Discussion:
Read in February 2017
(too old to reply)
Steve Coltrin
2017-03-01 15:05:03 UTC
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Empire games / Charles Stross
-----------------------------
7 or 4 in series (definitely _not_ 1), depending on how you count.
Seventeen years after the previous book, characters both surviving
and new draw into position for another interesting time. The last
one resulted in the atomic murder of variant-New England at the hands
of a United States that has spent the meantime marinating in its paranoia
and bigotry; this one is likely to end in the deaths of worlds.

Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.

The Vision. Issues 7-12, Little better than a beast / Tom King,
writer ; Gabriel Hernandez Walta, artist ; Jordie Bellaire, color
artist ; VC's Clayton Cowles, letterer.
---------------------------------------
In the previous collection, the Vision attempted to live a normal life
by building himself a robot^H^H^H^H^Hsynthezoid family. There were
problems, and a few deaths were involved. Now, a prescient, anonymous
narrator (a different PAN than previously) assures us that things will
get worse, which they do - unsurprisingly, as the Vision is a member
of the rather dysfuncional Maximoff extended family. While this brings
the story to its intended conclusion, it also ends in a sequel hook that
will likely lie fallow given King's departure from Marvel.

Red right hand / Levi Black
---------------------------
H.P. Lovecraft's great grand niece (I think; Black thinks there is such
a thing as a grand uncle, and there is not) gets a job offer from
Nyarlathotep - only _rhetorically_ an offer, you understand. Eldritch
abominations are planning the conquest of Earth, and Nyarlathotep is not
having that - he hasn't gotten tired of fucking with humanity yet;
her familial connections make Our Heroine uniqely suited to be his tool.
One part Weird Tales to nine parts Fangoria, this is second wave
Lovecraft fanfic in the vein of Brian Lumley, with almost none of the
human engagement contemporary authors have shown us we have a right to.
The sequel hook is big enough to hang Mussolini from; I am not planning to
jump onto it. Tor printed this book on newsprint, either to pad the
thickness of the book, to not spend too much money on an author
just up from the minors and soon to go back down to them, or (I expect)
both.

The skill of our hands / Steven Brust and Skyler White (not the meth baron)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sequel. The Incrementalists are an order of mind vampires dating back to
the Pleistocene, who strike from their memory palaces in the collective
unconscious to serially parasitize human hosts. They have the stated
goal of making the world a better place using something like what
neurolinguistic programming might be if it weren't a load of horseshit,
and their gatherings resemble those of the People's Front of Judea.
In this book they don't do any of that; mainly, they argue with each other.

May contain some Devera.

Star Wars. Issues 7-12, Showdown on Smugglers Moon / writer, Jason Aaron;
artist, John Cassaday ; colorist, Laura Martin ; letterer, Chris Eliopolous.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Luke looks for answers about the Force (and isn't really asking the right
questions). Leia has the wrong answer about Han (and isn't interested in
asking him the question). Vader answers the phone. In a flashback,
Kenobi questions whether he can stand living incognito.

Star Wars, Darth Vader. Issues 7-12, Vader / writer, Kieron Gillen ;
artist, Salvador Larroca ; colorist, Edgar Delgado ; letterer, Joe Caramagna.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Darth Vader is swamped. He has a starship heist to investigate, he has
rivals for his spot in the Empire's org chart, and he has side projects of
his own that need funding. Fortunately his sidekick Dr. Aphra has traced
Luke Skywalker to the vacant planet of Vrogas Vas.

Star Wars. Vader Down / story, Jason Aaron & Kieron Gillen ; artists, Mike
Deodato, Salvador Larroca.
--------------------------
Uninhabited? Sorry, there's a Rebel installation on Vrogas Vas, and in
short order, Vader is shot down, cut off from all aid, and surrounded by
Rebels. Which is bad news for the Rebels. Luke's research is interrupted,
Leia attempts heroism, Han practices applied entomology, Threepio meets a
disarming individual, Chewie gets to fight someone in his own weight class,
and Dr. Aphra needs to convince Vader she didn't _mean_ to send him into
a trap.

How to bake \pi : an edible exploration of the mathematics of mathematics /
Eugenia Cheng.
--------------
A view from low orbit of metamathematics with analogies from improvisational
cooking. I already knew what a category is, but the recipe for (boiled)
custard made me realize I had on hand what I needed to make (baked) custard,
which turned out rather well.
--
Steve Coltrin ***@omcl.org Google Groups killfiled here
"A group known as the League of Human Dignity helped arrange for Deuel
to be driven to a local livestock scale, where he could be weighed."
- Associated Press
Scott Lurndal
2017-03-01 15:41:16 UTC
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Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
Ahasuerus
2017-03-01 16:41:46 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
Are dystopias *fun* to read when you are not living in one?
Robert Woodward
2017-03-01 17:36:46 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Anthony Nance
2017-03-01 17:57:48 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Excluded middle, maybe? "Not as pleasant as" the Golden Age
doesn't have to mean "dystopia".

