Discussion:
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
(too old to reply)
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-18 18:20:09 UTC
Permalink
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18

Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.

Lynn
Kevrob
2019-10-18 19:37:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
Everyone is always reporting mountain lion/wildcat/catamount/puma/cougar
sitings here in CT. Almost always, what they have seen is a bobcat.

The big cats are (or maybe are) migrating east, into the habitat where
their eastern cousins were supposed to have been made extinct.

{Note the collection of mt lion DNA in Mass}

https://www.unionleader.com/news/animals/tracker-it-s-only-a-matter-of-time-before-mountain/article_fa0001f4-b8ad-56b8-a28e-5ec8559d14b2.html

Kevin R
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-18 21:00:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
Everyone is always reporting mountain lion/wildcat/catamount/puma/cougar
sitings here in CT. Almost always, what they have seen is a bobcat.
The big cats are (or maybe are) migrating east, into the habitat where
their eastern cousins were supposed to have been made extinct.
{Note the collection of mt lion DNA in Mass}
https://www.unionleader.com/news/animals/tracker-it-s-only-a-matter-of-time-before-mountain/article_fa0001f4-b8ad-56b8-a28e-5ec8559d14b2.html
Kevin R
Bobcats do not have tail. I have seen them here also. In fact,
somebody ran over a 35 lb female bobcat in front of my commercial
property about two years ago. The warehouse guys went and got her so we
could have a close look. Two inch incisors !

We have about one mountain lion per county in Texas. They do not like
each very much and consider 1,000 square miles as their hunting grounds.

Lynn
Kevrob
2019-10-18 22:49:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
Everyone is always reporting mountain lion/wildcat/catamount/puma/cougar
sitings here in CT. Almost always, what they have seen is a bobcat.
The big cats are (or maybe are) migrating east, into the habitat where
their eastern cousins were supposed to have been made extinct.
{Note the collection of mt lion DNA in Mass}
https://www.unionleader.com/news/animals/tracker-it-s-only-a-matter-of-time-before-mountain/article_fa0001f4-b8ad-56b8-a28e-5ec8559d14b2.html
Kevin R
Bobcats do not have tail.
They have a _bit_ of a tail, but nothing like a cougar's.

[quote]

The adult bobcat is 47.5 to 125 cm (18.7 to 49.2 in) long from the head
to the base of its distinctive stubby tail, averaging 82.7 cm (32.6 in);
the tail, which appears “bobbed” and gives the species its name, adds 9
to 20 cm (3.5 to 7.9 in)

[/quote]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobcat
Post by Lynn McGuire
I have seen them here also. In fact,
somebody ran over a 35 lb female bobcat in front of my commercial
property about two years ago. The warehouse guys went and got her so we
could have a close look. Two inch incisors !
We have about one mountain lion per county in Texas. They do not like
each very much and consider 1,000 square miles as their hunting grounds.
Watch out for these Bobcats:

http://www.bobcatshockeyblog.com/

or these ones:

http://www.thebaseballcube.com/extra/nicknames.asp?NN=Bobcats

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-18 23:03:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
Everyone is always reporting mountain lion/wildcat/catamount/puma/cougar
sitings here in CT. Almost always, what they have seen is a bobcat.
The big cats are (or maybe are) migrating east, into the habitat where
their eastern cousins were supposed to have been made extinct.
{Note the collection of mt lion DNA in Mass}
https://www.unionleader.com/news/animals/tracker-it-s-only-a-matter-of-time-before-mountain/article_fa0001f4-b8ad-56b8-a28e-5ec8559d14b2.html
Post by Kevrob
Kevin R
Bobcats do not have tail.
Well, they have small, short, bobbed tails; hence the name.
Post by Kevrob
We have about one mountain lion per county in Texas. They do not like
each very much and consider 1,000 square miles as their hunting grounds.
There's a proverb from India: One tiger to a hill.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-18 23:01:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-18 23:34:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-19 00:41:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2019-10-19 01:39:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/

I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!

Kevin R
J. Clarke
2019-10-19 02:06:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
One wonders if there will ever be bioengineered human-friendly big
cats. Humans and pigs share an ecological niche--"cat food". If the
cats could be made to not want to eat humans they could be very
useful.

We managed it with dogs without even using biotech.
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-19 02:17:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
One wonders if there will ever be bioengineered human-friendly big
cats. Humans and pigs share an ecological niche--"cat food". If the
cats could be made to not want to eat humans they could be very
useful.
We managed it with dogs without even using biotech.
Yes, but it appears dogs' genetics are more pliable than cats'.
Look at all the different sizes/shapes/behaviors humans have
developed in dogs. Not so much in cats.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Chrysi Cat
2019-10-19 19:33:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
One wonders if there will ever be bioengineered human-friendly big
cats. Humans and pigs share an ecological niche--"cat food". If the
cats could be made to not want to eat humans they could be very
useful.
We managed it with dogs without even using biotech.
The problem here is that even a human-friendly big cat is unable to take
feral swine.

