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OT planned - 'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
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a425couple
2018-04-06 13:15:03 UTC
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https://www.space.com/40207-space-hotel-launch-2021-aurora-station.html

'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | April 5, 2018 01:01pm ET

'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
Artist's illustration of Orion Span's planned orbiting hotel, Aurora
Station.
Credit: Orion Span

Well-heeled space tourists will have a new orbital destination four
years from now, if one company's plans come to fruition.

That startup, called Orion Span, aims to loft its "Aurora Station" in
late 2021 and begin accommodating guests in 2022.

"We are launching the first-ever affordable luxury space hotel," said
Orion Span founder and CEO Frank Bunger, who unveiled the Aurora Station
idea today (April 5) at the Space 2.0 Summit in San Jose, California.
[In Pictures: Private Space Stations of the Future]

"Affordable" is a relative term: A 12-day stay aboard Aurora Station
will start at $9.5 million. Still, that's quite a bit less than orbital
tourists have paid in the past. From 2001 through 2009, seven private
citizens took a total of eight trips to the International Space Station
(ISS), paying an estimated $20 million to $40 million each time. (These
private missions were brokered by the Virginia-based company Space
Adventures and employed Russian Soyuz spacecraft and rockets.)

"There's been innovation around the architecture to make it more modular
and more simple to use and have more automation, so we don't have to
have EVAs [extravehicular activities] or spacewalks," Bunger said of
Aurora Station.

Aurora Station will accommodate four paying guests and two crewmembers.
Credit: Orion Span
"The goal when we started the company was to create that innovation to
make simplicity possible, and by making simplicity possible, we drive a
tremendous amount of cost out of it," he told Space.com.

Orion Span is building Aurora Station itself, Bunger added. The company
— some of whose key engineering players have helped design and operate
the ISS — is manufacturing the hotel in Houston and developing the
software required to run it in the Bay Area, he said.

Aurora Station will be about the size of a large private jet's cabin.
It'll measure 43.5 feet long by 14.1 feet wide (13.3 by 4.3 meters) and
feature a pressurized volume of 5,650 cubic feet (160 cubic m), Orion
Span representatives said. For comparison, the ISS is 357 feet (109 m)
long and has an internal pressurized volume of 32,333 cubic feet (916
cubic m).

Orion Span plans to add onto the original Aurora Station core over time
as demand grows.

Credit: Orion Span
The private outpost will orbit at an altitude of 200 miles (320
kilometers) — a bit lower than the ISS, which is about 250 miles (400
km) above Earth on average. Right now, it's unclear how Aurora Station
and its future occupants will get to orbit; Orion Span has yet to
confirm any deals with launch providers, Bunger said.

Aurora Station will accommodate four paying guests and two crewmembers;
these latter personnel will likely be former astronauts, Bunger said.
Most of the guests will probably be private space tourists, at least
initially, but Orion Span will be available to a variety of customers,
including government space agencies, he added.

And the space hotel will get bigger over time, if everything goes
according to plan. As demand grows, Orion Span will launch additional
modules to link up with the original core outpost, Bunger said.

"Our long-term vision is to sell actual space in those new modules," he
said. "We're calling that a space condo. So, either for living or
subleasing, that's the future vision here — to create a long-term,
sustainable human habitation in LEO [low Earth orbit]."

Orion Span isn't alone in seeking to carve out this path. Several other
companies, including Axiom Space and Bigelow Aerospace, also aim to
launch commercial space stations to Earth orbit in the next few years to
meet anticipated demand from space tourists, national governments,
researchers and private industry. (Other private players, including
Virgin Galactic and Blue Origin, are developing vehicles to take paying
customers to and from suborbital space, and are scheduled to begin
commercial operations soon.)

If you've got $80,000 to spare, you can put a (fully refundable) deposit
down on an Aurora Station stay beginning today. Folks who fly up will
undergo a three-month training program, the last portion of which will
occur aboard the space hotel itself, Bunger said. To learn more, go to
www.orionspan.com.

