Discussion:
Brett Battles Project Eden Series
(too old to reply)
Amicus Brevis
2020-05-21 22:35:06 UTC
Permalink
Hi All,



Are there people on the list who have read Brett Battles Project Eden Series? I have a few thoughts about it, none of them good. Yet for some reason, I was unable to stop once I started - for any of the books - even though I considered the main story line incredible. Lot's of writers of traditional thriller fiction sometimes miss the fact that although it is acceptable for science fiction stores to be scientifically speculative or even fanciful, the plots are expected to be credible. Anyway, I found:


1. The bad guys are supposed to be super efficient (their dialogue sounds like it) but everything else about them is mediocre and sometimes even dumb.


2. As mediocre to stupid that the bad guys are, the good guys (both survivors and The Resistance) seem either below average intelligence or downright stupid. They are all brave people, but they kept doing really stupid things, that just fortuitously work out. In fact, they had just too much good luck and too little smarts.

3. It makes no sense that this small group, who show no evidence of having geneticists or research doctors on their team, develops a vaccine and the federal government and other labs around the world would not have it - in quantity. There is no way for any group to suppress that development. At minimum there should have been some reference to a huge outcry about the fact that they didn't have it. The real thing was more than three years after the test. Once their incompetence caused the test to break out of their cordon, their plan was shot to hell unless the second virus was such that the vaccine for the first would not work. But we know that it is the vaccine for the first one that worked with The Resistance.

The overall plot of the series was just horrible.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-21 23:20:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Amicus Brevis
Hi All,
Are there people on the list who have read Brett Battles Project Eden
Series? I have a few thoughts about it, none of them good. Yet for some
reason, I was unable to stop once I started - for any of the books -
even though I considered the main story line incredible. Lot's of
writers of traditional thriller fiction sometimes miss the fact that
although it is acceptable for science fiction stores to be
scientifically speculative or even fanciful, the plots are expected to
1. The bad guys are supposed to be super efficient (their dialogue
sounds like it) but everything else about them is mediocre and sometimes
even dumb.
2. As mediocre to stupid that the bad guys are, the good guys (both
survivors and The Resistance) seem either below average intelligence or
downright stupid. They are all brave people, but they kept doing really
stupid things, that just fortuitously work out. In fact, they had just
too much good luck and too little smarts.
3. It makes no sense that this small group, who show no evidence of
having geneticists or research doctors on their team, develops a vaccine
and the federal government and other labs around the world would not
have it - in quantity. There is no way for any group to suppress that
development. At minimum there should have been some reference to a huge
outcry about the fact that they didn't have it. The real thing was more
than three years after the test. Once their incompetence caused the
test to break out of their cordon, their plan was shot to hell unless
the second virus was such that the vaccine for the first would not work.
But we know that it is the vaccine for the first one that worked with
The Resistance.
The overall plot of the series was just horrible.
I never heard of it before, but thanks for the warning.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Amicus Brevis
2020-05-22 21:04:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Hi All,
Are there people on the list who have read Brett Battles Project Eden
Series? I have a few thoughts about it, none of them good. Yet for some
reason, I was unable to stop once I started - for any of the books -
even though I considered the main story line incredible. Lot's of
writers of traditional thriller fiction sometimes miss the fact that
although it is acceptable for science fiction stores to be
scientifically speculative or even fanciful, the plots are expected to
1. The bad guys are supposed to be super efficient (their dialogue
sounds like it) but everything else about them is mediocre and sometimes
even dumb.
2. As mediocre to stupid that the bad guys are, the good guys (both
survivors and The Resistance) seem either below average intelligence or
downright stupid. They are all brave people, but they kept doing really
stupid things, that just fortuitously work out. In fact, they had just
too much good luck and too little smarts.
3. It makes no sense that this small group, who show no evidence of
having geneticists or research doctors on their team, develops a vaccine
and the federal government and other labs around the world would not
have it - in quantity. There is no way for any group to suppress that
development. At minimum there should have been some reference to a huge
outcry about the fact that they didn't have it. The real thing was more
than three years after the test. Once their incompetence caused the
test to break out of their cordon, their plan was shot to hell unless
the second virus was such that the vaccine for the first would not work.
But we know that it is the vaccine for the first one that worked with
The Resistance.
The overall plot of the series was just horrible.
I never heard of it before, but thanks for the warning.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paradoxically, you probably won't regret reading it. It is one of those guilty reads like the National Enquirer - which I never read :-)
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-22 21:26:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Hi All,
Are there people on the list who have read Brett Battles Project Eden
Series? I have a few thoughts about it, none of them good. Yet for some
reason, I was unable to stop once I started - for any of the books -
even though I considered the main story line incredible. Lot's of
writers of traditional thriller fiction sometimes miss the fact that
although it is acceptable for science fiction stores to be
scientifically speculative or even fanciful, the plots are expected to
1. The bad guys are supposed to be super efficient (their dialogue
sounds like it) but everything else about them is mediocre and sometimes
even dumb.
2. As mediocre to stupid that the bad guys are, the good guys (both
survivors and The Resistance) seem either below average intelligence or
downright stupid. They are all brave people, but they kept doing really
stupid things, that just fortuitously work out. In fact, they had just
too much good luck and too little smarts.
3. It makes no sense that this small group, who show no evidence of
having geneticists or research doctors on their team, develops a vaccine
and the federal government and other labs around the world would not
have it - in quantity. There is no way for any group to suppress that
development. At minimum there should have been some reference to a huge
outcry about the fact that they didn't have it. The real thing was more
than three years after the test. Once their incompetence caused the
test to break out of their cordon, their plan was shot to hell unless
the second virus was such that the vaccine for the first would not work.
But we know that it is the vaccine for the first one that worked with
The Resistance.
The overall plot of the series was just horrible.
I never heard of it before, but thanks for the warning.
Paradoxically, you probably won't regret reading it. It is one of those
guilty reads like the National Enquirer - which I never read :-)
I don't either.

