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"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime"
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Lynn McGuire
2020-02-03 05:56:02 UTC
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"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011

I have read 42 of the 100.

BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.

Lynn
Ninapenda Jibini
2020-02-03 07:58:32 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I'm impressed with myself. 29 and two halves (Mists of Avalon and
Snow Crash, two of three books I've ever put down knowing I would
never, ever, ever pick them up again).
--
Terry Austin

Proof that Alan Baker is a liar and a fool, and even stupider than
Lynn:
https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/sw-border-migration


"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-02-03 15:21:55 UTC
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Post by Ninapenda Jibini
Post by Lynn McGuire
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I'm impressed with myself. 29 and two halves (Mists of Avalon and
Snow Crash, two of three books I've ever put down knowing I would
never, ever, ever pick them up again).
26. One of which (the Jordan) I will never lay hand or eyeballs
again.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Martin
2020-02-03 13:55:02 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
55, plus bits of a few others.
h***@gmail.com
2020-02-03 14:04:14 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
47 (not the exact lovecraft they list but I've got what claims to be the complete lovecraft)
plus another few that I own and intend to get around to reading real soon now.
h***@gmail.com
2020-02-04 01:21:29 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
47 (not the exact lovecraft they list but I've got what claims to be the complete lovecraft)
?!? My library had three very thick books of Lovecraft.
I didn't say it was in 1 volume.
It's also only his fiction not his letters or other writing
Robert Woodward
2020-02-03 17:50:58 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
Only 27 in my case (though several others are in my SBR).
Post by Lynn McGuire
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Setting my browser to full screen made this easier to see.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Chris Buckley
2020-02-03 18:40:16 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
I haven't read:
Bishop - Daughter of the Blood
Hamilton - Guilty Pleasures
Lovecraft - Tales (I've read other Lovecraft; don't know the overlap)
Yu - How to Live Safely in a SF Universe
Cashore - Graceling
Gabaldon - Outlander
Kadrey - Sandman Slim
Cline - Ready Player One
Brown - Red Rising
Wecker - The Golem and the Jinni
Weir - The Martian (I really should read this one)
O'Malley - The Rook

Does anybody have any strong recommendations among these 11 (aside from
the Weir, which I just have never got around to)?

Chris
h***@gmail.com
2020-02-04 00:54:36 UTC
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Post by Chris Buckley
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
Bishop - Daughter of the Blood
Hamilton - Guilty Pleasures
Lovecraft - Tales (I've read other Lovecraft; don't know the overlap)
Yu - How to Live Safely in a SF Universe
Cashore - Graceling
Gabaldon - Outlander
Kadrey - Sandman Slim
Cline - Ready Player One
Brown - Red Rising
Wecker - The Golem and the Jinni
Weir - The Martian (I really should read this one)
O'Malley - The Rook
Does anybody have any strong recommendations among these 11 (aside from
the Weir, which I just have never got around to)?
The Hamilton is a very good urban fantasy series up to a point.
Personally operating from memory I now put that point around book number 8, with a couple shortly after that still being really good but surrounded by dross
I think they're getting close to 30 now...
Joe Bernstein
2020-02-04 03:34:10 UTC
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Post by Chris Buckley
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon
Books editors
Bishop - Daughter of the Blood
Hamilton - Guilty Pleasures
Lovecraft - Tales (I've read other Lovecraft; don't know the overlap)
Yu - How to Live Safely in a SF Universe
Cashore - Graceling
Gabaldon - Outlander
Kadrey - Sandman Slim
Cline - Ready Player One
Brown - Red Rising
Wecker - The Golem and the Jinni
Weir - The Martian (I really should read this one)
O'Malley - The Rook
Does anybody have any strong recommendations among these 11 (aside
from the Weir, which I just have never got around to)?
Of those you list, I've read the Cashore (did a Novels of not long
ago), Gabaldon, Cline, and Weir. I liked the Weir a lot so if you
think it's your kind of thing (as it isn't mine), you'll probably
love it. If it *is* your kind of thing, there's a good chance you'll
like the Cline too, and I also liked it a lot. The Gabaldon is very
long and not very speculative - the protagonist gets whisked back
unexplainedly to the 18th century and spends the rest of the book
there - so unless you specifically find that interesting, you
probably don't need to read it. It also has many very long sequels.
The Cashore... <Graceling> is YA, but relatively tough meat for that;
it begins a trilogy; it's very good of its kind; no idea whether you
should read it.

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
Chris Buckley
2020-02-04 15:45:51 UTC
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Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Chris Buckley
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon
Books editors
Bishop - Daughter of the Blood
Hamilton - Guilty Pleasures
Lovecraft - Tales (I've read other Lovecraft; don't know the overlap)
Yu - How to Live Safely in a SF Universe
Cashore - Graceling
Gabaldon - Outlander
Kadrey - Sandman Slim
Cline - Ready Player One
Brown - Red Rising
Wecker - The Golem and the Jinni
Weir - The Martian (I really should read this one)
O'Malley - The Rook
Does anybody have any strong recommendations among these 11 (aside
from the Weir, which I just have never got around to)?
Of those you list, I've read the Cashore (did a Novels of not long
ago), Gabaldon, Cline, and Weir. I liked the Weir a lot so if you
think it's your kind of thing (as it isn't mine), you'll probably
love it. If it *is* your kind of thing, there's a good chance you'll
like the Cline too, and I also liked it a lot. The Gabaldon is very
long and not very speculative - the protagonist gets whisked back
unexplainedly to the 18th century and spends the rest of the book
there - so unless you specifically find that interesting, you
probably don't need to read it. It also has many very long sequels.
The Cashore... <Graceling> is YA, but relatively tough meat for that;
it begins a trilogy; it's very good of its kind; no idea whether you
should read it.
Thanks. My expectation is that I'll find the Weir quite good, but not
excellent - I like pure hard science fiction, but it has sounded like
the emotional impact aspect is not as strong, and I consider that
necessary to reach "excellent".

The Cashore, like many YA, sounds like the emotional impact is strong,
so I'll pick that up and give it a try. Thanks.

I wasn't careful enough on my first pass through and missed a couple of
"not reads", so my total read count is down to 86. I missed
Carter - Nights at the Circus (just overlooked it)
Vandermeer - Annihilation (I thought I had read it)

Vandermeer is one of those authors that I simply don't enjoy, and I don't
really know why. I have to force myself to keep reading in every book of
his that I've read, and I can never remember the plots afterwords!

