Discussion:
YASID: alien first contact book (comedy)
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Nyrath
2021-05-27 14:18:19 UTC
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I read this book sometime in the 1970s or 80s. It was a trade paperback.

The book alleged that it was a top-secret report of the US making first contact with a group of aliens, though the book actually was an almost Monty Python comedy. It was illustrated with lots of line art.

The aliens arrive in a spaceship resembling a metal bird. The aliens bear a close resemblance to the Easter Island statues. They start diplomatic relations, presenting various gifts. One is a strange fruit, whose cores are tastiest after one has removed all the thorns. The US diplomats present as a gift the original Robby the Robot prop from the movie Forbidden planet.

The aliens take a group of US observers on a tour of the local galaxy. They meet representatives of the race The Body Electric from the planet I Sing. The artist based the aliens on Jacob Epstein's sculpture Torso in Metal

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Finally the US observers are told about an evil militant race called The Blight. They are busy trying to enslave the entire galaxy, and Earth is next.

As the US military starts panicking, they watch the Blight battle fleet entering the solar system. They notice that at one point the fleet seems to falter for a few minutes. After some quick research they discover this was apparently caused by some country-and-western music being broadcast. The US military then manages to cause the Blight fleet to flee by using high-powered broadcasts of that artist's music.

Does this sound familiar?
Thank you for your time.
Paul S Person
2021-05-27 17:35:42 UTC
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On Thu, 27 May 2021 07:18:19 -0700 (PDT), Nyrath
Post by Nyrath
I read this book sometime in the 1970s or 80s. It was a trade paperback.
The book alleged that it was a top-secret report of the US making first contact with a group of aliens, though the book actually was an almost Monty Python comedy. It was illustrated with lots of line art.
The aliens arrive in a spaceship resembling a metal bird. The aliens bear a close resemblance to the Easter Island statues. They start diplomatic relations, presenting various gifts. One is a strange fruit, whose cores are tastiest after one has removed all the thorns. The US diplomats present as a gift the original Robby the Robot prop from the movie Forbidden planet.
The aliens take a group of US observers on a tour of the local galaxy. They meet representatives of the race The Body Electric from the planet I Sing. The artist based the aliens on Jacob Epstein's sculpture Torso in Metal
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Drill_(Jacob_Epstein)#/media/File:Torso_in_Metal_from_'The_Rock_Drill'_by_Jacob_Epstein,_Tate_Britain.JPG
Finally the US observers are told about an evil militant race called The Blight. They are busy trying to enslave the entire galaxy, and Earth is next.
As the US military starts panicking, they watch the Blight battle fleet entering the solar system. They notice that at one point the fleet seems to falter for a few minutes. After some quick research they discover this was apparently caused by some country-and-western music being broadcast. The US military then manages to cause the Blight fleet to flee by using high-powered broadcasts of that artist's music.
Does this sound familiar?
Thank you for your time.
Only the "music kills aliens" theme.
But that's from /Attack of the Killer Tomatoes!/, /Mars Attacks/, /The
Quiet Place/, no doubt others. The music, BTW, is invariably portrayed
as ear-destroyingly bad.