Follow Mike Wall on Twitter @michaeldwall and Google+. Follow us
@Spacedotcom, Facebook or Google+. Originally published on Space.com.

https://www.space.com/40207-space-hotel-launch-2021-aurora-station.html

---------------------------------
some comments include

Roger Baker
what happened to the orbital space hotel back in 2011?
http://newsfeed.time.com/.../how-much-for-a-room-at.../
Like · Reply · 1 · 3h

Ryan Blanchard · Stone Setter at RegO Manufacturing Co
Ben Bova, your vision is coming. This is amazing that I can read his
books and then the science and commercial society is making his books
real. What a time to be alive.
Like · Reply · 8h

Baer Grills
Wow I wasnt aware of this author!! Thanx for the info. Seems I have some
reading to catch up on. lol
Like · Reply · 7h

Edward Marineves
I already see the AirBNB potential.
Like · Reply · 1 · 9h

John Shutz
Tons of pollution and more space junk just so some bored well heeled
person can float around for a week. I'd rather donate the money to a
worthwhile cause.
Like · Reply · 2 · 9h

James G Timourian · Yerevan, Armenia
Do I detect a hint of envy?
Like · Reply · 1 · 2h

Baer Grills
Kinda makes me think. Imagine we had a major scientific break through
tomorrow and discovered how to "fold" space. but we can only make it to
a specific galaxy. We have calculated it would take another 300 years
before we could use this tech to get to different galaxies other then
the one we found. lets imagine in the one galaxy we can reach we found a
perfectly habitable earth-like planet (I mean just like early earth
before man started messing it up: Plenty of resources, fresh clean
water, flora and fauna and no competing dominate species.) our only
limitation is getting into space and once we make it into orbit this new
technology can get us to the new planet in a matter of hours.
So with all of the above in place. Here are the questions: 1) who claims
the planet? 2) Who gets to go to the planet? 3) How are people chosen to
go there? and here is the biggie - Would it eventually cause a world war?

You know what I say? When I answer these questions to myself? "Man isnt
ready to discover a habitable planet." We obviously need to keep doing
all that we do scientifically. However we have a lot of growing up to do
as a species. lol
Like · Reply · 1 · 8h · Edited

Olatunji Emmanuel Olagunju · Operation Clerk at Goldspeed freight agency
nig ltd
$9.5 m.is only to the super A'class citizens . i mean RSVP's It s
certainly a life changing experience.
Like · Reply · 11h

Baer Grills
$9.5 million!! Well I guess us regular folks are a long ways from seeing
space first hand. Oh well. Maybe eventually we can get a job up there to
serve space food to the 9.5 Million dollar guests. lol
Like · Reply · 1 · 12h

Len Russ
When it gets down to $100 a night, then I might be interested. ;-)
Like · Reply · 3 · 12h

Joel Bader · Theodore Roosevelt High School
Am I the only one who thought of Roald Dahl's sequel to Charlie and the
Chocolate Factory, where Willy Wonka's Great Glass Elevator heads into
space--and encounters a "Space Hotel"? I realize the book was written
during the NASA lunar exploration program, when people were dreaming of
colonizing space, but even now this sounds far-fetched.

Who knows, if Orion Span needs to raise more money for the venture, it
can plant Golden Tickets in promotional product-tie-ins which guarantee
a trip into orbit for the lucky finders.
Like · Reply · 1 · 12h

David Boyle · Works at I work for myself
At the stated size, and the likelihood that SpaceX will be flying the
BFS to orbit - hull dia 30 feet - this 'hotel' is going to look and feel
very small for $9.5M + trip costs. Investors will be hard to come by.
Like · Reply · 1 · 13h

Rafael Marado · Works at Minería
I hope it is a success. I wonder if the old people can make that travel.
Like · Reply · 1 · 16h

John Enrietto · Purdue University
Betting on the come with launch costs. Even if you have 7 passangers per
trip, at $9.5M that is $66.5M per trip. That is SpaceX launch cost now.
Nothing in it for the Aurora station.
Like · Reply · 3 · 17h

