Discussion:
YASID (Suicides Changing Places)
(too old to reply)
e***@optonline.net
2017-01-03 14:06:34 UTC
Permalink
Someone asked me:

It's a paperback book I had in the mid-60s - do you know this story?

It's about two (eventually) physically similar guys, from two completely
different environments, who trade places for a month or two.

The one from our (1950s) world is a meek, sickly British prole, living his life of quiet desperation in a terrace house with his wife. The other is a bored starship captain, weary with ennui at how he can have anything he desires, and all has become so predictable. They both decide to commit suicide by jumping into the river -- but instead of the quick impact they both wind up flying through a featureless gray void, passing each other midway -- and then each is somehow mistaken for the other, futuristic medicine rapidly rendering our hero into a strong, vigorous guy who gets into his new role, using unexpected tactics to win space battles. Meanwhile back in England our other hero beats up the neighborhood bully, winning 'his' wife's and the neighbors' adoring respect . Then somehow, again they're hurtling through the void, passing (and this time recognizing) each other, and upon arrival finding that each has improved the other's lot, happy endings all around. "Tomorrow" may have been in the title. Any idea what it was?

--
Evelyn C. Leeper
William December Starr
2017-01-04 15:24:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by e***@optonline.net
The one from our (1950s) world is a meek, sickly British prole,
living his life of quiet desperation in a terrace house with his
wife. The other is a bored starship captain, weary with ennui at
how he can have anything he desires, and all has become so
predictable. They both decide to commit suicide by jumping into
the river -- but instead of the quick impact they both wind up
flying through a featureless gray void, passing each other midway
-- and then each is somehow mistaken for the other, futuristic
medicine rapidly rendering our hero into a strong, vigorous guy
who gets into his new role, using unexpected tactics to win space
battles. Meanwhile back in England our other hero beats up the
neighborhood bully, winning 'his' wife's and the neighbors'
adoring respect . Then somehow, again they're hurtling through the
void, passing (and this time recognizing) each other, and upon
arrival finding that each has improved the other's lot, happy
endings all around. "Tomorrow" may have been in the title. Any
idea what it was?
None whatsoever, but it brings to mind a YASID of my own that's of
vaguely similar theme, a short story or maybe novelette that I read
in the very late 1960s in an anthology that I _think_ was themed
as "stories set in the distant future."

A man is living two alternating and utterly different lives:

1. He is the supreme ruler of a vast space empire, with all that
he desires (e.g., a harem of unearthly beautiful and sexually
skilled women) his merely for the utterance of his wishes. But he
has recurring, vivid and internally consistently progressive
dreams -- nightmares -- in which he has a horrible existence as a
tormented laborer living in horribly unpleasant conditions.

2. He's an isolated prospector/miner eking out an existence on a
borderline-uninhabitable planet, stuck in a tiny and unpleasant
survival hut with an utter harridan -- to and beyond the point of
evil sociopathy -- of a wife who tortures him psychologically
and, without damaging him enough that he can't daily perform his
back-breaking labor, physically. But, he has access to what we'd
today call a fully immersive virtual reality rig which he can
sometimes use -- his wife is a major impediment to frequent use,
of course -- to live a fantasy, vivid and internally consistently
progressive fantasy as the supreme ruler of a vast space empire,
everything he wants his merely for the utterance of his wishes.

He reasons that only one of these lives is real, but he's utterly
unable to determine whether (a) the terrible one is real and the
other a fantasy which he can thank god sometimes temporarily escape
into, or (b) the life of utter luxury is real, but his mind is
creating a recurring exactly-opposite false reality in order to
keep him from going psychologically flatline from boredom[1]. And
it's never revealed to the reader either which is real.

-----------
*1: Or a variant he considers: deadly bored by his perfect
life, he himself has *knowingly* set up the nightmares
via far-future mind-tech at his disposal, and in order
to make it work he has deliberately had all knowledge of
that wiped from his mind.