Now I'm trying to think of forms of written matter that I read
and that I would call "guilty reads." Can't think of any.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Amicus Brevis
2020-05-23 21:23:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Hi All,
Are there people on the list who have read Brett Battles Project Eden
Series? I have a few thoughts about it, none of them good. Yet for some
reason, I was unable to stop once I started - for any of the books -
even though I considered the main story line incredible. Lot's of
writers of traditional thriller fiction sometimes miss the fact that
although it is acceptable for science fiction stores to be
scientifically speculative or even fanciful, the plots are expected to
1. The bad guys are supposed to be super efficient (their dialogue
sounds like it) but everything else about them is mediocre and sometimes
even dumb.
2. As mediocre to stupid that the bad guys are, the good guys (both
survivors and The Resistance) seem either below average intelligence or
downright stupid. They are all brave people, but they kept doing really
stupid things, that just fortuitously work out. In fact, they had just
too much good luck and too little smarts.
3. It makes no sense that this small group, who show no evidence of
having geneticists or research doctors on their team, develops a vaccine
and the federal government and other labs around the world would not
have it - in quantity. There is no way for any group to suppress that
development. At minimum there should have been some reference to a huge
outcry about the fact that they didn't have it. The real thing was more
than three years after the test. Once their incompetence caused the
test to break out of their cordon, their plan was shot to hell unless
the second virus was such that the vaccine for the first would not work.
But we know that it is the vaccine for the first one that worked with
The Resistance.
The overall plot of the series was just horrible.
I never heard of it before, but thanks for the warning.
Paradoxically, you probably won't regret reading it. It is one of those
guilty reads like the National Enquirer - which I never read :-)
I don't either.
Now I'm trying to think of forms of written matter that I read
and that I would call "guilty reads." Can't think of any.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
There are no whole forms that fall into that category for me. But there are books that people read and love that I know are completely worthless. For me, - like _The Destroyer_ series mostly by Warren Murphy and Richard Murphy are some such books.