Chris
-dsr-
2020-02-05 15:53:07 UTC
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Post by Chris Buckley
Bishop - Daughter of the Blood
Hamilton - Guilty Pleasures
Lovecraft - Tales (I've read other Lovecraft; don't know the overlap)
Yu - How to Live Safely in a SF Universe
Cashore - Graceling
Gabaldon - Outlander
Kadrey - Sandman Slim
Cline - Ready Player One
Brown - Red Rising
Wecker - The Golem and the Jinni
Weir - The Martian (I really should read this one)
O'Malley - The Rook
Does anybody have any strong recommendations among these 11 (aside from
the Weir, which I just have never got around to)?
Other people have put in some recommendations, so excluding those...

Kadrey's Sandman Slim is an action-and-gang-politics novel running through
Hell and Los Angelese, which are not all that distinguishable. It's gory
fun but I found the sequelae increasingly less fun and more gore.

Cline's Ready Player One is a nostalgia trip for people who were playing
video games in the 1980s. If you weren't, it depends a lot of reference
to things that don't mean anything.

I liked The Rook -- it starts off with an amnesiac protagonist, and no,
she doesn't regain her memory as such -- but apparently it makes people
more familiar with London than I am squirm. Avoid the TV series, which is
direly boring.

Others have already chimed in on The Martian; I'm going to take the possibly
minority opinion that it's fun but meaningless: you'll find yourself involved
in the survival of the protagonist, and then it's over and you can go about
your day, completely unchanged.

-dsr-
Joe Bernstein
2020-02-05 17:14:46 UTC
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Post by -dsr-
Cline's Ready Player One is a nostalgia trip for people who were
playing video games in the 1980s. If you weren't, it depends a lot of
reference to things that don't mean anything.
Um, I wasn't, and I still got quite a lot. Oh, I suppose if any of
the video game references were carrying Unexplained Deep Meanings, I
missed that; but both the superficial and the emotional plot worked
fine for me without. Cline does have his narrator explain a lot.

I suppose if you *dislike* references to video games (and to a lesser
extent things 1980s in general, not *my* favourite part of my youth),
you'll be an unhappy reader.
Post by -dsr-
Others have already chimed in on The Martian; I'm going to take the
possibly minority opinion that it's fun but meaningless: you'll find
yourself involved in the survival of the protagonist, and then it's
over and you can go about your day, completely unchanged.
Um. I re-read my Cashore posts last night, and in one of them I
called some chapters from <Graceling>'s late middle "great". Those
chapters are a somewhat similar sort of survival story. They do
carry more emotional weight than the one in <The Martian>, not least
because the POV is trying to keep herself *and* someone else alive,
but anyway. I'm not sure I walked away from <Graceling> changed, but
I still say it has some genuinely great chapters in it.

That said, you're right that that's what reading <The Martian> is
like.

Weir can do more emotional impact than he does in <The Martian>. The
first thing of his I actually read was <Cheshire Crossing>, 2006-2008,
which has *less* of that than it should, but isn't lacking it.

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
Jerry Brown
2020-02-03 18:51:26 UTC
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On Sun, 2 Feb 2020 23:56:02 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
32
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Magewolf
2020-02-03 19:14:06 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
   https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
54 read and a few more glanced through or seen as movies.
Stephen Harker
2020-02-03 20:03:59 UTC
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Post by Magewolf
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon
Books editors
   https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
54 read and a few more glanced through or seen as movies.
29 for me. Several others I had dropped after starting.
--
Stephen Harker ***@netspace.net.au
was: http://sjharker.customer.netspace.net.au/
now: http://members.iinet.net.au/~***@netspace.net.au/
or: http://members.iinet.net.au/~sjharker_nbn/
William Hyde
2020-02-03 20:27:48 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
I have read 44, about 40 more I would like to read, a dozen or so I might read, and a few I will continue to avoid.

I would be about ten lower were it not for recommendations here.

William Hyde
Juho Julkunen
2020-02-03 21:33:49 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
I got 39 nine or so, which is more than I expected.

I've got half a dozen of them waiting on my bookshelves, and I've seen
adaptations of a dozen more. Quite a few are on my to-read list, and
I've still got over half a lifetime left.
--
Juho Julkunen
David Johnston
2020-02-03 22:47:40 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
   https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
1. 1984. I read it because it was an "important book". Well at least
it wasn't all that boring.

2. 2001, A Space Odyssey. I think to fully appreciate 2001 you have to
both read the book and watch the movie. Of course I have.

3. A Canticle for Liebowitz. As I recall it was a good book.

4. A Game of Thrones. After I read it I joked that in the Game of
Thrones RPG there would be three alignements, Crazy, Stupid and Evil.

5. A Wizard of Earthsea. I was more than a little puzzled by why a
female author coined the expression "Weak as women's magic" and seemed
to have it be true in her setting.

6. A Wrinkle in Time. Read it as a kid. Not terribly impressed, for
the most part except that creepy suburbia was awesome.

7. Altered Carbon. Never read it.

8. American Gods. It wasn't bad. Although no appearances by the real
American gods. Mother Nature, Santa. The Founding Fathers.

9. Among Others. Never read it. Just checked out the synopsis. Don't
want to.

10. Ancillary Justice. I thought it was OK but I haven't gotten around
to reading the others.

11. Annihilation. I haven't watched the movie either but I suspect the
movie put it on this lists.

12. Assassin's Apprentice. I've read it. It was OK.

13. Blood Music. Never read.

14. Brave New World. Who would read 1984 without reading BNW?

15. Childhood's End. One of the books where what I got from the ending
doesn't seem to be what the author intended to me to get.

16. Cloud Atlas. No.

17. Daughter of the Blood. Did not finish.

18. Dhalgren. The only Delaney I liked was Babel 17. Bounced off
Dhalgren.

19. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. The movie was better.

20. Doomsday Book. I hated it.

21. Dragonflight. The initial short story was very much a knock-off of
Andre Norton. After that she found her own voice. But I find McAffrey
a little on the overly idealistic side.

22. Dune. Great book. The sequels were a waste of time.

23. Ender's Game. I read the short story. I'd gone off Card by the
time the book came out so I never bothered.

24. Fahrenheit 451. Bradbury was irritated that people took it as
being about censorship and not how television was a menace that would
make everyone stupid. Just goes to show subtlety and dystopia don't mix.

25. Foreigner. I probably didn't read it but I can't be sure. What I
mostly remember about the couple of Cherryh books I read was my decision
to never read one again.

26. Frankenstein. I'm not sure whether I read this one or just
absorbed all the plot points through osmosis.

27. Good Omens. Actually read it as a book club book. Everyone hated
it. Too damn British. And it doesn't help that we were in Canada's
Bible Belt.