Heck, _humans_ are hard-pressed to take feral swine because once they're
wounded they're guaranteed not to go off somewhere to die while trying
to heal, but rather to do their level best to take you with them. Even
in the era when spears were a good hunting weapon, a boar spear had to
have a crosspiece so that the swine couldn't run _up the spear_ to gore
the hunter _even as it ran itself through even worse than it began the
episode._

Cats are instinctively aware of this; I'm not sure that even lions often
take live warthogs.

Pumas (now that the genus is down to just them, it's as good a way to
refer to them as any other) are not going to take anything resembling a
healthy feral pig. I honestly don't know if there's _any_ way to get rid
of them.

And of course I don't know that even CRISPRing in the loyalty encoding
from canines would make the cats human-safe anyway. Not least because I
have a pair of blood blisters on the inside of my left leg right now
from where my parents' dog bit mostly my clothing, but managed to pinch
skin, on Tuesday. Now imagine that type of resistance-to-command, even
for a second, from something that keeps 15-cm claws sheathed when not in
use, so they're more deadly weapons when they _are_ being used.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
J. Clarke
2019-10-19 20:25:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
One wonders if there will ever be bioengineered human-friendly big
cats. Humans and pigs share an ecological niche--"cat food". If the
cats could be made to not want to eat humans they could be very
useful.
We managed it with dogs without even using biotech.
The problem here is that even a human-friendly big cat is unable to take
feral swine.
That would be news to _this_ big cat.

and _this_ one

and _this_ one

Post by Chrysi Cat
Heck, _humans_ are hard-pressed to take feral swine
So? It seems to have escaped your notice that the natural ecological
niche of humans is "cat food".
Post by Chrysi Cat
because once they're
wounded they're guaranteed not to go off somewhere to die while trying
to heal, but rather to do their level best to take you with them.
An effective strategy against something that is not an apex predator.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Even
in the era when spears were a good hunting weapon, a boar spear had to
have a crosspiece so that the swine couldn't run _up the spear_ to gore
the hunter _even as it ran itself through even worse than it began the
episode._
Yeah, lion spears have the same feature for the same reason.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Cats are instinctively aware of this; I'm not sure that even lions often
take live warthogs.

Post by Chrysi Cat
Pumas (now that the genus is down to just them, it's as good a way to
refer to them as any other) are not going to take anything resembling a
healthy feral pig. I honestly don't know if there's _any_ way to get rid
of them.
32% of puma kills in Texas are of wild hogs.
<https://www.jstor.org/stable/3672595?read-now=1&seq=5#page_scan_tab_contents>
(note--there is a paywall but there is also a free registration that
allows reading 6 articles a month)
Post by Chrysi Cat
And of course I don't know that even CRISPRing in the loyalty encoding
from canines would make the cats human-safe anyway.
So maybe we need to do a better job of engineering.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Not least because I
have a pair of blood blisters on the inside of my left leg right now
from where my parents' dog bit mostly my clothing, but managed to pinch
skin, on Tuesday. Now imagine that type of resistance-to-command, even
for a second, from something that keeps 15-cm claws sheathed when not in
use, so they're more deadly weapons when they _are_ being used.
Funny how they're dangerous to _you_ but not to pigs.
Chrysi Cat
2019-10-19 21:41:44 UTC
Permalink
On 10/19/2019 2:25 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