And then there are books that people like way more than any reasonable assessment of the books would warrant - and the reader thinks so too. For me, some of those are _The Dragon Never Sleeps_ by Glenn Cook, "The Age of the Pussyfoot" by Frederick Pohl, "The Star Beast" by Robert Heinlein, "The Battle of Forever" by A E Van Vogt and the short story "The Monster" by A E Van Vogt. I love these reads beyond all reason. I am embarrassed to admit how many times I have read them. All of them are best ordinary at best, yet they would be among the books I would read if I learned I have only a few more weeks to live - if I have time to read.
Titus G
2020-05-23 22:23:51 UTC
Permalink
On 24/05/20 9:23 am, Amicus Brevis wrote:
snip
Post by Amicus Brevis
And then there are books that people like way more than any reasonable assessment of the books would warrant - and the reader thinks so too. For me, some of those are _The Dragon Never Sleeps_ by Glenn Cook, "The Age of the Pussyfoot" by Frederick Pohl, "The Star Beast" by Robert Heinlein, "The Battle of Forever" by A E Van Vogt and the short story "The Monster" by A E Van Vogt. I love these reads beyond all reason. I am embarrassed to admit how many times I have read them. All of them are best ordinary at best, yet they would be among the books I would read if I learned I have only a few more weeks to live - if I have time to read.
It doesn't matter how something is classified. You are so lucky to have
found such books for yourself, Perhaps it is not plots nor characters
but a resonance with the authorial voice that provides the pleasure but
no matter what, it is great that you have such passion in regard to your
favourites and there should be no embarrassment.
Amicus Brevis
2020-05-24 20:56:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Amicus Brevis
And then there are books that people like way more than any reasonable assessment of the books would warrant - and the reader thinks so too. For me, some of those are _The Dragon Never Sleeps_ by Glenn Cook, "The Age of the Pussyfoot" by Frederick Pohl, "The Star Beast" by Robert Heinlein, "The Battle of Forever" by A E Van Vogt and the short story "The Monster" by A E Van Vogt. I love these reads beyond all reason. I am embarrassed to admit how many times I have read them. All of them are best ordinary at best, yet they would be among the books I would read if I learned I have only a few more weeks to live - if I have time to read.
It doesn't matter how something is classified. You are so lucky to have
found such books for yourself, Perhaps it is not plots nor characters
but a resonance with the authorial voice that provides the pleasure but
no matter what, it is great that you have such passion in regard to your
favourites and there should be no embarrassment.
Thanks! The embarrassment has helped to make me a better person too! I stopped criticizing people's entertainment choices decades ago because of it. Almost all my friends and close family are extremely snobbish about tv viewing choices - and are veritable "book Nazis".
Kevrob
2020-05-25 02:56:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Amicus Brevis
And then there are books that people like way more than any reasonable assessment of the books would warrant - and the reader thinks so too. For me, some of those are _The Dragon Never Sleeps_ by Glenn Cook, "The Age of the Pussyfoot" by Frederick Pohl, "The Star Beast" by Robert Heinlein, "The Battle of Forever" by A E Van Vogt and the short story "The Monster" by A E Van Vogt. I love these reads beyond all reason. I am embarrassed to admit how many times I have read them. All of them are best ordinary at best, yet they would be among the books I would read if I learned I have only a few more weeks to live - if I have time to read.
It doesn't matter how something is classified. You are so lucky to have
found such books for yourself, Perhaps it is not plots nor characters
but a resonance with the authorial voice that provides the pleasure but
no matter what, it is great that you have such passion in regard to your
favourites and there should be no embarrassment.
Thanks! The embarrassment has helped to make me a better person too! I stopped criticizing people's entertainment choices decades ago because of it. Almost all my friends and close family are extremely snobbish about tv viewing choices - and are veritable "book Nazis".
A poster in the comics groups used to use this quote for a sig:

[quote]


The head of the English department asked me, "Do you read any crap?"
And I said, no, in that insufferable high school manner, no doubt.
And he said, "You need to read more crap."
The point was to read more for entertainment and for fun. -
GAIL SIMONE