Tony
Ahasuerus
2017-03-01 18:39:18 UTC
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Post by Anthony Nance
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Excluded middle, maybe? "Not as pleasant as" the Golden Age
doesn't have to mean "dystopia".
I guess it depends on which definition of "dystopia" you want to use.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/dystopia says that a
dystopia is an "imagined place or state in which everything is unpleasant
or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degraded one." If we
choose the broader "unpleasant or bad" part of the definition, then it
is highly subjective. If we choose the "totalitarian or environmentally
degraded one" part, then it's more objective.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-01 19:14:17 UTC
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Post by Anthony Nance
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Excluded middle, maybe? "Not as pleasant as" the Golden Age
doesn't have to mean "dystopia".
If you're sufficiently nostalgic, it does.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Robert Carnegie
2017-03-01 19:27:33 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
On the other hand, some of what's said about
The Good Old Days sounds like Interesting Times.

Are these days Interesting Times?
Dimensional Traveler
2017-03-01 20:14:56 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
On the other hand, some of what's said about
The Good Old Days sounds like Interesting Times.
Are these days Interesting Times?
They are for me.
--
Running the rec.arts.TV Channels Watched Survey.
Winter 2016 survey began Dec 01 and will end Feb 28
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-01 20:41:07 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
On the other hand, some of what's said about
The Good Old Days sounds like Interesting Times.
Are these days Interesting Times?
Oh, definitely. I would say "next decade, television series
about the hair-raising tension of these times will be made by
every network."

Except (according to _Slate_) *they're already making those
series now.*
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-01 19:13:34 UTC
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Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.

http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/13-Dante/XIVOldManCrete.htm

No, at least as far back as the Book of Daniel (II, 31-ff.),
probably from the Maccabean period (2nd C BCE).

And Republicans nowadays want to go back to the "golden age" of
the 1950s (I *lived* through the 1950s, when the Cold War was
rife and we were all perpetually terrified of WWIII and girls
were told their only destiny in life was to marry and have babies;
it wasn't so hot).

If not to the 1850s (there was a poster once who complained on one
of these forums that she never went back to the Southland to visit
her family any more, because all they did was sit around and complain
about the "good old days" when they had slaves).
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Ahasuerus
2017-03-01 19:46:30 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/13-Dante/XIVOldManCrete.htm
No, at least as far back as the Book of Daniel (II, 31-ff.),
probably from the Maccabean period (2nd C BCE). [snip]
From Hesiod's _Works and Days_ (ca. 700 B.C.)
(http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/hesiod/works.htm):

First of all the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus made a golden race
of mortal men who lived in the time of Cronos when he was reigning in
heaven. And they lived like gods without sorrow of heart, remote and free
from toil and grief: miserable age rested not on them; but with legs and
arms never failing they made merry with feasting beyond the reach of all
evils. When they died, it was as though they were overcome with sleep,
and they had all good things; for the fruitful earth unforced bare them
fruit abundantly and without stint. They dwelt in ease and peace upon
their lands with many good things, rich in flocks and loved by the
blessed gods.

...