<snip>
Post by J. Clarke
Funny how they're dangerous to _you_ but not to pigs.
Last I checked, *I* don't have foot-long daggers growing out of each
side of my mouth, nor is my epidermis 7 cm thick over a layer of fat
that will take most stabbings by anything _other_ than a boar spear and
turn them into superficial damage.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
J. Clarke
2019-10-19 22:41:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
<snip>
Post by J. Clarke
Funny how they're dangerous to _you_ but not to pigs.
Last I checked, *I* don't have foot-long daggers growing out of each
side of my mouth, nor is my epidermis 7 cm thick over a layer of fat
that will take most stabbings by anything _other_ than a boar spear and
turn them into superficial damage.
Interesting that you focused on that and trimmed all the references to
cats doing things that you claim they can't do.
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-19 23:43:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
One wonders if there will ever be bioengineered human-friendly big
cats. Humans and pigs share an ecological niche--"cat food". If the
cats could be made to not want to eat humans they could be very
useful.
We managed it with dogs without even using biotech.
The problem here is that even a human-friendly big cat is unable to take
feral swine.
That would be news to _this_ big cat.
http://youtu.be/JM_ffkRosFM
and _this_ one
http://youtu.be/0YMO1FYGde0
and _this_ one
http://youtu.be/1qX5Iy8gViM
Post by Chrysi Cat
Heck, _humans_ are hard-pressed to take feral swine
So? It seems to have escaped your notice that the natural ecological
niche of humans is "cat food".
Post by Chrysi Cat
because once they're
wounded they're guaranteed not to go off somewhere to die while trying
to heal, but rather to do their level best to take you with them.
An effective strategy against something that is not an apex predator.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Even
in the era when spears were a good hunting weapon, a boar spear had to
have a crosspiece so that the swine couldn't run _up the spear_ to gore
the hunter _even as it ran itself through even worse than it began the
episode._
Yeah, lion spears have the same feature for the same reason.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Cats are instinctively aware of this; I'm not sure that even lions often
take live warthogs.
http://youtu.be/DIm9KuwxCBM
Post by Chrysi Cat
Pumas (now that the genus is down to just them, it's as good a way to
refer to them as any other) are not going to take anything resembling a
healthy feral pig. I honestly don't know if there's _any_ way to get rid
of them.
32% of puma kills in Texas are of wild hogs.
<https://www.jstor.org/stable/3672595?read-now=1&seq=5#page_scan_tab_contents>
(note--there is a paywall but there is also a free registration that
allows reading 6 articles a month)
Post by Chrysi Cat
And of course I don't know that even CRISPRing in the loyalty encoding
from canines would make the cats human-safe anyway.
So maybe we need to do a better job of engineering.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Not least because I
have a pair of blood blisters on the inside of my left leg right now
from where my parents' dog bit mostly my clothing, but managed to pinch
skin, on Tuesday. Now imagine that type of resistance-to-command, even
for a second, from something that keeps 15-cm claws sheathed when not in
use, so they're more deadly weapons when they _are_ being used.
Funny how they're dangerous to _you_ but not to pigs.
Adult pigs are tougher than humans. More massive, sharper teeth.
We were a *very* endangered species till we started sharpening
sticks and chipping flint.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2019-10-19 23:59:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
One wonders if there will ever be bioengineered human-friendly big
cats. Humans and pigs share an ecological niche--"cat food". If the
cats could be made to not want to eat humans they could be very
useful.
We managed it with dogs without even using biotech.
The problem here is that even a human-friendly big cat is unable to take
feral swine.
That would be news to _this_ big cat.
http://youtu.be/JM_ffkRosFM
and _this_ one
http://youtu.be/0YMO1FYGde0
and _this_ one
http://youtu.be/1qX5Iy8gViM
Post by Chrysi Cat
Heck, _humans_ are hard-pressed to take feral swine
So? It seems to have escaped your notice that the natural ecological
niche of humans is "cat food".
Post by Chrysi Cat
because once they're
wounded they're guaranteed not to go off somewhere to die while trying
to heal, but rather to do their level best to take you with them.
An effective strategy against something that is not an apex predator.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Even
in the era when spears were a good hunting weapon, a boar spear had to
have a crosspiece so that the swine couldn't run _up the spear_ to gore
the hunter _even as it ran itself through even worse than it began the
episode._
Yeah, lion spears have the same feature for the same reason.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Cats are instinctively aware of this; I'm not sure that even lions often
take live warthogs.
http://youtu.be/DIm9KuwxCBM
Post by Chrysi Cat
Pumas (now that the genus is down to just them, it's as good a way to
refer to them as any other) are not going to take anything resembling a
healthy feral pig. I honestly don't know if there's _any_ way to get rid
of them.
32% of puma kills in Texas are of wild hogs.
<https://www.jstor.org/stable/3672595?read-now=1&seq=5#page_scan_tab_contents>
(note--there is a paywall but there is also a free registration that
allows reading 6 articles a month)
Post by Chrysi Cat
And of course I don't know that even CRISPRing in the loyalty encoding
from canines would make the cats human-safe anyway.
So maybe we need to do a better job of engineering.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Not least because I
have a pair of blood blisters on the inside of my left leg right now
from where my parents' dog bit mostly my clothing, but managed to pinch
skin, on Tuesday. Now imagine that type of resistance-to-command, even
for a second, from something that keeps 15-cm claws sheathed when not in