28. Graceling. I'm wondering whether A Spell For Chameleon was the
first novel like this one where instead of magic being a sphere of
intellectual study that you learned it was instead a superpower you were
born with ala the X-Men.

29. Grass. Preachy as hell.

30. Guilty Pleasures. Anita Black from before she went to crap.

31. H.P. Lovecraft Tales. I've read all the stories in the book if not
this particular collection. I don't know why anyone would spend a buck
for stories that all can be downloaded for free.

32. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Knockoff of the Worst Witch
that became popular to an inexplicable degree.

33. How To Live Safely In A Science Fictional Universe. Never heard of
it before.

34. Howls Moving Castle. I've read it but I don't remember it well.
So I thought I'd reread it. I went to the library side to order a copy
and noted that it was say down on the list past a lot of copies of the
cartoon. Well, that's standard when there's video version of a book,
sadly. But I was amused to see that the cartoon listing says "Based on
the novel " Howl ' s moving castle " by Daiana Win Jo^nzu." What
happens when you translate something into Japanese and back.

35. Hyperion. Bored me. Didn't finish.

36. I am Legend. Wait that was a novel? I remember it as a short story.

37. I, Robot. Of course I've read it.

38. Interview With A Vampire. A quite oppressive book.

39. Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrel. Found it tedious. Did not finish.

40. Kindred. Maybe I should read that some day.

41. Kushiel's Dart. Not my kink.

42. Lord Foul's Bane. After reading it I joked that it was second only
to the Bible in how many people read it without enjoying it.

43. Neuromancer. Never read it. Cyberpunk was not really my thing.

44. Nights at the Circus. Never heard of it before.

45. Old Man's War. I have not read it. The premise inspires skepticism.

46. Outlander. Bounced off it.

47. Pawn of Prophecy. I recall enjoying it, but came to feel that the
ethnic stereotyping was a bit much even if the ethnicities were
imaginary. I mean what the countries that don't have a farmer
personality going to do to feed themselves?

48. Perdido Street Station. Never got around to it.

49. Ready Player One. Did not finish. Self-indulgent and trivial.

50. Red Mars. Haven't read it.

51. Riddle-Master. Haven't read it.

52. Ringworld. A Big Dumb Object without much of a story to go with it.

53. Sabriel. Bounced.

54. Sandman Slim. I hated him.

55. Slaughterhouse Five. Bounced.

56. Snow Crash. Bounced.

57. Solaris. Never read it.

58. Starship Troopers. And much lecturing of the reader ensued.

59. Stories Of Your Life And Others. Haven't read it.

60. Stranger in a Strange Land. I wouldn't say it was bad. I would
say it was way over-rated in the 70s. It's Jonathan Livingstone Seagull
with naked apes.

61. The Color of Magic: Early Pratchett before he fully came into his
own Prachettness. Thus I liked it better.

62. The Curse of Chalion. Never read it. Read later books in the
setting and wasn't a fan of the world.

63. The Dark is Rising. Good children's fantasy.

64. The Dispossessed. Leguin expresses her left-anarchist sympathies
while recognizing that there are problems with anarchy .

65. The Dragonbone Chair. Never read it.

66. The Eye of World. I got the impression that he started writing
this series as a response to the irritating qualities of the witches
from Andre Norton's Witch World. Which probably explains why so much of
the later books in the series were devoted to handing out spankings to
proud women.

67. The Forever War. Dials the lingering futility of the Vietnam War
up to 11.

68. The Golden Compass. The anti-religious agenda got on my nerves.

69. The Golem and the Djinni. Seriously? You alphabetized your list
but didn't ignore the "the" in the titles? Oh, and I never read that.

69. The Gunslinger> I stopped reading Stephen King after The Dome.

70. The Handmaid's Tale. You know I've read a fair number of dystopias
for a guy who doesn't like them.

71. Hitchhiker's Guide To the Galaxy. Ah yes. British humour. Up
there with dystopias. But I've read it.

72. The Hobbit: Read it as a kid. It wasn't bad.

74. The Hunger Games. The book that launched a thousand YA dystopias.
Or maybe a hundred. There were a lot is what I'm saying. It was pretty
good. Like Dune, it's smart to stop with the first book.

75. The Left Hand of Darkness. Never read it.

76. The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. Read it as a kid. Tolkien
was right about the sloppy world building.

77. The Lord of Rings. It takes a while to get to the good stuff.

78. The Magicians. Bounced.

79. The Martian. Really good.

80. The Martian Chronicles. Science fiction by a guy who didn't like
science fiction.

81. Mists of Avalon. Read it. Barely remember it. I do seem to
recall that it contained Bradleys fondness for segregated female
societies.

82. The Name of the Wind. I think I've read it. Or its sequel.

83. The Princess Bride. The rare book that the movie was better than.
Perhaps because it was written by a screenwriter.

84. The Road. Hard pass.

85. The Rook. I should read it.

86. The Sparrow. The religious elements kept me from trying it.

87. The Speed of Dark. I quite liked it.

88. The Stars My Destination. Science fictioning the Count of Monte
Cristo gives you a strong framework to go with.

89. The Sword of Shannara. Actually I liked more than most people who
talk about it. Sure it was derivative. But I like the twist of why the
plot device was the only that could kill the Dark Lord.

90. The Time Machine. Or as the cover would have it The Time Mac Hine.
Yeah, I've read it. I liked War of the Worlds better.

91. The Time Travellers Wife. Did not read. Do not intend to.

92. The Way of Kings. I like Brandon Sanderson.

93. The Windup Girl. Everything I've heard about it says I don't want
to read it.

94. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. There was a Saturday Night Live
sketch about Captain Nemo trying to explain it wasn't 20,000 "Leagues"
down. It's narratively weak because ultimately it's just "Look at this
cool stuff".

95. Uglies. Too YA for me to try.

96. Uprooted. Yes, I've read it. It wasn't anything special.

97. Wool. Bounced

98. World War Z. After I read it I thought everything that needed to
be said about the zombie apocalypse had been said and declared myself
done with zombies. But it wasn't bad.