For now truly is a race of iron, and men never rest from labour and
sorrow by day, and from perishing by night; and the gods shall lay sore
trouble upon them.
David Johnston
2017-03-01 19:49:20 UTC
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Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/13-Dante/XIVOldManCrete.htm
No, at least as far back as the Book of Daniel (II, 31-ff.),
probably from the Maccabean period (2nd C BCE). [snip]
From Hesiod's _Works and Days_ (ca. 700 B.C.)
First of all the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus made a golden race
of mortal men who lived in the time of Cronos when he was reigning in
heaven.
Uh...wut? Hesiod, your timeline's a bit messed up there.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-01 20:39:26 UTC
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Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/13-Dante/XIVOldManCrete.htm
No, at least as far back as the Book of Daniel (II, 31-ff.),
probably from the Maccabean period (2nd C BCE). [snip]
From Hesiod's _Works and Days_ (ca. 700 B.C.)
First of all the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus made a golden race
of mortal men who lived in the time of Cronos when he was reigning in
heaven. And they lived like gods without sorrow of heart, remote and free
from toil and grief: miserable age rested not on them; but with legs and
arms never failing they made merry with feasting beyond the reach of all
evils. When they died, it was as though they were overcome with sleep,
and they had all good things; for the fruitful earth unforced bare them
fruit abundantly and without stint. They dwelt in ease and peace upon
their lands with many good things, rich in flocks and loved by the
blessed gods.
...
For now truly is a race of iron, and men never rest from labour and
sorrow by day, and from perishing by night; and the gods shall lay sore
trouble upon them.
All right! Further and further back.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Peter Trei
2017-03-01 21:35:59 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/13-Dante/XIVOldManCrete.htm
No, at least as far back as the Book of Daniel (II, 31-ff.),
probably from the Maccabean period (2nd C BCE). [snip]
From Hesiod's _Works and Days_ (ca. 700 B.C.)
First of all the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus made a golden race
of mortal men who lived in the time of Cronos when he was reigning in
heaven. And they lived like gods without sorrow of heart, remote and free
from toil and grief: miserable age rested not on them; but with legs and
arms never failing they made merry with feasting beyond the reach of all
evils. When they died, it was as though they were overcome with sleep,
and they had all good things; for the fruitful earth unforced bare them
fruit abundantly and without stint. They dwelt in ease and peace upon
their lands with many good things, rich in flocks and loved by the
blessed gods.
...
For now truly is a race of iron, and men never rest from labour and
sorrow by day, and from perishing by night; and the gods shall lay sore
trouble upon them.
All right! Further and further back.
My suspicion is that this all goes back to memories of the Late Bronze
Age Collapse, circa 1200BC. That's the first point I'm aware of where
a huge number of people could say 'Life used to be better, things have
gone to shit since.'

pt
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-01 22:34:18 UTC
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Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/13-Dante/XIVOldManCrete.htm
No, at least as far back as the Book of Daniel (II, 31-ff.),
probably from the Maccabean period (2nd C BCE). [snip]
From Hesiod's _Works and Days_ (ca. 700 B.C.)
First of all the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus made a golden race
of mortal men who lived in the time of Cronos when he was reigning in
heaven. And they lived like gods without sorrow of heart, remote and free
from toil and grief: miserable age rested not on them; but with legs and
arms never failing they made merry with feasting beyond the reach of all
evils. When they died, it was as though they were overcome with sleep,
and they had all good things; for the fruitful earth unforced bare them
fruit abundantly and without stint. They dwelt in ease and peace upon
their lands with many good things, rich in flocks and loved by the
blessed gods.
...
For now truly is a race of iron, and men never rest from labour and
sorrow by day, and from perishing by night; and the gods shall lay sore
trouble upon them.
All right! Further and further back.
My suspicion is that this all goes back to memories of the Late Bronze
Age Collapse, circa 1200BC. That's the first point I'm aware of where
a huge number of people could say 'Life used to be better, things have
gone to shit since.'
Hm. As later recounted (from traditional materials) by Homer.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-03-01 23:07:49 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/13-Dante/XIVOldManCrete.htm
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
No, at least as far back as the Book of Daniel (II, 31-ff.),
probably from the Maccabean period (2nd C BCE). [snip]
From Hesiod's _Works and Days_ (ca. 700 B.C.)
First of all the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus made a golden race
of mortal men who lived in the time of Cronos when he was reigning in
heaven. And they lived like gods without sorrow of heart, remote and free
from toil and grief: miserable age rested not on them; but with legs and
arms never failing they made merry with feasting beyond the reach of all
evils. When they died, it was as though they were overcome with sleep,
and they had all good things; for the fruitful earth unforced bare them
fruit abundantly and without stint. They dwelt in ease and peace upon
their lands with many good things, rich in flocks and loved by the
blessed gods.
...
For now truly is a race of iron, and men never rest from labour and
sorrow by day, and from perishing by night; and the gods shall lay sore
trouble upon them.
All right! Further and further back.
My suspicion is that this all goes back to memories of the Late Bronze
Age Collapse, circa 1200BC. That's the first point I'm aware of where
a huge number of people could say 'Life used to be better, things have
gone to shit since.'
Hm. As later recounted (from traditional materials) by Homer.
I dunno. You would hardly point to Homer for a Golden Age other than
the fact Heroes were about. War, strife and a man who can't even
accomplish the simple task of getting home without running in to trouble.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
David Johnston
2017-03-01 23:54:07 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/13-Dante/XIVOldManCrete.htm
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
No, at least as far back as the Book of Daniel (II, 31-ff.),
probably from the Maccabean period (2nd C BCE). [snip]
From Hesiod's _Works and Days_ (ca. 700 B.C.)
First of all the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus made a golden race
of mortal men who lived in the time of Cronos when he was reigning in
heaven. And they lived like gods without sorrow of heart, remote and free
from toil and grief: miserable age rested not on them; but with legs and
arms never failing they made merry with feasting beyond the reach of all
evils. When they died, it was as though they were overcome with sleep,
and they had all good things; for the fruitful earth unforced bare them
fruit abundantly and without stint. They dwelt in ease and peace upon
their lands with many good things, rich in flocks and loved by the
blessed gods.
...
For now truly is a race of iron, and men never rest from labour and
sorrow by day, and from perishing by night; and the gods shall lay sore
trouble upon them.
All right! Further and further back.
My suspicion is that this all goes back to memories of the Late Bronze
Age Collapse, circa 1200BC. That's the first point I'm aware of where
a huge number of people could say 'Life used to be better, things have
gone to shit since.'
Hm. As later recounted (from traditional materials) by Homer.
I dunno. You would hardly point to Homer for a Golden Age other than
the fact Heroes were about.
The alleged timeframe of the fall of Troy does fit rather tidily into
the time frame of the Late Bronze Age collapse.
Titus G
2017-03-02 04:29:24 UTC
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snip
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
SNIP

