Discussion:
<the girl in between> by Sarah Carroll
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Joe Bernstein
2019-11-22 04:36:38 UTC
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Read as New York: Kathy Dawson Books [Penguin Random House], c 2017.
A British and/or Irish edition, probably from Simon & Schuster, may
have preceded.

I picked this book up because its back cover carries these blurbs:

"Heartbreakingly beautiful"

and

"A deeply moving story of family, homelessness, and the ghosts
that won't let us go."

For most of the book, I didn't get "beautiful" and "moving". The
narrator is a young girl who's homeless with her alcoholic, sometimes
on-the-wagon mother. They've settled into an abandoned mill, which
is pretty palatial by homeless standards. (There are hints that
we're in America, but Carroll is Irish and the book seems to me
really to be set there even if its author intended otherwise. If so,
Dublin.) The narrator, whose name we never learn, knows she must
never stray out of the mill, for fear that the Authorities will take
her from her mother. (Because of my mother's atrocious housekeeping,
this was a standing concern of my growing-up too, though it concerned
nobody seeing the house instead of nobody seeing me.) One thing she
does is chase a rumoured ghost, without finding anything. Although
her mother makes her study, even math, it's obvious that this life is
a train wreck approaching; I skipped to the end to see whether
Carroll would allow them to escape it, saw nothing on the last page
showing that, and kept reading in growing consternation.

And then *five pages* from the ending comes what it took for me,
anyway, as the naïve reader I am, to recognise what kind of rasfw on-
topic book this is, and as I gasped in shock, watch the entire multi-
day reading experience, hitherto frustrating and painful, restructure
itself as unbelievably beautiful and incredibly moving.

So, um, yeah. If you're old enough to read YA books [1], you should
read this.

Joe Bernstein

[1] This refers to a standing theory of mine that I just realised I
haven't actually posted about in years. I figure most people outgrow
kids' books, including YA, and then have to grow up enough more to
read them again. So I don't mean "If you're at least ten", I mean
"If you're emotionally out of your twenties", more or less. Which,
um, I actually sorta assume we here all are, but maybe I'm wrong.
So yeah. You should read this YA book. Really.
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-11-22 14:07:50 UTC
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In article <***@144.76.35.198>,
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com> wrote:

[snipped]
Post by Joe Bernstein
[1] This refers to a standing theory of mine that I just realised I
haven't actually posted about in years. I figure most people outgrow
kids' books, including YA, and then have to grow up enough more to
read them again. So I don't mean "If you're at least ten", I mean
"If you're emotionally out of your twenties", more or less. Which,
um, I actually sorta assume we here all are, but maybe I'm wrong.
Reminds me of the dedication of _The Lion..._

"My dear Lucy,

"I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not
realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are
already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed
and bound you will be older still. But some day you will be old
enough to start reading fairy tales again. You can then take it
down from some upper shelf, dust it, and tell me what you think
of it. I shall probably be too deaf to hear, and too old to
understand a word you say, but I shall still be

