Discussion:
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
(too old to reply)
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-13 17:12:10 UTC
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xkcd, "turkish deslight"
https://xkcd.com/1980/

Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-13 17:15:13 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
Sigh. "turkish delight".

I am going blind ! I've got to check and triple check everything I
write now. Plus I had my day glasses on instead of my computer glasses.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-13 19:31:29 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
Sigh. "turkish delight".
I am going blind ! I've got to check and triple check everything I
write now. Plus I had my day glasses on instead of my computer glasses.
It's basically gumdrops, only dusted in powdered, not granulated,
sugar.

I can't eat anything with sugar in it anyway, but I would be much
more solely tempted by Cinnabon. For one thing, you can smell it
from blocks away.

FX: visible ribbon of aroma lifting Warner Brother cartoon
character by the nostrils and wafting him helplessly away

But you have to remember, Lewis was born in 1898. It's possible
that TD was the most delectable edible he had ever experienced
when he was Edmund's age.

Also, ISTR that it was magical TD and more tempting than the real
thing.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Robert Carnegie
2018-04-14 11:16:00 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
Sigh. "turkish delight".
I am going blind ! I've got to check and triple check everything I
write now. Plus I had my day glasses on instead of my computer glasses.
It's basically gumdrops, only dusted in powdered, not granulated,
sugar.
I can't eat anything with sugar in it anyway, but I would be much
more solely tempted by Cinnabon. For one thing, you can smell it
from blocks away.
FX: visible ribbon of aroma lifting Warner Brother cartoon
character by the nostrils and wafting him helplessly away
But you have to remember, Lewis was born in 1898. It's possible
that TD was the most delectable edible he had ever experienced
when he was Edmund's age.
Also, ISTR that it was magical TD and more tempting than the real
thing.
Anything you eat in fairyland is risky. Do I correctly
remember that the friendly animals had tinned food? That
probably would be okay. And meanwhile I suppose England
had wartime and post-war food rationing.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-14 15:12:56 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
Sigh. "turkish delight".
I am going blind ! I've got to check and triple check everything I
write now. Plus I had my day glasses on instead of my computer glasses.
It's basically gumdrops, only dusted in powdered, not granulated,
sugar.
I can't eat anything with sugar in it anyway, but I would be much
more solely tempted by Cinnabon. For one thing, you can smell it
from blocks away.
FX: visible ribbon of aroma lifting Warner Brother cartoon
character by the nostrils and wafting him helplessly away
But you have to remember, Lewis was born in 1898. It's possible
that TD was the most delectable edible he had ever experienced
when he was Edmund's age.
Also, ISTR that it was magical TD and more tempting than the real
thing.
Anything you eat in fairyland is risky. Do I correctly
remember that the friendly animals had tinned food? That
probably would be okay. And meanwhile I suppose England
had wartime and post-war food rationing.
True. The novel is *set* during WWII (that's why the kids were
in the country house; they'd been evacuated), and it was
published in 1950, when rationing was still on.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
m***@sky.com
2018-04-14 17:09:10 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
Sigh. "turkish delight".
I am going blind ! I've got to check and triple check everything I
write now. Plus I had my day glasses on instead of my computer glasses.
It's basically gumdrops, only dusted in powdered, not granulated,
sugar.
I can't eat anything with sugar in it anyway, but I would be much
more solely tempted by Cinnabon. For one thing, you can smell it
from blocks away.
FX: visible ribbon of aroma lifting Warner Brother cartoon
character by the nostrils and wafting him helplessly away
But you have to remember, Lewis was born in 1898. It's possible
that TD was the most delectable edible he had ever experienced
when he was Edmund's age.
Also, ISTR that it was magical TD and more tempting than the real
thing.
Anything you eat in fairyland is risky. Do I correctly
remember that the friendly animals had tinned food? That
probably would be okay. And meanwhile I suppose England
had wartime and post-war food rationing.
True. The novel is *set* during WWII (that's why the kids were
in the country house; they'd been evacuated), and it was
published in 1950, when rationing was still on.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
I suspect that Lewis used "Turkish Delight" mostly because of the mystique of the name, secure in the knowledge that most of his readers wouldn't have experienced the comparative disappointment of the real thing. My Mum was born in Glasgow in 1927 and grew up there: she has fond memories of the sweets despite rationing (a search finds https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/upton-house-and-gardens/features/sweet-rationing-in-wwii) - in fact she has had a sweet tooth all her life. I haven't eaten sweets for years (scared of dentists, and seeing more reasons not to eat sugar every day) but I'd take Fox's Glacier Mints (manufactured since 1918) over Turkish Delight any day. (Mum's sweet of choice is currently Toblerone - which might in theory have been available to some people at that time, but I suspect was neither accessible nor affordable to her).
Johnny1A
2018-04-24 03:17:29 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
Sigh. "turkish delight".
I am going blind ! I've got to check and triple check everything I
write now. Plus I had my day glasses on instead of my computer glasses.
It's basically gumdrops, only dusted in powdered, not granulated,
sugar.
I can't eat anything with sugar in it anyway, but I would be much
more solely tempted by Cinnabon. For one thing, you can smell it
from blocks away.
FX: visible ribbon of aroma lifting Warner Brother cartoon
character by the nostrils and wafting him helplessly away
But you have to remember, Lewis was born in 1898. It's possible
that TD was the most delectable edible he had ever experienced
when he was Edmund's age.
Also, ISTR that it was magical TD and more tempting than the real
thing.
Anything you eat in fairyland is risky. Do I correctly
remember that the friendly animals had tinned food?
IDR canned food, but at one point the Beaver family was eating fresh-caught fish fried up English-style, IIRC, and everybody enjoyed it but Edmund, because he'd been messed with my the Bad Stuff.
Johnny1A
2018-04-24 04:04:18 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
Sigh. "turkish delight".
I am going blind ! I've got to check and triple check everything I
write now. Plus I had my day glasses on instead of my computer glasses.
It's basically gumdrops, only dusted in powdered, not granulated,
sugar.
The rosewater doesn't look appealing, but the lemon ones look like they might be decent, in theory.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-24 04:25:21 UTC
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Post by Johnny1A
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
Sigh. "turkish delight".
I am going blind ! I've got to check and triple check everything I
write now. Plus I had my day glasses on instead of my computer glasses.
It's basically gumdrops, only dusted in powdered, not granulated,
sugar.
The rosewater doesn't look appealing, but the lemon ones look like they
might be decent, in theory.
Actually, rosewater-flavored sweets can be very nice indeed. I
think I mentioned upthread the Zimiamvian feast Karen Anderson
once cooked for a few friends; she put essence of roses into the
pastry for the quince tarts. I have an Elizabethan fruitcake recipe
with which I make a Mock Boar's Head every December for an SCA
feast; it uses rosewater. I buy it at an Indian import store in
Berkeley.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Kevrob
2018-04-13 17:31:07 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
OK, this one:

