Discussion:
If you like...you should also try...
(too old to reply)
t***@gmail.com
2018-09-28 20:11:51 UTC
Permalink
So in the back of my copy of Drake's Lt Leary Commanding (2001 paperback edition
published by Baen), there are three pages titled "If you like...you should try..." ; and
of course their "you should try" are all Baen works/authors, but I'm finding their
recommendations rather entertaining (if not always on target).

Just a few examples:
If you like Anne McCaffrey you should try ... Elizabeth Moon, Mercedes Lackey
If you like Mercedes Lackey you should try... Holly Lisle, Josepha Sherman, Ellen Guon, Mark Shepherd
If you like Larry Niven you should try...James P. Hogan, Charles Sheffield
Heinlein's "Juveniles" ... Larry Segriff, William R. Fortschen
"Lord of the Rings"...Elizabeth Moon "The Deed of Paksenarrion"
"Star Wars" ... Larry Niven, David Weber, the Wing Commander(tm) series
"Casablanca" ... Larry Niven, "Man-Kzin Wars II"
Quests ... Mary Brown, Elizabeth Moon, Piers Anthony
Science Fact ... Robert L Forward, "Indistinguishable From Magic"; James P. Hogan "Rockets, Redheads,
and Revolution" and "Minds, Machines, and Evolution"; Charles Sheffield "Borderlands
of Science"
Werewolves ... Cox & Weisskopf (eds.), "Tomorrow Bites"; Wm. Mark Simmons, "One Foot in the Grave";
Brett Davis, "Hair of the Dog"

And there are about 20 more authors/movies/categories.

So two questions:
1) Explain please the recommendation for Casablanca? (having never read Man-Kzin Wars II, which
seems to be two novellas, one by Dean Ing and one by Pournelle & Stirling)
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?

As I said - entertaining if not always on target
Tony
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-09-28 20:18:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
So in the back of my copy of Drake's Lt Leary Commanding (2001 paperback edition
published by Baen), there are three pages titled "If you like...you should try..." ; and
of course their "you should try" are all Baen works/authors, but I'm finding their
recommendations rather entertaining (if not always on target).
If you like Anne McCaffrey you should try ... Elizabeth Moon, Mercedes Lackey
If you like Mercedes Lackey you should try... Holly Lisle, Josepha
Sherman, Ellen Guon, Mark Shepherd
If you like Larry Niven you should try...James P. Hogan, Charles Sheffield
Heinlein's "Juveniles" ... Larry Segriff, William R. Fortschen
"Lord of the Rings"...Elizabeth Moon "The Deed of Paksenarrion"
"Star Wars" ... Larry Niven, David Weber, the Wing Commander(tm) series
"Casablanca" ... Larry Niven, "Man-Kzin Wars II"
Quests ... Mary Brown, Elizabeth Moon, Piers Anthony
Science Fact ... Robert L Forward, "Indistinguishable From Magic"; James
P. Hogan "Rockets, Redheads,
and Revolution" and "Minds, Machines, and
Evolution"; Charles Sheffield "Borderlands
of Science"
Werewolves ... Cox & Weisskopf (eds.), "Tomorrow Bites"; Wm. Mark
Simmons, "One Foot in the Grave";
Brett Davis, "Hair of the Dog"
And there are about 20 more authors/movies/categories.
1) Explain please the recommendation for Casablanca? (having never read
Man-Kzin Wars II, which
seems to be two novellas, one by Dean Ing and one by Pournelle & Stirling)
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca" in that
milieu.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Mike Van Pelt
2018-09-28 23:08:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by t***@gmail.com
1) Explain please the recommendation for Casablanca? (having never read
Man-Kzin Wars II, which
seems to be two novellas, one by Dean Ing and one by Pournelle & Stirling)
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca" in that
milieu.
There's subtle, there's outright stealing ...

Then there's gleefully waving the "Your winnings, sir" flag
in front of the readers' face. Repeatedly.

The last is kind of what Pournelle & Stirling did.