Dan Riley · University of British Columbia
Switch to nuclear power. Solar panels are fugly. I'm tired of fugly
space stations.
Like · Reply · 1 · 18h

Frank Glover · Works at Advent Tool & Mold
Aside from the regulatory issues, what do you think the waste heat
radiator of a space-based reactor is going to look like...?
Reply · 1 · 13h

Len Russ
How many have you stayed in?
Reply · 12h

Paul Bedichek · University of Denver
I'm a big proponent of nuclear power,but solar power works perfectly in
this application,you have 24 hr access to very strong light,and you use
expensive panels that are very eficient. You'd also have some batteries
and fuel cells.
We will use nuclear energy for propulsion and especially for ground
operations on Mars,we will also use some nuclear on the Moon,but low
earth orbit is perfect for solar panels.,
Reply · 12h
Show 1 more reply in this thread

William Pennat · Fitchburg, Massachusetts
Orbiter Hilton, check. Next up, Moon base. Next after that, visit
monoliths orbiting Jupiter....
Moriarty
2018-04-06 23:12:33 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Friday, April 6, 2018 at 11:15:17 PM UTC+10, a425couple wrote:

<snips>
Post by a425couple
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | April 5, 2018 01:01pm ET
Well-heeled space tourists will have a new orbital destination four
years from now, if one company's plans come to fruition.
That startup, called Orion Span, aims to loft its "Aurora Station" in
late 2021 and begin accommodating guests in 2022.
"We are launching the first-ever affordable luxury space hotel," said
Orion Span founder and CEO Frank Bunger, who unveiled the Aurora Station
idea today (April 5) at the Space 2.0 Summit in San Jose, California.
[In Pictures: Private Space Stations of the Future]
Have the allowed for the inevitable infestation of Vermicious Knids?

