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165 One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire
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Jaimie Vandenbergh
2020-03-22 19:43:36 UTC
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On 21 Mar 2020 at 20:44:36 GMT, "Ted Nolan <tednolan>" <Ted Nolan <tednolan>>
165 One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire
As usual, a visit with Toby Daye is an interesting and engrossing
experience, and as usual, I am left with a lot of questions.
My biggest question is "I thought I read this one?", but I don't recognise
anything at all. Maybe I skipped it somehow. Or perhaps I read it with a heavy
cold on. Odd.

Well, (back) on the Strategic Book Reserve it goes.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
I always wanted to be someone. I should have been more specific.
-- Lily Tomlin
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-23 02:32:03 UTC
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165 One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire
As usual, a visit with Toby Daye is an interesting and engrossing
experience, and as usual, I am left with a lot of questions.
In this book, Fae knight and part-time detective October Daye must
find a pair of missing children to head off a ruinous war between
the land and sea fae, and a third child to head off a tragedy of
her own. Naturally the most powerful people in her world are either
aligned against her, or powerless to help. The fact that the war
may tear her from the man she loves is simply icing on the cake.
The book moves along at a good clip, and Toby's voice remains an
entertaining one. Add to that the fact that we get a bunch of
revelations about the Ludiaeg and a picture of life amongst the sea
fae.
Why then can't I go five stars? I think for the following reasons
and questions...
WHICH ENTAIL SPOILERS
I think the biggest thing that gave me a bit of nagging frustration
with this book was Toby's lack of gumption in her personal life.
We know from the first book that she makes poor choices about who
to love (or sleep with), and we were teased time and again in this
book with Connor's wishy-washiness. Toby is told several times
that he has a suspicious ammount of "but it wasn't my fault" in his
past, and she reacts time and again to the "I'm king, and I accept
my responsibilities and consequences" Tybolt, but the plot structure
saves her from having to come to a realization that she has chosen
badly by arranging for Connor to die a hero. Likewise, she avoids
taking the hard path of staying in her daughter's life even if it
is a human life. I can kind of see how being turned into a horse
terminally freaked Quentin's girlfriend out, but nothing worse than
what human kindappers would have done has happened to Toby's daughter
(I'm not saying that isn't bad -- it certainly was!). To just
accept that being around Fae would drive her crazy in itself seems
odd for the woman who is supposed to be re-writing the rules of
faery. Finally, the resolution to the war that Toby comes up with
entails her dropping her noble title and giving up her homestead.
This just feels like backsliding. We know Toby doesn't enjoy being
a countess, but the brief glimpses we get of her domain show that
she is trying something new and special, and to just give it up
(and to give up on proving the Queen wrong about giving her a
posioned chalice) feels totally wrong. If nothing else, she has
just sold Marcia down the river, and spit on the alliance with the
Cait Sidhe.
Also, Toby's detective skills continue to be fairly minimal,
consisting in this book of calling someone up on the phone and
asking if he knows who did it. As it happens, he does..
I'm also still trying to figure out why the villian thought his
plan would work out to his advantage, and why he thought a psychotic
girl would be a good confederate (and how he got access to her..)
And why an outnumbered army in a society which doesn't hesitate to
use tech for transportation or communication wouldn't invest in
some guns..
I think any book with the Ludiaeg in it should be rated five stars.

And I am not biased at all.