"your affectionate Godfather,
"C. S. Lewis."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2019-11-22 18:04:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 04:36:38 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Read as New York: Kathy Dawson Books [Penguin Random House], c 2017.
A British and/or Irish edition, probably from Simon & Schuster, may
have preceded.
"Heartbreakingly beautiful"
and
"A deeply moving story of family, homelessness, and the ghosts
that won't let us go."
For most of the book, I didn't get "beautiful" and "moving". The
narrator is a young girl who's homeless with her alcoholic, sometimes
on-the-wagon mother. They've settled into an abandoned mill, which
is pretty palatial by homeless standards. (There are hints that
we're in America, but Carroll is Irish and the book seems to me
really to be set there even if its author intended otherwise. If so,
Dublin.) The narrator, whose name we never learn, knows she must
never stray out of the mill, for fear that the Authorities will take
her from her mother. (Because of my mother's atrocious housekeeping,
this was a standing concern of my growing-up too, though it concerned
nobody seeing the house instead of nobody seeing me.) One thing she
does is chase a rumoured ghost, without finding anything. Although
her mother makes her study, even math, it's obvious that this life is
a train wreck approaching; I skipped to the end to see whether
Carroll would allow them to escape it, saw nothing on the last page
showing that, and kept reading in growing consternation.
And then *five pages* from the ending comes what it took for me,
anyway, as the naïve reader I am, to recognise what kind of rasfw on-
topic book this is, and as I gasped in shock, watch the entire multi-
day reading experience, hitherto frustrating and painful, restructure
itself as unbelievably beautiful and incredibly moving.
So, um, yeah. If you're old enough to read YA books [1], you should
read this.
Joe Bernstein
[1] This refers to a standing theory of mine that I just realised I
haven't actually posted about in years. I figure most people outgrow
kids' books, including YA, and then have to grow up enough more to
read them again. So I don't mean "If you're at least ten", I mean
"If you're emotionally out of your twenties", more or less. Which,
um, I actually sorta assume we here all are, but maybe I'm wrong.
So yeah. You should read this YA book. Really.
I suspect the same applies to Disney and other kiddy animation: some
people eventually grow out of the "that's for kids" phase and
appreciate the animation. And the story-telling which, in many cases,
is vastly superior to most other film genres. And, in some cases, all
the stuff that they now recognize but which sailed right over their
heads when they first saw it.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Kevrob
2019-11-22 18:17:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by Paul S Person
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 04:36:38 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Read as New York: Kathy Dawson Books [Penguin Random House], c 2017.
A British and/or Irish edition, probably from Simon & Schuster, may
have preceded.
"Heartbreakingly beautiful"
and
"A deeply moving story of family, homelessness, and the ghosts
that won't let us go."
For most of the book, I didn't get "beautiful" and "moving". The
narrator is a young girl who's homeless with her alcoholic, sometimes
on-the-wagon mother. They've settled into an abandoned mill, which
is pretty palatial by homeless standards. (There are hints that
we're in America, but Carroll is Irish and the book seems to me
really to be set there even if its author intended otherwise. If so,
Dublin.) The narrator, whose name we never learn, knows she must
never stray out of the mill, for fear that the Authorities will take
her from her mother. (Because of my mother's atrocious housekeeping,
this was a standing concern of my growing-up too, though it concerned
nobody seeing the house instead of nobody seeing me.) One thing she
does is chase a rumoured ghost, without finding anything. Although
her mother makes her study, even math, it's obvious that this life is
a train wreck approaching; I skipped to the end to see whether
Carroll would allow them to escape it, saw nothing on the last page
showing that, and kept reading in growing consternation.
And then *five pages* from the ending comes what it took for me,
anyway, as the naďve reader I am, to recognise what kind of rasfw on-
topic book this is, and as I gasped in shock, watch the entire multi-
day reading experience, hitherto frustrating and painful, restructure
itself as unbelievably beautiful and incredibly moving.
So, um, yeah. If you're old enough to read YA books [1], you should
read this.
Joe Bernstein
[1] This refers to a standing theory of mine that I just realised I
haven't actually posted about in years. I figure most people outgrow
kids' books, including YA, and then have to grow up enough more to
read them again. So I don't mean "If you're at least ten", I mean
"If you're emotionally out of your twenties", more or less. Which,
um, I actually sorta assume we here all are, but maybe I'm wrong.
So yeah. You should read this YA book. Really.
I suspect the same applies to Disney and other kiddy animation: some
people eventually grow out of the "that's for kids" phase and
appreciate the animation. And the story-telling which, in many cases,
is vastly superior to most other film genres. And, in some cases, all
the stuff that they now recognize but which sailed right over their
heads when they first saw it.
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.

Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Joe Bernstein
2019-11-22 23:43:31 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...

Of course I didn't go to matinees.

-- JLB
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-11-23 00:03:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
Wise choice. I went to a Saturday afternoon matinee once, in my
late youth/early adulthood. I forget what the movie was. What I
remember is that SOMEbody in that theatre was shedding red
measles, and I caught it. Two weeks in a darkened room.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2019-11-23 00:19:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
I watch such things at home, when they are available from my
video service. But, I'm a life-long animation and comics fan.
There have been periods of my life when family members gave me\
the "haven't you outgrown that stuff" lectures, of course. Now
those same folks have either left us for non-existence or some
theoretical existence on some other plane, or they are watching
or reading these same films and books along with grandchildren and
grandnieces and grandnephews.

I know I have the most recent "Get To Know Your Dragon" on the DVR.
I had to see "Frozen." Kristen Bell voices and sings "Anna," and
Idina Menzel ("Wicked," "Enchanted") does the same for Elsa.