use, so they're more deadly weapons when they _are_ being used.
Funny how they're dangerous to _you_ but not to pigs.
Adult pigs are tougher than humans. More massive, sharper teeth.
We were a *very* endangered species till we started sharpening
sticks and chipping flint.
Yep, but to cats, pigs and humans occupy the same nice, "lunch".
J. Clarke
2019-10-20 00:07:10 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 19 Oct 2019 19:59:24 -0400, J. Clarke
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
One wonders if there will ever be bioengineered human-friendly big
cats. Humans and pigs share an ecological niche--"cat food". If the
cats could be made to not want to eat humans they could be very
useful.
We managed it with dogs without even using biotech.
The problem here is that even a human-friendly big cat is unable to take
feral swine.
That would be news to _this_ big cat.
http://youtu.be/JM_ffkRosFM
and _this_ one
http://youtu.be/0YMO1FYGde0
and _this_ one
http://youtu.be/1qX5Iy8gViM
Post by Chrysi Cat
Heck, _humans_ are hard-pressed to take feral swine
So? It seems to have escaped your notice that the natural ecological
niche of humans is "cat food".
Post by Chrysi Cat
because once they're
wounded they're guaranteed not to go off somewhere to die while trying
to heal, but rather to do their level best to take you with them.
An effective strategy against something that is not an apex predator.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Even
in the era when spears were a good hunting weapon, a boar spear had to
have a crosspiece so that the swine couldn't run _up the spear_ to gore
the hunter _even as it ran itself through even worse than it began the
episode._
Yeah, lion spears have the same feature for the same reason.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Cats are instinctively aware of this; I'm not sure that even lions often
take live warthogs.
http://youtu.be/DIm9KuwxCBM
Post by Chrysi Cat
Pumas (now that the genus is down to just them, it's as good a way to
refer to them as any other) are not going to take anything resembling a
healthy feral pig. I honestly don't know if there's _any_ way to get rid
of them.
32% of puma kills in Texas are of wild hogs.
<https://www.jstor.org/stable/3672595?read-now=1&seq=5#page_scan_tab_contents>
(note--there is a paywall but there is also a free registration that
allows reading 6 articles a month)
Post by Chrysi Cat
And of course I don't know that even CRISPRing in the loyalty encoding
from canines would make the cats human-safe anyway.
So maybe we need to do a better job of engineering.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Not least because I
have a pair of blood blisters on the inside of my left leg right now
from where my parents' dog bit mostly my clothing, but managed to pinch
skin, on Tuesday. Now imagine that type of resistance-to-command, even
for a second, from something that keeps 15-cm claws sheathed when not in
use, so they're more deadly weapons when they _are_ being used.
Funny how they're dangerous to _you_ but not to pigs.
Adult pigs are tougher than humans. More massive, sharper teeth.
We were a *very* endangered species till we started sharpening
sticks and chipping flint.
Yep, but to cats, pigs and humans occupy the same nice, "lunch".
niche
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-20 05:32:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
One wonders if there will ever be bioengineered human-friendly big
cats. Humans and pigs share an ecological niche--"cat food". If the
cats could be made to not want to eat humans they could be very
useful.
We managed it with dogs without even using biotech.
The problem here is that even a human-friendly big cat is unable to take
feral swine.
That would be news to _this_ big cat.
http://youtu.be/JM_ffkRosFM
and _this_ one
http://youtu.be/0YMO1FYGde0
and _this_ one
http://youtu.be/1qX5Iy8gViM
Post by Chrysi Cat
Heck, _humans_ are hard-pressed to take feral swine
So? It seems to have escaped your notice that the natural ecological
niche of humans is "cat food".
Post by Chrysi Cat
because once they're
wounded they're guaranteed not to go off somewhere to die while trying
to heal, but rather to do their level best to take you with them.
An effective strategy against something that is not an apex predator.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Even
in the era when spears were a good hunting weapon, a boar spear had to
have a crosspiece so that the swine couldn't run _up the spear_ to gore
the hunter _even as it ran itself through even worse than it began the
episode._
Yeah, lion spears have the same feature for the same reason.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Cats are instinctively aware of this; I'm not sure that even lions often
take live warthogs.
http://youtu.be/DIm9KuwxCBM
Post by Chrysi Cat
Pumas (now that the genus is down to just them, it's as good a way to
refer to them as any other) are not going to take anything resembling a
healthy feral pig. I honestly don't know if there's _any_ way to get rid
of them.
32% of puma kills in Texas are of wild hogs.
<https://www.jstor.org/stable/3672595?read-now=1&seq=5#page_scan_tab_contents>
(note--there is a paywall but there is also a free registration that
allows reading 6 articles a month)
Post by Chrysi Cat
And of course I don't know that even CRISPRing in the loyalty encoding
from canines would make the cats human-safe anyway.
So maybe we need to do a better job of engineering.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Not least because I
have a pair of blood blisters on the inside of my left leg right now
from where my parents' dog bit mostly my clothing, but managed to pinch
skin, on Tuesday. Now imagine that type of resistance-to-command, even
for a second, from something that keeps 15-cm claws sheathed when not in
use, so they're more deadly weapons when they _are_ being used.
Funny how they're dangerous to _you_ but not to pigs.
Adult pigs are tougher than humans. More massive, sharper teeth.
We were a *very* endangered species till we started sharpening
sticks and chipping flint.
Yep, but to cats, pigs and humans occupy the same niche, "lunch".
Depending on the relative size of the cat, the human, and the
pig.