It was a good story otherwise, but the winking at Casablanca
tossed me out of the story whenever they did it. I'm not
sure I'd have called this an "If you liked Casablanca, you'll
like this" sort of thing.
--
Mike Van Pelt | "I don't advise it unless you're nuts."
mvp at calweb.com | -- Ray Wilkinson, after riding out Hurricane
KE6BVH | Ike on Surfside Beach in Galveston
Jack Bohn
2018-09-29 14:14:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca" in that
milieu.
There's subtle, there's outright stealing ...
Then there's gleefully waving the "Your winnings, sir" flag
in front of the readers' face. Repeatedly.
The last is kind of what Pournelle & Stirling did.
It was a good story otherwise, but the winking at Casablanca
tossed me out of the story whenever they did it. I'm not
sure I'd have called this an "If you liked Casablanca, you'll
like this" sort of thing.
Some people like puns, some like slapstick.
Did Pournelle & Stirling riff on a different Bogie movie in each of their Man/Kzin Wars stories, or was it something I thought they should do so much I've back-interpreted it into them? I mean, they have a story titled, "The Asteroid Queen".



On the "If you like ___, you should also try ___", back around the time of Windows 95, Microsoft had a flirtation with putting the sum of human knowledge out on CD-Roms. One such was on pop music; publishing information and reprints of some magazine's reviews, and one feature linking bands to similar bands. I wondered if one could form a chain of "___ is similar to ___" leading from, say, Yes to the Sex Pistols, but mostly got a lot of closed loops; I suspect a lot of the links were formed by musicians moving from one band to another.
--
-Jack
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-29 15:34:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca" in that
milieu.
There's subtle, there's outright stealing ...
You remember what T. S. Eliot said about Shakespeare: Immature
artists imitate; mature artists steal.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ahasuerus
2018-09-29 16:13:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca"
in that milieu.
There's subtle, there's outright stealing ...
You remember what T. S. Eliot said about Shakespeare: Immature
artists imitate; mature artists steal.
Yes, but Eliot's point wasn't what it is usually assumed to be. The
full quote is:

"One of the surest of tests is the way in which a poet borrows.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what
they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least
something different. The good poet welds his theft into a whole of
feeling which is unique, utterly different from that from which it
was torn; the bad poet throws it into something which has no cohesion.
A good poet will usually borrow from authors remote in time, or alien
in language, or diverse in interest."