Kevin R
J. Clarke
2019-11-23 01:41:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 23:43:31 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
Same here.
Kevrob
2019-11-23 13:33:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 23:43:31 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
Same here.
When I was working brick-&-mortar retail, had to work weekends
and often had off on, let's say, Wednesdays, I would take
in films in the afternoon. The theaters were often nearly
empty. I rarely go out to see a movie, there's so much
unwatched content on my DVR.

Kevin R
Paul S Person
2019-11-23 18:54:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 23:43:31 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
Same here.
When I was working brick-&-mortar retail, had to work weekends
and often had off on, let's say, Wednesdays, I would take
in films in the afternoon. The theaters were often nearly
empty. I rarely go out to see a movie, there's so much
unwatched content on my DVR.
I slowed down on theater-going when the films I was seeing, however
well reviewed and however attractive they appeared to be, turned out
to be ... lacking.

Then the 10-plex was purchased by Sundance and converted into an Adult
Entertainment facility. One that shows films instead of go-go girls.

Their liquor license makes it off-limits to anyone under 21, in a
/college/ district, where a lot of the adult inhabitants are under
that age (Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, some Seniors). They also have
assigned seating (they call it "reserved seating" but, as anyone who
has reserved a seat knows, it is assigned to you), and the chairs have
beverage cup holders. And service in-theater. Of "adult beverages",
ie, alcoholic beverages.

So, if they put you next to some drunk, /you cannot move to another
seat/ before he pukes all over you because it is not the seat they
assigned to you. Well, so I presume, that's how it usually works.
Between the decline in entertainment value of the movies coming out
and the conversion of the 10-plex, I, of course, stopped going at all.

I might try again (not at the 10-plex, somewhere I need to use transit
to get to) for the next James Bond film but, really, it is hard to
imagine anything else that is likely to get me to make the effort.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Paul S Person
2019-11-23 18:46:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 23:43:31 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
When my ability to go to theatres was seriously impacted by my job, I
saw very few animated movies in theaters -- I mostly relied on a
Usenet group to review them and help sort out the ones I might like
and then bought them on DVD, sight unseen.

When I retired, I went to the theater (usually a 10-plex about a mile
away by foot) each Friday, and started including animated films as
candidates for viewing.

I generally went to the first showing on the Friday they came out.

When I saw /Dinosaur/, the theater included a group of /very/ short
persons, shepherded by a couple of adults, who were clearly seeing a
movie in a movie theater for the very first time. They were very
entertaining.

So was /Dinosaur/, although, personally, I could have done with 90
minutes of the sort of story telling it starts out with instead of the
more usual material that followed.

Also, /Kung Fu 2/ is notable as, if not the only, one of the very few
films where a multi-speaker surround system actually made sense
(usually, they just blur the words, in my experience -- I didn't here
the words to Gandalf's song until I saw /FOTR/ in stereo): when
Tigress addresses Po while he is talking with his father, her voice
actually came from /behind/ me.

That something this great /can/ be done, of course, only reinforces
the incompetence with which most multi-speaker sound tracks are
configured.

Not to mention the films were, in the movie, the voices are so low you
cannot hear them, in some cases even when there are no loud machine
sounds to use as an excuse -- but, in the trailers, the dialogue can
be heard clearly, presumably because the trailer-makers believe that
audiences should actually be able to /hear/ the actors, while the
film-makers do not.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2019-11-23 21:38:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 23:43:31 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
When my ability to go to theatres was seriously impacted by my job, I
saw very few animated movies in theaters -- I mostly relied on a
Usenet group to review them and help sort out the ones I might like
and then bought them on DVD, sight unseen.
When I retired, I went to the theater (usually a 10-plex about a mile
away by foot) each Friday, and started including animated films as
candidates for viewing.
I generally went to the first showing on the Friday they came out.
When I saw /Dinosaur/, the theater included a group of /very/ short
persons, shepherded by a couple of adults, who were clearly seeing a
movie in a movie theater for the very first time. They were very
entertaining.
So was /Dinosaur/, although, personally, I could have done with 90
minutes of the sort of story telling it starts out with instead of the
more usual material that followed.
Chekhov's Asteroid? (Is that a spoiler?)
Post by J. Clarke
Also, /Kung Fu 2/ is notable as, if not the only, one of the very few
films where a multi-speaker surround system actually made sense
_Kung Fu Panda 2_ in the United Kingdom, unless
I'm dreadfully confused.