African lions, for example, will eat humans when they get the
chance. There was a news item recently about a team of poachers
who invaded a lion park ... their gnawed remains were discovered
later. Some tigers turn man-eater, but only when they can't
catch their usual prey-- humans are softer and easier to catch,
when they aren't armed.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2019-10-19 10:48:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.

Breeding compliant monster cats to take the out is stupid.
They would mate with non-compliant big cats, which there
are anyway.

I alluded to the _Girl Genius_ story setting: that sort
of scheme is why their Europe is almost entirely unsuitable
for tourism.
J. Clarke
2019-10-19 13:47:30 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 19 Oct 2019 03:48:27 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
Breeding compliant monster cats to take the out is stupid.
They would mate with non-compliant big cats, which there
are anyway.
You mean like compliant big dogs will mate with non-compliant big
dogs? Oops.

In any case exactly how many feral tigers or lions or leopards _are_
there in North America?
Post by Robert Carnegie
I alluded to the _Girl Genius_ story setting: that sort
of scheme is why their Europe is almost entirely unsuitable
for tourism.
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-19 19:03:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 19 Oct 2019 03:48:27 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
Breeding compliant monster cats to take the out is stupid.
They would mate with non-compliant big cats, which there
are anyway.
You mean like compliant big dogs will mate with non-compliant big
dogs? Oops.
In any case exactly how many feral tigers or lions or leopards _are_
there in North America?
Post by Robert Carnegie
I alluded to the _Girl Genius_ story setting: that sort
of scheme is why their Europe is almost entirely unsuitable
for tourism.
We humans do not tolerate fellow predators very well. Look how many
cave bears there are running around in North America.

We do have a problem with feral tigers and lions here in Texas as they
escape their owners.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-19 20:31:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 19 Oct 2019 03:48:27 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
Breeding compliant monster cats to take the out is stupid.
They would mate with non-compliant big cats, which there
are anyway.
You mean like compliant big dogs will mate with non-compliant big
dogs? Oops.
In any case exactly how many feral tigers or lions or leopards _are_
there in North America?
Post by Robert Carnegie
I alluded to the _Girl Genius_ story setting: that sort
of scheme is why their Europe is almost entirely unsuitable
for tourism.
We humans do not tolerate fellow predators very well. Look how many
cave bears there are running around in North America.
And smilodons. And terror birds, for that matter.