More on the history of this quote at
https://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/03/06/artists-steal/
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-09-29 17:53:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca"
in that milieu.
There's subtle, there's outright stealing ...
You remember what T. S. Eliot said about Shakespeare: Immature
artists imitate; mature artists steal.
Yes, but Eliot's point wasn't what it is usually assumed to be. The
"One of the surest of tests is the way in which a poet borrows.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what
they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least
something different. The good poet welds his theft into a whole of
feeling which is unique, utterly different from that from which it
was torn; the bad poet throws it into something which has no cohesion.
A good poet will usually borrow from authors remote in time, or alien
in language, or diverse in interest."
Thank you! Saved to disk.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ahasuerus
2018-09-29 18:34:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca"
in that milieu.
There's subtle, there's outright stealing ...
You remember what T. S. Eliot said about Shakespeare: Immature
artists imitate; mature artists steal.
Yes, but Eliot's point wasn't what it is usually assumed to be. The
"One of the surest of tests is the way in which a poet borrows.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what
they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least
something different. The good poet welds his theft into a whole of
feeling which is unique, utterly different from that from which it
was torn; the bad poet throws it into something which has no cohesion.
A good poet will usually borrow from authors remote in time, or alien
in language, or diverse in interest."
Thank you! Saved to disk.
I'll make sure to let the author know when I meet him!
Robert Woodward
2018-09-29 16:48:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca" in that
milieu.
There's subtle, there's outright stealing ...
Then there's gleefully waving the "Your winnings, sir" flag
in front of the readers' face. Repeatedly.
The last is kind of what Pournelle & Stirling did.
It was a good story otherwise, but the winking at Casablanca
tossed me out of the story whenever they did it. I'm not
sure I'd have called this an "If you liked Casablanca, you'll
like this" sort of thing.
Some people like puns, some like slapstick.
Did Pournelle & Stirling riff on a different Bogie movie in each of their
Man/Kzin Wars stories, or was it something I thought they should do so much
I've back-interpreted it into them? I mean, they have a story titled, "The
Asteroid Queen".
Yes, they did (another story was called "In the Hall of the Mountain
King", who had a treasure, IIRC).
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
t***@gmail.com
2018-10-01 11:04:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Van Pelt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by t***@gmail.com
1) Explain please the recommendation for Casablanca? (having never read
Man-Kzin Wars II, which
seems to be two novellas, one by Dean Ing and one by Pournelle & Stirling)
Pretty sure one of the MKW books was a retelling of "Casablanca" in that
milieu.
There's subtle, there's outright stealing ...
Then there's gleefully waving the "Your winnings, sir" flag
in front of the readers' face. Repeatedly.
The last is kind of what Pournelle & Stirling did.
It was a good story otherwise, but the winking at Casablanca
tossed me out of the story whenever they did it. I'm not
sure I'd have called this an "If you liked Casablanca, you'll
like this" sort of thing.
Ah - my thanks to both you and Ted.
- Tony
m***@sky.com
2018-09-29 14:42:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
So in the back of my copy of Drake's Lt Leary Commanding (2001 paperback edition
published by Baen), there are three pages titled "If you like...you should try..." ; and
of course their "you should try" are all Baen works/authors, but I'm finding their
recommendations rather entertaining (if not always on target).
If you like Anne McCaffrey you should try ... Elizabeth Moon, Mercedes Lackey
If you like Mercedes Lackey you should try... Holly Lisle, Josepha Sherman, Ellen Guon, Mark Shepherd
If you like Larry Niven you should try...James P. Hogan, Charles Sheffield
Heinlein's "Juveniles" ... Larry Segriff, William R. Fortschen
"Lord of the Rings"...Elizabeth Moon "The Deed of Paksenarrion"
"Star Wars" ... Larry Niven, David Weber, the Wing Commander(tm) series
"Casablanca" ... Larry Niven, "Man-Kzin Wars II"
Quests ... Mary Brown, Elizabeth Moon, Piers Anthony
Science Fact ... Robert L Forward, "Indistinguishable From Magic"; James P. Hogan "Rockets, Redheads,
and Revolution" and "Minds, Machines, and Evolution"; Charles Sheffield "Borderlands
of Science"
Werewolves ... Cox & Weisskopf (eds.), "Tomorrow Bites"; Wm. Mark Simmons, "One Foot in the Grave";
Brett Davis, "Hair of the Dog"
And there are about 20 more authors/movies/categories.
1) Explain please the recommendation for Casablanca? (having never read Man-Kzin Wars II, which
seems to be two novellas, one by Dean Ing and one by Pournelle & Stirling)
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
As I said - entertaining if not always on target
Tony
I read Mary Brown's "The Unlikely Ones" some years ago. I remember it as a gentle, likeable, readable story but not much about the plot - the summary at https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/170293.The_Unlikely_Ones sounds like what I remember, but is more detailed than that memory.
t***@gmail.com
2018-10-01 11:04:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by t***@gmail.com
So in the back of my copy of Drake's Lt Leary Commanding (2001 paperback edition
published by Baen), there are three pages titled "If you like...you should try..." ; and
of course their "you should try" are all Baen works/authors, but I'm finding their
recommendations rather entertaining (if not always on target).
If you like Anne McCaffrey you should try ... Elizabeth Moon, Mercedes Lackey
If you like Mercedes Lackey you should try... Holly Lisle, Josepha Sherman, Ellen Guon, Mark Shepherd
If you like Larry Niven you should try...James P. Hogan, Charles Sheffield
Heinlein's "Juveniles" ... Larry Segriff, William R. Fortschen
"Lord of the Rings"...Elizabeth Moon "The Deed of Paksenarrion"
"Star Wars" ... Larry Niven, David Weber, the Wing Commander(tm) series
"Casablanca" ... Larry Niven, "Man-Kzin Wars II"
Quests ... Mary Brown, Elizabeth Moon, Piers Anthony
Science Fact ... Robert L Forward, "Indistinguishable From Magic"; James P. Hogan "Rockets, Redheads,
and Revolution" and "Minds, Machines, and Evolution"; Charles Sheffield "Borderlands
of Science"
Werewolves ... Cox & Weisskopf (eds.), "Tomorrow Bites"; Wm. Mark Simmons, "One Foot in the Grave";
Brett Davis, "Hair of the Dog"
And there are about 20 more authors/movies/categories.
1) Explain please the recommendation for Casablanca? (having never read Man-Kzin Wars II, which
seems to be two novellas, one by Dean Ing and one by Pournelle & Stirling)
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
As I said - entertaining if not always on target
Tony
I read Mary Brown's "The Unlikely Ones" some years ago. I remember it as a gentle, likeable, readable story but not much about the plot - the summary at https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/170293.The_Unlikely_Ones sounds like what I remember, but is more detailed than that memory.
Thanks!
- Tony
Joe Bernstein
2018-10-03 04:38:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
So in the back of my copy of Drake's Lt Leary Commanding (2001
paperback edition published by Baen), there are three pages titled
"If you like...you should try..." ; and of course their "you should
try" are all Baen works/authors, but I'm finding their
recommendations rather entertaining (if not always on target).
Sometime around then we had a thread here of the same kind. I think
Kipling was in the subject line, and the idea was mainstream writer
-> spec-fic writer. One of my prouder moments on Usenet is my
contribution to that thread, in which the mainstream writers were
ancient Greeks and, I think, Romans (several of them themselves
spec-fic writers, of course).