-- wds
Peter Trei
2017-01-04 15:33:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by William December Starr
Post by e***@optonline.net
The one from our (1950s) world is a meek, sickly British prole,
living his life of quiet desperation in a terrace house with his
wife. The other is a bored starship captain, weary with ennui at
how he can have anything he desires, and all has become so
predictable. They both decide to commit suicide by jumping into
the river -- but instead of the quick impact they both wind up
flying through a featureless gray void, passing each other midway
-- and then each is somehow mistaken for the other, futuristic
medicine rapidly rendering our hero into a strong, vigorous guy
who gets into his new role, using unexpected tactics to win space
battles. Meanwhile back in England our other hero beats up the
neighborhood bully, winning 'his' wife's and the neighbors'
adoring respect . Then somehow, again they're hurtling through the
void, passing (and this time recognizing) each other, and upon
arrival finding that each has improved the other's lot, happy
endings all around. "Tomorrow" may have been in the title. Any
idea what it was?
None whatsoever, but it brings to mind a YASID of my own that's of
vaguely similar theme, a short story or maybe novelette that I read
in the very late 1960s in an anthology that I _think_ was themed
as "stories set in the distant future."
1. He is the supreme ruler of a vast space empire, with all that
he desires (e.g., a harem of unearthly beautiful and sexually
skilled women) his merely for the utterance of his wishes. But he
has recurring, vivid and internally consistently progressive
dreams -- nightmares -- in which he has a horrible existence as a
tormented laborer living in horribly unpleasant conditions.
2. He's an isolated prospector/miner eking out an existence on a
borderline-uninhabitable planet, stuck in a tiny and unpleasant
survival hut with an utter harridan -- to and beyond the point of
evil sociopathy -- of a wife who tortures him psychologically
and, without damaging him enough that he can't daily perform his
back-breaking labor, physically. But, he has access to what we'd
today call a fully immersive virtual reality rig which he can
sometimes use -- his wife is a major impediment to frequent use,
of course -- to live a fantasy, vivid and internally consistently
progressive fantasy as the supreme ruler of a vast space empire,
everything he wants his merely for the utterance of his wishes.
He reasons that only one of these lives is real, but he's utterly
unable to determine whether (a) the terrible one is real and the
other a fantasy which he can thank god sometimes temporarily escape
into, or (b) the life of utter luxury is real, but his mind is
creating a recurring exactly-opposite false reality in order to
keep him from going psychologically flatline from boredom[1]. And
it's never revealed to the reader either which is real.
-----------
*1: Or a variant he considers: deadly bored by his perfect
life, he himself has *knowingly* set up the nightmares
via far-future mind-tech at his disposal, and in order
to make it work he has deliberately had all knowledge of
that wiped from his mind.
-- wds
I recall reading this too, but as I so often am, I'm blank on the
author and title.

pt
William December Starr
2017-01-04 15:49:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
I recall reading this too, but as I so often am, I'm blank
on theauthor and title.
One of many things that suck in life: You see somebody else's
YASID and all you can think is "Aargh, me too."

-- wds
Dimensional Traveler
2017-01-04 16:15:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by William December Starr
Post by Peter Trei
I recall reading this too, but as I so often am, I'm blank
on theauthor and title.
One of many things that suck in life: You see somebody else's
YASID and all you can think is "Aargh, me too."
There has to be a story with that as a component.... :D
--
Running the rec.arts.TV Channels Watched Survey.
Winter 2016 survey began Dec 01 and will end Feb 28
Peter Trei
2017-01-04 16:57:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by William December Starr
Post by Peter Trei
I recall reading this too, but as I so often am, I'm blank
on theauthor and title.
One of many things that suck in life: You see somebody else's
YASID and all you can think is "Aargh, me too."
There has to be a story with that as a component.... :D
I'm SURE I read one somewhere....

