Discussion:
Where are the Dreegh?
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c***@gmail.com
2014-04-16 21:52:06 UTC
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The book you are talking about is called "Supermind".
Supermind is a science fiction novel by A. E. van Vogt first published in complete form in 1976 by publisher DAW Books.
Look it up on Wikipedia. Great book, great author.
Moriarty
2014-04-17 00:57:28 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
The book you are talking about is called "Supermind".
The post you are replying to is 16 years old.

-Moriarty
Dorothy J Heydt
2014-04-17 01:25:31 UTC
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Post by Moriarty
Post by c***@gmail.com
The book you are talking about is called "Supermind".
The post you are replying to is 16 years old.
Gosh. Imagine having to wait that long for an answer!
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Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Should you wish to email me, you'd better use the gmail edress.
Kithrup's all spammy and hotmail's been hacked.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2014-04-17 03:05:45 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
Post by c***@gmail.com
The book you are talking about is called "Supermind".
The post you are replying to is 16 years old.
Gosh. Imagine having to wait that long for an answer!
Well, this is an SF group. Apparently he is located 8 light years from here..
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columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Walter Bushell
2014-04-17 11:49:48 UTC
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
Post by c***@gmail.com
The book you are talking about is called "Supermind".
The post you are replying to is 16 years old.
Gosh. Imagine having to wait that long for an answer!
In science we frequently have to wait much longer for an answer.
--
Never attribute to stupidity that which can be explained by greed. Me.
John F. Eldredge
2014-04-27 02:57:08 UTC
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Post by Walter Bushell
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
Post by c***@gmail.com
The book you are talking about is called "Supermind".
The post you are replying to is 16 years old.
Gosh. Imagine having to wait that long for an answer!
In science we frequently have to wait much longer for an answer.
Hexapodia is the key insight.
Don Kuenz
2014-04-26 00:05:24 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
The book you are talking about is called "Supermind".
Supermind is a science fiction novel by A. E. van Vogt first published
in complete form in 1976 by publisher DAW Books.
Look it up on Wikipedia. Great book, great author.
_Supermind_ is a fix-up novel based on three novellas:

Asylum
Research Alpha
The Proxy Intelligence

"Asylum" and "The Proxy Intelligence" are in my collection. "Asylum" is
the first van Vogt story that I ever read. It's "mind within a mind"
device reminds me of two other authors. Wilson uses a symbiote named
"Pard" in _Healer_. And then there's Asimov. In regards to Asimov, my
_Cambridge Companion_ says it much better than me.

The attempt to apply scientific principles to the workings
of the human mind had an odder result. Amid sober stories
about natural law and complex investigations of social
trends, the magazines of the 1940s and 1950s published a
great many stories about telepathy and other forms of
extrasensory perception, or so-called 'psi powers'.
Campbell considered these to be as valid scientifically as
any speculation about alien environments or rocket ship
engineering. One of his favourite writers of psionic
fiction was A. E. Van Vogt, who was otherwise the antithesis
of Campbell-era sf. Rather than writing the rigorously
logical stories that Campbell encouraged from Asimov or
Heinlein, Van Vogt produced dreamlike narratives about
psychic supermen in hiding, such as Jommy Cross in the
enormously popular Slan (serialized in 1940). Van Vogt's
fiction is energetic and vivid, but often barely coherent.
His protagonists resemble fairy-tale heroes more than
Heinlein's competent engineers. They are guided along the
way by characters who might as well be wizards; their
psychic gifts are thinly disguised wishing-rings and cloaks
of invisibility.

Ryk also talked about van Vogt in a recent thread. [1] It was a delight
to re-read Ryk's thread after actually reading van Vogt for the first
time. This excerpt resonated with me:

This isn't terribly surprising when you realize that Van Vogt
literally wrote from his dreams - he was awakened regularly
every night to be sure to write them down.

That's precisely what "Asylum" reminded me of, one of my own dreams.
(I keep a dream journal.) IMHO van Vogt is the master of imagery.
Thanks to van Vogt I now know why they call it "The Golden Age of
Science Fiction."

Note 1. This is the script used to piece together Ryk's thread from a
usenet archive hosted on one of my servers.

$ find . -print0 \
| xargs -0 grep "Under the Influence: A. E. Van Vogt" -l \
| xargs cat >> ~/vvthread

---

Don Kuenz
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2014-04-26 03:46:53 UTC
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Post by Don Kuenz
Post by c***@gmail.com
The book you are talking about is called "Supermind".
Supermind is a science fiction novel by A. E. van Vogt first published
in complete form in 1976 by publisher DAW Books.
Look it up on Wikipedia. Great book, great author.
Asylum
Research Alpha
The Proxy Intelligence
"Research Alpha", which I don't believe I've read, is with James H. Schmitz.
It's hard to imagine a more unlikely pairing.

I agree largely on the Van Vogt dream logic, but he had other strengths
as well. I read the Clane stories again recently in the Baen edition.
This supposedly put them all back to back as they appeared in the
magazines rather than the fix-up versions Van Vogt used for
_Empire Of The Atom_ and _The Wizard of Linn_.

I found that way that they held up very well, and were full of pithy
insights and memorable moments despite having a more or less linear
plotline. (Not that wonkiness is absent either, what with the
"we're all inside Clane's sphere and he could reach down at any minute"
aspect).
--
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columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Quadibloc
2014-04-27 19:04:50 UTC
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I hope they got a A -- that was hilarious.
I would flunk Dave...

since he's the one who started this switching, and let Lisa redo.

John Savard
Quadibloc
2014-04-27 19:19:10 UTC
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Well, here's a prime example of that. This assignment was
Lisa (last name deleted) and Dave (last name deleted)
A web search does turn up other versions of this story, without the "person to your right" part, but with the names as Rebecca and Gary.

John Savard
Don Bruder
2014-04-27 22:27:24 UTC
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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Post by Quadibloc
John Savard
Hey, John... You realize that this is a touch outdated, right?
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e***@gmail.com
2019-12-01 13:49:24 UTC
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As a child (about 25 years ago, I read a novella which
was old even then, featuring a race of vampires called
the Dreegh. The only reason I remember them is I
thought they got a rough deal - they were all passengers
on one spaceship that got caught in some wierd solar
flare and turned into vampires (yes, I know it sounds
stupid). Two of 'em came to Earth and a cop had to
track them down.
Does this ring any bells with anyone?
The Dreeghs are featured in A E van Vogt's novella Asylum. That novella also forms part of his longer book Supermind.
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