-Moriarty
Dimensional Traveler
2018-04-07 03:20:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Moriarty
<snips>
Post by a425couple
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | April 5, 2018 01:01pm ET
Well-heeled space tourists will have a new orbital destination four
years from now, if one company's plans come to fruition.
That startup, called Orion Span, aims to loft its "Aurora Station" in
late 2021 and begin accommodating guests in 2022.
"We are launching the first-ever affordable luxury space hotel," said
Orion Span founder and CEO Frank Bunger, who unveiled the Aurora Station
idea today (April 5) at the Space 2.0 Summit in San Jose, California.
[In Pictures: Private Space Stations of the Future]
Have the allowed for the inevitable infestation of Vermicious Knids?
"Go outside and play."
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
J. Clarke
2018-04-07 00:36:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by a425couple
Go to this address to view it with pictures and video)
https://www.space.com/40207-space-hotel-launch-2021-aurora-station.html
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | April 5, 2018 01:01pm ET
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
Artist's illustration of Orion Span's planned orbiting hotel, Aurora
Station.
Credit: Orion Span
Well-heeled space tourists will have a new orbital destination four
years from now, if one company's plans come to fruition.
That startup, called Orion Span, aims to loft its "Aurora Station" in
late 2021 and begin accommodating guests in 2022.
"We are launching the first-ever affordable luxury space hotel," said
Orion Span founder and CEO Frank Bunger, who unveiled the Aurora Station
idea today (April 5) at the Space 2.0 Summit in San Jose, California.
[In Pictures: Private Space Stations of the Future]
"Affordable" is a relative term: A 12-day stay aboard Aurora Station
will start at $9.5 million. Still, that's quite a bit less than orbital
tourists have paid in the past. From 2001 through 2009, seven private
citizens took a total of eight trips to the International Space Station
(ISS), paying an estimated $20 million to $40 million each time. (These
private missions were brokered by the Virginia-based company Space
Adventures and employed Russian Soyuz spacecraft and rockets.)
"There's been innovation around the architecture to make it more modular
and more simple to use and have more automation, so we don't have to
have EVAs [extravehicular activities] or spacewalks," Bunger said of
Aurora Station.
Aurora Station will accommodate four paying guests and two crewmembers.
Credit: Orion Span
"The goal when we started the company was to create that innovation to
make simplicity possible, and by making simplicity possible, we drive a
tremendous amount of cost out of it," he told Space.com.
Orion Span is building Aurora Station itself, Bunger added. The company
— some of whose key engineering players have helped design and operate
the ISS — is manufacturing the hotel in Houston and developing the
software required to run it in the Bay Area, he said.
Aurora Station will be about the size of a large private jet's cabin.
It'll measure 43.5 feet long by 14.1 feet wide (13.3 by 4.3 meters) and
feature a pressurized volume of 5,650 cubic feet (160 cubic m), Orion
Span representatives said. For comparison, the ISS is 357 feet (109 m)
long and has an internal pressurized volume of 32,333 cubic feet (916
cubic m).
And for other comparison the BFR second stage is intended to have
29,000 cubic feet all by its lonesome.
Post by a425couple
Orion Span plans to add onto the original Aurora Station core over time
as demand grows.
Credit: Orion Span
The private outpost will orbit at an altitude of 200 miles (320
kilometers) — a bit lower than the ISS, which is about 250 miles (400
km) above Earth on average. Right now, it's unclear how Aurora Station
and its future occupants will get to orbit; Orion Span has yet to
confirm any deals with launch providers, Bunger said.
Aurora Station will accommodate four paying guests and two crewmembers;
these latter personnel will likely be former astronauts, Bunger said.
Most of the guests will probably be private space tourists, at least
initially, but Orion Span will be available to a variety of customers,
including government space agencies, he added.
And the space hotel will get bigger over time, if everything goes
according to plan. As demand grows, Orion Span will launch additional
modules to link up with the original core outpost, Bunger said.
"Our long-term vision is to sell actual space in those new modules," he
said. "We're calling that a space condo. So, either for living or
subleasing, that's the future vision here — to create a long-term,
sustainable human habitation in LEO [low Earth orbit]."
Orion Span isn't alone in seeking to carve out this path. Several other
companies, including Axiom Space and Bigelow Aerospace, also aim to
launch commercial space stations to Earth orbit in the next few years to
meet anticipated demand from space tourists, national governments,
researchers and private industry. (Other private players, including
Virgin Galactic and Blue Origin, are developing vehicles to take paying
customers to and from suborbital space, and are scheduled to begin
commercial operations soon.)
If you've got $80,000 to spare, you can put a (fully refundable) deposit
down on an Aurora Station stay beginning today. Folks who fly up will
undergo a three-month training program, the last portion of which will
occur aboard the space hotel itself, Bunger said. To learn more, go to
www.orionspan.com.
@Spacedotcom, Facebook or Google+. Originally published on Space.com.
https://www.space.com/40207-space-hotel-launch-2021-aurora-station.html
---------------------------------
some comments include
Roger Baker
what happened to the orbital space hotel back in 2011?
http://newsfeed.time.com/.../how-much-for-a-room-at.../
Like · Reply · 1 · 3h
Ryan Blanchard · Stone Setter at RegO Manufacturing Co
Ben Bova, your vision is coming. This is amazing that I can read his