which is in contrast with the "diseases kill aliens" theme in /War of
the Worlds/, /Independence Day/, no doubt others.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Tony Nance
2021-05-28 02:06:57 UTC
Permalink
I read this book sometime in the 1970s or 80s. It was a trade paperback.
The book alleged that it was a top-secret report of the US making first contact with a group of aliens, though the book actually was an almost Monty Python comedy. It was illustrated with lots of line art.
The aliens arrive in a spaceship resembling a metal bird. The aliens bear a close resemblance to the Easter Island statues. They start diplomatic relations, presenting various gifts. One is a strange fruit, whose cores are tastiest after one has removed all the thorns. The US diplomats present as a gift the original Robby the Robot prop from the movie Forbidden planet.
The aliens take a group of US observers on a tour of the local galaxy. They meet representatives of the race The Body Electric from the planet I Sing. The artist based the aliens on Jacob Epstein's sculpture Torso in Metal
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Drill_(Jacob_Epstein)#/media/File:Torso_in_Metal_from_'The_Rock_Drill'_by_Jacob_Epstein,_Tate_Britain.JPG
Finally the US observers are told about an evil militant race called The Blight. They are busy trying to enslave the entire galaxy, and Earth is next.
As the US military starts panicking, they watch the Blight battle fleet entering the solar system. They notice that at one point the fleet seems to falter for a few minutes. After some quick research they discover this was apparently caused by some country-and-western music being broadcast. The US military then manages to cause the Blight fleet to flee by using high-powered broadcasts of that artist's music.
Does this sound familiar?
Thank you for your time.
Although I've never read it myself, I'm reasonably sure this is
The Extraterrestrial Report by Richard Siegel, published 1978.
- Tony
Nyrath
2021-05-28 06:25:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Nance
Although I've never read it myself, I'm reasonably sure this is
The Extraterrestrial Report by Richard Siegel, published 1978.
- Tony
That's it! Thank you so much! I've been trying to find that book for years.
Michael F. Stemper
2021-05-28 17:10:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Nance
I read this book sometime in the 1970s or 80s. It was a trade paperback.
The book alleged that it was a top-secret report of the US making first contact with a group of aliens, though the book actually was an almost Monty Python comedy. It was illustrated with lots of line art.
Does this sound familiar?
Thank you for your time.
Although I've never read it myself, I'm reasonably sure this is
The Extraterrestrial Report by Richard Siegel, published 1978.
This is the second YASID from Nyrath that I have seen only because
somebody followed up to it. I saw his reply to my response to the
other YASID, so I know that I don't have him in my killfile.

I wonder what's going on?
--
Michael F. Stemper
Deuteronomy 10:18-19
Scott Lurndal
2021-05-28 17:48:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael F. Stemper
Post by Tony Nance
I read this book sometime in the 1970s or 80s. It was a trade paperback.
The book alleged that it was a top-secret report of the US making first contact with a group of aliens, though the book actually was an almost Monty Python comedy. It was illustrated with lots of line art.
Does this sound familiar?
Thank you for your time.
Although I've never read it myself, I'm reasonably sure this is
The Extraterrestrial Report by Richard Siegel, published 1978.
This is the second YASID from Nyrath that I have seen only because
somebody followed up to it. I saw his reply to my response to the
other YASID, so I know that I don't have him in my killfile.
I wonder what's going on?
Propgation delays, most likely. Congestion drops at your NNTP provider may
be another. Recall that there is no central storage point in Usenet.

I often see replies before the post, and sometimes never see the OP.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-05-28 18:07:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nyrath
Post by Tony Nance
I read this book sometime in the 1970s or 80s. It was a trade paperback.
The book alleged that it was a top-secret report of the US making
first contact with a group of aliens, though the book actually was an
almost Monty Python comedy. It was illustrated with lots of line art.
Post by Tony Nance
Does this sound familiar?
Thank you for your time.
Although I've never read it myself, I'm reasonably sure this is
The Extraterrestrial Report by Richard Siegel, published 1978.
This is the second YASID from Nyrath that I have seen only because
somebody followed up to it. I saw his reply to my response to the
other YASID, so I know that I don't have him in my killfile.
I wonder what's going on?
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles. Is it
possible that you have (inadvertently) killfiled for only the
combination of "Nyrath" AND "YASID"?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Steve Coltrin
2021-05-28 18:42:19 UTC
Permalink
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
--
Steve Coltrin ***@omcl.org Google Groups killfiled here
"A group known as the League of Human Dignity helped arrange for Deuel
to be driven to a local livestock scale, where he could be weighed."
- Associated Press
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-05-28 20:46:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
Thank you.