Yeah, here the thread is:
<https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.arts.sf.written/vb91rMdxAZ8%5B1-25%5D>'

and oops, it turns out what I remembered is just the second half of a
post in whose first half I just whine about the whole idea. Sigh.
(The whole thread also quickly turned into a discussion of Ayn Rand,
for that matter. Sigh. Sometimes it doesn't do to revisit one's
memories.)
Post by t***@gmail.com
Quests ... Mary Brown, Elizabeth Moon, Piers Anthony
This is ludicrous on the face of it. I don't see how anyone could
possibly like these three authors for similar reasons. (Mind, I'm
not saying nobody could like all three - I do myself, for certain
values of "like" - but the *grouping* makes about as much sense as
lemon meringue, kimchi and toothpaste.)
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown [snip] has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
She wrote five books with four heroines; the first book's acquires a
ring which each of the others inherits, so they're just barely a
series. To spoil just a bit, the first and last are pretty light-
hearted, the ones in between darker; all but the pseudo-science-
fictional fourth book tell of journies which can be understood as
quests, no doubt why Baen put her into this line. Brown took some
pains to repeat herself with variations, making it obvious that
she wasn't just a naive storyteller, but if she had any agenda
other than art, I didn't notice it. Recommended if quiet, nearly
irenic fantasy is your thing.

<The Unlikely Ones>, 1986

<Pigs Don't Fly>, 1994
<Master of Many Treasures>, 1995 (same heroine)

<Strange Deliverance>, 1997 (arguably sf; most distinctive plot)

<Dragonne's Eg> [sic], 1999

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
m***@sky.com
2018-10-03 17:14:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by t***@gmail.com
So in the back of my copy of Drake's Lt Leary Commanding (2001
paperback edition published by Baen), there are three pages titled
"If you like...you should try..." ; and of course their "you should
try" are all Baen works/authors, but I'm finding their
recommendations rather entertaining (if not always on target).
Sometime around then we had a thread here of the same kind. I think
Kipling was in the subject line, and the idea was mainstream writer
-> spec-fic writer. One of my prouder moments on Usenet is my
contribution to that thread, in which the mainstream writers were
ancient Greeks and, I think, Romans (several of them themselves
spec-fic writers, of course).
<https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.arts.sf.written/vb91rMdxAZ8%5B1-25%5D>'
and oops, it turns out what I remembered is just the second half of a
post in whose first half I just whine about the whole idea. Sigh.
(The whole thread also quickly turned into a discussion of Ayn Rand,
for that matter. Sigh. Sometimes it doesn't do to revisit one's
memories.)
I have a Baen book "A Separate Star", edited by Drake and Miesel, subtitled "A tribute to Rudyard Kipling, containing a variety of stories by well known authors purportedly influenced by Kipling, and a few by Kipling himself. Book copyright is 1989. Could that be a cause or an effect of your original thread?
Joe Bernstein
2018-10-04 01:40:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by t***@gmail.com
So in the back of my copy of Drake's Lt Leary Commanding (2001
paperback edition published by Baen), there are three pages titled
"If you like...you should try..." ;
Sometime around then we had a thread here of the same kind. I think
Kipling was in the subject line, and the idea was mainstream writer
-> spec-fic writer.
<https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.arts.sf.written/vb91rMdxAZ8[1-25]>
I have a Baen book "A Separate Star", edited by Drake and Miesel,
subtitled "A tribute to Rudyard Kipling, containing a variety of
stories by well known authors purportedly influenced by Kipling,
and a few by Kipling himself. Book copyright is 1989. Could that
be a cause or an effect of your original thread?
Effect, definitely not, since the thread was 2005.