books and then the science and commercial society is making his books
real. What a time to be alive.
Like · Reply · 8h
Baer Grills
Wow I wasnt aware of this author!! Thanx for the info. Seems I have some
reading to catch up on. lol
Like · Reply · 7h
Edward Marineves
I already see the AirBNB potential.
Like · Reply · 1 · 9h
John Shutz
Tons of pollution and more space junk just so some bored well heeled
person can float around for a week. I'd rather donate the money to a
worthwhile cause.
Like · Reply · 2 · 9h
James G Timourian · Yerevan, Armenia
Do I detect a hint of envy?
Like · Reply · 1 · 2h
Baer Grills
Kinda makes me think. Imagine we had a major scientific break through
tomorrow and discovered how to "fold" space. but we can only make it to
a specific galaxy. We have calculated it would take another 300 years
before we could use this tech to get to different galaxies other then
the one we found. lets imagine in the one galaxy we can reach we found a
perfectly habitable earth-like planet (I mean just like early earth
before man started messing it up: Plenty of resources, fresh clean
water, flora and fauna and no competing dominate species.) our only
limitation is getting into space and once we make it into orbit this new
technology can get us to the new planet in a matter of hours.
So with all of the above in place. Here are the questions: 1) who claims
the planet? 2) Who gets to go to the planet? 3) How are people chosen to
go there? and here is the biggie - Would it eventually cause a world war?
You know what I say? When I answer these questions to myself? "Man isnt
ready to discover a habitable planet." We obviously need to keep doing
all that we do scientifically. However we have a lot of growing up to do
as a species. lol
Like · Reply · 1 · 8h · Edited
Olatunji Emmanuel Olagunju · Operation Clerk at Goldspeed freight agency
nig ltd
$9.5 m.is only to the super A'class citizens . i mean RSVP's It s
certainly a life changing experience.
Like · Reply · 11h
Baer Grills
$9.5 million!! Well I guess us regular folks are a long ways from seeing
space first hand. Oh well. Maybe eventually we can get a job up there to
serve space food to the 9.5 Million dollar guests. lol
Like · Reply · 1 · 12h
Len Russ
When it gets down to $100 a night, then I might be interested. ;-)
Like · Reply · 3 · 12h
Joel Bader · Theodore Roosevelt High School
Am I the only one who thought of Roald Dahl's sequel to Charlie and the
Chocolate Factory, where Willy Wonka's Great Glass Elevator heads into
space--and encounters a "Space Hotel"? I realize the book was written
during the NASA lunar exploration program, when people were dreaming of
colonizing space, but even now this sounds far-fetched.
Who knows, if Orion Span needs to raise more money for the venture, it
can plant Golden Tickets in promotional product-tie-ins which guarantee
a trip into orbit for the lucky finders.
Like · Reply · 1 · 12h
David Boyle · Works at I work for myself
At the stated size, and the likelihood that SpaceX will be flying the
BFS to orbit - hull dia 30 feet - this 'hotel' is going to look and feel
very small for $9.5M + trip costs. Investors will be hard to come by.
Like · Reply · 1 · 13h
Rafael Marado · Works at Minería
I hope it is a success. I wonder if the old people can make that travel.
Like · Reply · 1 · 16h
John Enrietto · Purdue University
Betting on the come with launch costs. Even if you have 7 passangers per
trip, at $9.5M that is $66.5M per trip. That is SpaceX launch cost now.
Nothing in it for the Aurora station.
Like · Reply · 3 · 17h
Dan Riley · University of British Columbia
Switch to nuclear power. Solar panels are fugly. I'm tired of fugly
space stations.
Like · Reply · 1 · 18h
Frank Glover · Works at Advent Tool & Mold
Aside from the regulatory issues, what do you think the waste heat
radiator of a space-based reactor is going to look like...?
Reply · 1 · 13h
Len Russ
How many have you stayed in?
Reply · 12h
Paul Bedichek · University of Denver
I'm a big proponent of nuclear power,but solar power works perfectly in
this application,you have 24 hr access to very strong light,and you use
expensive panels that are very eficient. You'd also have some batteries
and fuel cells.
We will use nuclear energy for propulsion and especially for ground
operations on Mars,we will also use some nuclear on the Moon,but low
earth orbit is perfect for solar panels.,
Reply · 12h
Show 1 more reply in this thread
William Pennat · Fitchburg, Massachusetts
Orbiter Hilton, check. Next up, Moon base. Next after that, visit
monoliths orbiting Jupiter....
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-07 00:50:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by a425couple
Go to this address to view it with pictures and video)
https://www.space.com/40207-space-hotel-launch-2021-aurora-station.html
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | April 5, 2018 01:01pm ET
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
Artist's illustration of Orion Span's planned orbiting hotel, Aurora
Station.
Credit: Orion Span
Well-heeled space tourists will have a new orbital destination four
years from now, if one company's plans come to fruition.
That startup, called Orion Span, aims to loft its "Aurora Station" in
late 2021 and begin accommodating guests in 2022.
"We are launching the first-ever affordable luxury space hotel," said
Orion Span founder and CEO Frank Bunger, who unveiled the Aurora Station
idea today (April 5) at the Space 2.0 Summit in San Jose, California.
[In Pictures: Private Space Stations of the Future]
"Affordable" is a relative term: A 12-day stay aboard Aurora Station
will start at $9.5 million. Still, that's quite a bit less than orbital
tourists have paid in the past. From 2001 through 2009, seven private
citizens took a total of eight trips to the International Space Station
(ISS), paying an estimated $20 million to $40 million each time. (These
private missions were brokered by the Virginia-based company Space
Adventures and employed Russian Soyuz spacecraft and rockets.)
...