Lynn McGuire
J. Clarke
2020-03-23 02:59:30 UTC
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Permalink
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 21:32:03 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
165 One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire
As usual, a visit with Toby Daye is an interesting and engrossing
experience, and as usual, I am left with a lot of questions.
In this book, Fae knight and part-time detective October Daye must
find a pair of missing children to head off a ruinous war between
the land and sea fae, and a third child to head off a tragedy of
her own. Naturally the most powerful people in her world are either
aligned against her, or powerless to help. The fact that the war
may tear her from the man she loves is simply icing on the cake.
The book moves along at a good clip, and Toby's voice remains an
entertaining one. Add to that the fact that we get a bunch of
revelations about the Ludiaeg and a picture of life amongst the sea
fae.
Why then can't I go five stars? I think for the following reasons
and questions...
WHICH ENTAIL SPOILERS
I think the biggest thing that gave me a bit of nagging frustration
with this book was Toby's lack of gumption in her personal life.
We know from the first book that she makes poor choices about who
to love (or sleep with), and we were teased time and again in this
book with Connor's wishy-washiness. Toby is told several times
that he has a suspicious ammount of "but it wasn't my fault" in his
past, and she reacts time and again to the "I'm king, and I accept
my responsibilities and consequences" Tybolt, but the plot structure
saves her from having to come to a realization that she has chosen
badly by arranging for Connor to die a hero. Likewise, she avoids
taking the hard path of staying in her daughter's life even if it
is a human life. I can kind of see how being turned into a horse
terminally freaked Quentin's girlfriend out, but nothing worse than
what human kindappers would have done has happened to Toby's daughter
(I'm not saying that isn't bad -- it certainly was!). To just
accept that being around Fae would drive her crazy in itself seems
odd for the woman who is supposed to be re-writing the rules of
faery. Finally, the resolution to the war that Toby comes up with
entails her dropping her noble title and giving up her homestead.
This just feels like backsliding. We know Toby doesn't enjoy being
a countess, but the brief glimpses we get of her domain show that
she is trying something new and special, and to just give it up
(and to give up on proving the Queen wrong about giving her a
posioned chalice) feels totally wrong. If nothing else, she has
just sold Marcia down the river, and spit on the alliance with the
Cait Sidhe.
Also, Toby's detective skills continue to be fairly minimal,
consisting in this book of calling someone up on the phone and
asking if he knows who did it. As it happens, he does..
I'm also still trying to figure out why the villian thought his
plan would work out to his advantage, and why he thought a psychotic
girl would be a good confederate (and how he got access to her..)
And why an outnumbered army in a society which doesn't hesitate to
use tech for transportation or communication wouldn't invest in
some guns..
I think any book with the Ludiaeg in it should be rated five stars.
And I am not biased at all.
There is a little problem with the fae and guns in that universe. Iron
is deadly. Toby can tolerate a little of it because she's only half
fae. Guns, unless you're going for something very exotic, contain a
lot of iron. And it's not all that clear that shooting a fae does
much other than make it angry anyway, unless you're using a silver or
iron bullet (silver and iron are toxic to different extents--there are
cases where to make sure you have to use both) and generally speaking
neither does any kindness to your gun barrel.

Note, there is a big hole in this theory, a lot of fae drive steel
cars and it doesn't seem to bother them.
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-23 04:33:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 21:32:03 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
165 One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire
As usual, a visit with Toby Daye is an interesting and engrossing
experience, and as usual, I am left with a lot of questions.
In this book, Fae knight and part-time detective October Daye must
find a pair of missing children to head off a ruinous war between
the land and sea fae, and a third child to head off a tragedy of
her own. Naturally the most powerful people in her world are either
aligned against her, or powerless to help. The fact that the war
may tear her from the man she loves is simply icing on the cake.
The book moves along at a good clip, and Toby's voice remains an
entertaining one. Add to that the fact that we get a bunch of
revelations about the Ludiaeg and a picture of life amongst the sea
fae.
Why then can't I go five stars? I think for the following reasons
and questions...
WHICH ENTAIL SPOILERS
I think the biggest thing that gave me a bit of nagging frustration
with this book was Toby's lack of gumption in her personal life.
We know from the first book that she makes poor choices about who
to love (or sleep with), and we were teased time and again in this
book with Connor's wishy-washiness. Toby is told several times
that he has a suspicious ammount of "but it wasn't my fault" in his
past, and she reacts time and again to the "I'm king, and I accept
my responsibilities and consequences" Tybolt, but the plot structure
saves her from having to come to a realization that she has chosen
badly by arranging for Connor to die a hero. Likewise, she avoids
taking the hard path of staying in her daughter's life even if it
is a human life. I can kind of see how being turned into a horse
terminally freaked Quentin's girlfriend out, but nothing worse than
what human kindappers would have done has happened to Toby's daughter
(I'm not saying that isn't bad -- it certainly was!). To just
accept that being around Fae would drive her crazy in itself seems
odd for the woman who is supposed to be re-writing the rules of
faery. Finally, the resolution to the war that Toby comes up with
entails her dropping her noble title and giving up her homestead.
This just feels like backsliding. We know Toby doesn't enjoy being
a countess, but the brief glimpses we get of her domain show that
she is trying something new and special, and to just give it up
(and to give up on proving the Queen wrong about giving her a
posioned chalice) feels totally wrong. If nothing else, she has
just sold Marcia down the river, and spit on the alliance with the
Cait Sidhe.
Also, Toby's detective skills continue to be fairly minimal,
consisting in this book of calling someone up on the phone and
asking if he knows who did it. As it happens, he does..
I'm also still trying to figure out why the villian thought his
plan would work out to his advantage, and why he thought a psychotic
girl would be a good confederate (and how he got access to her..)
And why an outnumbered army in a society which doesn't hesitate to
use tech for transportation or communication wouldn't invest in
some guns..
I think any book with the Ludiaeg in it should be rated five stars.
And I am not biased at all.
There is a little problem with the fae and guns in that universe. Iron
is deadly. Toby can tolerate a little of it because she's only half
fae. Guns, unless you're going for something very exotic, contain a
lot of iron. And it's not all that clear that shooting a fae does
much other than make it angry anyway, unless you're using a silver or
iron bullet (silver and iron are toxic to different extents--there are
cases where to make sure you have to use both) and generally speaking
neither does any kindness to your gun barrel.
Note, there is a big hole in this theory, a lot of fae drive steel
cars and it doesn't seem to bother them.
Steel jacketed bullets have been widely used in big game hunting for
over a hundred years. Steel cored armor piercing bullets are widely
used by armed forces all over the world. Barrels wear out primarily
from thermal erosion by the propellent gases, not mechanical wear.