Cause? I doubt it. The thread was started by David Tate, the list
of mainstream authors was decidedly middle- to high-brow, and he said
it was inspired by a contemporary thread started by Kate Nepveu,
'Fantasy Conversion Kit', meant to list books to give non-genre
readers to convince them fantasy was OK to read. In fact, he was the
third poster to that thread, and mused over starting the thread he
soon *did* start *in that post*. So no, I don't think a then sixteen-
year-old Baen book had much to do with it, although the book sounds
possibly respectable enough to have gotten his attention when it came
out. (For that matter, I don't really have a clue what he was like
in 1989, and he may well not have been as relatively highbrow then as
he was when I knew him here. I wasn't myself, although flipside I
was much more of a spec-fic reader in 2005 than in 1989.)

Kate Nepveu's thread was a bit annoying to extract from Google, and
this URL may slightly misdirect you:
<https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/rec.arts.sf.written/kYTMmGP9xC4/1bK2bDpzOyoJ>

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
Robert Carnegie
2018-10-03 20:25:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by t***@gmail.com
So in the back of my copy of Drake's Lt Leary Commanding (2001
paperback edition published by Baen), there are three pages titled
"If you like...you should try..." ; and of course their "you should
try" are all Baen works/authors, but I'm finding their
recommendations rather entertaining (if not always on target).
Sometime around then we had a thread here of the same kind. I think
Kipling was in the subject line, and the idea was mainstream writer
-> spec-fic writer. One of my prouder moments on Usenet is my
contribution to that thread, in which the mainstream writers were
ancient Greeks and, I think, Romans (several of them themselves
spec-fic writers, of course).
<https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/rec.arts.sf.written/vb91rMdxAZ8%5B1-25%5D>'
and oops, it turns out what I remembered is just the second half of a
post in whose first half I just whine about the whole idea. Sigh.
(The whole thread also quickly turned into a discussion of Ayn Rand,
for that matter. Sigh. Sometimes it doesn't do to revisit one's
memories.)
Post by t***@gmail.com
Quests ... Mary Brown, Elizabeth Moon, Piers Anthony
This is ludicrous on the face of it. I don't see how anyone could
possibly like these three authors for similar reasons. (Mind, I'm
not saying nobody could like all three - I do myself, for certain
values of "like" - but the *grouping* makes about as much sense as
lemon meringue, kimchi and toothpaste.)
The publisher wants you to buy 'em, not like 'em.
If they persuade you to buy books you don't like,
that's a kind of win.

But in that case should Piers Anthony be last or
first in the collection? Could he put you off quests
before you get around to the others?
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown [snip] has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
She wrote five books with four heroines; the first book's acquires a
ring which each of the others inherits, so they're just barely a
series. To spoil just a bit, the first and last are pretty light-
hearted, the ones in between darker; all but the pseudo-science-
fictional fourth book tell of journies which can be understood as
quests, no doubt why Baen put her into this line. Brown took some
pains to repeat herself with variations, making it obvious that
she wasn't just a naive storyteller, but if she had any agenda
other than art, I didn't notice it. Recommended if quiet, nearly
irenic fantasy is your thing.
<The Unlikely Ones>, 1986
<Pigs Don't Fly>, 1994
<Master of Many Treasures>, 1995 (same heroine)
<Strange Deliverance>, 1997 (arguably sf; most distinctive plot)
<Dragonne's Eg> [sic], 1999
Joe Bernstein
--
t***@gmail.com
2018-10-05 11:56:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by t***@gmail.com
<some snippage>
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown [snip] has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
She wrote five books with four heroines; the first book's acquires a
ring which each of the others inherits, so they're just barely a
series. To spoil just a bit, the first and last are pretty light-
hearted, the ones in between darker; all but the pseudo-science-
fictional fourth book tell of journies which can be understood as
quests, no doubt why Baen put her into this line. Brown took some
pains to repeat herself with variations, making it obvious that
she wasn't just a naive storyteller, but if she had any agenda
other than art, I didn't notice it. Recommended if quiet, nearly
irenic fantasy is your thing.
<The Unlikely Ones>, 1986
<Pigs Don't Fly>, 1994
<Master of Many Treasures>, 1995 (same heroine)
<Strange Deliverance>, 1997 (arguably sf; most distinctive plot)
<Dragonne's Eg> [sic], 1999
Ah good - thank you very much Joe.
- Tony
Quadibloc
2018-10-05 01:34:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.

Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.

The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.

And in this video of a music performance:



Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?

Not, of course, _this_ Nancy Wilson:



John Savard
Quadibloc
2018-10-05 01:39:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
I spelled them both wrong.

The author's name was spelled exactly the same way as the famous singer's, Sarah
Vaughan. The book being signed was her "The Anatomy of a Scandal".

