Discussion:
Over The Hedge: the new stars
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Lynn McGuire
2020-01-25 19:53:51 UTC
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Over The Hedge: the new stars
https://www.gocomics.com/overthehedge/2020/01/25

Oh wow, no freaking way all those could could be as bright as stars, right ?

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-01-25 21:24:21 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Over The Hedge: the new stars
https://www.gocomics.com/overthehedge/2020/01/25
Oh wow, no freaking way all those could could be as bright as stars, right ?
I have no idea.

I live in the Bay Area where we seldom see stars, for the fog.

I'm mostly reminded of the Archangel Network in Doctor Who, set
up by the Master in order to bamboozle everybody. It was later
turned against him by the Doctor's friends.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Peter Trei
2020-01-25 22:08:05 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Over The Hedge: the new stars
https://www.gocomics.com/overthehedge/2020/01/25
Oh wow, no freaking way all those could could be as bright as stars, right ?
When in final orbit, they are 4th to 7th magnitude, and can be seen with the naked eye under good Conditions.

https://www.space.com/spacex-starlink-astronomy-observations.html.

https://spacenews.com/spacex-astronomers-working-to-address-brightness-of-starlink-satellites/

However, depending on latitude and time of year, they are only in sunlight for a limited period
after sunset and before dawn.

Painting them black would play hobb with their thermal regulation: they'd overheat. A better approach may actually be to mirrorize their surfaces, which would make them invisible most of the time, with occasional flashes.

Pt
J. Clarke
2020-01-25 23:25:22 UTC
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On Sat, 25 Jan 2020 14:08:05 -0800 (PST), Peter Trei
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Lynn McGuire
Over The Hedge: the new stars
https://www.gocomics.com/overthehedge/2020/01/25
Oh wow, no freaking way all those could could be as bright as stars, right ?
When in final orbit, they are 4th to 7th magnitude, and can be seen with the naked eye under good Conditions.
https://www.space.com/spacex-starlink-astronomy-observations.html.
https://spacenews.com/spacex-astronomers-working-to-address-brightness-of-starlink-satellites/
However, depending on latitude and time of year, they are only in sunlight for a limited period
after sunset and before dawn.
Painting them black would play hobb with their thermal regulation: they'd overheat. A better approach may actually be to mirrorize their surfaces, which would make them invisible most of the time, with occasional flashes.
They're trying a dark coating on one of the latest batch.

J. Clarke
2020-01-25 23:19:32 UTC
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On Sat, 25 Jan 2020 13:53:51 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Over The Hedge: the new stars
https://www.gocomics.com/overthehedge/2020/01/25
Oh wow, no freaking way all those could could be as bright as stars, right ?
Near dawn and dusk sure. Once they've passed into shadow no. And
they're in low orbits so they pass into shadow quickly.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
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