https://xkcd.com/1972/

Growing up reading "Batman" reprints, "The Shadow," "Doc
Savage" and other 30s and 40s heroes, that this vehicle is
familiar to me, and probably to others here.

See also the Bond film, "You Only Live Twice."

Kevin R
T Guy
2018-04-14 13:41:57 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
https://xkcd.com/1972/
Growing up reading "Batman" reprints, "The Shadow," "Doc
Savage" and other 30s and 40s heroes, that this vehicle is
familiar to me, and probably to others here.
Correctimundo, though I don't recall it from The Shadow, but then I'm not as familiar with that as I am with Batman and Doc Savage.
Post by Kevrob
See also the Bond film, "You Only Live Twice."
I wonder if that borrowed from Doc, given the similarity between Dr No and the Doc _The Fantastic Island_ (title from memory).
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
T Guy
2018-04-14 13:48:46 UTC
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Post by T Guy
Post by Kevrob
https://xkcd.com/1972/
Growing up reading "Batman" reprints, "The Shadow," "Doc
Savage" and other 30s and 40s heroes, that this vehicle is
familiar to me, and probably to others here.
Correctimundo, though I don't recall it from The Shadow, but then I'm not as familiar with that as I am with Batman and Doc Savage.
Post by Kevrob
See also the Bond film, "You Only Live Twice."
I wonder if that borrowed from Doc, given the similarity between Dr No and the Doc _The Fantastic Island_ (title from memory).
Yup. This one: https://docsavage.org/2017/12/the-fantastic-island/
Chrysi Cat
2018-04-13 17:33:50 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-04-13 17:53:33 UTC
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Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
Aside from all the weird sex and surrealism that was fascinating to a
14 year old, what I remember from _Gravity's Rainbow_ is the rant against
English candy & confections..
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-13 19:40:22 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
Aside from all the weird sex and surrealism that was fascinating to a
14 year old, what I remember from _Gravity's Rainbow_ is the rant against
English candy & confections..
All I remember from it is that the author for some reason kept
avoiding the subject of ballistic trajectories and kept harping
on weird sex and surrealism. And I was rather older than 14.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-13 17:57:33 UTC
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Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds ! I am allergic to them !

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-13 19:41:47 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds ! I am allergic to them !
What a pity. I practically live on them. I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-13 20:53:06 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds ! I am allergic to them !
What a pity. I practically live on them. I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age. I am not suppose to eat
blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc with my blood
thinners. But, I love blueberries !

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-13 21:20:27 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds ! I am allergic to them !
What a pity. I practically live on them. I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age. I am not suppose to eat
blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc with my blood
thinners. But, I love blueberries !
Sympathies. I'll eat your blueberries for you. (They're about
the only fruit I can eat.)

What can you eat that I can't? (Hint: if it contains sugar in
any measurable quantity....

(or starch either...)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-13 22:23:02 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds ! I am allergic to them !
What a pity. I practically live on them. I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age. I am not suppose to eat
blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc with my blood
thinners. But, I love blueberries !
Sympathies. I'll eat your blueberries for you. (They're about
the only fruit I can eat.)
What can you eat that I can't? (Hint: if it contains sugar in
any measurable quantity....
(or starch either...)
The only foods that I am allergic to are milk and almonds. But if the
milk is cooked (pancakes, cake, scrambled eggs, etc), I can eat it. But
the wife now cooks with soy milk since our disabled daughter is now
allergic to milk also. She started having problems with milk a couple
of years ago and she is now 30. I've been allergic to almonds since I
was 35 and milk since I was 40. The absolute worst item is almond
extract, a lot of foods have that extract in them.

But I am not suppose to eat any dark vegetables. The darker a vegetable
is, the more vitamin K it has. My Warfarin (Coumadin) is counter acted
by vitamin K. But I eat a minimal amount anyway, life is short. They
just increase my chance of having a stroke of which I am high risk due
to heart issues.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warfarin

I am also allergic to Penicillan and Keflex. Not good.