[/quote] Found in the comments section of:

https://www.cbr.com/issue-24-8/ {Comic Book Resources}

Kevin R
{Happily reading "more crap" since 1962. :) }
Amicus Brevis
2020-05-25 04:21:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Amicus Brevis
And then there are books that people like way more than any reasonable assessment of the books would warrant - and the reader thinks so too. For me, some of those are _The Dragon Never Sleeps_ by Glenn Cook, "The Age of the Pussyfoot" by Frederick Pohl, "The Star Beast" by Robert Heinlein, "The Battle of Forever" by A E Van Vogt and the short story "The Monster" by A E Van Vogt. I love these reads beyond all reason. I am embarrassed to admit how many times I have read them. All of them are best ordinary at best, yet they would be among the books I would read if I learned I have only a few more weeks to live - if I have time to read.
It doesn't matter how something is classified. You are so lucky to have
found such books for yourself, Perhaps it is not plots nor characters
but a resonance with the authorial voice that provides the pleasure but
no matter what, it is great that you have such passion in regard to your
favourites and there should be no embarrassment.
Thanks! The embarrassment has helped to make me a better person too! I stopped criticizing people's entertainment choices decades ago because of it. Almost all my friends and close family are extremely snobbish about tv viewing choices - and are veritable "book Nazis".
[quote]
The head of the English department asked me, "Do you read any crap?"
And I said, no, in that insufferable high school manner, no doubt.
And he said, "You need to read more crap."
The point was to read more for entertainment and for fun. -
GAIL SIMONE
https://www.cbr.com/issue-24-8/ {Comic Book Resources}
Kevin R
{Happily reading "more crap" since 1962. :) }
Wise man. Thank you. I read at a ratio of 5: 1 in favor of entertainment. And that does not include my "serious" reading in formats other than books. I have found that ratio defensible to myself. And, to be honest, I am my only critic on the matter.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-25 04:14:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
The head of the English department asked me, "Do you read any crap?"
And I said, no, in that insufferable high school manner, no doubt.
And he said, "You need to read more crap."
The point was to read more for entertainment and for fun. -
GAIL SIMONE
Cool. I had a high-school English teacher who was *convinced*
that SF was crap. He wanted me to read Willa Cather and Ralph
Waldo Emerson.

I had my revenge, though: he gave the annual literary prize to a
work of fantasy which had been plagiarized from one of the
lower-grade f/sf magazines, _Fantastic_ or _Amazing_ or one of
those. And I had a copy of the original, which I gave to him. I
did not press the point that the story he'd chosen was *not very
high-quality f/sf.*
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Amicus Brevis
2020-05-25 04:42:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
The head of the English department asked me, "Do you read any crap?"
And I said, no, in that insufferable high school manner, no doubt.
And he said, "You need to read more crap."
The point was to read more for entertainment and for fun. -
GAIL SIMONE
Cool. I had a high-school English teacher who was *convinced*
that SF was crap. He wanted me to read Willa Cather and Ralph
Waldo Emerson.
I had my revenge, though: he gave the annual literary prize to a
work of fantasy which had been plagiarized from one of the
lower-grade f/sf magazines, _Fantastic_ or _Amazing_ or one of
those. And I had a copy of the original, which I gave to him. I
did not press the point that the story he'd chosen was *not very
high-quality f/sf.*
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
LOL! Good for you. Sometimes I wish this list had an "up-vote" or "Like" function. But consider it given.
Kevrob
2020-05-25 17:38:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
The head of the English department asked me, "Do you read any crap?"
And I said, no, in that insufferable high school manner, no doubt.
And he said, "You need to read more crap."
The point was to read more for entertainment and for fun. -
GAIL SIMONE
Cool. I had a high-school English teacher who was *convinced*
that SF was crap. He wanted me to read Willa Cather and Ralph
Waldo Emerson.
I had my revenge, though: he gave the annual literary prize to a
work of fantasy which had been plagiarized from one of the
lower-grade f/sf magazines, _Fantastic_ or _Amazing_ or one of
those. And I had a copy of the original, which I gave to him. I
did not press the point that the story he'd chosen was *not very
high-quality f/sf.*
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
LOL! Good for you. Sometimes I wish this list had an "up-vote" or "Like" function. But consider it given.
That is one of Dorothy's best stories.