Cf. Wrede's Frontier Magic trilogy, in which there is sufficient
magical wildlife that humans never got a chance in the New World,
and the sabertooths and terror birds and mammothes and so on
have survived.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Chrysi Cat
2019-10-19 21:43:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 19 Oct 2019 03:48:27 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
Breeding compliant monster cats to take the out is stupid.
They would mate with non-compliant big cats, which there
are anyway.
You mean like compliant big dogs will mate with non-compliant big
dogs? Oops.
In any case exactly how many feral tigers or lions or leopards _are_
there in North America?
Post by Robert Carnegie
I alluded to the _Girl Genius_ story setting: that sort
of scheme is why their Europe is almost entirely unsuitable
for tourism.
We humans do not tolerate fellow predators very well. Look how many
cave bears there are running around in North America.
And smilodons. And terror birds, for that matter.
Cf. Wrede's Frontier Magic trilogy, in which there is sufficient
magical wildlife that humans never got a chance in the New World,
and the sabertooths and terror birds and mammothes and so on
have survived.
Dare I ask which continent the horses are on? And whether anyone was
smart enough to figure out you ride on 'em rather than killing them all
off for food?
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
J. Clarke
2019-10-19 22:43:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
On Sat, 19 Oct 2019 03:48:27 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
Breeding compliant monster cats to take the out is stupid.
They would mate with non-compliant big cats, which there
are anyway.
You mean like compliant big dogs will mate with non-compliant big
dogs? Oops.
In any case exactly how many feral tigers or lions or leopards _are_
there in North America?
Post by Robert Carnegie
I alluded to the _Girl Genius_ story setting: that sort
of scheme is why their Europe is almost entirely unsuitable
for tourism.
We humans do not tolerate fellow predators very well. Look how many
cave bears there are running around in North America.
And smilodons. And terror birds, for that matter.
One should consider though that the terror birds evolved in a cat-free
environment, then cats arrived, and that the smilodons were evolved to
depend on megafauna that ceased to exist--whether the megafauna ceased
to exist because humans hunted it out or because of global warming is
an open question.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Cf. Wrede's Frontier Magic trilogy, in which there is sufficient
magical wildlife that humans never got a chance in the New World,
and the sabertooths and terror birds and mammothes and so on
have survived.
Kevrob
2019-10-19 14:29:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted";
...as were rabbits in Australia.
Post by Robert Carnegie
go to it.
If I were much younger, and less likely to be prey than
predator, sure!
Post by Robert Carnegie
Breeding compliant monster cats to take the out is stupid.
They would mate with non-compliant big cats, which there
are anyway.
I alluded to the _Girl Genius_ story setting: that sort
of scheme is why their Europe is almost entirely unsuitable
for tourism.
ObSF: the Draka in Stirling's quartet restore leopards
and wolves to their conquered Europe, to discourage the
enslaved from trying to escape and live rough, and to
provide dangerous game to hunt.

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-19 15:27:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted";
...as were rabbits in Australia.
Post by Robert Carnegie
go to it.
If I were much younger, and less likely to be prey than
predator, sure!
Even if you were younger, boar-hunting is a dangerous sport. It
was done with lots of dogs and men armed with boar-spears, which
have a cross-bar a couple of feet up the (very long) shaft from
the spearhead. So the boar won't simply walk up the shaft and
get you, like Mordred.
Post by Kevrob
ObSF: the Draka in Stirling's quartet restore leopards
and wolves to their conquered Europe, to discourage the
enslaved from trying to escape and live rough, and to
provide dangerous game to hunt.
ObOtherSF: Schmitz's first Telzey Amberdon story, in which the
crest cats used to be hunted by men on foot, which the crest cats
were okay with, because it was pretty much an even battle. The
man was as likely to be killed as the crest cat. Then the men
took to hunting from helicopters, which the crest cats took
objection to: not sporting odds. So they went invisible, till
the _moment juste._
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2019-10-19 18:27:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Even if you were younger, boar-hunting is a dangerous sport. It
was done with lots of dogs and men armed with boar-spears, which
have a cross-bar a couple of feet up the (very long) shaft from
the spearhead. So the boar won't simply walk up the shaft and
get you, like Mordred.
Not to forget how Odysseus got his identifying scar.

Kevin R
Gene Wirchenko
2019-10-20 07:39:34 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 19 Oct 2019 15:27:07 GMT, ***@kithrup.com (Dorothy J
Heydt) wrote:

[snip]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
ObOtherSF: Schmitz's first Telzey Amberdon story, in which the
crest cats used to be hunted by men on foot, which the crest cats
were okay with, because it was pretty much an even battle. The
man was as likely to be killed as the crest cat. Then the men
took to hunting from helicopters, which the crest cats took
objection to: not sporting odds. So they went invisible, till
the _moment juste._
And YA ObOtherSF: Niven's bandersnatchi and humans having an
agreement about mutual hunting.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
p***@hotmail.com
2019-10-20 23:28:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted";
...as were rabbits in Australia.
Post by Robert Carnegie
go to it.
If I were much younger, and less likely to be prey than
predator, sure!
Even if you were younger, boar-hunting is a dangerous sport. It
was done with lots of dogs and men armed with boar-spears, which
have a cross-bar a couple of feet up the (very long) shaft from
the spearhead. So the boar won't simply walk up the shaft and
get you, like Mordred.
Post by Kevrob
ObSF: the Draka in Stirling's quartet restore leopards
and wolves to their conquered Europe, to discourage the
enslaved from trying to escape and live rough, and to
provide dangerous game to hunt.
ObOtherSF: Schmitz's first Telzey Amberdon story, in which the
crest cats used to be hunted by men on foot, which the crest cats
were okay with, because it was pretty much an even battle. The
man was as likely to be killed as the crest cat. Then the men
took to hunting from helicopters, which the crest cats took
objection to: not sporting odds. So they went invisible, till
the _moment juste._
I have a vague memory that it was scientists capturing crest cats
for study who used life detectors and shot the cats from aircars
with stunners. The cats responded to this violation of the quid pro quo
by going invisible, and the scientists responded to the apparent
population crash by trying to capture more cats to find out what
was causing it and either reverse it or at least put the cats into
life banks so that the species could be restored sometime in
the future.