Hobbyists have cast silver bullets using standard bullets molds
and fired them from ordinary guns. These are considerably harder
than lead bullets, so it takes more force to start them into the
rifling. It therefore requires careful handloading to achieve
maximum performance without exceeding safe pressures, but no
more so than with the monolithic copper alloy bullets which
are in common use.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
J. Clarke
2020-03-23 05:55:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 21:32:03 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
165 One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire
As usual, a visit with Toby Daye is an interesting and engrossing
experience, and as usual, I am left with a lot of questions.
In this book, Fae knight and part-time detective October Daye must
find a pair of missing children to head off a ruinous war between
the land and sea fae, and a third child to head off a tragedy of
her own. Naturally the most powerful people in her world are either
aligned against her, or powerless to help. The fact that the war
may tear her from the man she loves is simply icing on the cake.
The book moves along at a good clip, and Toby's voice remains an
entertaining one. Add to that the fact that we get a bunch of
revelations about the Ludiaeg and a picture of life amongst the sea
fae.
Why then can't I go five stars? I think for the following reasons
and questions...
WHICH ENTAIL SPOILERS
I think the biggest thing that gave me a bit of nagging frustration
with this book was Toby's lack of gumption in her personal life.
We know from the first book that she makes poor choices about who
to love (or sleep with), and we were teased time and again in this
book with Connor's wishy-washiness. Toby is told several times
that he has a suspicious ammount of "but it wasn't my fault" in his
past, and she reacts time and again to the "I'm king, and I accept
my responsibilities and consequences" Tybolt, but the plot structure
saves her from having to come to a realization that she has chosen
badly by arranging for Connor to die a hero. Likewise, she avoids
taking the hard path of staying in her daughter's life even if it
is a human life. I can kind of see how being turned into a horse
terminally freaked Quentin's girlfriend out, but nothing worse than
what human kindappers would have done has happened to Toby's daughter
(I'm not saying that isn't bad -- it certainly was!). To just
accept that being around Fae would drive her crazy in itself seems
odd for the woman who is supposed to be re-writing the rules of
faery. Finally, the resolution to the war that Toby comes up with
entails her dropping her noble title and giving up her homestead.
This just feels like backsliding. We know Toby doesn't enjoy being
a countess, but the brief glimpses we get of her domain show that
she is trying something new and special, and to just give it up
(and to give up on proving the Queen wrong about giving her a
posioned chalice) feels totally wrong. If nothing else, she has
just sold Marcia down the river, and spit on the alliance with the
Cait Sidhe.
Also, Toby's detective skills continue to be fairly minimal,
consisting in this book of calling someone up on the phone and
asking if he knows who did it. As it happens, he does..
I'm also still trying to figure out why the villian thought his
plan would work out to his advantage, and why he thought a psychotic
girl would be a good confederate (and how he got access to her..)
And why an outnumbered army in a society which doesn't hesitate to
use tech for transportation or communication wouldn't invest in
some guns..
I think any book with the Ludiaeg in it should be rated five stars.
And I am not biased at all.
There is a little problem with the fae and guns in that universe. Iron
is deadly. Toby can tolerate a little of it because she's only half
fae. Guns, unless you're going for something very exotic, contain a
lot of iron. And it's not all that clear that shooting a fae does
much other than make it angry anyway, unless you're using a silver or
iron bullet (silver and iron are toxic to different extents--there are
cases where to make sure you have to use both) and generally speaking
neither does any kindness to your gun barrel.
Note, there is a big hole in this theory, a lot of fae drive steel
cars and it doesn't seem to bother them.
Steel jacketed bullets have been widely used in big game hunting for
over a hundred years.
You might want to check again. "Full metal jacket" is usually gilding
metal, not steel. Steel is not good for barrels, and big game hunters
using multi-thousand 19th century dollar double rifles would not be
wanting to wreck their barrels.
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Steel cored armor piercing bullets are widely
used by armed forces all over the world. Barrels wear out primarily
from thermal erosion by the propellent gases, not mechanical wear.
If you are using copper or gilding-metal or lead bullets. Steel on
steel galls.
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Hobbyists have cast silver bullets using standard bullets molds
and fired them from ordinary guns.
I didn't say otherwise.
Post by p***@hotmail.com
These are considerably harder
than lead bullets, so it takes more force to start them into the
rifling. It therefore requires careful handloading to achieve