And yea this count means I overlooked a couple. I ain't going back to
find them.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2020-02-03 23:07:00 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
2. 2001, A Space Odyssey. I think to fully appreciate 2001 you
have to both read the book and watch the movie. Of course I
have.
So have I. I still have no idea what the ending is all about.
Post by David Johnston
4. A Game of Thrones. After I read it I joked that in the Game
of Thrones RPG there would be three alignements, Crazy, Stupid
and Evil.
So, just like regular D&D?
Post by David Johnston
20. Doomsday Book. I hated it.
So did I. But I'm glad I read it. It's one of those books.
Post by David Johnston
22. Dune. Great book. The sequels were a waste of time.
Made me want to punch Herbert in the face until he learned how to
be less dry and *boring*.
Post by David Johnston
34. Howls Moving Castle. I've read it but I don't remember it
well. So I thought I'd reread it. I went to the library side to
order a copy and noted that it was say down on the list past a
lot of copies of the cartoon. Well, that's standard when
there's video version of a book, sadly. But I was amused to see
that the cartoon listing says "Based on the novel " Howl ' s
moving castle " by Daiana Win Jo^nzu." What happens when you
translate something into Japanese and back.
Despite how easy it is to miss, the movie is a very different story
than the book.
Post by David Johnston
39. Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrel. Found it tedious. Did
not finish.
Somewhat less engaging than the miniseries.
Post by David Johnston
42. Lord Foul's Bane. After reading it I joked that it was
second only to the Bible in how many people read it without
enjoying it.
I would never had finished it if I hadn't made the mistake of
reading the third one first.
Post by David Johnston
68. The Golden Compass. The anti-religious agenda got on my
nerves.
Really wasn't anti-religious so much as anti-authoritarianism (or
any flavor), but certainly with religious trappings (as might be
expected of a Brit).
Post by David Johnston
71. Hitchhiker's Guide To the Galaxy. Ah yes. British humour.
And not the kind I like.
Post by David Johnston
76. The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. Read it as a kid.
Tolkien was right about the sloppy world building.
But a much easier read than LotR.
Post by David Johnston
81. Mists of Avalon. Read it. Barely remember it. I do seem
to recall that it contained Bradleys fondness for segregated
female societies.
And blind hatred of anything with a penis.
--
Terry Austin

Proof that Alan Baker is a liar and a fool, and even stupider than
Lynn:
https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/sw-border-migration
(May 2019 total for people arrested for entering the United States
illegally is over 132,000 for just the southwest border.)

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB
Joe Bernstein
2020-02-05 00:25:34 UTC
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David Johnston <***@yahoo.com> wrote in news:r1a7uj$kb3$***@gioia.aioe.org a post I just used as a framework
for my own, cutting out all his comments, so it seemed churlish not
Post by David Johnston
5. A Wizard of Earthsea. I was more than a little puzzled by why a
female author coined the expression "Weak as women's magic" and seemed
to have it be true in her setting.
I take it you haven't read <Tehanu> ?
Post by David Johnston
8. American Gods. It wasn't bad. Although no appearances by the
real American gods. Mother Nature, Santa. The Founding Fathers.
I once watched a movie about lesbians with a woman who was, um,
exploring her bisexuality at the time, and she said it was a really
male view of lesbianism. Well, <American Gods> is a really, um,
non-American view of America.
Post by David Johnston
28. Graceling. I'm wondering whether A Spell For Chameleon was the
first novel like this one where instead of magic being a sphere of
intellectual study that you learned it was instead a superpower you
were born with ala the X-Men.
Good question.
Post by David Johnston
36. I am Legend. Wait that was a novel? I remember it as a short story.
I thought it was a novella expanded from a short story, but the ISFDB
seems to claim it started with a 160-page paperback, and the <SF
Encyclopedia> agrees. Oops.
Post by David Johnston
61. The Color of Magic: Early Pratchett before he fully came into
his own Prachettness. Thus I liked it better.
I really liked it and its sequel. I also really like some other
Pratchett books, but I've never understood the widespread sentiment
that this is just not worth bothering with when you read Pratchett.
Post by David Johnston
62. The Curse of Chalion. Never read it. Read later books in the
setting and wasn't a fan of the world.
Well, that would be a problem for this book, but if you're a middle-
aged man you might want to try it anyway; it's very much a book for
middle-aged men, which the others are not.
Post by David Johnston
74. The Hunger Games. The book that launched a thousand YA
dystopias. Or maybe a hundred. There were a lot is what I'm saying.
It was pretty good. Like Dune, it's smart to stop with the first
book.
Depends what you're there for. The first book has most of the
adventure, but also has the stuff that dominates the later ones.
Post by David Johnston
And yea this count means I overlooked a couple. I ain't going back to
find them.
They're <Red Rising> and <The Last Unicorn>.

Joe Bernstein
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
-dsr-
2020-02-05 16:18:59 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
7. Altered Carbon. Never read it.
Mid-future action SF with a noir-cyberpunk style. People have backup devices
("cortical stacks") that allow their minds to survive the death of their bodies.
This can be used for exploitation of the poor in order to gain immortality.
Post by David Johnston
13. Blood Music. Never read.
Nanotech apocalypse started by a bored geek. Has an ending which is neither
"and then a cold virus kills them all off" nor "race to kill the hive mother".
Post by David Johnston
43. Neuromancer. Never read it. Cyberpunk was not really my thing.
Then Altered Carbon won't be, either.
Post by David Johnston
45. Old Man's War. I have not read it. The premise inspires skepticism.
It's a fun MilSF book which hints at deep problems in that universe. The
sequels explore the deep problems.
Post by David Johnston
56. Snow Crash. Bounced.
I found it thoroughly entertaining, but given your dislike of cyberpunk, I am
confident this isn't for you.
Post by David Johnston
59. Stories Of Your Life And Others. Haven't read it.
Stories range from not bad to excellent, IMHO. I actually thought the title
story was among the least impressive.
Post by David Johnston
69. The Gunslinger> I stopped reading Stephen King after The Dome.
Arguably you should have started earlier. "11/22/63", however, is a pretty good
time-travel novel. From another author it would be midlist.
Post by David Johnston
95. Uglies. Too YA for me to try.
It's a dystopia, anyway.

-dsr-
James Nicoll
2020-02-05 17:11:13 UTC
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Post by -dsr-
Post by David Johnston
95. Uglies. Too YA for me to try.
It's a dystopia, anyway.
My main critique of the series is that all three together would make a nice, lean
novel. As three volume length, I found it a bit leisurely.
--
My reviews can be found at http://jamesdavisnicoll.com/
My tor pieces at https://www.tor.com/author/james-davis-nicoll/
My Dreamwidth at https://james-davis-nicoll.dreamwidth.org/
My patreon is at https://www.patreon.com/jamesdnicoll
Bice
2020-02-06 00:37:48 UTC
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On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 15:47:40 -0700, David Johnston
Post by David Johnston
Post by Lynn McGuire
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
1. 1984. I read it because it was an "important book". Well at least
I'm not as voracious a reader as most here, but my ongoing attempt to
read all the Hugo winners helped me get a semi-decent score on this
list:

1. 1984. Bought it while I was out looking for Hugo winners but
haven't gotten around to reading it yet. Will eventually.

