I happened to run across due to searching for
references to the word "Naacal", "The Trail of Cthulhu", from 1944 in Weird
Tales.

John Savard

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