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-21 03:19:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Kevrob
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
Post by Kevrob
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted";
...as were rabbits in Australia.
Post by Robert Carnegie
go to it.
If I were much younger, and less likely to be prey than
predator, sure!
Even if you were younger, boar-hunting is a dangerous sport. It
was done with lots of dogs and men armed with boar-spears, which
have a cross-bar a couple of feet up the (very long) shaft from
the spearhead. So the boar won't simply walk up the shaft and
get you, like Mordred.
Post by Kevrob
ObSF: the Draka in Stirling's quartet restore leopards
and wolves to their conquered Europe, to discourage the
enslaved from trying to escape and live rough, and to
provide dangerous game to hunt.
ObOtherSF: Schmitz's first Telzey Amberdon story, in which the
crest cats used to be hunted by men on foot, which the crest cats
were okay with, because it was pretty much an even battle. The
man was as likely to be killed as the crest cat. Then the men
took to hunting from helicopters, which the crest cats took
objection to: not sporting odds. So they went invisible, till
the _moment juste._
I have a vague memory that it was scientists capturing crest cats
for study who used life detectors and shot the cats from aircars
with stunners.
No. They were hunters who hunted dangerous game for fun. So, of
course, were the crest cats; and as long as it was approximately
even kills on both sides, they were okay with that.

The cats responded to this violation of the quid pro quo
Post by Lynn McGuire
by going invisible, and the scientists responded to the apparent
population crash by trying to capture more cats to find out what
was causing it and either reverse it or at least put the cats into
life banks so that the species could be restored sometime in
the future.
Something like that, yes, but since the only *known* surviving
crest cat was Telzey's pet^H^H^Hcompanion, one can undestand
their anxiety. But the principal engine behind the attempt was
Telzey's bitchy aunt.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Titus G
2019-10-21 03:50:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
That was fascinating thank you as is this youtube video which
demonstrates the pig intelligence and caution in regard to their safety.

Wild Hog Trapping.....Jager Pro.

h***@gmail.com
2019-10-20 13:19:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted";
...as were rabbits in Australia.
Rabbits were originally brought as food animals, about 80 years later somebody released some for hunting (this did include some people getting special breeds sent out to be released)
Now foxes were introduced into Australia for hunting...
Kevrob
2019-10-20 13:37:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Kevrob
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted";
...as were rabbits in Australia.
Rabbits were originally brought as food animals, about 80 years later somebody released some for hunting (this did include some people getting special breeds sent out to be released)
Thanks for the correction.

https://www.nma.gov.au/defining-moments/resources/rabbits-introduced
Post by h***@gmail.com
Now foxes were introduced into Australia for hunting...
--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-19 15:22:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
Breeding compliant monster cats to take the out is stupid.
They would mate with non-compliant big cats, which there
are anyway.
I alluded to the _Girl Genius_ story setting: that sort
of scheme is why their Europe is almost entirely unsuitable
for tourism.
And, please note, the New World hasn't been heard from in a very
long time.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
nuny@bid.nes
2019-10-20 10:09:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.

Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.

It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.

Oh, and we have at least two mountain lions' territories meet roughly where I live. We see one one night, then a week or so later we see the other one. This time of year they're not following the deer who wander through our back yard almost every morning.


Mark L. Fergerson
J. Clarke
2019-10-20 13:37:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.

Post by ***@bid.nes
Oh, and we have at least two mountain lions' territories meet roughly where I live. We see one one night, then a week or so later we see the other one. This time of year they're not following the deer who wander through our back yard almost every morning.
Mark L. Fergerson
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-21 23:22:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/

Lynn
J. Clarke
2019-10-21 23:30:55 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-22 17:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-22 17:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped
rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major
part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to
get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get
back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time
to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
So you equip Puff with infrared vision.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Leo Sgouros
2019-10-22 18:09:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped
rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major
part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to
get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get
back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time
to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
So you equip Puff with infrared vision.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
And a Vulcan cannon.
https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1GCEJ_enUS872US872&sxsrf=ACYBGNQW-4_Zs1XUwXD6rJXBI6ZuhEI9zA:1571767716376&q=dakota+puff+the+magic+dragon&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjXrJ2Du7DlAhUO16wKHbQEBeoQsAR6BAgEEAE&biw=1920&bih=969
Dimensional Traveler
2019-10-22 18:51:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped
rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major
part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to
get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get
back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time
to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
So you equip Puff with infrared vision.
I owe you drone-delivered ice cream.
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Dimensional Traveler
2019-10-22 18:49:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs.  I had a
visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak.  Since we have about 250 mountain
lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough.  It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
   A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped
rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
   Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to
get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
   It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can
get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't
have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas.  Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
    https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding.  They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Impose a 3am to 7am mandatory curfew and shoot anything the right size
in infrared that moves. :D