2. 2001, A Space Odyssey. Read it in high school in the early 80s
after seeing the movie. Loved both. Talked my first college roommate
into going to see a on-campus showing of the movie - on the way out of
the theater, he said "Do I get a prize for sitting through that piece
of shit?" Can't win 'em all, I guess.

3. A Canticle for Liebowitz. This had been on my "want to read" list
for ages, and I finally read it in 2018 as part of my Hugo quest.
Really liked it.

4. A Game of Thrones. Saw the HBO series, and that was probably
enough for me. My wife has read all the existing books and keeps
trying to get me to read them, but I'm not starting unless he finishes
the damned thing, and doubtful even then.

5. A Wizard of Earthsea. Read the original "trilogy". Found out
later there were more books in the series, but was not moved to seek
them out. Oddly, my favorite of the first three was the second one,
in which Ged doesn't even show up until half-way through.

6. A Wrinkle in Time. Read it and its sequels as a kid and loved
them. Read Wrinkle to my daughter when she was little and...she did
not share my enthusiasm.

7. Altered Carbon. Haven't read it. The title sounds familiar...is
there a movie or TV series based on this?

8. American Gods. Sitting on my Hugo bookshelf waiting to be read.
I've been going in chronological order, but a local bartender keeps
telling me I should skip ahead to this one.

9. Among Others. On the Hugo shelf, waiting.

10. Ancillary Justice. Also on the upcoming Hugo shelf, along with
its sequels.

11. Annihilation. Saw the movie, didn't realize it was based on a
book. Movie was pretty weird (in a good way), maybe I should give the
book a try someday.

12. Assassin's Apprentice. Nope.

13. Blood Music. Had a copy in hand at a used book store recently,
but I had to institute a "no buying non-Hugo books until you read all
of the Hugo winners" rule, so I put it back.

14. Brave New World. Sitting on the shelf next to 1984 waiting to be
read.

15. Childhood's End. Very nearly broke the "no buying non-Hugo
books" rule to pick this up, but stayed strong. I'll get to it
eventually.

16. Cloud Atlas. Haven't read it, haven't seen the movie. From here
on out, I'm just going to skip the "haven't experienced it" books.

19. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. The book that got me into
PKD, who has become one of my favorite authors. Bought it because of
Blade Runner (of course) - I love the movie, and like the book even
more.

20. Doomsday Book. On the Hugo shelf, waiting.

21. Dragonflight. I read the first few Pern books back in the 80s.
Don't remember much about them, but I know I read them.

22. Dune. I've slogged through this thing a few times (and have read
all five sequels a couple times) trying to figure out why so many
people rave about them. I still don't get it.

23. Ender's Game. Read it for the Hugo quest and saw the "twist"
ending coming from a mile away. Also saw the movie. Wasn't all that
thrilled with either of them. Speaker For the Dead didn't do it for
me either. Glad I don't have to read any more Card.

24. Fahrenheit 451. Read it, it was OK but not my favorite Bradbury.

26. Frankenstein. I feel like I've absorbed most of this novel
through popular culture, but I've never actually read it.

27. Good Omens. On my "to be read eventually" list.

31. H.P. Lovecraft Tales. As other have said, I didn't read the
specific collection on the Amazon page, but I have read a "best of
Lovecraft" collection. Oddly enough, it was given to me by another
bartender. Very literate bartenders at the local brewpub.

32. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. I've seen all the movies,
or at least they've been playing in rooms that I've been in at some
point. Since one of them won a Hugo, I guess I'll be reading the
series eventually. Both my wife and daughter have read them all and
have been bugging me for years to read them. Not really looking
forward to it.

34. Howls Moving Castle. Took my daughter to a showing of the movie
at the local branch of Penn State when she was deep in an anime phase.
I don't think either of us understood it. Didn't know it was based on
a book until just recently.

35. Hyperion. This is where I'm at in my Hugo quest. Read the first
two, currently reading Endymion. Started off really well, got a bit
overcomplicated and then way too metaphysical in book two, now seems
to have turned into a very straightforward adventure story. Odd
series.

37. I, Robot. I've read all the Robot, Empire and Foundation books.
One of my all-time favorite series. And yes, I even like the way
Asimov tied them all together.

39. Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrel. On the upcoming Hugo shelf.

42. Lord Foul's Bane. Read the original trilogy in college because a
friend found out that I liked The Lord of the Rings and assured me I'd
like the Covenant books. And to be fair, the first trilogy wasn't
bad. Didn't care much for the second trilogy. Only recently found
out that he's since added more books to the series, but I'm not at all
tempted to read them. Actually liked the "Mirror of her Dreams" books
better.

43. Neuromancer. Read it, liked it, but the whole film-noir style
was a tad overdone.

45. Old Man's War. Another one that I almost bought at a used book
store but had to put back.

46. Outlander. My wife has read them all and watched the TV series,
but hasn't once suggested that I might like them. I'll take that as a
hint.

48. Perdido Street Station. I kept running into this book while
looking for The City and The City. Didn't buy it.

49. Ready Player One. Another bartender recommendation (different
bar - is there a high correlation between bartenders and SF fans?),
but I haven't read it or seen the movie yet. Probably will
eventually.

50. Red Mars. The whole trilogy is sitting on the Hugo shelf,
waiting.

52. Ringworld. About two pages into reading it for the Hugo quest, I
realized that I had read it back in high school. Read it again anyway
because I really like it.

55. Slaughterhouse Five. Read this back around high school age too.
Don't remember much other than enjoying it.

57. Solaris. Saw the movie. The Clooney version. Not sure if that
counts.

58. Starship Troopers.
60. Stranger in a Strange Land. I read a lot of Heinlein for my Hugo
quest, and quickly found out that I just don't like his books. Not
the early novels, not the later stuff, none of it. I just don't dig
his style. That said, the first half of SiaSL wasn't bad, but it went
downhill fast in the second half.

61. The Color of Magic. On my "to be read eventually" list.

62. The Curse of Chalion. On the Hugo shelf, waiting.

64. The Dispossessed. The Hugo quest has also shown me that I'm not
a big Le Guin fan. The stories aren't bad, but I find it hard to get
into her "literary" writing style and I feel like every paragraph is
trying to bash me over the head with a moral. Of her books that I've
read, this was probably my least favorite. I might read it again some
time putting the chapters in chronological order to see if that
impoves it.