pt
a***@msn.com
2018-12-28 02:09:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by William December Starr
Post by e***@optonline.net
The one from our (1950s) world is a meek, sickly British prole,
living his life of quiet desperation in a terrace house with his
wife. The other is a bored starship captain, weary with ennui at
how he can have anything he desires, and all has become so
predictable. They both decide to commit suicide by jumping into
the river -- but instead of the quick impact they both wind up
flying through a featureless gray void, passing each other midway
-- and then each is somehow mistaken for the other, futuristic
medicine rapidly rendering our hero into a strong, vigorous guy
who gets into his new role, using unexpected tactics to win space
battles. Meanwhile back in England our other hero beats up the
neighborhood bully, winning 'his' wife's and the neighbors'
adoring respect . Then somehow, again they're hurtling through the
void, passing (and this time recognizing) each other, and upon
arrival finding that each has improved the other's lot, happy
endings all around. "Tomorrow" may have been in the title. Any
idea what it was?
None whatsoever, but it brings to mind a YASID of my own that's of
vaguely similar theme, a short story or maybe novelette that I read
in the very late 1960s in an anthology that I _think_ was themed
as "stories set in the distant future."
1. He is the supreme ruler of a vast space empire, with all that
he desires (e.g., a harem of unearthly beautiful and sexually
skilled women) his merely for the utterance of his wishes. But he
has recurring, vivid and internally consistently progressive
dreams -- nightmares -- in which he has a horrible existence as a
tormented laborer living in horribly unpleasant conditions.
2. He's an isolated prospector/miner eking out an existence on a
borderline-uninhabitable planet, stuck in a tiny and unpleasant
survival hut with an utter harridan -- to and beyond the point of
evil sociopathy -- of a wife who tortures him psychologically
and, without damaging him enough that he can't daily perform his
back-breaking labor, physically. But, he has access to what we'd
today call a fully immersive virtual reality rig which he can
sometimes use -- his wife is a major impediment to frequent use,
of course -- to live a fantasy, vivid and internally consistently
progressive fantasy as the supreme ruler of a vast space empire,
everything he wants his merely for the utterance of his wishes.
He reasons that only one of these lives is real, but he's utterly
unable to determine whether (a) the terrible one is real and the
other a fantasy which he can thank god sometimes temporarily escape
into, or (b) the life of utter luxury is real, but his mind is
creating a recurring exactly-opposite false reality in order to
keep him from going psychologically flatline from boredom[1]. And
it's never revealed to the reader either which is real.
-----------
*1: Or a variant he considers: deadly bored by his perfect
life, he himself has *knowingly* set up the nightmares
via far-future mind-tech at his disposal, and in order
to make it work he has deliberately had all knowledge of
that wiped from his mind.
-- wds
I think this is "In the Imagicon," by George Henry Smith
D B Davis
2018-12-29 01:30:04 UTC
Permalink
On Wednesday, January 4, 2017 at 10:24:55 AM UTC-5, William December Starr wro
Post by William December Starr
Post by e***@optonline.net
The one from our (1950s) world is a meek, sickly British prole,
living his life of quiet desperation in a terrace house with his
wife. The other is a bored starship captain, weary with ennui at
how he can have anything he desires, and all has become so
predictable. They both decide to commit suicide by jumping into
the river -- but instead of the quick impact they both wind up
flying through a featureless gray void, passing each other midway
-- and then each is somehow mistaken for the other, futuristic
medicine rapidly rendering our hero into a strong, vigorous guy
who gets into his new role, using unexpected tactics to win space
battles. Meanwhile back in England our other hero beats up the
neighborhood bully, winning 'his' wife's and the neighbors'
adoring respect . Then somehow, again they're hurtling through the
void, passing (and this time recognizing) each other, and upon
arrival finding that each has improved the other's lot, happy
endings all around. "Tomorrow" may have been in the title. Any
idea what it was?
None whatsoever, but it brings to mind a YASID of my own that's of
vaguely similar theme, a short story or maybe novelette that I read
in the very late 1960s in an anthology that I _think_ was themed
as "stories set in the distant future."
1. He is the supreme ruler of a vast space empire, with all that
he desires (e.g., a harem of unearthly beautiful and sexually
skilled women) his merely for the utterance of his wishes. But he
has recurring, vivid and internally consistently progressive
dreams -- nightmares -- in which he has a horrible existence as a
tormented laborer living in horribly unpleasant conditions.
2. He's an isolated prospector/miner eking out an existence on a
borderline-uninhabitable planet, stuck in a tiny and unpleasant
survival hut with an utter harridan -- to and beyond the point of
evil sociopathy -- of a wife who tortures him psychologically
and, without damaging him enough that he can't daily perform his
back-breaking labor, physically. But, he has access to what we'd
today call a fully immersive virtual reality rig which he can
sometimes use -- his wife is a major impediment to frequent use,
of course -- to live a fantasy, vivid and internally consistently
progressive fantasy as the supreme ruler of a vast space empire,
everything he wants his merely for the utterance of his wishes.
He reasons that only one of these lives is real, but he's utterly
unable to determine whether (a) the terrible one is real and the
other a fantasy which he can thank god sometimes temporarily escape
into, or (b) the life of utter luxury is real, but his mind is
creating a recurring exactly-opposite false reality in order to
keep him from going psychologically flatline from boredom[1]. And
it's never revealed to the reader either which is real.
-----------
*1: Or a variant he considers: deadly bored by his perfect
life, he himself has *knowingly* set up the nightmares
via far-future mind-tech at his disposal, and in order
to make it work he has deliberately had all knowledge of
that wiped from his mind.
-- wds
I think this is "In the Imagicon," by George Henry Smith
AFAIK, it's been almost two years since William last posted to rasw. In
William's absence allow me to note that "In the Imagicon" shares a lot
of plot points with William's YASID.
A couple of websites host "In the Imagicon." The first website
credits George Henry Smith. [1] The second website credits Joe Haley,
with a disclaimer "(Based on an original story by George Henry Smith)."
[2] Both stories look identical to me.