One of my uncles, 78, is having serious problems with blood sugar. When
his hits 350, he cannot see anymore. At that point, my aunt runs him to
the ER where they lower it somehow. But he is a sugar junkie like all
of us.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-14 00:20:03 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds ! I am allergic to them !
What a pity. I practically live on them. I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age. I am not suppose to eat
blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc with my blood
thinners. But, I love blueberries !
Sympathies. I'll eat your blueberries for you. (They're about
the only fruit I can eat.)
What can you eat that I can't? (Hint: if it contains sugar in
any measurable quantity....
(or starch either...)
The only foods that I am allergic to are milk and almonds. But if the
milk is cooked (pancakes, cake, scrambled eggs, etc), I can eat it. But
the wife now cooks with soy milk since our disabled daughter is now
allergic to milk also. She started having problems with milk a couple
of years ago and she is now 30. I've been allergic to almonds since I
was 35 and milk since I was 40. The absolute worst item is almond
extract, a lot of foods have that extract in them.
But I am not suppose to eat any dark vegetables. The darker a vegetable
is, the more vitamin K it has. My Warfarin (Coumadin) is counter acted
by vitamin K. But I eat a minimal amount anyway, life is short. They
just increase my chance of having a stroke of which I am high risk due
to heart issues.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warfarin
Sympathies all over again. I had a pacemaker put in a couple of
months ago, and I CANNOT FEEL ANY DIFFERENCE except that I now
have a lump under my skin.
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am also allergic to Penicillan and Keflex. Not good.
I'm allergic to the entire *cillin family, also Cipro and
Theophylline. I don't think I've ever encountered Keflex.

/google

And the list of "Related Drugs" doesn't ring any bells either.
Post by Lynn McGuire
One of my uncles, 78, is having serious problems with blood sugar. When
his hits 350, he cannot see anymore.
Cripes!
Post by Lynn McGuire
At that point, my aunt runs him to
the ER where they lower it somehow.
Insulin, probably.
Post by Lynn McGuire
But he is a sugar junkie like all
of us.
If I eat sugar my blood sugar goes up to 400 or so. It doesn't
interfere with my vision, but one serving of (to take the last
example) Key Lime pie put six pounds of weight on me by morning.

Now, as everyone who's ever been on a diet knows (and this
includes most women in the US), it's mostly water. And when I go
back on the diet, it's mostly water that I lose. But it takes
about ten days. Vanity is slowly beginning to conquer greed.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Carl Fink
2018-04-15 02:28:34 UTC
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[Huge snip of quoted material]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Sympathies all over again. I had a pacemaker put in a couple of
months ago, and I CANNOT FEEL ANY DIFFERENCE except that I now
have a lump under my skin.
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am also allergic to Penicillan and Keflex. Not good.
I'm allergic to the entire *cillin family, also Cipro and
Theophylline. I don't think I've ever encountered Keflex.
[smaller snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
One of my uncles, 78, is having serious problems with blood sugar. When
his hits 350, he cannot see anymore.
Cripes!
Post by Lynn McGuire
At that point, my aunt runs him to
the ER where they lower it somehow.
Insulin, probably.
Post by Lynn McGuire
But he is a sugar junkie like all
of us.
If I eat sugar my blood sugar goes up to 400 or so. It doesn't
interfere with my vision, but one serving of (to take the last
example) Key Lime pie put six pounds of weight on me by morning.
I'm allergic to the cillins (and to at least one mycin), and as a kid I had
a reaction to a sulfa drug, too.

I'm a diabetic myself, but 400! That's, um, really high. Is that despite
meds?
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-15 02:52:48 UTC
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Post by Carl Fink
[Huge snip of quoted material]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Sympathies all over again. I had a pacemaker put in a couple of
months ago, and I CANNOT FEEL ANY DIFFERENCE except that I now
have a lump under my skin.
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am also allergic to Penicillan and Keflex. Not good.
I'm allergic to the entire *cillin family, also Cipro and
Theophylline. I don't think I've ever encountered Keflex.
[smaller snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
One of my uncles, 78, is having serious problems with blood sugar. When
his hits 350, he cannot see anymore.
Cripes!
Post by Lynn McGuire
At that point, my aunt runs him to
the ER where they lower it somehow.
Insulin, probably.
Post by Lynn McGuire
But he is a sugar junkie like all
of us.
If I eat sugar my blood sugar goes up to 400 or so. It doesn't
interfere with my vision, but one serving of (to take the last
example) Key Lime pie put six pounds of weight on me by morning.
I'm allergic to the cillins (and to at least one mycin), and as a kid I had
a reaction to a sulfa drug, too.
I'm a diabetic myself, but 400! That's, um, really high. Is that despite
meds?
It happens when I take my meds, but also go off my diet. I try
not to do the latter any more. Trouble is, my diet is *very*
limited, with as few carbohydrates as I can possibly achieve, and
if I go out to dinner anywhere, they're not going to serve
anything that doesn't have some carbs in it.

I see my endocrinologist in a couple of weeks; maybe she'll
change my meds some. She'd like to put me on Januvia, but even
after Medicare and Blue Cross have taken their cut, a month's
worth of Januvia *still* costs three hundred and fifty bucks. I
don't *have* three hundred and fifty bucks, after the premiums
for the abovementioned Medicare and Blue Cross have taken their
cut of my Social Security.

But my endocrinologist is very clever and maybe she'll think of
something.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-15 04:14:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Carl Fink
[Huge snip of quoted material]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Sympathies all over again. I had a pacemaker put in a couple of
months ago, and I CANNOT FEEL ANY DIFFERENCE except that I now
have a lump under my skin.
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am also allergic to Penicillan and Keflex. Not good.
I'm allergic to the entire *cillin family, also Cipro and
Theophylline. I don't think I've ever encountered Keflex.
[smaller snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
One of my uncles, 78, is having serious problems with blood sugar. When
his hits 350, he cannot see anymore.
Cripes!
Post by Lynn McGuire
At that point, my aunt runs him to
the ER where they lower it somehow.
Insulin, probably.
Post by Lynn McGuire
But he is a sugar junkie like all
of us.
If I eat sugar my blood sugar goes up to 400 or so. It doesn't
interfere with my vision, but one serving of (to take the last
example) Key Lime pie put six pounds of weight on me by morning.
I'm allergic to the cillins (and to at least one mycin), and as a kid I had
a reaction to a sulfa drug, too.
I'm a diabetic myself, but 400! That's, um, really high. Is that despite
meds?
It is after he has his monthly Interferon treatment. The Interferon
nullifies the Insulin that he shoots up with. They are working on an
alternative to the Insulin but not much progress yet.