66. The Eye of World. Goddamned Wheel of Time series. A co-worker
gave me the first two books. He failed to mention that they were the
beginning of a never-ending series. I read the whole thing (I'm
obsessive that way), but man did it get tedious in the later Jordan
volumes. It's pretty bad when a series is noticably improved by the
author dying and letting someone else step in to finish it. I should
probably read some other Sanderson eventually. Anyway, this was one
of the very few book series that, as soon as I was done reading it, I
got rid of the whole thing because I knew I'd never want to read it
again.

67. The Forever War. Read for the Hugo quest. I'm not a big milSF
fan, but it wasn't bad.

69. The Gunslinger. Love the first book and the one that's a
flashback to Roland's youth. I thought the series went downhill when
King decided to bring in characters from Earth, and the last few books
really sucked. You could tell he was rushing through it just to get
the series finished. I mean, he set up this big cross-over with The
Stand that could have been amazing...then never did anything with it.

71. Hitchhiker's Guide To the Galaxy. One of my all-time favorite
series. Sci-fi meets Pythonesque humor? Sign me up. I could have
done with another half-dozen of these, even if the last couple books
weren't quite up to the standards of the first couple.

72. The Hobbit. A favorite.

75. The Left Hand of Darkness. Of the Le Guin I've read, this was
probably my favorite. Still not a book I liked all that much though.

76. The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. One of the first fantasy
series I ever read. Even as a kid, I thought the religous allegories
were a bit heavy-handed.

77. The Lord of the Rings. Possibly my favorite book of all time. I
also love the Peter Jackson movies, so sue me (but hated what he did
to The Hobbit). When the LotR movies came out on DVD, my daughter
(who was three or four at the time) wanted to watch them, but my wife
and I thought they were too scary for her. So I read the entire book
to her as a bedtime story, about 5-10 pages or so a night. Took
around half a year. By the end, she had decided that Merry and Pippin
were her new imaginary friends.

79. The Martian. Loved the movie, should probably read the book
eventually.

80. The Martian Chronicles. An early SF favorite. I was inspired to
read the book by the TV miniseries in 1980, which puts it around
seventh grade. Perfect fit.

83. The Princess Bride. I liked the movie. Should probably read the
book eventually.

84. The Road. Saw the movie. Not sure if I can say I actually liked
it. Doubt I'll read the book.

88. The Stars My Destination. I've almost bought this one in used
book stores multiple times. I'll get to it eventually.

89. The Sword of Shannara. I'm about 50% sure I read this in high
school or college but don't remember anything at all about it. Maybe
I just saw it in book stores and thought it looked like something I'd
like, but never got around to buying.

90. The Time Machine. I *think* I read it, but it might be like
Frankenstein where I've just absorbed the story over the years. But I
distinctly remember the parts about Morlocks freaking me out, so maybe
I had to read it for school? I dunno.

93. The Windup Girl. On the Hugo shelf, waiting.

94. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. I went on the ride at Disney World
in the 70s. Does that count?

BTW, the two that you missed were Red Rising by Pierce Brown and The
Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle. I haven't read either of them.