I just asked Hal if he's dealt with Lisp, and he said, "I've
never touched it in my life." So that lets out my usual source
for answers to "How in Cat's name does [NAME] work?"
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2021-05-28 21:56:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
Thank you.
I just asked Hal if he's dealt with Lisp, and he said, "I've
never touched it in my life." So that lets out my usual source
for answers to "How in Cat's name does [NAME] work?"
In my experience the primary virtue of LISP is that if one learns it
one will never again have trouble balancing parentheses.
Lynn McGuire
2021-05-28 22:40:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
Thank you.
I just asked Hal if he's dealt with Lisp, and he said, "I've
never touched it in my life." So that lets out my usual source
for answers to "How in Cat's name does [NAME] work?"
In my experience the primary virtue of LISP is that if one learns it
one will never again have trouble balancing parentheses.
I spent a year writing software in AutoLisp. And I verify that statement.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-05-28 23:52:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
Thank you.
I just asked Hal if he's dealt with Lisp, and he said, "I've
never touched it in my life." So that lets out my usual source
for answers to "How in Cat's name does [NAME] work?"
In my experience the primary virtue of LISP is that if one learns it
one will never again have trouble balancing parentheses.
I spent a year writing software in AutoLisp. And I verify that statement.
Do you assert it by the Peace and your name within it?

...Sorry, I've been binging on the Commonweal books.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2021-05-30 21:37:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
Thank you.
I just asked Hal if he's dealt with Lisp, and he said, "I've
never touched it in my life." So that lets out my usual source
for answers to "How in Cat's name does [NAME] work?"
In my experience the primary virtue of LISP is that if one learns it
one will never again have trouble balancing parentheses.
I spent a year writing software in AutoLisp. And I verify that statement.
Do you assert it by the Peace and your name within it?
...Sorry, I've been binging on the Commonweal books.
There is no Peace in our generation.

Lynn

Paul S Person
2021-05-29 17:11:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Steve Coltrin
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
Thank you.
I just asked Hal if he's dealt with Lisp, and he said, "I've
never touched it in my life." So that lets out my usual source
for answers to "How in Cat's name does [NAME] work?"
I actually dabbled in it once. UW physical plant employed guys (later
expanded to include gals) who, among other things, checked out fire
alarms to see if the university /really/ needed to pay Seattle Fire
Department to roll onto campus or not (over the course of an average
year, they save 10 times what they were paid, not just individually,
but each individual's pay added together). They had a plotter that
could draw maps of buildings showing exactly which alarm was
triggered, and they wanted a program to do so when they told it the
alarm number. The plotter was controlled by Lisp. It was very strange.

But enough of that. The first (and possibly only) thing you need to
know about Lisp is that it's name is popularly interpreted as meaning
"Lots of Irritating Superfluous Parentheses". That about sums it up.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Robert Carnegie
2021-05-29 22:32:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
Thank you.
I just asked Hal if he's dealt with Lisp, and he said, "I've
never touched it in my life." So that lets out my usual source
for answers to "How in Cat's name does [NAME] work?"
I think the only informative statement is that it's
a programming language (since the 1950s) that is,
presumably, good at this sort of thing, and you may be
pleased that one version of it was named Franz Lisp.
Deliberately.
Dorothy J Heydt
2021-05-30 02:47:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
begin fnord
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles.
The short answer is, both the syntax and power of killfiles vary
*drastically* across different newsreaders. (On mine, they're Lisp
S-expressions and I can see your eyes glazing over from two states away
so I'll stop now.)
Thank you.
I just asked Hal if he's dealt with Lisp, and he said, "I've
never touched it in my life." So that lets out my usual source
for answers to "How in Cat's name does [NAME] work?"
I think the only informative statement is that it's
a programming language (since the 1950s) that is,
presumably, good at this sort of thing, and you may be
pleased that one version of it was named Franz Lisp.
Deliberately.
Awwwwwww.

I think I mentioned somewhere upthread that Debian Linux names
its releases after Toy Story characters.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Michael F. Stemper
2021-05-28 19:15:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael F. Stemper
This is the second YASID from Nyrath that I have seen only because
somebody followed up to it. I saw his reply to my response to the
other YASID, so I know that I don't have him in my killfile.
I wonder what's going on?
I don't know enough about the syntax of killfiles. Is it
possible that you have (inadvertently) killfiled for only the
combination of "Nyrath" AND "YASID"?
No, because the reply that I saw from him still had "YASID" in
the subject.
--
Michael F. Stemper
Nostalgia just ain't what it used to be.
Nyrath
2021-05-30 00:22:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael F. Stemper
This is the second YASID from Nyrath that I have seen only because
somebody followed up to it. I saw his reply to my response to the
other YASID, so I know that I don't have him in my killfile.
I might have incorrectly replied to the follow-up post. My tablet was doing strange things
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