Don't get old.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-15 05:06:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Carl Fink
[Huge snip of quoted material]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Sympathies all over again. I had a pacemaker put in a couple of
months ago, and I CANNOT FEEL ANY DIFFERENCE except that I now
have a lump under my skin.
Post by Lynn McGuire
I am also allergic to Penicillan and Keflex. Not good.
I'm allergic to the entire *cillin family, also Cipro and
Theophylline. I don't think I've ever encountered Keflex.
[smaller snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
One of my uncles, 78, is having serious problems with blood sugar. When
his hits 350, he cannot see anymore.
Cripes!
Post by Lynn McGuire
At that point, my aunt runs him to
the ER where they lower it somehow.
Insulin, probably.
Post by Lynn McGuire
But he is a sugar junkie like all
of us.
If I eat sugar my blood sugar goes up to 400 or so. It doesn't
interfere with my vision, but one serving of (to take the last
example) Key Lime pie put six pounds of weight on me by morning.
I'm allergic to the cillins (and to at least one mycin), and as a kid I had
a reaction to a sulfa drug, too.
I'm a diabetic myself, but 400! That's, um, really high. Is that despite
meds?
It is after he has his monthly Interferon treatment. The Interferon
nullifies the Insulin that he shoots up with. They are working on an
alternative to the Insulin but not much progress yet.
Don't get old.
Well, but considering the alternatives ....
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
David DeLaney
2018-04-15 06:55:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Don't get old.
Well, but considering the alternatives ....
ObAlice: "With proper assistance, you could have left off at seven."

Dave, after she tells H.D. she's seven and one-half _exactly_
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Cryptoengineer
2018-04-15 16:32:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Don't get old.
Well, but considering the alternatives ....
ObAlice: "With proper assistance, you could have left off at seven."
Dave, after she tells H.D. she's seven and one-half _exactly_
_Alice_ has some very dark humor.

pt
Greg Goss
2018-04-15 11:17:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Key Lime pie put six pounds of weight on me by morning.
Now, as everyone who's ever been on a diet knows (and this
includes most women in the US), it's mostly water. And when I go
back on the diet, it's mostly water that I lose. But it takes
about ten days. Vanity is slowly beginning to conquer greed.
My water levels wander all over the place. This makes it hard to take
small weight changes seriously.

Typically I will weigh 3 or 4 pounds less when I get up in the
morning. If I go through one of my rounds of night sweats (wake up
soaked) I can be down 6 pounds by morning.

So when someone on Facebook tells me "I'm down two pounds today, ten
for the week" I have to hold my tongue.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Carl Fink
2018-04-15 12:59:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
My water levels wander all over the place. This makes it hard to take
small weight changes seriously.
Typically I will weigh 3 or 4 pounds less when I get up in the
morning. If I go through one of my rounds of night sweats (wake up
soaked) I can be down 6 pounds by morning.
So when someone on Facebook tells me "I'm down two pounds today, ten
for the week" I have to hold my tongue.
You're supposed to weigh yourself at the same time each day, and no, a
two-pound variation (in an adult) doesn't mean very much.
--
Carl Fink ***@nitpicking.com

Read my blog at blog.nitpicking.com. Reviews! Observations!
Stupid mistakes you can correct!
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-15 15:03:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Key Lime pie put six pounds of weight on me by morning.
Now, as everyone who's ever been on a diet knows (and this
includes most women in the US), it's mostly water. And when I go
back on the diet, it's mostly water that I lose. But it takes
about ten days. Vanity is slowly beginning to conquer greed.
My water levels wander all over the place. This makes it hard to take
small weight changes seriously.
Typically I will weigh 3 or 4 pounds less when I get up in the
morning.
Well, so do I, but that's because I weigh myself on getting up,
before breakfast. That weight has not varied from 190.5 pounds
for the last six weeks, ever since I worked off the Key Lime pie.
It's annoying.

If I go through one of my rounds of night sweats (wake up
Post by Greg Goss
soaked) I can be down 6 pounds by morning.
So when someone on Facebook tells me "I'm down two pounds today, ten
for the week" I have to hold my tongue.
Maybe s/he actually is. There are people who are not as old or
as metabolically challenged as us.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Sjouke Burry
2018-04-14 02:57:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds ! I am allergic to them !
What a pity. I practically live on them. I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age. I am not suppose to eat
blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc with my blood
thinners. But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
Chris Buckley
2018-04-14 14:26:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Lynn McGuire
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age. I am not suppose to eat
blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc with my blood
thinners. But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
Yes. I'm on blood thinners for life, and switching from warfarin to
Xarelto was a tremendous improvement, affecting all sorts of things like
diet and blood tests obviously, but also meant I could go off it easily
when I had a recent kidney stone.

