Discussion:
018 Vick's Vultures (Union Earth Privateers Book 1) by Scott Warren
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-21 20:01:32 UTC
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018 Vick's Vultures (Union Earth Privateers Book 1) by Scott Warren

This book reminds me of one I mentioned a few months ago, _The
Terran Privateer_ by Glynn Stewart. In both books, Earth is an
insignificant newcomer to the galactic scene trying to bolster its
tech base by scavenging alien ships. However, in this book Earth
is still independent by virtue of keeping its head down and not
letting out the location of the home planet. Captain Victoria Marin
and her boatload of privateers have the nickname "Vultures" because
the specialize in picking clean the corpses of alien ships. (Despite
being authorized privateers, they apparently do not go out against
live ships). Through a stroke of luck, they come across a crippled
ship of one of the "Big Three", the high rolling powers in this
part of the galaxy, and not only is it still largely intact, but
the crew is still alive. Earth policy as well as Vick's inclination
is to repatriate captured crew, but in this case that thrusts her,
and Earth directly into Big Three politics and will probably lead
to Earth being crushed like a bug shortly after Vick and her Vultures.
This book was entertaining, and a bit old-fashionedly (and not
always convincingly) Campbellian in spots. The characterization
is mostly by broad strokes -- we know little more about Vick than
she is a hard drinking, hard-loving reprobate who doesn't worry
overmuch about the maritial status of her conquests, and we don't
get much more about the other characters. Curiously, the best
characterization is of one of the captured aliens, whom I hope to
see more of in the next book -- which I will be reading as though
there are definitely some rough spots I did enjoy the book.
D B Davis
2020-03-30 22:15:03 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
018 Vick's Vultures (Union Earth Privateers Book 1) by Scott Warren
This book reminds me of one I mentioned a few months ago, _The
Terran Privateer_ by Glynn Stewart. In both books, Earth is an
insignificant newcomer to the galactic scene trying to bolster its
tech base by scavenging alien ships. However, in this book Earth
is still independent by virtue of keeping its head down and not
letting out the location of the home planet. Captain Victoria Marin
and her boatload of privateers have the nickname "Vultures" because
the specialize in picking clean the corpses of alien ships. (Despite
being authorized privateers, they apparently do not go out against
live ships). Through a stroke of luck, they come across a crippled
ship of one of the "Big Three", the high rolling powers in this
part of the galaxy, and not only is it still largely intact, but
the crew is still alive. Earth policy as well as Vick's inclination
is to repatriate captured crew, but in this case that thrusts her,
and Earth directly into Big Three politics and will probably lead
to Earth being crushed like a bug shortly after Vick and her Vultures.
This book was entertaining, and a bit old-fashionedly (and not
always convincingly) Campbellian in spots. The characterization
is mostly by broad strokes -- we know little more about Vick than
she is a hard drinking, hard-loving reprobate who doesn't worry
overmuch about the maritial status of her conquests, and we don't
get much more about the other characters. Curiously, the best
characterization is of one of the captured aliens, whom I hope to
see more of in the next book -- which I will be reading as though
there are definitely some rough spots I did enjoy the book.
You and others know that Perry Rhodan's initial strategy is to keep the
Earth's location as secret as possible from other, potentially hostile,
more technically advanced, aliens. Rhodan also excels at appropriating
alien apparatuses and ships. _PR_'s characterization's probably on par
with _Vick's Vultures_ too. That's not a defect for readers such as me
who are apathetic about character development.



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-31 00:28:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
018 Vick's Vultures (Union Earth Privateers Book 1) by Scott Warren
This book reminds me of one I mentioned a few months ago, _The
Terran Privateer_ by Glynn Stewart. In both books, Earth is an
insignificant newcomer to the galactic scene trying to bolster its
tech base by scavenging alien ships. However, in this book Earth
is still independent by virtue of keeping its head down and not
letting out the location of the home planet. Captain Victoria Marin
and her boatload of privateers have the nickname "Vultures" because
the specialize in picking clean the corpses of alien ships. (Despite
being authorized privateers, they apparently do not go out against
live ships). Through a stroke of luck, they come across a crippled
ship of one of the "Big Three", the high rolling powers in this
part of the galaxy, and not only is it still largely intact, but
the crew is still alive. Earth policy as well as Vick's inclination
is to repatriate captured crew, but in this case that thrusts her,
and Earth directly into Big Three politics and will probably lead
to Earth being crushed like a bug shortly after Vick and her Vultures.
This book was entertaining, and a bit old-fashionedly (and not
always convincingly) Campbellian in spots. The characterization
is mostly by broad strokes -- we know little more about Vick than
she is a hard drinking, hard-loving reprobate who doesn't worry
overmuch about the maritial status of her conquests, and we don't
get much more about the other characters. Curiously, the best
characterization is of one of the captured aliens, whom I hope to
see more of in the next book -- which I will be reading as though
there are definitely some rough spots I did enjoy the book.
You and others know that Perry Rhodan's initial strategy is to keep the
Earth's location as secret as possible from other, potentially hostile,
more technically advanced, aliens. Rhodan also excels at appropriating
alien apparatuses and ships. _PR_'s characterization's probably on par
with _Vick's Vultures_ too. That's not a defect for readers such as me
who are apathetic about character development.
That's an interesting comparison, and I would say that in both cases
the characterizations don't get in the way of the story :-)

I have the feeling that the PR ones were a bit better, but that was so long
ago I my adult self might think 13 year old me wrong.

From what others have said here, Voltz (Vlotz?) eventually took over as
PR series runner. What I recall about him was all his entries were really
weird, and having characters a bit more vivid didn't help with that.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Lynn McGuire
2020-03-30 23:20:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
018 Vick's Vultures (Union Earth Privateers Book 1) by Scott Warren
This book reminds me of one I mentioned a few months ago, _The
Terran Privateer_ by Glynn Stewart. In both books, Earth is an
insignificant newcomer to the galactic scene trying to bolster its
tech base by scavenging alien ships. However, in this book Earth
is still independent by virtue of keeping its head down and not
letting out the location of the home planet. Captain Victoria Marin
and her boatload of privateers have the nickname "Vultures" because
the specialize in picking clean the corpses of alien ships. (Despite
being authorized privateers, they apparently do not go out against
live ships). Through a stroke of luck, they come across a crippled
ship of one of the "Big Three", the high rolling powers in this
part of the galaxy, and not only is it still largely intact, but
the crew is still alive. Earth policy as well as Vick's inclination
is to repatriate captured crew, but in this case that thrusts her,
and Earth directly into Big Three politics and will probably lead
to Earth being crushed like a bug shortly after Vick and her Vultures.
This book was entertaining, and a bit old-fashionedly (and not
always convincingly) Campbellian in spots. The characterization
is mostly by broad strokes -- we know little more about Vick than
she is a hard drinking, hard-loving reprobate who doesn't worry
overmuch about the maritial status of her conquests, and we don't
get much more about the other characters. Curiously, the best
characterization is of one of the captured aliens, whom I hope to
see more of in the next book -- which I will be reading as though
there are definitely some rough spots I did enjoy the book.
John Ringo's introduction of the young Earth people to the old galactic
civilizations did not go as well. The first aliens built a start gate
in the Solar System. The second aliens traded trinkets for Earth's
valuables. The third aliens dropped rocks for the rest of Earth's
valuables until half of the population was dead. "Live Free or Die:
Troy Rising I"
https://www.amazon.com/Live-Free-Die-Troy-Rising/dp/1439133972/

Lynn
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