Shortly after I finished my VA in History and Political Science,
I went job hunting. I had been working full-time for a B Dalton,
except that in my last semester I switched from part-time school
and full-time work to a 5-course load (15 credits of the US type)
and a part-time work schedule: 24-30 hours a week. When I told my
manager, a recently installed replacement for the fellow who had
hired me, since promoted, that I was again available for full-time
I was told "we don't have the labor budget for that." And the
company had just killed the manager-trainee program.....

I managed to catch on with a local independent as a full-time
special order buyer who was also tasked with handling many back-
office tasks on our point-of-sales/inventory/orders computer system,
which was state of the art for 1986: a minicomputer running C/PM,
menu-driven/non-GUI and networked for up to 8 users! We did
nightly mini-tape backups, and could do EDI (electronic data
interchange) ordering via modem with two of our wholesalers! Just
don't try to run any other reports at the same time, or you'd crash
the whole thing. Later we switched to Windows, more terminals, added
PUBNET and as the 20th century waned, a website with webstore.

The owner delighted in quizzing staff about what they were reading,
as he had as much faith in a bookseller who doesn't read in his spare
time as you might have in a chef who won't eat his own cooking.
I used to drive him nuts when my reports of the fiction I read were
so heavy with sf and fantasy, much of which I had to special order,
because he dedicated so little space in the stores for those categories.
I majored in political science and history, and gobbled up tomes
from those departments, though different ones than he read, he being a
red diaper baby and I an ex-conservative turned libertarian. Eventually
he came to see this as a good thing. He'd send me ARCs and comp copies
of stuff he would never get around to sampling, thinking "maybe this is
the sort of thing Kevin would like..." As a result, I'd sometimes clue
him in to things that might sell well that he was going to skip or not
take a strong position on. If in-person bookselling survives in the
hoped-for "post Covid" world, and you are managing a store, staff it
with folks with disparate taste in reading. I've worked where the staff
all recommended the same stuff - BORING! It's much better to have
a "mystery maven," a "business maven," a "tech/science maven," etc,
especially when staff shared their particular knowledge with each other.
I used to call one co-worker at Mayfair Mall near Milwaukee "Wauwatosa's
Queen of Romance." She was so knowledgeable about that category that
she got special treatment from Harlequin and Silhouette (at the time,
part of Pocket Books/S&S.) She sold a lot of books for them. And
co-workers who knew all about children's books, from picture books for
baby to YA were essential.

I wasn't the only "sf/f guy" at my last store. One of my co-workers
was Midori Snyder. Between the two of us we could find or order anything
the customer might want, even ones he hadn't heard of that he _must_
have. :)

"You certainly know your trash" - George Deasey,
in Michael Chabon's "Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay."

Kevin R
Kevrob
2020-05-27 11:37:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Shortly after I finished my VA in History and Political Science,
...

BA, of course.

Famn dat dingers!