A detail that your distributor may have expected
the audience to notice on their own, so no need to
explain it.
Post by J. Clarke
(usually, they just blur the words, in my experience -- I didn't here
the words to Gandalf's song until I saw /FOTR/ in stereo): when
Tigress addresses Po while he is talking with his father, her voice
actually came from /behind/ me.
That something this great /can/ be done, of course, only reinforces
the incompetence with which most multi-speaker sound tracks are
configured.
Not to mention the films were, in the movie, the voices are so low you
cannot hear them, in some cases even when there are no loud machine
sounds to use as an excuse -- but, in the trailers, the dialogue can
be heard clearly, presumably because the trailer-makers believe that
audiences should actually be able to /hear/ the actors, while the
film-makers do not.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-11-23 22:11:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 23:43:31 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
When my ability to go to theatres was seriously impacted by my job, I
saw very few animated movies in theaters -- I mostly relied on a
Usenet group to review them and help sort out the ones I might like
and then bought them on DVD, sight unseen.
When I retired, I went to the theater (usually a 10-plex about a mile
away by foot) each Friday, and started including animated films as
candidates for viewing.
I generally went to the first showing on the Friday they came out.
When I saw /Dinosaur/, the theater included a group of /very/ short
persons, shepherded by a couple of adults, who were clearly seeing a
movie in a movie theater for the very first time. They were very
entertaining.
So was /Dinosaur/, although, personally, I could have done with 90
minutes of the sort of story telling it starts out with instead of the
more usual material that followed.
Chekhov's Asteroid? (Is that a spoiler?)
Heh. Good one.

My WIP is full of Chekhov's guns in various shapes and sizes, and
when I finish the first draft I'm gonna have to go back and put
them on their various mantelpieces.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2019-11-24 18:31:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 23 Nov 2019 13:38:16 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 23:43:31 -0000 (UTC), Joe Bernstein
Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Kevrob
Having children gives older types an excuse to read or reread
fairy stories, or watch or rewatch Disney films, and the like.
"Of course I saw "Frozen." I have three young girls. I couldn't
NOT watch it." - or words to that effect. Mind you, the l'il
darlings might want to watch something aimed at ages they haven't
attained yet.
Unca Kevin,
who has no kids, but has seen this
at the homes of his siblings' who do.
Huh. I just watched <Frozen> (and <Monsters, Inc.> and *some*, but
by no means all, others) on my own - and yes, in theatres, not hiding
at home with DVDs - without worrying about it. Not used to thinking
of myself as *thicker*-skinned than others ...
Of course I didn't go to matinees.
When my ability to go to theatres was seriously impacted by my job, I
saw very few animated movies in theaters -- I mostly relied on a
Usenet group to review them and help sort out the ones I might like
and then bought them on DVD, sight unseen.
When I retired, I went to the theater (usually a 10-plex about a mile
away by foot) each Friday, and started including animated films as
candidates for viewing.
I generally went to the first showing on the Friday they came out.
When I saw /Dinosaur/, the theater included a group of /very/ short
persons, shepherded by a couple of adults, who were clearly seeing a
movie in a movie theater for the very first time. They were very
entertaining.
So was /Dinosaur/, although, personally, I could have done with 90
minutes of the sort of story telling it starts out with instead of the
more usual material that followed.
Chekhov's Asteroid? (Is that a spoiler?)
Nope.

The first part of this trailer
is a cut version of the
opening sequence. Followed by scenes from the rest of the movie.

Ignore those later scenes. Imagine a film done the way the first part
was!
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
Also, /Kung Fu 2/ is notable as, if not the only, one of the very few
films where a multi-speaker surround system actually made sense
_Kung Fu Panda 2_ in the United Kingdom, unless
I'm dreadfully confused.
A detail that your distributor may have expected
the audience to notice on their own, so no need to
explain it.
Yeah, it was /Kung Fu Panda 2/ here,
as well.

Sorry for any confusion.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
(usually, they just blur the words, in my experience -- I didn't here
the words to Gandalf's song until I saw /FOTR/ in stereo): when
Tigress addresses Po while he is talking with his father, her voice
actually came from /behind/ me.
That something this great /can/ be done, of course, only reinforces
the incompetence with which most multi-speaker sound tracks are
configured.
Not to mention the films were, in the movie, the voices are so low you
cannot hear them, in some cases even when there are no loud machine
sounds to use as an excuse -- but, in the trailers, the dialogue can
be heard clearly, presumably because the trailer-makers believe that
audiences should actually be able to /hear/ the actors, while the
film-makers do not.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
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