John Savard
Quadibloc
2018-10-05 01:54:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
http://youtu.be/Q48GbOy-AGo
I had to dig way down in the search results, but I finally found a clip of her in
her heyday:



John Savard
Scott Lurndal
2018-10-05 13:05:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
http://youtu.be/Q48GbOy-AGo
I had to dig way down in the search results, but I finally found a clip of her in
I saw Nancy at the Hollywood Bowl. Also saw Sarah Vaughn (and stevie ray with BB)
there during the 25 years of playboy jazz festivals I attended. Over that
period (1984-2009), that included Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Joe Williams,
various incarnations of the classic swing bands (e.g. Woody Herman's thundering
herd, Glen Miller band, Tonight Show orchestra), Spyro Gyra, Yellowjackets,
Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke, Al DiMeola (all solo, it wasn't until after 2010
that they performed again as Return to Forever), Joe Sample, Joe Henderson,
Larry Carlton, The Rippingtons, Rit, Maynard, Ray Charles, Sonny Rollins,
Stan Getz, The Crusaders, Bela Fleck, Ozomotli, et alia. About 500 acts, total.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-05 14:20:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
http://youtu.be/Q48GbOy-AGo
I had to dig way down in the search results, but I finally found a clip
of her in
I saw Nancy at the Hollywood Bowl. Also saw Sarah Vaughn (and stevie ray with BB)
there during the 25 years of playboy jazz festivals I attended. Over that
period (1984-2009), that included Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Joe Williams,
various incarnations of the classic swing bands (e.g. Woody Herman's thundering
herd, Glen Miller band, Tonight Show orchestra), Spyro Gyra, Yellowjackets,
Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke, Al DiMeola (all solo, it wasn't until after 2010
that they performed again as Return to Forever), Joe Sample, Joe Henderson,
Larry Carlton, The Rippingtons, Rit, Maynard, Ray Charles, Sonny Rollins,
Stan Getz, The Crusaders, Bela Fleck, Ozomotli, et alia. About 500 acts, total.
Well, during my student days (when students got discount tickets
to concerts), I saw Teresa Stich-Randall, Russell Oberlin, Ralph
Kirkpatrick, Jacqueline du Pre, Charles Bressler, Glenn Gould
(yes, he wore red socks, crossed his legs, and hummed), and
others whom I can't name now, it's been too long.

And I saw Jess Thomas three times: as Lohengrin (that was in the
Greek Theatre, and when it came to "Mein lieber Schwan" they
opened the doors in the backdrop and he sang *facing away from
the audience* and sang into open air with nothing to back him but
the Golden Gate Bridge, and we could hear every note); as
Cavaradossi in _Tosca_, and as Loge in _Rheingold._

And singing in University Chorus, I got to sing in Beethoven's
Ninth under Josef Krips, and Debussy's "Sirenes" under Georges
Pretre.

Since then, I've seen Rogers Covey-Crump a few times and Benjamin
Bagby every time he came to Berkeley, however broke we were.

A different pantheon from yours, but just as memorable.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
and when it
t***@gmail.com
2018-10-05 11:58:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
Peter Trei
2018-10-05 12:32:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Quadibloc
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.

Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.

pt
Jerry Brown
2018-10-05 17:46:40 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Quadibloc
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
There is a British news anchor called Jon Snow who has been around for
several decades (i.e. predating ASoIaF) and is still active. I've
wondered how bemused he must have been the first few times he was
accused of knowing nothing.
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-05 18:28:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:58:02 AM UTC-4,
On Thursday, October 4, 2018 at 9:34:33 PM UTC-4, Quadibloc
On Friday, September 28, 2018 at 2:11:53 PM UTC-6,
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a
couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore
with a sign about an author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her
that she consider using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the
guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not
be the famous person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so
deliberately, but it happens. Even worse would be to share an
infamous name, with a real or fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service
called 'Dick Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible',
an excellent podcast I listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the
audio, it sounds like the actress.
There is a British news anchor called Jon Snow who has been
around for several decades (i.e. predating ASoIaF) and is still
active. I've wondered how bemused he must have been the first
few times he was accused of knowing nothing.
There used to be a radio DJ in LA who was a bit of a shock jock,
named Michael Jackson. Shortly after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, he
called up their corporate headquarters live on the air. They didn't
believe that was his name, or that they were live on the air in LA.
It went on for some time.