Chris
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-15 02:23:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose to eat
blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc with my blood
thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-15 02:27:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose to eat
blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc with my blood
thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
I actually was on Pradaxa for three years. Then my cardiologist told me
to read the article in the Houston Press by the ER doc. Basically, it
takes three days to get Pradaxa out of your system and one bag of whole
blood to get Warfarin out of your system. You pays your money and takes
your chances !

http://www.houstonpress.com/news/pradaxa-patients-cant-stop-the-bleeding-6594403

Lynn
Cryptoengineer
2018-04-15 03:10:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and
maybe almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat
"Aplets and Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the
rosewater replaced by apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious,
so it's not the concept,
it's the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that
people
are annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface
by confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose
to eat blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc
with my blood thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
I actually was on Pradaxa for three years. Then my cardiologist told
me to read the article in the Houston Press by the ER doc. Basically,
it takes three days to get Pradaxa out of your system and one bag of
whole blood to get Warfarin out of your system. You pays your money
and takes your chances !
http://www.houstonpress.com/news/pradaxa-patients-cant-stop-the-bleedin
g-6594403
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.

pt
p***@hotmail.com
2018-04-15 03:47:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, April 14, 2018 at 10:10:46 PM UTC-5, Cryptoengineer wrote:
n
Post by Cryptoengineer
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
In this case both applications use the same property of Warfarin being
an anti-coagulant. Rats die of hemorrhage when the chemical interferes
with their blood clotting.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-15 04:21:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by p***@hotmail.com
n
Post by Cryptoengineer
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
In this case both applications use the same property of Warfarin being
an anti-coagulant. Rats die of hemorrhage when the chemical interferes
with their blood clotting.
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
I've been on Wafarin for about 5 years now. It is like riding a knife.
One month too much and the next not not enough. I get an INR test ever
month to check it.

Lynn
Greg Goss
2018-04-15 11:23:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Lynn McGuire
I've been on Wafarin for about 5 years now. It is like riding a knife.
One month too much and the next not not enough. I get an INR test ever
month to check it.
When my late wife was sick the second time, there were a lot of issues
arising. After her leg swelled up to three times its normal size,
they put her on "a liver friendly version of Heparin" for life. I
forget what the actual drug was.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-15 04:18:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and
maybe almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat
"Aplets and Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the
rosewater replaced by apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious,
so it's not the concept,
it's the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that
people
are annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface
by confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose
to eat blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc
with my blood thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
I actually was on Pradaxa for three years. Then my cardiologist told
me to read the article in the Houston Press by the ER doc. Basically,
it takes three days to get Pradaxa out of your system and one bag of
whole blood to get Warfarin out of your system. You pays your money
and takes your chances !
http://www.houstonpress.com/news/pradaxa-patients-cant-stop-the-bleedin
g-6594403
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
pt
Many medicines are poisons in large quantities. So is water. So is
food. So is air. Moderation is the key to (most) everything.


Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-15 05:07:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and
maybe almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat
"Aplets and Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the
rosewater replaced by apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious,
so it's not the concept,
it's the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that
people
are annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface
by confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose
to eat blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc
with my blood thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
I actually was on Pradaxa for three years. Then my cardiologist told
me to read the article in the Houston Press by the ER doc. Basically,
it takes three days to get Pradaxa out of your system and one bag of
whole blood to get Warfarin out of your system. You pays your money
and takes your chances !
http://www.houstonpress.com/news/pradaxa-patients-cant-stop-the-bleedin
g-6594403
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
It's a blood thinner. There are times when you want to give a
patient a carefully measured dose of blood thinner. There are
times when you want to give rats a *whole lot* of blood thinner.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
David DeLaney
2018-04-15 06:57:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
It's been a blood thinner for some time. 1954, says Wikipedia, in the US, 6
years after it started off as rat-B-gone.

ObSF: Brin, _Sundiver_.

Dave, no, I'm not saying why
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-15 15:05:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Cryptoengineer
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
It's been a blood thinner for some time. 1954, says Wikipedia, in the US, 6
years after it started off as rat-B-gone.
ObSF: Brin, _Sundiver_.
Dave, no, I'm not saying why
Tease. Now I'll have to reread it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Greg Goss
2018-04-15 20:22:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Cryptoengineer
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
It's been a blood thinner for some time. 1954, says Wikipedia, in the US, 6
years after it started off as rat-B-gone.
ObSF: Brin, _Sundiver_.
Dave, no, I'm not saying why
Tease. Now I'll have to reread it.
It's not one of Brin's best. After you've read the two other
generally-accepted Uplift Wars stories, it fits nicely into that
universe. I didn't like it much as a stand-alone.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Johnny1A
2018-04-24 04:01:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Cryptoengineer
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
It's been a blood thinner for some time. 1954, says Wikipedia, in the US, 6
years after it started off as rat-B-gone.
ObSF: Brin, _Sundiver_.
Dave, no, I'm not saying why
Tease. Now I'll have to reread it.
It's not one of Brin's best. After you've read the two other
generally-accepted Uplift Wars stories, it fits nicely into that
universe. I didn't like it much as a stand-alone.
I read _Startide Rising_ first, then _Sundiver_, so I can't say how I would have reacted to reading them in order, but you're probably right that the first books reads better as the second.

_Sundiver_ _does_ do a good job of explaining some of the 'whys' behind the Galactics' rules, esp. with regard to planetary biospheres and why the Galactics only allow 'leasing' of worlds, not ownership, to a given species.
Joe Pfeiffer
2018-04-15 20:49:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and
maybe almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat
"Aplets and Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the
rosewater replaced by apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious,
so it's not the concept,
it's the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that
people
are annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface
by confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose
to eat blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc
with my blood thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
I actually was on Pradaxa for three years. Then my cardiologist told
me to read the article in the Houston Press by the ER doc. Basically,
it takes three days to get Pradaxa out of your system and one bag of
whole blood to get Warfarin out of your system. You pays your money
and takes your chances !
http://www.houstonpress.com/news/pradaxa-patients-cant-stop-the-bleedin
g-6594403
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
I've got a friend with an artificial heart valve who refers to it as his
rat poison.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-15 22:36:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Joe Pfeiffer
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and
maybe almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat
"Aplets and Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the
rosewater replaced by apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious,
so it's not the concept,
it's the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that
people
are annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface
by confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose
to eat blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc
with my blood thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
I actually was on Pradaxa for three years. Then my cardiologist told
me to read the article in the Houston Press by the ER doc. Basically,
it takes three days to get Pradaxa out of your system and one bag of
whole blood to get Warfarin out of your system. You pays your money
and takes your chances !
http://www.houstonpress.com/news/pradaxa-patients-cant-stop-the-bleedin
g-6594403
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
I've got a friend with an artificial heart valve who refers to it as his
rat poison.
Well, you've gotta keep those rats from taking over your
circulatory system!
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Quadibloc
2018-04-19 11:11:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin, you're dead.

Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the body. Since a
healthy body is all right where it is, too much of just about any
medicine will kill you.

Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Quadibloc
2018-04-19 11:55:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quadibloc
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Also, this principle applies to a different extent to different kinds of
medicines.

Antibiotics are, etymologically, "anti-life" drugs. Yet, they're almost an
exception to the rule. That's because antibiotics block metabolic pathways that
*bacteria* depend on, but eukaryotic cells, the kind we're made out of, can
happily do without.

Instead, their drawback is promoting antibiotic resistance among the target bacteria.

This is why we have so many antibiotics - while it's much harder to come up with
good anti-fungal medications, and still harder to use medicines against, say,
amoebic dysentery. The difference between fungi and animals is smaller than that
between bacteria and animals - and amoebae are eukaryotic cells.

At the opposite end of the spectrum are cancer chemotherapy agents.
Chemotherapy: the basic principle is, give the cancer patient a controlled dose
of arsenic, not enough to kill him, just enough to make his hair fall out... and
because cancer cells grow faster, and hog the body's nutrients for themselves,
they will get a larger dose, and die.

Arsenic, as far as I know, is not used as a cancer chemotherapy agent, but the
substances that are indeed are basically poisons to the patient as well as the
tumor.

The typical drug, though, just "does something" - raises or lowers blood
pressure, blood sugar, body temperature, whatever. If one is healthy, those
things are good where they are, and bad if pushed too far either way. So the
idea is to use a poison whose effects are opposite to those of an illness, to
control its symptoms so the patient can live and function. It's naturally an
imperfect measure.

John Savard
Johnny1A
2018-04-24 03:55:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Also, this principle applies to a different extent to different kinds of
medicines.
Antibiotics are, etymologically, "anti-life" drugs. Yet, they're almost an
exception to the rule. That's because antibiotics block metabolic pathways that
*bacteria* depend on, but eukaryotic cells, the kind we're made out of, can
happily do without.
_Almost_.

That brought to mind a story from 2015, about the dangers of over-trust in automated systems and antibiotic overdose:

https://medium.com/backchannel/how-technology-led-a-hospital-to-give-a-patient-38-times-his-dosage-ded7b3688558

Those dose makes the poison, to the 38th power.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-19 13:27:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quadibloc
Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin, you're dead.
Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the body. Since a
healthy body is all right where it is, too much of just about any
medicine will kill you.
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Paracelsus said back in the sixteenth century that poison is in
the dosage.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Kevrob
2018-04-19 16:50:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin, you're dead.
Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the body. Since a
healthy body is all right where it is, too much of just about any
medicine will kill you.
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Paracelsus said back in the sixteenth century that poison is in
the dosage.
I remember Bruce Ames quoting that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Ames

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_dose_makes_the_poison

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-19 20:09:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin, you're dead.
Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the body. Since a
healthy body is all right where it is, too much of just about any
medicine will kill you.
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Paracelsus said back in the sixteenth century that poison is in
the dosage.
I remember Bruce Ames quoting that.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Ames
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_dose_makes_the_poison
Oh, I remember him. I used to work for a subordinate of his.

(She would not have liked me to call her that, but the heck with
her, she's dead anyway.)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
D B Davis
2018-04-20 23:43:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin, you're dead.
Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the body. Since a
healthy body is all right where it is, too much of just about any
medicine will kill you.
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Paracelsus said back in the sixteenth century that poison is in
the dosage.
Strychnine's been used as an analeptic for centuries. It was first used
as rat back in the sixteenth century, before it was used as a stimulant.
(What is it with rat poison and medicine anyhow?)
Back in the day, chemists used to taste test heretofore unknown
substances. So, who was the first guy to taste test strychnine, a
known poison? Was he a "Hey everybody, watch me stick my tongue on
strychnine" idiot?
All of this medical talk as of late reminds me that
_The Medical Detectives_ (Rouceche) remains unread in my to-be-read
stack. Looks like a the perfect weekend to pick it up.

Thank you,

--
Don
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-04-20 23:48:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by D B Davis
So, who was the first guy to taste test strychnine,
a known poison? Was he a "Hey everybody, watch me stick my
tongue on strychnine" idiot?
Beer has existed for millenia. Presumably, so have rednecks who ask
you hold theirs.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-04-21 03:20:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by D B Davis
So, who was the first guy to taste test strychnine,
a known poison? Was he a "Hey everybody, watch me stick my
tongue on strychnine" idiot?
Beer has existed for millenia. Presumably, so have rednecks who ask
you hold theirs.
"Here, hold my spear...."
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
David DeLaney
2018-04-21 05:40:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by D B Davis
So, who was the first guy to taste test strychnine,
a known poison? Was he a "Hey everybody, watch me stick my
tongue on strychnine" idiot?
Beer has existed for millenia. Presumably, so have rednecks who ask
you hold theirs.
In the last century or two, It Is Said That chemists used to keep track of who
had just learned to isolate elemental fluorine by watching the obituary columns.