Kevin R

Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-23 22:40:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Hi All,
Are there people on the list who have read Brett Battles Project Eden
Series? I have a few thoughts about it, none of them good. Yet for some
reason, I was unable to stop once I started - for any of the books -
even though I considered the main story line incredible. Lot's of
writers of traditional thriller fiction sometimes miss the fact that
although it is acceptable for science fiction stores to be
scientifically speculative or even fanciful, the plots are expected to
1. The bad guys are supposed to be super efficient (their dialogue
sounds like it) but everything else about them is mediocre and sometimes
even dumb.
2. As mediocre to stupid that the bad guys are, the good guys (both
survivors and The Resistance) seem either below average intelligence or
downright stupid. They are all brave people, but they kept doing really
stupid things, that just fortuitously work out. In fact, they had just
too much good luck and too little smarts.
3. It makes no sense that this small group, who show no evidence of
having geneticists or research doctors on their team, develops a vaccine
and the federal government and other labs around the world would not
have it - in quantity. There is no way for any group to suppress that
development. At minimum there should have been some reference to a huge
outcry about the fact that they didn't have it. The real thing was more
than three years after the test. Once their incompetence caused the
test to break out of their cordon, their plan was shot to hell unless
the second virus was such that the vaccine for the first would not work.
But we know that it is the vaccine for the first one that worked with
The Resistance.
The overall plot of the series was just horrible.
I never heard of it before, but thanks for the warning.
Paradoxically, you probably won't regret reading it. It is one of those
guilty reads like the National Enquirer - which I never read :-)
I don't either.
Now I'm trying to think of forms of written matter that I read
and that I would call "guilty reads." Can't think of any.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
There are no whole forms that fall into that category for me. But there
are books that people read and love that I know are completely
worthless. For me, - like _The Destroyer_ series mostly by Warren
Murphy and Richard Murphy are some such books.
And then there are books that people like way more than any reasonable
assessment of the books would warrant - and the reader thinks so too.
For me, some of those are _The Dragon Never Sleeps_ by Glenn Cook, "The
Age of the Pussyfoot" by Frederick Pohl, "The Star Beast" by Robert
Heinlein, "The Battle of Forever" by A E Van Vogt and the short story
"The Monster" by A E Van Vogt. I love these reads beyond all reason. I
am embarrassed to admit how many times I have read them. All of them are
best ordinary at best, yet they would be among the books I would read if
I learned I have only a few more weeks to live - if I have time to read.
_The Star Beast_ is the only one of your list that I've read. I
like it a lot.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2020-05-25 07:46:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Amicus Brevis
Hi All,
Are there people on the list who have read Brett Battles Project Eden
Series? I have a few thoughts about it, none of them good. Yet for some
reason, I was unable to stop once I started - for any of the books -
even though I considered the main story line incredible. Lot's of
writers of traditional thriller fiction sometimes miss the fact that
although it is acceptable for science fiction stores to be
scientifically speculative or even fanciful, the plots are expected to
1. The bad guys are supposed to be super efficient (their dialogue
sounds like it) but everything else about them is mediocre and sometimes
even dumb.
2. As mediocre to stupid that the bad guys are, the good guys (both
survivors and The Resistance) seem either below average intelligence or
downright stupid. They are all brave people, but they kept doing really
stupid things, that just fortuitously work out. In fact, they had just
too much good luck and too little smarts.
3. It makes no sense that this small group, who show no evidence of
having geneticists or research doctors on their team, develops a vaccine
and the federal government and other labs around the world would not
have it - in quantity. There is no way for any group to suppress that
development. At minimum there should have been some reference to a huge
outcry about the fact that they didn't have it. The real thing was more
than three years after the test. Once their incompetence caused the
test to break out of their cordon, their plan was shot to hell unless
the second virus was such that the vaccine for the first would not work.
But we know that it is the vaccine for the first one that worked with
The Resistance.
The overall plot of the series was just horrible.
I never heard of it before, but thanks for the warning.
Paradoxically, you probably won't regret reading it. It is one of those
guilty reads like the National Enquirer - which I never read :-)
I don't either.
Now I'm trying to think of forms of written matter that I read
and that I would call "guilty reads." Can't think of any.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
There are no whole forms that fall into that category for me. But there
are books that people read and love that I know are completely
worthless. For me, - like _The Destroyer_ series mostly by Warren
Murphy and Richard Murphy are some such books.
And then there are books that people like way more than any reasonable
assessment of the books would warrant - and the reader thinks so too.
For me, some of those are _The Dragon Never Sleeps_ by Glenn Cook, "The
Age of the Pussyfoot" by Frederick Pohl, "The Star Beast" by Robert
Heinlein, "The Battle of Forever" by A E Van Vogt and the short story
"The Monster" by A E Van Vogt. I love these reads beyond all reason. I
am embarrassed to admit how many times I have read them. All of them are
best ordinary at best, yet they would be among the books I would read if
I learned I have only a few more weeks to live - if I have time to read.
_The Star Beast_ is the only one of your list that I've read. I
like it a lot.
Me too. TSB is in my top twenty list.

Lynn
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