(I used to get asked a lot of I was the Terry Austin who worked as
na inker for whichever comic book company did Green Lantern. He is
apparently pretty well known in some circles. Even met him at
ComicCon one year.)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Juho Julkunen
2018-10-05 21:15:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not
be the famous person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so
(I used to get asked a lot of I was the Terry Austin who worked as
na inker for whichever comic book company did Green Lantern. He is
apparently pretty well known in some circles. Even met him at
ComicCon one year.)
He did work for DC, too, but he made his name inking Uncanny X-men on
Claremont and Byrne's run.

He spent the bulk of this millennium inking Sonic for Archie Comics,
apparently.
--
Juho Julkunen
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-05 22:44:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but
not be the famous person. I can't imagine a parent naming a
kid so
(I used to get asked a lot of I was the Terry Austin who worked
as na inker for whichever comic book company did Green Lantern.
He is apparently pretty well known in some circles. Even met
him at ComicCon one year.)
He did work for DC, too, but he made his name inking Uncanny
X-men on Claremont and Byrne's run.
He spent the bulk of this millennium inking Sonic for Archie
Comics, apparently.
I'll take your word for it. I never read comic books, even as a kid,
and couldn't tell you who printed what. All I know is that I saw some
Green Lantern artwork at his artist's booth at the convention. My
only other memory is that he seemed like a nice guy, and said (at the
time - this was a *long* time ago) that he didn't believe in email (I
asked because he has a lot of fans who would love to tell him).
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Greg Goss
2018-10-08 06:53:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
There used to be a radio DJ in LA who was a bit of a shock jock,
named Michael Jackson. Shortly after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, he
called up their corporate headquarters live on the air. They didn't
believe that was his name, or that they were live on the air in LA.
It went on for some time.
Back in 1988, the woman I was drooling over was drooling over a goth
garage-band (and occasional gigs) musician named "Mike Jackson". In
person he prefered "Michael" but that would just be confusing for a
musician's bookings.

Thirty years later, the woman involved in the drool-triangle (I don't
know if she ever connected with him) was trying to set me up with the
now-female person whose new name I forget. I believe in equality and
all that, but am heading towards elderly, and the concept squicke me.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Kevrob
2018-10-11 00:39:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
(I used to get asked a lot of I was the Terry Austin who worked as
na inker for whichever comic book company did Green Lantern. He is
apparently pretty well known in some circles. Even met him at
ComicCon one year.)
That would be National/DC Comics. The comics TA was the main inker
on the revived X-MEN from Marvel for 4 years. Tons of credits
and bags of comics fan awards:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Austin_(comics)

Kevin R
Greg Goss
2018-10-08 06:49:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
There is a British news anchor called Jon Snow who has been around for
several decades (i.e. predating ASoIaF) and is still active. I've
wondered how bemused he must have been the first few times he was
accused of knowing nothing.
In the eighties (?) Wendy's was presenting their vicious CEO as a
friendly uncle character spokesman in their ads.

Comedian Dave Thomas was given a TV show about that time.