I wonder if it will have free and unlimited barf bags ?

Lynn
Tony
2018-04-07 15:05:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by a425couple
Go to this address to view it with pictures and video)
https://www.space.com/40207-space-hotel-launch-2021-aurora-station.html
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | April 5, 2018 01:01pm ET
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
Artist's illustration of Orion Span's planned orbiting hotel, Aurora
Station.
Credit: Orion Span
Well-heeled space tourists will have a new orbital destination four
years from now, if one company's plans come to fruition.
That startup, called Orion Span, aims to loft its "Aurora Station" in
late 2021 and begin accommodating guests in 2022.
"We are launching the first-ever affordable luxury space hotel," said
Orion Span founder and CEO Frank Bunger, who unveiled the Aurora
Station idea today (April 5) at the Space 2.0 Summit in San Jose,
California. [In Pictures: Private Space Stations of the Future]
"Affordable" is a relative term: A 12-day stay aboard Aurora Station
will start at $9.5 million. Still, that's quite a bit less than
orbital tourists have paid in the past. From 2001 through 2009, seven
private citizens took a total of eight trips to the International
Space Station (ISS), paying an estimated $20 million to $40 million
each time. (These private missions were brokered by the
Virginia-based company Space Adventures and employed Russian Soyuz
spacecraft and rockets.)
...
I wonder if it will have free and unlimited barf bags ?
Lynn
I wonder if this is to compete with Robert Bigelow's plans?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bigelow_Commercial_Space_Station


---
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Kevrob
2018-04-07 15:26:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by a425couple
Go to this address to view it with pictures and video)
https://www.space.com/40207-space-hotel-launch-2021-aurora-station.html
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | April 5, 2018 01:01pm ET
'Luxury Space Hotel' to Launch in 2021
Artist's illustration of Orion Span's planned orbiting hotel, Aurora
Station.
Credit: Orion Span
Well-heeled space tourists will have a new orbital destination four
years from now, if one company's plans come to fruition.
That startup, called Orion Span, aims to loft its "Aurora Station" in
late 2021 and begin accommodating guests in 2022.
"We are launching the first-ever affordable luxury space hotel," said
Orion Span founder and CEO Frank Bunger, who unveiled the Aurora
Station idea today (April 5) at the Space 2.0 Summit in San Jose,
California. [In Pictures: Private Space Stations of the Future]
"Affordable" is a relative term: A 12-day stay aboard Aurora Station
will start at $9.5 million. Still, that's quite a bit less than
orbital tourists have paid in the past. From 2001 through 2009, seven
private citizens took a total of eight trips to the International
Space Station (ISS), paying an estimated $20 million to $40 million
each time. (These private missions were brokered by the
Virginia-based company Space Adventures and employed Russian Soyuz
spacecraft and rockets.)
...
I wonder if it will have free and unlimited barf bags ?
Lynn
I wonder if this is to compete with Robert Bigelow's plans?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bigelow_Commercial_Space_Station
Has anyone called a Bigelow inflatable a "teabag" yet?

Kevin R

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