Note.

1. http://pinku-stories.blogspot.com/2010/08/in-imagicon-by-george-henry-smith.html
2. http://www.brightempire.com/JoeHaley/IntheImagicon.html



Thank you,
--
Don
a***@msn.com
2018-12-29 12:23:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
AFAIK, it's been almost two years since William last posted to rasw. In
William's absence allow me to note that "In the Imagicon" shares a lot
of plot points with William's YASID.
Don
Thanks. Maybe in two more years, he'll be back.
Titus G
2018-12-28 04:36:23 UTC
Permalink
snip
Post by a***@msn.com
it brings to mind a YASID of my own that's of vaguely similar
theme, a short story or maybe novelette that I read in the very
late 1960s in an anthology that I _think_ was themed as "stories
set in the distant future."
1. He is the supreme ruler of a vast space empire, with all that he
desires (e.g., a harem of unearthly beautiful and sexually skilled
women) his merely for the utterance of his wishes. But he has
recurring, vivid and internally consistently progressive dreams --
nightmares -- in which he has a horrible existence as a tormented
laborer living in horribly unpleasant conditions.
2. He's an isolated prospector/miner eking out an existence on a
borderline-uninhabitable planet, stuck in a tiny and unpleasant
survival hut with an utter harridan -- to and beyond the point of
evil sociopathy -- of a wife who tortures him psychologically and,
without damaging him enough that he can't daily perform his
back-breaking labor, physically. But, he has access to what we'd
today call a fully immersive virtual reality rig which he can
sometimes use -- his wife is a major impediment to frequent use, of
course -- to live a fantasy, vivid and internally consistently
progressive fantasy as the supreme ruler of a vast space empire,
everything he wants his merely for the utterance of his wishes.
He reasons that only one of these lives is real, but he's utterly
unable to determine whether (a) the terrible one is real and the
other a fantasy which he can thank god sometimes temporarily
escape into, or (b) the life of utter luxury is real, but his mind
is creating a recurring exactly-opposite false reality in order to
keep him from going psychologically flatline from boredom[1]. And
it's never revealed to the reader either which is real.
----------- *1: Or a variant he considers: deadly bored by his
perfect life, he himself has *knowingly* set up the nightmares via
far-future mind-tech at his disposal, and in order to make it work
he has deliberately had all knowledge of that wiped from his mind.
-- wds
I think this is "In the Imagicon," by George Henry Smith
I just read the variant online and suspect the original would have been
better. Very short. The tale of life on Nestrond was my favourite part.
Thank you.
Butch Malahide
2018-12-30 01:58:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by a***@msn.com
it brings to mind a YASID of my own that's of vaguely similar
theme, a short story or maybe novelette that I read in the very
late 1960s in an anthology that I _think_ was themed as "stories
set in the distant future."
1. He is the supreme ruler of a vast space empire, with all that he
desires (e.g., a harem of unearthly beautiful and sexually skilled
women) his merely for the utterance of his wishes. But he has
recurring, vivid and internally consistently progressive dreams --
nightmares -- in which he has a horrible existence as a tormented
laborer living in horribly unpleasant conditions.
2. He's an isolated prospector/miner eking out an existence on a
borderline-uninhabitable planet, stuck in a tiny and unpleasant
survival hut with an utter harridan -- to and beyond the point of
evil sociopathy -- of a wife who tortures him psychologically and,
without damaging him enough that he can't daily perform his
back-breaking labor, physically. But, he has access to what we'd
today call a fully immersive virtual reality rig which he can
sometimes use -- his wife is a major impediment to frequent use, of
course -- to live a fantasy, vivid and internally consistently
progressive fantasy as the supreme ruler of a vast space empire,
everything he wants his merely for the utterance of his wishes.
He reasons that only one of these lives is real, but he's utterly
unable to determine whether (a) the terrible one is real and the
other a fantasy which he can thank god sometimes temporarily
escape into, or (b) the life of utter luxury is real, but his mind
is creating a recurring exactly-opposite false reality in order to
keep him from going psychologically flatline from boredom[1]. And
it's never revealed to the reader either which is real.
----------- *1: Or a variant he considers: deadly bored by his
perfect life, he himself has *knowingly* set up the nightmares via