maximum performance without exceeding safe pressures, but no
more so than with the monolithic copper alloy bullets which
are in common use.
So how well do they work in the sort of weapon that would make a
difference in a fae on fae war?
p***@hotmail.com
2020-03-23 06:48:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by p***@hotmail.com
Post by J. Clarke
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 21:32:03 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
165 One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire
As usual, a visit with Toby Daye is an interesting and engrossing
experience, and as usual, I am left with a lot of questions.
In this book, Fae knight and part-time detective October Daye must
find a pair of missing children to head off a ruinous war between
the land and sea fae, and a third child to head off a tragedy of
her own. Naturally the most powerful people in her world are either
aligned against her, or powerless to help. The fact that the war
may tear her from the man she loves is simply icing on the cake.
The book moves along at a good clip, and Toby's voice remains an
entertaining one. Add to that the fact that we get a bunch of
revelations about the Ludiaeg and a picture of life amongst the sea
fae.
Why then can't I go five stars? I think for the following reasons
and questions...
WHICH ENTAIL SPOILERS
I think the biggest thing that gave me a bit of nagging frustration
with this book was Toby's lack of gumption in her personal life.
We know from the first book that she makes poor choices about who
to love (or sleep with), and we were teased time and again in this
book with Connor's wishy-washiness. Toby is told several times
that he has a suspicious ammount of "but it wasn't my fault" in his
past, and she reacts time and again to the "I'm king, and I accept
my responsibilities and consequences" Tybolt, but the plot structure
saves her from having to come to a realization that she has chosen
badly by arranging for Connor to die a hero. Likewise, she avoids
taking the hard path of staying in her daughter's life even if it
is a human life. I can kind of see how being turned into a horse
terminally freaked Quentin's girlfriend out, but nothing worse than
what human kindappers would have done has happened to Toby's daughter
(I'm not saying that isn't bad -- it certainly was!). To just
accept that being around Fae would drive her crazy in itself seems
odd for the woman who is supposed to be re-writing the rules of
faery. Finally, the resolution to the war that Toby comes up with
entails her dropping her noble title and giving up her homestead.
This just feels like backsliding. We know Toby doesn't enjoy being
a countess, but the brief glimpses we get of her domain show that
she is trying something new and special, and to just give it up
(and to give up on proving the Queen wrong about giving her a
posioned chalice) feels totally wrong. If nothing else, she has
just sold Marcia down the river, and spit on the alliance with the
Cait Sidhe.
Also, Toby's detective skills continue to be fairly minimal,
consisting in this book of calling someone up on the phone and
asking if he knows who did it. As it happens, he does..
I'm also still trying to figure out why the villian thought his
plan would work out to his advantage, and why he thought a psychotic
girl would be a good confederate (and how he got access to her..)
And why an outnumbered army in a society which doesn't hesitate to
use tech for transportation or communication wouldn't invest in
some guns..
I think any book with the Ludiaeg in it should be rated five stars.
And I am not biased at all.
There is a little problem with the fae and guns in that universe. Iron
is deadly. Toby can tolerate a little of it because she's only half
fae. Guns, unless you're going for something very exotic, contain a
lot of iron. And it's not all that clear that shooting a fae does
much other than make it angry anyway, unless you're using a silver or
iron bullet (silver and iron are toxic to different extents--there are
cases where to make sure you have to use both) and generally speaking
neither does any kindness to your gun barrel.
Note, there is a big hole in this theory, a lot of fae drive steel
cars and it doesn't seem to bother them.
Steel jacketed bullets have been widely used in big game hunting for
over a hundred years.
You might want to check again. "Full metal jacket" is usually gilding
metal, not steel. Steel is not good for barrels, and big game hunters
using multi-thousand 19th century dollar double rifles would not be
wanting to wreck their barrels.
A variety of constructions are now used to make "solid" bullets used for
dangerous game, including monolithic copper alloy, but steel jacketed
lead is still one of them:

https://www.hornady.com/bullets/dgs-dangerous-game-solid#!/

Yes, the bullet has a thin coating of copper but this is not thick
enough to prevent the steel jacket from being engraved by the rifling.
If it were useful to have exposed iron when shooting at fae, the copper
wash could be confined to the sides of the bullet.

Note that the 480 grain .458 DGS bullet is used for the 450 Nitro Express
and the 500 grain .474 DGS bullet is used for the 470 Nitro Express, both
cartridges being chambered almost exclusively in double rifles.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist

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