Discussion:
[Because My Tears Are Delicious To You] Needle by Hal Clement
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James Nicoll
2020-03-29 13:31:07 UTC
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Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Magewolf
2020-03-29 17:40:44 UTC
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Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
I do not know if this book was very popular in Japan or just very
popular among authors and manga makers from there but references and
homages to it turn up all over the place.

The two best known homages being Parasyte and 7 Billion Needles, I think.
James Nicoll
2020-03-29 17:48:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
I do not know if this book was very popular in Japan or just very
popular among authors and manga makers from there but references and
homages to it turn up all over the place.
The two best known homages being Parasyte and 7 Billion Needles, I think.
Ah, the Velvet Underground of SF?
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
J. Clarke
2020-03-29 18:21:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
I do not know if this book was very popular in Japan or just very
popular among authors and manga makers from there but references and
homages to it turn up all over the place.
The two best known homages being Parasyte and 7 Billion Needles, I think.
An oddity, Amazon has it on Kindle just about everywhere but the US.
Not sure what that's telling us.
Ahasuerus
2020-03-30 15:58:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
Definitely one of the more enjoyable juveniles of the era.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-30 16:09:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
Definitely one of the more enjoyable juveniles of the era.
I certainly won't quibble over the 'enjoyable' part!

But was it a juvenile? Certainly one of the protags was young, but the
story was serialized in "Astounding", so it wasn't pitched to a "juvenile"
audience..
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jack Bohn
2020-03-30 16:22:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
Definitely one of the more enjoyable juveniles of the era.
I certainly won't quibble over the 'enjoyable' part!
But was it a juvenile? Certainly one of the protags was young, but the
story was serialized in "Astounding", so it wasn't pitched to a "juvenile"
audience..
Heinlein's _Citizen of the Galaxy_ was serialized in ASTOUNDING, _Have Spacesuit_ and _Starbeast_ in F&SF, but I think that was just extra money to the primary contract with Scribner's. Would Clement having a yearly book contract have been a good thing, or might it have cramped his writing too much?
--
-Jack
Ahasuerus
2020-03-30 16:38:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
Definitely one of the more enjoyable juveniles of the era.
I certainly won't quibble over the 'enjoyable' part!
But was it a juvenile? Certainly one of the protags was young,
but the story was serialized in "Astounding", so it wasn't pitched
to a "juvenile" audience..
True, the novel was first serialized in _Astounding_ in 1949. However,
when Doubleday published it as a book in 1950, there were two editions:
one for the adult market and the other one for the adolescent market.
The second one was a part of the "Young Moderns" series and was priced
accordingly -- $1.00 vs. $2.50. See
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1479 for details.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-30 16:50:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
Definitely one of the more enjoyable juveniles of the era.
I certainly won't quibble over the 'enjoyable' part!
But was it a juvenile? Certainly one of the protags was young,
but the story was serialized in "Astounding", so it wasn't pitched
to a "juvenile" audience..
True, the novel was first serialized in _Astounding_ in 1949. However,
one for the adult market and the other one for the adolescent market.
The second one was a part of the "Young Moderns" series and was priced
accordingly -- $1.00 vs. $2.50. See
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1479 for details.
Huh. Interesting! I wonder how they kept the adults from buying the cheaper
copy. They were going to get looked down on for reading SF anyway..
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Ahasuerus
2020-03-30 19:22:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
Definitely one of the more enjoyable juveniles of the era.
I certainly won't quibble over the 'enjoyable' part!
But was it a juvenile? Certainly one of the protags was young,
but the story was serialized in "Astounding", so it wasn't pitched
to a "juvenile" audience..
True, the novel was first serialized in _Astounding_ in 1949. However,
one for the adult market and the other one for the adolescent market.
The second one was a part of the "Young Moderns" series and was priced
accordingly -- $1.00 vs. $2.50. See
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1479 for details.
Huh. Interesting! I wonder how they kept the adults from buying the cheaper
copy. They were going to get looked down on for reading SF anyway..
Keep in mind that 1950 was the dawn of the mass market paperback era.
During the first half of the 20th century it was common to have
multiple hardcover editions of the same book. The more expensive ones
used good paper and had a sturdy binding. Less expensive editions used
low quality paper and the binding was just a notch or two above what
later readers would call a "trade paperback". It wasn't unlike the
difference between the paper stock and the manufacturing methods used
by "slick" magazines vs. "pulp" magazines.
Robert Carnegie
2020-03-30 20:50:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
Definitely one of the more enjoyable juveniles of the era.
I certainly won't quibble over the 'enjoyable' part!
But was it a juvenile? Certainly one of the protags was young,
but the story was serialized in "Astounding", so it wasn't pitched
to a "juvenile" audience..
True, the novel was first serialized in _Astounding_ in 1949. However,
one for the adult market and the other one for the adolescent market.
The second one was a part of the "Young Moderns" series and was priced
accordingly -- $1.00 vs. $2.50. See
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1479 for details.
Huh. Interesting! I wonder how they kept the adults from buying the cheaper
copy. They were going to get looked down on for reading SF anyway..
Keep in mind that 1950 was the dawn of the mass market paperback era.
During the first half of the 20th century it was common to have
multiple hardcover editions of the same book. The more expensive ones
used good paper and had a sturdy binding. Less expensive editions used
low quality paper and the binding was just a notch or two above what
later readers would call a "trade paperback". It wasn't unlike the
difference between the paper stock and the manufacturing methods used
by "slick" magazines vs. "pulp" magazines.
Would it accommodate school and public lending libraries,
that would want books that can be read by many people
before disintegrating?
Kevrob
2020-03-30 21:08:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by James Nicoll
Needle by Hal Clement
https://jamesdavisnicoll.com/review/flowing-through-my-veins
Definitely one of the more enjoyable juveniles of the era.
I certainly won't quibble over the 'enjoyable' part!
But was it a juvenile? Certainly one of the protags was young,
but the story was serialized in "Astounding", so it wasn't pitched
to a "juvenile" audience..
True, the novel was first serialized in _Astounding_ in 1949. However,
one for the adult market and the other one for the adolescent market.
The second one was a part of the "Young Moderns" series and was priced
accordingly -- $1.00 vs. $2.50. See
http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?1479 for details.
Huh. Interesting! I wonder how they kept the adults from buying the cheaper
copy. They were going to get looked down on for reading SF anyway..
Keep in mind that 1950 was the dawn of the mass market paperback era.
During the first half of the 20th century it was common to have
multiple hardcover editions of the same book. The more expensive ones
used good paper and had a sturdy binding. Less expensive editions used
low quality paper and the binding was just a notch or two above what
later readers would call a "trade paperback". It wasn't unlike the
difference between the paper stock and the manufacturing methods used
by "slick" magazines vs. "pulp" magazines.
Would it accommodate school and public lending libraries,
that would want books that can be read by many people
before disintegrating?
Those books would be purchased in the stronger "library binding,"
or converted to it as an aftermarket service.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_binding

Something to look out for in the used book market:
LB hardcovers, ex library, no dust jacket.

https://www.abebooks.com/blog/2011/12/01/the-difference-between-ex-library-ex-libris-books

Kevin R

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