far-future mind-tech at his disposal, and in order to make it work
he has deliberately had all knowledge of that wiped from his mind.
-- wds
I think this is "In the Imagicon," by George Henry Smith
I just read the variant online and suspect the original would have been
better. Very short. The tale of life on Nestrond was my favourite part.
Thank you.
https://archive.org/details/Galaxy_v24n03_1966-02/page/n139
Titus G
2018-12-30 04:17:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Butch Malahide
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by a***@msn.com
it brings to mind a YASID of my own that's of vaguely similar
theme, a short story or maybe novelette that I read in the very
late 1960s in an anthology that I _think_ was themed as "stories
set in the distant future."
1. He is the supreme ruler of a vast space empire, with all that he
desires (e.g., a harem of unearthly beautiful and sexually skilled
women) his merely for the utterance of his wishes. But he has
recurring, vivid and internally consistently progressive dreams --
nightmares -- in which he has a horrible existence as a tormented
laborer living in horribly unpleasant conditions.
2. He's an isolated prospector/miner eking out an existence on a
borderline-uninhabitable planet, stuck in a tiny and unpleasant
survival hut with an utter harridan -- to and beyond the point of
evil sociopathy -- of a wife who tortures him psychologically and,
without damaging him enough that he can't daily perform his
back-breaking labor, physically. But, he has access to what we'd
today call a fully immersive virtual reality rig which he can
sometimes use -- his wife is a major impediment to frequent use, of
course -- to live a fantasy, vivid and internally consistently
progressive fantasy as the supreme ruler of a vast space empire,
everything he wants his merely for the utterance of his wishes.
He reasons that only one of these lives is real, but he's utterly
unable to determine whether (a) the terrible one is real and the
other a fantasy which he can thank god sometimes temporarily
escape into, or (b) the life of utter luxury is real, but his mind
is creating a recurring exactly-opposite false reality in order to
keep him from going psychologically flatline from boredom[1]. And
it's never revealed to the reader either which is real.
----------- *1: Or a variant he considers: deadly bored by his
perfect life, he himself has *knowingly* set up the nightmares via
far-future mind-tech at his disposal, and in order to make it work
he has deliberately had all knowledge of that wiped from his mind.
-- wds
I think this is "In the Imagicon," by George Henry Smith
I just read the variant online and suspect the original would have been
better. Very short. The tale of life on Nestrond was my favourite part.
Thank you.
https://archive.org/details/Galaxy_v24n03_1966-02/page/n139
.
Thank you. That version is what WDS described as the variant where
reality is revealed to the reader.
D B Davis
2018-12-30 15:42:02 UTC
Permalink
<snip>
Post by Titus G
Post by Butch Malahide
Post by Titus G
I just read the variant online and suspect the original would have been
better. Very short. The tale of life on Nestrond was my favourite part.
Thank you.
https://archive.org/details/Galaxy_v24n03_1966-02/page/n139
.
Thank you. That version is what WDS described as the variant where
reality is revealed to the reader.
A very quick perusal (unassisted by a software tool such as cmp) leads
me to believe that the two stories linked in my footnote may be exact
copies of the Galaxy story.
At this point my followup's going to veer off to stories about
alternate realities, such as _Transistion_ (Banks). Hollywood-Bezos'
treatment of _The Man in the High Castle_ (PKD) prolongs PKD's original
story with a parallel realities interpretation.
In the Bezos treatment, special characters, called travelers,
transition between alternate realities. Unlike the Banks, where
transitionaries "flit" into another human's husk in an alternate
reality, the Bezos treatment has travelers move in toto between
alternate realities.
The Bezos treatment is going downhill for me. (YMMV.) Although the
first two seasons featured an interesting creative interpretation of the
PKD, the third season reflexively uses sex and violence as filler
whenever it can not think of anything else to do. And that happens far
too too often anymore. It's enough to make my mind scream, "I don't care
what happens to these people!"
Life's too short. So all of those vapid time-wasting scenes get
dropped on the cutting room floor by me and my video editing software.
Presumable the Bezos treatment will continue to devolve until it all
ends up on the cutting room floor.

Note.