-- Bob
r***@gmail.com
2020-02-11 21:37:06 UTC
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Post by David Johnston
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
   https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
1. 1984. I read it because it was an "important book". Well at least
it wasn't all that boring.
2. 2001, A Space Odyssey. I think to fully appreciate 2001 you have to
both read the book and watch the movie. Of course I have.
3. A Canticle for Liebowitz. As I recall it was a good book.
4. A Game of Thrones. After I read it I joked that in the Game of
Thrones RPG there would be three alignements, Crazy, Stupid and Evil.
5. A Wizard of Earthsea. I was more than a little puzzled by why a
female author coined the expression "Weak as women's magic" and seemed
to have it be true in her setting.
6. A Wrinkle in Time. Read it as a kid. Not terribly impressed, for
the most part except that creepy suburbia was awesome.
7. Altered Carbon. Never read it.
8. American Gods. It wasn't bad. Although no appearances by the real
American gods. Mother Nature, Santa. The Founding Fathers.
9. Among Others. Never read it. Just checked out the synopsis. Don't
want to.
10. Ancillary Justice. I thought it was OK but I haven't gotten around
to reading the others.
11. Annihilation. I haven't watched the movie either but I suspect the
movie put it on this lists.
12. Assassin's Apprentice. I've read it. It was OK.
13. Blood Music. Never read.
14. Brave New World. Who would read 1984 without reading BNW?
15. Childhood's End. One of the books where what I got from the ending
doesn't seem to be what the author intended to me to get.
16. Cloud Atlas. No.
17. Daughter of the Blood. Did not finish.
18. Dhalgren. The only Delaney I liked was Babel 17. Bounced off
Dhalgren.
19. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. The movie was better.
20. Doomsday Book. I hated it.
21. Dragonflight. The initial short story was very much a knock-off of
Andre Norton. After that she found her own voice. But I find McAffrey
a little on the overly idealistic side.
22. Dune. Great book. The sequels were a waste of time.
23. Ender's Game. I read the short story. I'd gone off Card by the
time the book came out so I never bothered.
24. Fahrenheit 451. Bradbury was irritated that people took it as
being about censorship and not how television was a menace that would
make everyone stupid. Just goes to show subtlety and dystopia don't mix.
25. Foreigner. I probably didn't read it but I can't be sure. What I
mostly remember about the couple of Cherryh books I read was my decision
to never read one again.
26. Frankenstein. I'm not sure whether I read this one or just
absorbed all the plot points through osmosis.
27. Good Omens. Actually read it as a book club book. Everyone hated
it. Too damn British. And it doesn't help that we were in Canada's
Bible Belt.
28. Graceling. I'm wondering whether A Spell For Chameleon was the
first novel like this one where instead of magic being a sphere of
intellectual study that you learned it was instead a superpower you were
born with ala the X-Men.
29. Grass. Preachy as hell.
30. Guilty Pleasures. Anita Black from before she went to crap.
31. H.P. Lovecraft Tales. I've read all the stories in the book if not
this particular collection. I don't know why anyone would spend a buck
for stories that all can be downloaded for free.
32. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Knockoff of the Worst Witch
that became popular to an inexplicable degree.
33. How To Live Safely In A Science Fictional Universe. Never heard of
it before.
34. Howls Moving Castle. I've read it but I don't remember it well.
So I thought I'd reread it. I went to the library side to order a copy
and noted that it was say down on the list past a lot of copies of the
cartoon. Well, that's standard when there's video version of a book,
sadly. But I was amused to see that the cartoon listing says "Based on
the novel " Howl ' s moving castle " by Daiana Win Jo^nzu." What
happens when you translate something into Japanese and back.
35. Hyperion. Bored me. Didn't finish.
36. I am Legend. Wait that was a novel? I remember it as a short story.
37. I, Robot. Of course I've read it.
38. Interview With A Vampire. A quite oppressive book.
39. Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrel. Found it tedious. Did not finish.
40. Kindred. Maybe I should read that some day.
41. Kushiel's Dart. Not my kink.
42. Lord Foul's Bane. After reading it I joked that it was second only
to the Bible in how many people read it without enjoying it.
43. Neuromancer. Never read it. Cyberpunk was not really my thing.
44. Nights at the Circus. Never heard of it before.
45. Old Man's War. I have not read it. The premise inspires skepticism.
46. Outlander. Bounced off it.
47. Pawn of Prophecy. I recall enjoying it, but came to feel that the
ethnic stereotyping was a bit much even if the ethnicities were
imaginary. I mean what the countries that don't have a farmer
personality going to do to feed themselves?
48. Perdido Street Station. Never got around to it.
49. Ready Player One. Did not finish. Self-indulgent and trivial.
50. Red Mars. Haven't read it.
51. Riddle-Master. Haven't read it.
52. Ringworld. A Big Dumb Object without much of a story to go with it.
53. Sabriel. Bounced.
54. Sandman Slim. I hated him.
55. Slaughterhouse Five. Bounced.
56. Snow Crash. Bounced.
57. Solaris. Never read it.
58. Starship Troopers. And much lecturing of the reader ensued.
59. Stories Of Your Life And Others. Haven't read it.
60. Stranger in a Strange Land. I wouldn't say it was bad. I would
say it was way over-rated in the 70s. It's Jonathan Livingstone Seagull
with naked apes.
61. The Color of Magic: Early Pratchett before he fully came into his
own Prachettness. Thus I liked it better.
62. The Curse of Chalion. Never read it. Read later books in the
setting and wasn't a fan of the world.
63. The Dark is Rising. Good children's fantasy.
64. The Dispossessed. Leguin expresses her left-anarchist sympathies
while recognizing that there are problems with anarchy .
65. The Dragonbone Chair. Never read it.
66. The Eye of World. I got the impression that he started writing
this series as a response to the irritating qualities of the witches
from Andre Norton's Witch World. Which probably explains why so much of
the later books in the series were devoted to handing out spankings to
proud women.
67. The Forever War. Dials the lingering futility of the Vietnam War
up to 11.
68. The Golden Compass. The anti-religious agenda got on my nerves.
69. The Golem and the Djinni. Seriously? You alphabetized your list
but didn't ignore the "the" in the titles? Oh, and I never read that.
69. The Gunslinger> I stopped reading Stephen King after The Dome.
70. The Handmaid's Tale. You know I've read a fair number of dystopias
for a guy who doesn't like them.
71. Hitchhiker's Guide To the Galaxy. Ah yes. British humour. Up
there with dystopias. But I've read it.
72. The Hobbit: Read it as a kid. It wasn't bad.
74. The Hunger Games. The book that launched a thousand YA dystopias.
Or maybe a hundred. There were a lot is what I'm saying. It was pretty
good. Like Dune, it's smart to stop with the first book.
75. The Left Hand of Darkness. Never read it.
76. The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. Read it as a kid. Tolkien
was right about the sloppy world building.
77. The Lord of Rings. It takes a while to get to the good stuff.
78. The Magicians. Bounced.
79. The Martian. Really good.
80. The Martian Chronicles. Science fiction by a guy who didn't like
science fiction.
81. Mists of Avalon. Read it. Barely remember it. I do seem to
recall that it contained Bradleys fondness for segregated female
societies.
82. The Name of the Wind. I think I've read it. Or its sequel.
83. The Princess Bride. The rare book that the movie was better than.
Perhaps because it was written by a screenwriter.
84. The Road. Hard pass.
85. The Rook. I should read it.
86. The Sparrow. The religious elements kept me from trying it.
87. The Speed of Dark. I quite liked it.
88. The Stars My Destination. Science fictioning the Count of Monte
Cristo gives you a strong framework to go with.
89. The Sword of Shannara. Actually I liked more than most people who
talk about it. Sure it was derivative. But I like the twist of why the
plot device was the only that could kill the Dark Lord.
90. The Time Machine. Or as the cover would have it The Time Mac Hine.
Yeah, I've read it. I liked War of the Worlds better.
91. The Time Travellers Wife. Did not read. Do not intend to.
92. The Way of Kings. I like Brandon Sanderson.
93. The Windup Girl. Everything I've heard about it says I don't want
to read it.
94. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. There was a Saturday Night Live
sketch about Captain Nemo trying to explain it wasn't 20,000 "Leagues"
down. It's narratively weak because ultimately it's just "Look at this
cool stuff".
95. Uglies. Too YA for me to try.
96. Uprooted. Yes, I've read it. It wasn't anything special.
97. Wool. Bounced
98. World War Z. After I read it I thought everything that needed to
be said about the zombie apocalypse had been said and declared myself
done with zombies. But it wasn't bad.
And yea this count means I overlooked a couple. I ain't going back to
find them.
The two you missed appear to be:
Red Rising by Pierce Brown
The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle

In addition, I wasn't able to find any of these on the Amazon page. Perhaps it's been modified in the past few days?

Altered Carbon
Howl's Moving Castle
Snow Crash
The Dispossessed

I've created a Google sheet with the 100 books.
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1efC-GMlqmctHBalxhd8oeOASm6aMJjeFSC4TeYQciXc/edit?usp=sharing

My read count was 42, with three "bounced". Not that anyone cares.
Titus G
2020-02-12 06:55:28 UTC
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Post by r***@gmail.com
My read count was 42, with three "bounced". Not that anyone cares.
Those that scrolled through 300 plus lines they had read before to learn
nothing of interest probably care about that, but, do you care about
their cares?
r***@gmail.com
2020-02-12 20:56:47 UTC
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Post by Titus G
Post by r***@gmail.com
My read count was 42, with three "bounced". Not that anyone cares.
Those that scrolled through 300 plus lines they had read before to learn
nothing of interest probably care about that, but, do you care about
their cares?
Anyone who ends up in the position of scrolling through 300 plus lines
of quoted text, without text styling that easily indicates what is quoted
text and what is new, should invest in a new newsreader.

However your point is taken; trimming quoted text is polite, and I failed
in that respect.