I am surprised no one has mentioned the Garden of Eden.
To bring this back on topic, I suggest the book of Genesis?
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2017-03-02 04:35:10 UTC
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Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
SNIP
I am surprised no one has mentioned the Garden of Eden.
To bring this back on topic, I suggest the book of Genesis?
It never sounded all that great to me. I mean, yes, beautiful naked girl,
but I don't like camping and sunburn easily..
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Cryptoengineer
2017-03-02 04:49:37 UTC
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Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
SNIP
I am surprised no one has mentioned the Garden of Eden.
To bring this back on topic, I suggest the book of Genesis?
Thought to be written in the 5th or 6th C, BC. While it
undoubtedly is based on much older traditions, it still fits
with my Late Bronze Age Collapse suggestion.

pt
David Johnston
2017-03-02 05:29:23 UTC
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Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
SNIP
I am surprised no one has mentioned the Garden of Eden.
Probably because the Garden of Eden isn't a golden age or a utopia.
Golden Ages are supposed to be productive and utopias are supposed to
have a society.
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-02 14:31:40 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
SNIP
I am surprised no one has mentioned the Garden of Eden.
Probably because the Garden of Eden isn't a golden age or a utopia.
Golden Ages are supposed to be productive and utopias are supposed to
have a society.
Can two people be a society? Depends on your definition of
terms.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-02 05:10:15 UTC
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Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
SNIP
I am surprised no one has mentioned the Garden of Eden.
To bring this back on topic, I suggest the book of Genesis?
I remember auditing a class on folklore with Alan Dundes, in
which he pointed out that a large part of the Fall of Man as
described in Genesis can be interpreted as "how work came into
the world."

Around the time of the discovery/invention of agriculture,
by the women who discovered that if you *planted* some of the
grains you'd gathered, there would be more of them next year,
thus superseding the hunter/gatherer lifestyle.

"Once upon a time we lived in a beautiful garden and ate the
fruit off the trees, and nobody had to work. Now men have to
work hard and women have to have lots of babies and it's more
painful than it used to be,* and I forget just what happened but
it was all some woman's fault."