1. http://pinku-stories.blogspot.com/2010/08/in-imagicon-by-george-henry-smith.html
2. http://www.brightempire.com/JoeHaley/IntheImagicon.html



Thank you,
--
Don
J. Clarke
2018-12-30 17:11:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by D B Davis
<snip>
Post by Titus G
Post by Butch Malahide
Post by Titus G
I just read the variant online and suspect the original would have been
better. Very short. The tale of life on Nestrond was my favourite part.
Thank you.
https://archive.org/details/Galaxy_v24n03_1966-02/page/n139
.
Thank you. That version is what WDS described as the variant where
reality is revealed to the reader.
A very quick perusal (unassisted by a software tool such as cmp) leads
me to believe that the two stories linked in my footnote may be exact
copies of the Galaxy story.
At this point my followup's going to veer off to stories about
alternate realities, such as _Transistion_ (Banks). Hollywood-Bezos'
treatment of _The Man in the High Castle_ (PKD) prolongs PKD's original
story with a parallel realities interpretation.
In the Bezos treatment, special characters, called travelers,
transition between alternate realities. Unlike the Banks, where
transitionaries "flit" into another human's husk in an alternate
reality, the Bezos treatment has travelers move in toto between
alternate realities.
The Bezos treatment is going downhill for me. (YMMV.) Although the
first two seasons featured an interesting creative interpretation of the
PKD, the third season reflexively uses sex and violence as filler
whenever it can not think of anything else to do. And that happens far
too too often anymore. It's enough to make my mind scream, "I don't care
what happens to these people!"
Life's too short. So all of those vapid time-wasting scenes get
dropped on the cutting room floor by me and my video editing software.
Presumable the Bezos treatment will continue to devolve until it all
ends up on the cutting room floor.
Note.
1. http://pinku-stories.blogspot.com/2010/08/in-imagicon-by-george-henry-smith.html
2. http://www.brightempire.com/JoeHaley/IntheImagicon.html
?
Thank you,
The TV series Travelers seems to be handling alternate universes or at
least alternate timelines in a different way--the people we meet
aren't experiencing alternate timelines, they're experiencing the one
that they're on, but their leaders in the futre are experiencing them
based on the activities of the Travelers.

<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



<spoilers follow>



At the end of season 3 (the current one) the controller in the future
announces that this timeline is being abandoned and the lead character
travels back to a much earlier time, so Season 4, if it happens, will
not be a continuation of the current story but a partial reboot,
possibly with different characters.
Jerry Brown
2018-12-30 18:25:31 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 12:11:40 -0500, J. Clarke
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

<snip>
Post by J. Clarke
The TV series Travelers seems to be handling alternate universes or at
least alternate timelines in a different way--the people we meet
aren't experiencing alternate timelines, they're experiencing the one
that they're on, but their leaders in the futre are experiencing them
based on the activities of the Travelers.
Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles had this as well.
Post by J. Clarke
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
<spoilers follow>
At the end of season 3 (the current one) the controller in the future
announces that this timeline is being abandoned and the lead character
travels back to a much earlier time, so Season 4, if it happens, will
not be a continuation of the current story but a partial reboot,
possibly with different characters.
That's the Watsonian version; the Doylist would be "contract
renegotiation time".
--
Jerry Brown

A cat may look at a king
(but probably won't bother)
Robert Carnegie
2017-01-04 19:17:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by e***@optonline.net
It's a paperback book I had in the mid-60s - do you know this story?
It's about two (eventually) physically similar guys, from two completely
different environments, who trade places for a month or two.
The one from our (1950s) world is a meek, sickly British prole, living his life of quiet desperation in a terrace house with his wife. The other is a bored starship captain, weary with ennui at how he can have anything he desires, and all has become so predictable. They both decide to commit suicide by jumping into the river -- but instead of the quick impact they both wind up flying through a featureless gray void, passing each other midway -- and then each is somehow mistaken for the other, futuristic medicine rapidly rendering our hero into a strong, vigorous guy who gets into his new role, using unexpected tactics to win space battles. Meanwhile back in England our other hero beats up the neighborhood bully, winning 'his' wife's and the neighbors' adoring respect . Then somehow, again they're hurtling through the void, passing (and this time recognizing) each other, and upon arrival finding that each has improved the other's lot, happy endings all around. "Tomorrow" may have been in the title. Any idea what it was?
The one where Captain Kirk and friends accidentally
beams into Gene Roddenberry's television studio
doesn't go anything like this, I suppose?

Regardless, the title could be about mirrors or
reflections?
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