Dave, things I hope to never have to work with
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-21 00:10:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin, you're dead.
Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the body. Since a
healthy body is all right where it is, too much of just about any
medicine will kill you.
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Paracelsus said back in the sixteenth century that poison is in
the dosage.
Strychnine's been used as an analeptic for centuries. It was first used
as rat back in the sixteenth century, before it was used as a stimulant.
(What is it with rat poison and medicine anyhow?)
Back in the day, chemists used to taste test heretofore unknown
substances. So, who was the first guy to taste test strychnine, a
known poison? Was he a "Hey everybody, watch me stick my tongue on
strychnine" idiot?
All of this medical talk as of late reminds me that
_The Medical Detectives_ (Rouceche) remains unread in my to-be-read
stack. Looks like a the perfect weekend to pick it up.
It's good. It's one of my reread-every-couple-of-years books.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
D B Davis
2018-05-05 14:12:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by D B Davis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin, you're dead.
Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the body. Since a
healthy body is all right where it is, too much of just about any
medicine will kill you.
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
Paracelsus said back in the sixteenth century that poison is in
the dosage.
Strychnine's been used as an analeptic for centuries. It was first used
as rat back in the sixteenth century, before it was used as a stimulant.
(What is it with rat poison and medicine anyhow?)
Back in the day, chemists used to taste test heretofore unknown
substances. So, who was the first guy to taste test strychnine, a
known poison? Was he a "Hey everybody, watch me stick my tongue on
strychnine" idiot?
All of this medical talk as of late reminds me that
_The Medical Detectives_ (Rouceche) remains unread in my to-be-read
stack. Looks like a the perfect weekend to pick it up.
It's good. It's one of my reread-every-couple-of-years books.
My read of _The Medical Detectives_ (Rouceche) started shortly after
this thread appeared. (So it will take a while longer for me to get to
"The Weapon Shops of Isher" (van Vogt) that Ted read in April.)
_The Medical Detectives_ is perfect for me. It's medically themed
short story sleuthing that offers plenty of opportunities to paw through
my _Dorlands Illustrated Medical Dictionary_ along the way. The idea of
known disease carriers living within a community unnerves me.
Although it shouldn't. One of my former colleagues is an infections
disease doc. A few years ago he pulled a massive worm out of a Vietnam
Vet. (Actually some type of chemical concoction caused the worm to be
excreted, if you must know.) The infection dated back to the Vietnam
War.
Imagine that. My stomach's rumbling. This seems like a good place
for me to stop and grab some grub. :0)



Thank you,
--
Don
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-04-19 17:30:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quadibloc
Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin,
you're dead.
Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the
body. Since a healthy body is all right where it is, too much of
just about any medicine will kill you.
Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.
And poisons out of medicines.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Quadibloc
2018-04-19 11:46:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
As I said in my first immediate reply:

Well, yes. It's a blood thinner. If your blood gets too thin, you're dead.

Medicines - at least the allopathic kind - do things to the body. Since a
healthy body is all right where it is, too much of just about any
medicine will kill you.

Dosage makes medicines out of poisons.

In addition:

Even before I saw a TV show about beginning pharmacy students where on their
first day this principle - that drugs are all poisons - was pointed out to them,
I remember laughing at a John W. Campbell editorial where this principle was
ignored.

He was writing about his experiences on medication for high blood pressure. How,
if he took a little too much of it, he was incapacitated, but in a benign way.

And so in his editorial he suggested that there was an excessive prejudice
against chemical weapons, because this was an example of how they could be made
into very benign and nonlethal agents.

For one thing, if someone is incapacitated, say by pepper spray, then it becomes
possible and even easy to kill him by cutting his throat with a knife.

But what I saw as I was reading the editorial was this - if you're using a
chemical agent as a weapon, the dosage is going to be very variable. If you're
using it to disable enemy troops so your men can safely walk in to their
installation, you will have to make sure you've given all of them an
incapacitating dose, or some of them are going to still be able to shoot your
men going in.

If you do that, though, then some of those enemy troops will have had to have
received a dosage several times larger.

A medicine that lowers blood pressure. A little too much, and you can't get out
of bed. A lot too much... no oxygen to the brain, and death comes in a short
time.

And I was just shocked that this wasn't *obvious* to him, so that he could write
such a silly thing.

John Savard
Johnny1A
2018-04-24 03:21:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and
maybe almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat
"Aplets and Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the
rosewater replaced by apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious,
so it's not the concept,
it's the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that
people
are annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface
by confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose
to eat blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc
with my blood thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
I actually was on Pradaxa for three years. Then my cardiologist told
me to read the article in the Houston Press by the ER doc. Basically,
it takes three days to get Pradaxa out of your system and one bag of
whole blood to get Warfarin out of your system. You pays your money
and takes your chances !
http://www.houstonpress.com/news/pradaxa-patients-cant-stop-the-bleedin
g-6594403
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
When I was a kid, I had the same reaction to first hearing about nitroglycerin being used as a medicine, I had always thought of it as a rather touchy _explosive_.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-24 04:27:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Johnny1A
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Sjouke Burry
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
     https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and
maybe almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat
"Aplets and Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the
rosewater replaced by apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious,
so it's not the concept,
it's the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that
people
are annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface
by confectioners' sugar :-P
No freaking almonds !  I am allergic to them !
What a pity.  I practically live on them.  I'm about to eat Greek
yogurt, blueberries, and almonds for lunch, because that's one of
the small set of edibles that don't set my blood sugar soaring.
Yes, we all have our crosses to bear as we age.  I am not suppose
to eat blueberries since their high vitamin K content plays havoc
with my blood thinners.  But, I love blueberries !
Lynn
Switch to PRADAXA.(dabigatran etexilaat).
No dependence any more on vitamin K.
I actually was on Pradaxa for three years. Then my cardiologist told
me to read the article in the Houston Press by the ER doc. Basically,
it takes three days to get Pradaxa out of your system and one bag of
whole blood to get Warfarin out of your system. You pays your money
and takes your chances !
http://www.houstonpress.com/news/pradaxa-patients-cant-stop-the-bleedin
g-6594403
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
When I was a kid, I had the same reaction to first hearing about
nitroglycerin being used as a medicine, I had always thought of it as a
rather touchy _explosive_.
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Greg Goss
2018-04-24 05:11:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-04-24 05:14:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
As I recall, Gilligan had a problem with that.