On the other hand, making sure email addresses are not quoted in plaintext
is *also* polite, and you failed in that respect.
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2020-02-13 00:31:44 UTC
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Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Titus G
Post by r***@gmail.com
My read count was 42, with three "bounced". Not that anyone cares.
Those that scrolled through 300 plus lines they had read before to learn
nothing of interest probably care about that, but, do you care about
their cares?
Anyone who ends up in the position of scrolling through 300 plus lines
of quoted text, without text styling that easily indicates what is quoted
text and what is new, should invest in a new newsreader.
However your point is taken; trimming quoted text is polite, and I failed
in that respect.
On the other hand, making sure email addresses are not quoted in plaintext
is *also* polite, and you failed in that respect.
Given that your email address is in the Usenet post headers which are
continuously harvested by spambots, that is an entirely pointless concern I'm
afraid.

I've had a real email address in my Usenet posts since 1991, and I've got the
spam filters to prove it.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
I love children, especially when they cry, for then someone takes them away.
-- Nancy Mitford
Joe Bernstein
2020-02-17 23:44:55 UTC
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Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by r***@gmail.com
On the other hand, making sure email addresses are not quoted in
plaintext is *also* polite, and you failed in that respect.
Huh? When did this become part of netiquette? Says who?

E-mail addresses in plaintext are Usenet tradition going way, way
back. It used to be considered impolite *not* to use your real
address, but the spammers did that in.
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Given that your email address is in the Usenet post headers which are
continuously harvested by spambots, that is an entirely pointless
concern I'm afraid.
The address I post with, and have for, um, two years [1], still
doesn't get spam, unless you count as spam e-mail from companies that
I've tried to do business with. [2] [3]

If spambots are continuously harvesting Usenet headers, they seem to
have a mysterious aversion to my address. I suggest it's simpler to
hypothesise that they've moved on to richer feeding grounds.

Of course, this is another way of saying the previous poster's
concern is pointless.

Joe Bernstein

[1] The address I used for Usenet before that, for decades, got
torrential spam. I'm not saying the spambots never harvested Usenet,
I'm just saying that they've pretty clearly stopped doing so. Also,
that address got tons of spam right up to the end. Spambots clearly
don't let go of addresses once they have them.
Probably if Usenet got popular enough again that it was worth
notifying newbies that real addresses were safe again, the spambots
would notice, and the safety would go away again.

[2] This site called Shutterfly offers a whole bunch of freebies in
an annual promotion at the grocery store I shop at. One year I
decided to find out how that works. Well, it doesn't work, that's
how. If I were as unconcerned about libel as some here think I am,
I'd call them bare-faced liars, but since I'm not, I'll just say that
I never found the magic key that would've enabled them to keep their
word. They tried to console me by sending me hundreds of e-mails, an
easy majority of the total mail this address has ever gotten.

[3] My other address, the one I use mainly for e-mail, gets lots of
spam, but it all has a discernible rationale. A company I special
ordered something from e-mails me promotions every day, despite my
stated aversion to same. Several accounting-service companies used
my address when it was public record because I was a registered tax
preparer, and have never bothered to notice either that I never buy
anything from them, or that I'm no longer registered. And this idiot
in Texas who firmly believes that my address is hers [4] has gotten
me signed up for at least one other spamming company. But I don't
get any Viagra ads or Nigerian cons at that address, just these
companies, over and over and over again.

[4] I am not making this up: she's given my address to her lawyer,
her daughter's school, Facebook and other social media sites, the
list goes on. I have some difficulty imagining her way of life. So
far, at least, she hasn't given my address to any romantic partners,
but I guess that day could come.
Someone in South Africa gives my address to a local equivalent of
Uber, but all their e-mails appear to be related to her actual use of
the service, not promotions, so they've never been received as spam.
--
Joe Bernstein <***@gmail.com>
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2020-02-19 02:12:28 UTC
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Post by Joe Bernstein
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by r***@gmail.com
On the other hand, making sure email addresses are not quoted in
plaintext is *also* polite, and you failed in that respect.
Huh? When did this become part of netiquette? Says who?
E-mail addresses in plaintext are Usenet tradition going way, way
back. It used to be considered impolite *not* to use your real
address, but the spammers did that in.
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Given that your email address is in the Usenet post headers which are
continuously harvested by spambots, that is an entirely pointless
concern I'm afraid.
The address I post with, and have for, um, two years [1], still
doesn't get spam, unless you count as spam e-mail from companies that
I've tried to do business with. [2] [3]
If spambots are continuously harvesting Usenet headers, they seem to
have a mysterious aversion to my address. I suggest it's simpler to
hypothesise that they've moved on to richer feeding grounds.
Of course, this is another way of saying the previous poster's
concern is pointless.
Joe Bernstein
[1] The address I used for Usenet before that, for decades, got
torrential spam. I'm not saying the spambots never harvested Usenet,
I'm just saying that they've pretty clearly stopped doing so.
Cool! I'm still using the same address that got picked up for spamming, so...

Good to know.

I use different addresses for everywhere I set up an account and it's always
rather obvious when some company I've dealt with in the past has had their
address list compromised - a sudden attack of spams sent to
***@whichevercompany.sessile.org.

It's never so far been anyone I've stored payment methods with, or anyone I
care about setting up a killrule for.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
To every complex problem there is a solution which is simple, neat and wrong.
-- HL Mencken
Peter Trei
2020-02-04 00:01:31 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
46 for me. It looks like a good list.

Pt
J. Clarke
2020-02-04 01:01:49 UTC
Reply
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On Sun, 2 Feb 2020 23:56:02 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
I think it's 54 for me. There are several maybes.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Robert Carnegie
2020-02-04 03:10:49 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
Do "The Amazon Books Editors" provide information about
these books besides format and price?

I mean, in a sense, almost all books are "to read"
if you feel like it. Maybe not in one go for the
telephone directory. And at the same time you can
nominate books "not to read". But still, "books
to read" is an extremely broad category.
Titus G
2020-02-04 04:04:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
Lynn
Do "The Amazon Books Editors" provide information about
these books besides format and price?
Do Amazon Books have Editors who edit books?
Post by Robert Carnegie
I mean, in a sense, almost all books are "to read"
if you feel like it. Maybe not in one go for the
telephone directory. And at the same time you can
nominate books "not to read". But still, "books
to read" is an extremely broad category.
But far politer than "Quick, Buy These 100 (Insert genre here) Books
(from us) Before You Die."
Seriously, it is a far better list than the usual Dan Lyvinngston Lottery.
David Goldfarb
2020-02-05 02:11:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
"100 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books to Read in a Lifetime" from the Amazon Books
editors
https://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/?node=12661600011
I have read 42 of the 100.
BTW, the lists are arranged in 5 groups of 20.
69 of 100. Some solid choices on there.
--
David Goldfarb | "You can't do only one thing."
***@gmail.com |
***@ocf.berkeley.edu | -- John W. Campbell, Jr.
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