Discussion:
Automobile Nomenclature Question
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p***@hotmail.com
2020-04-02 01:10:39 UTC
Permalink
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.

It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.

Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.

At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Chrysi Cat
2020-04-02 05:09:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Oy. All of it setting up for a bad pun.

I'd tell you to go to the corner and think about what you've done, but
unless you live alone it's prolly semi-permanently occupied by your
grandkids until March.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Chrysi Cat
2020-04-02 05:11:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Oy. All of it setting up for a bad pun.
I'd tell you to go to the corner and think about what you've done, but
unless you live alone it's prolly semi-permanently occupied by your
grandkids until March.
And besides, that strikes me more as a setup to "CARDIS".
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Dimensional Traveler
2020-04-02 07:05:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Titus G
2020-04-03 05:05:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-04-03 05:23:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
There are no Poles longer than 10 feet.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Kevrob
2020-04-03 05:31:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
There are no Poles longer than 10 feet.
--
Get a Lithuanian. Some of their basketball players
are quite "long."

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-04-03 05:32:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
There are no Poles longer than 10 feet.
Old remark from I forget where: "I wouldn't touch that with a
ten-foot pole, or even a twelve-foot bulgarian."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2020-04-03 10:38:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
There are no Poles longer than 10 feet.
Old remark from I forget where: "I wouldn't touch that with a
ten-foot pole, or even a twelve-foot bulgarian."
That has a distinctly Marx-brothers flavor to it.
Kevrob
2020-04-03 05:25:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
2 metres ~= 2 yards, and that's ~ six feet.

We use 6 ft, Stateside. Same/same, as a rule of thumb, I'd say.

6 ft. = 1.8288m

10 ft is 3.048m

100-yard (300 ft) US football gridiron is 90m, same as an
association football pitch for 2 11-member sides, at the
minimum standard, goal-line to goal-line in both cases, if
that helps any.

"X football fields long" is a common descriptor of long things
in Leftpondia. Nobody ever uses "bowling lanes" as a de facto
standard.

Kevin R
Alan Baker
2020-04-03 06:25:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
You need to review your unit conversions.

:-)
David Johnston
2020-04-03 18:06:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
Listen to the wisdom of Gygax. Two meters is only 6.5 feet. Ten foot
poles are about right.
Titus G
2020-04-04 03:29:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
 Listen to the wisdom of Gygax.  Two meters is only 6.5 feet.  Ten foot
poles are about right.
Never played D&D.
Yes.
Yes. Two feet to hold on to, one foot to whack with....
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-04-04 04:02:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
 Listen to the wisdom of Gygax.  Two meters is only 6.5 feet.  Ten foot
poles are about right.
Never played D&D.
Yes.
Yes. Two feet to hold on to, one foot to whack with....
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2020-04-04 05:18:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
*repeatedly whacks the poster with a ten foot pole*
Safe social distancing is two metres so you need a longer pole.
 Listen to the wisdom of Gygax.  Two meters is only 6.5 feet.  Ten foot
poles are about right.
Dafuq?
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
t***@gmail.com
2020-04-02 12:25:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
Oh my - that was a bit Dodge-y, don't you think? :)
- Tony
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-04-02 12:45:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
Oh my - that was a bit Dodge-y, don't you think? :)
- Tony
I'm in Accord.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Kevrob
2020-04-02 12:59:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
Oh my - that was a bit Dodge-y, don't you think? :)
- Tony
I'm in Accord.
GD must have come with all the options,
because you want your ride Turing, complete!

Kevin R
Alan Baker
2020-04-02 17:21:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
When Dante wrote "Inferno"...

...there was one circle he neglected to mention:

The one for punsters.

But I know someone who will love it.

;-)
Alan Baker
2020-04-02 17:21:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
So all of that was just a Prelude for a pun?
D B Davis
2020-04-03 00:37:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
In Robert Heinlein's novel _The Number of the Beast_, one of the
protagonists, Zachary Carter, has a car he has named Gay Deceiver.
It is a flying car that can carry four people. It has at least
sub-orbital capability on Earth and orbital capability on Mars.
It has a computer that can operate the vehicle autonomously in
all modes. The computer has voice recognition capability and is
surprisingly versatile in verbal interactions with the pilot and
other crew members.
Early in the book the "continua drive" invented by Dr. Jacob Burroughs
is installed in Gay Deceiver, and this gives the vehicle the ability to
travel instantaneously to any point in space and time in this and a very
large number of other universes. When they travel to the universe of
the _Wizard of Oz_, Gay Deceiver becomes fully sentient and fully
conversant in the English language. She retains this ability through
all subsequent travels.
At this point would it be correct to refer to Gay Deceiver as a
Turing car?
"The greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor;
it is the one thing that cannot be learnt from others;
and it is also a sign of genius, since a good metaphor
implies an intuitive perception of the similarity in the
dissimilar."

Your pun is more than recursive: "Infinity is not in finity."

Your pun is more than compounded: "Where do mathematicians go on
weekends? To a Möbius strip club!"

Your hyper-pun contains two independent puns. There's a Turing machine
pun and a Turing sexual pun. It's a multi-layered play on words, a cut
above.

Note.

[1] All examples from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pun



Thank you,
--
Don.......My cat's )\._.,--....,'``.
telltale tall tail /, _.. \ _\ (`._ ,.
tells tall tales.. `._.-(,_..'--(,_..'`-.;.'
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