As did Wile E.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Moriarty
2018-04-24 05:21:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
As I recall, Gilligan had a problem with that.
As did Wile E.
Probably James Nicoll too.

-Moriarty
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-24 13:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
NO.

An education as an engineer and long years as a programmer have
made him professionally paranoid about doing dumb things.

He says, "Any bang would be very minimal." But he's still not
going to try it out.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dimensional Traveler
2018-04-24 15:21:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
NO.
An education as an engineer and long years as a programmer have
made him professionally paranoid about doing dumb things.
He says, "Any bang would be very minimal." But he's still not
going to try it out.
Of course not! That's what neighbor's kids are for.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-24 15:56:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
NO.
An education as an engineer and long years as a programmer have
made him professionally paranoid about doing dumb things.
He says, "Any bang would be very minimal." But he's still not
going to try it out.
Of course not! That's what neighbor's kids are for.
No neighbors' kids in the immediate vicinity. And if we tried it
out on Vincent, there would be Words.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Greg Goss
2018-04-25 01:05:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
NO.
An education as an engineer and long years as a programmer have
made him professionally paranoid about doing dumb things.
He says, "Any bang would be very minimal." But he's still not
going to try it out.
Of course not! That's what neighbor's kids are for.
No neighbors' kids in the immediate vicinity. And if we tried it
out on Vincent, there would be Words.
He's an engineer. Four minutes to rig a drop-hammer with a string
trigger from ten feet away.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-25 03:59:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
NO.
An education as an engineer and long years as a programmer have
made him professionally paranoid about doing dumb things.
He says, "Any bang would be very minimal." But he's still not
going to try it out.
Of course not! That's what neighbor's kids are for.
No neighbors' kids in the immediate vicinity. And if we tried it
out on Vincent, there would be Words.
He's an engineer. Four minutes to rig a drop-hammer with a string
trigger from ten feet away.
Yeah, except it would mean getting up and leaving his computer.
He's well into middle age and very sedentary now.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Dimensional Traveler
2018-04-25 04:54:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
And so it is ... in large doses. Hal, since his heart surgery
(ten or twelve years ago), carries a little tiny vial of
nitroclycerine tablets in his shirt pocket. Every now and then
he has to get a new set because they have a limited shelf life.
He's never used any.
Has he ever tried banging on the expired ones?
NO.
An education as an engineer and long years as a programmer have
made him professionally paranoid about doing dumb things.
He says, "Any bang would be very minimal." But he's still not
going to try it out.
Of course not! That's what neighbor's kids are for.
No neighbors' kids in the immediate vicinity. And if we tried it
out on Vincent, there would be Words.
He's an engineer. Four minutes to rig a drop-hammer with a string
trigger from ten feet away.
For some reason that reminds me of something my father and uncles did
once when they were young. They were in to model rockets. (Please note
this would have been in the 1950s, maybe early 1960s.) They made a
rocket out of a steel pipe and fuel for it from a mix of sugar and
hydrogen-peroxide. (I see some of you out there wincing!!) My
grandfather agreed to let them try to launch it on the condition that
they be in a ditch a hundred yards away.

Pieces of the pipe landed a hundred yards away from the ditch. On the
other side from where they started. :D
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Lynn McGuire
2018-04-24 19:38:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 4/23/2018 10:21 PM, Johnny1A wrote:
...
Post by Johnny1A
Post by Cryptoengineer
Its wierd to me to hear of Warfarin being used as a medicine - I've
always thought of it as rat poison.
When I was a kid, I had the same reaction to first hearing about nitroglycerin being used as a medicine, I had always thought of it as a rather touchy _explosive_.
Critical mass in everything is very important.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-04-13 19:38:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
    https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
I'll grant the traditional version, tasting of rosewater and maybe
almond, wouldn't be great. But the old-time Christmas treat "Aplets and
Cotlets" are basically turkish delight with the rosewater replaced by
apricot or apple, and *they're* delicious, so it's not the concept, it's
the traditional execution. Well, and possibly also that people are
annoyed by having to hold something covered on every surface by
confectioners' sugar :-P
Better than having to hold onto it *without* the confectioner's
sugar. That stuff is *sticky* in its unpowdered state.

Karen Anderson (in pace requiescat) once did a Zimiamvian dinner
to celebrate the date on which the main character supposedly left
this tawdry world to return to the legendary one. All the food
(there were several courses) came from mentions in one or another
of Eddison's novels. Astrid and I were the serving wenches, and
Hal was the wine* steward. Karen made TD, under its proper name
Rahad Lokoum, with rosewater and, IIRC, without powdered sugar
because it would've covered up the gold leaf.

_____
*Strictly speaking, wine-and-alternative steward, because Fritz
Leiber was one of the guests and he was on the wagon.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
T Guy
2018-04-14 13:39:06 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
xkcd, "turkish deslight"
https://xkcd.com/1980/
Yup, Cinnebons is much better for bribery.
Lynn
'Delight in the sense of 'golden' and 'delicious' in 'French Golden Delicious appples.' IOW, xkcd nails it here.
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