_____
*Because apparently hunter/gatherers had smaller babies, causing
less trouble in childbirth, than agriculturists who eat lots of
carbohydrates and produce bigger babies. I forget just where I
recently saw an article speculating just that, but if I find it
I'll post a link.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dimensional Traveler
2017-03-02 15:52:41 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
SNIP
I am surprised no one has mentioned the Garden of Eden.
To bring this back on topic, I suggest the book of Genesis?
I remember auditing a class on folklore with Alan Dundes, in
which he pointed out that a large part of the Fall of Man as
described in Genesis can be interpreted as "how work came into
the world."
Around the time of the discovery/invention of agriculture,
by the women who discovered that if you *planted* some of the
grains you'd gathered, there would be more of them next year,
thus superseding the hunter/gatherer lifestyle.
"Once upon a time we lived in a beautiful garden and ate the
fruit off the trees, and nobody had to work. Now men have to
work hard and women have to have lots of babies and it's more
painful than it used to be,* and I forget just what happened but
it was all some woman's fault."
_____
*Because apparently hunter/gatherers had smaller babies, causing
less trouble in childbirth, than agriculturists who eat lots of
carbohydrates and produce bigger babies. I forget just where I
recently saw an article speculating just that, but if I find it
I'll post a link.
Last I knew the issue with human childbirth was the size of the head -
skull - brain; and the enlarged human brain was largely effected by
humans eating more meat. (In reality I know its not _that_ simple but
still.)
--
Running the rec.arts.TV Channels Watched Survey.
Winter 2016 survey began Dec 01 and will end Feb 28
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-02 16:07:44 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
Quote of the week!
We have always lived in a dystopia (stolen from the obvious
source). The
very concept of a Golden Age in the past implies that the
present is not
as pleasant of a place to be in.
Oh yes. That concept goes back AT LEAST as far as classical
times, and probably further.
SNIP
I am surprised no one has mentioned the Garden of Eden.
To bring this back on topic, I suggest the book of Genesis?
I remember auditing a class on folklore with Alan Dundes, in
which he pointed out that a large part of the Fall of Man as
described in Genesis can be interpreted as "how work came into
the world."
Around the time of the discovery/invention of agriculture,
by the women who discovered that if you *planted* some of the
grains you'd gathered, there would be more of them next year,
thus superseding the hunter/gatherer lifestyle.
"Once upon a time we lived in a beautiful garden and ate the
fruit off the trees, and nobody had to work. Now men have to
work hard and women have to have lots of babies and it's more
painful than it used to be,* and I forget just what happened but
it was all some woman's fault."
_____
*Because apparently hunter/gatherers had smaller babies, causing
less trouble in childbirth, than agriculturists who eat lots of
carbohydrates and produce bigger babies. I forget just where I
recently saw an article speculating just that, but if I find it
I'll post a link.
Last I knew the issue with human childbirth was the size of the head -
skull - brain; and the enlarged human brain was largely effected by
humans eating more meat. (In reality I know its not _that_ simple but
still.)
Yes. The problem with the whole infant being larger on a
carbohydrate diet is more recent than the growing size of the
brain. Like, ten thousand years ago rather than half a million.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dorothy J Heydt
2017-03-01 16:27:35 UTC
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Post by Steve Coltrin
Dystopias are a lot less fun to read when you're living in one.
That definitely belongs in somebody's .sig file.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Carl Fink
2017-03-01 17:40:32 UTC
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Post by Steve Coltrin
How to bake \pi : an edible exploration of the mathematics of mathematics /
Eugenia Cheng.
--------------
A view from low orbit of metamathematics with analogies from improvisational
cooking. I already knew what a category is, but the recipe for (boiled)
custard made me realize I had on hand what I needed to make (baked) custard,
which turned out rather well.
This is a book that I read, thought I was understanding as I read it, and have
almost no memory of now, not even the recipes (though I do remember the
existence of recipes).
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
Default User
2017-03-01 18:46:11 UTC
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Post by Steve Coltrin
H.P. Lovecraft's great grand niece (I think; Black thinks there is such
a thing as a grand uncle, and there is not)
I am going to quibble with this. While "grand uncle" or "granduncle" is not nearly as common as the "great" version, it is legitimate usage and has been around for hundreds of years.

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/granduncle


Brian
Moriarty
2017-03-01 23:58:23 UTC
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Post by Default User
Post by Steve Coltrin
H.P. Lovecraft's great grand niece (I think; Black thinks there is such
a thing as a grand uncle, and there is not)
I am going to quibble with this. While "grand uncle" or "granduncle" is not nearly as common as the "great" version, it is legitimate usage and has been around for hundreds of years.
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/granduncle
ObSF: Bilbo Baggins had a great granduncle, Bullroarer Took. Bullroarer was his mother's, father's, father's, father's brother.

-Moriarty
Gene Wirchenko
2017-03-02 01:58:32 UTC
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Raw Message
On Wed, 01 Mar 2017 08:05:03 -0700, Steve Coltrin <***@omcl.org>
wrote:

[snip]
Post by Steve Coltrin
Red right hand / Levi Black
---------------------------
H.P. Lovecraft's great grand niece (I think; Black thinks there is such
a thing as a grand uncle, and there is not) gets a job offer from
Nyarlathotep - only _rhetorically_ an offer, you understand. Eldritch
There is such a thing as a grand-uncle; it another name for
great-uncle. A great-grandniece is also known as a great-great-niece.

[snip]

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2017-03-03 11:50:23 UTC
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Post by Steve Coltrin
The skill of our hands / Steven Brust and Skyler White (not the meth baron)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sequel.
I've failed to notice *two* Brust books? Excellent! Ordered. And
pre-ordered the next Vlad too.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor
to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread.
- Anatole France
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