"OK, I'm not THAT Dave Thomas, but I was here first. OK, he's older
than I am, so that doesn't work. But you HEARD OF me first."
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Jerry Brown
2018-10-11 17:29:22 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 05 Oct 2018 18:46:40 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Quadibloc
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
There is a British news anchor called Jon Snow who has been around for
several decades (i.e. predating ASoIaF) and is still active. I've
wondered how bemused he must have been the first few times he was
accused of knowing nothing.
And I myself occasionally get asked if I am the US politician (several
times in fact by T*m Br**n*ng).
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-11 19:31:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 05 Oct 2018 18:46:40 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
On Friday, September 28, 2018 at 2:11:53 PM UTC-6,
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a
couple others above) - has anyone here read
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by t***@gmail.com
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a
sign about an
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she
consider
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar
is Nancy Wilson?
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
There is a British news anchor called Jon Snow who has been around for
several decades (i.e. predating ASoIaF) and is still active. I've
wondered how bemused he must have been the first few times he was
accused of knowing nothing.
And I myself occasionally get asked if I am the US politician (several
times in fact by T*m Br**n*ng).
--
Jerry Brown
Hm. What is your actual first name? Gerald maybe? Because the
outgoing Governor of Califonia's first name is Edmund. That was
also his father's first name, who was Governor of California back
in the fifties. He was called Pat. (Middle names maybe?)
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jerry Brown
2018-10-13 06:22:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 05 Oct 2018 18:46:40 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
On Friday, September 28, 2018 at 2:11:53 PM UTC-6,
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a
couple others above) - has anyone here read
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by t***@gmail.com
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a
sign about an
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she
consider
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar
is Nancy Wilson?
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
There is a British news anchor called Jon Snow who has been around for
several decades (i.e. predating ASoIaF) and is still active. I've
wondered how bemused he must have been the first few times he was
accused of knowing nothing.
And I myself occasionally get asked if I am the US politician (several
times in fact by T*m Br**n*ng).
--
Jerry Brown
Hm. What is your actual first name?
Jeremy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Gerald maybe? Because the
outgoing Governor of Califonia's first name is Edmund. That was
also his father's first name, who was Governor of California back
in the fifties. He was called Pat. (Middle names maybe?)
AFAIC the governor should have abbreviated to "Gerry" like other
Geralds (e.g. Anderson).
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-13 14:20:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 05 Oct 2018 18:46:40 +0100, Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 05:32:02 -0700 (PDT), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
On Friday, September 28, 2018 at 2:11:53 PM UTC-6,
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a
couple others above) - has anyone here read
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by t***@gmail.com
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a
sign about an
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she
consider
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar
is Nancy Wilson?
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service
called 'Dick
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Jerry Brown
Post by Peter Trei
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
There is a British news anchor called Jon Snow who has been around for
several decades (i.e. predating ASoIaF) and is still active. I've
wondered how bemused he must have been the first few times he was
accused of knowing nothing.
And I myself occasionally get asked if I am the US politician (several
times in fact by T*m Br**n*ng).
--
Jerry Brown
Hm. What is your actual first name?
Jeremy
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Gerald maybe? Because the
outgoing Governor of Califonia's first name is Edmund. That was
also his father's first name, who was Governor of California back
in the fifties. He was called Pat. (Middle names maybe?)
AFAIC the governor should have abbreviated to "Gerry" like other
Geralds (e.g. Anderson).
Well, he didn't, and Pat died a while ago and Jerry's retiring
(term-limited out, and he's 80 anyway) at the end of the year.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2018-10-05 19:16:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Quadibloc
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
"BBC Radio 4 Extra" is a station that plays a lot of
really old programmes, including works overseen by
1950s "producer" - Bill Gates - such as a handful of
surviving episodes of shop sitcom "Floggit's".
Moriarty
2018-10-08 20:48:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Quadibloc
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Funnily enough I'd heard of Heart's Nancy Wilson but not the jazz singer. So which one is the famous one? In any case, the Heart one was born in 1954 when the jazz one was 17, so the same name is likely pure coincidence rather than a deliberate act by cruel parents.
Post by Peter Trei
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'.
If he'd given a damn, he could easily have gone by "Richard".

-Moriarty
Kevrob
2018-10-11 00:31:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Quadibloc
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
If he had been given the name "Richard," you'd think he'd insist on
"Rick" or "Rich" unless he liked being a "Dick."

The most famous fellow with my name was a meteorologist on the Weather
Channel, of African-American heritage. Nobody would confuse the two of
us. :)

Kevin R
Robert Carnegie
2018-10-11 07:20:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Peter Trei
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by Quadibloc
Post by t***@gmail.com
2) I'm unfamiliar with Mary Brown and Larry Segriff (and a couple others above) - has anyone here read
stuff written by them?
I've eaten Mary Brown chicken.
Which reminds me. I remember passing by a local bookstore with a sign about an
author signing by... Sarah Vaughn.
The author wasn't there, or I would have suggested to her that she consider
using her middle initial.
http://youtu.be/gQDJ45qJHBQ
Would you believe me if I told you the blonde playing the guitar is Nancy Wilson?
Well of course - it would be heartless of me to say otherwise.
- Tony
It must be hard to go through life with a famous name, but not be the famous
person. I can't imagine a parent naming a kid so deliberately, but it
happens. Even worse would be to share an infamous name, with a real or
fictional person.
Back in the 70s, there was an announcer on the BBC World Service called 'Dick
Tracy'. One of the staff on '99 percent invisible', an excellent podcast I
listen to, is 'Vivian Le', but on the audio, it sounds like the actress.
If he had been given the name "Richard," you'd think he'd insist on
"Rick" or "Rich" unless he liked being a "Dick."
The most famous fellow with my name was a meteorologist on the Weather
Channel, of African-American heritage. Nobody would confuse the two of
us. :)
Kevin R
In Britain in the 1970s I think Dick Tracy didn't suggest
membrum virile /or/ the famous comic strip detective,
but I'm not dead sure. We'd had our own "Dick Barton -
Special Agent" but he was mainly a memory by then.
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