(To get the smarter ones you may have to expand that to anything that
isn't indoors.)
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-22 20:12:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs.  I had
a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak.  Since we have about 250 mountain
lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough.  It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
   A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped
rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
   Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to
get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
   It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can
get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't
have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas.  Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
    https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding.  They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Impose a 3am to 7am mandatory curfew and shoot anything the right size
in infrared that moves.  :D
(To get the smarter ones you may have to expand that to anything that
isn't indoors.)
"shoot anything the right size in infrared that moves."

My worry exactly.

Lynn
Dimensional Traveler
2019-10-22 21:59:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs.  I had
a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak.  Since we have about 250 mountain
lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough.  It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
   A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped
rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
   Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to
get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
   It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can
get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't
have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas.  Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
    https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding.  They normally feed at 4
am to 6 am.
Impose a 3am to 7am mandatory curfew and shoot anything the right size
in infrared that moves.  :D
(To get the smarter ones you may have to expand that to anything that
isn't indoors.)
"shoot anything the right size in infrared that moves."
My worry exactly.
Hey, you Texans keep bragging about how tough you are!
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-22 22:29:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs.  I
had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak.  Since we have about 250 mountain
lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough.  It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
   A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped
rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
   Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying
to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they
hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
   It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you
can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they
won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas.  Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
    https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding.  They normally feed at 4
am to 6 am.
Impose a 3am to 7am mandatory curfew and shoot anything the right
size in infrared that moves.  :D
(To get the smarter ones you may have to expand that to anything that
isn't indoors.)
"shoot anything the right size in infrared that moves."
My worry exactly.
Hey, you Texans keep bragging about how tough you are!
Hey, I've seen what a 7.62 (.308) will do to a deer. I don't want a
piece of that.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2019-10-22 22:48:49 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.

However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Peter Trei
2019-10-24 04:05:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."

There are later, more lethal versions.

Pt
Dimensional Traveler
2019-10-24 06:23:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.

For the really pissed off hogs. :)
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Paul S Person
2019-10-24 16:23:18 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:23:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.

I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).

So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)

Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Kevrob
2019-10-24 17:22:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
On Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:23:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.
I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).
So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)
Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
Durned swine would probably dig under the wall.
"Root, hog, or die!"

Kevin R
Paul S Person
2019-10-25 16:44:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
On Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:23:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@bid.nes
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I had a visit
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground (grubbing) under
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite a while.
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.
I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).
So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)
Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
Durned swine would probably dig under the wall.
"Root, hog, or die!"
But a really /good/ wall would go down at least, oh say, a mile.

Dig under /that/, swine from Hell!
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dimensional Traveler
2019-10-25 18:01:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
Durned swine would probably dig under the wall.
"Root, hog, or die!"
But a really /good/ wall would go down at least, oh say, a mile.
Dig under /that/, swine from Hell!
If they are Swine From Hell, being much deeper than a mile underground
is their natural state. :D
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-25 19:37:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
On Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:23:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Saturday, October 19, 2019 at 3:48:30 AM UTC-7, Robert
Post by Robert Carnegie
On Friday, October 18, 2019 at 8:55:02 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs.
I had a visit
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250
mountain lions in
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for
quite a while.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with
scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're
trying to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they
hear a gunshot) they tend to scatter.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values
of "comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get
back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time
to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out
the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing
red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football
field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
Post by Kevrob
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.
I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).
So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)
Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
Durned swine would probably dig under the wall.
"Root, hog, or die!"
But a really /good/ wall would go down at least, oh say, a mile.
Dig under /that/, swine from Hell!
Uncless they could climb it. How high a wall are we talking
about? I grant you they don't have hands. But they have awfully
strong leg muscles.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-24 17:35:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
On Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:23:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Saturday, October 19, 2019 at 3:48:30 AM UTC-7, Robert
Post by Robert Carnegie
On Friday, October 18, 2019 at 8:55:02 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I
had a visit
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite
a while.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with
scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying
to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get
back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time
to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out
the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing
red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football
field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.
I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).
So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)
Could it be Sheckley's "Watchbird"?
Post by Paul S Person
Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
A variant on "If I owned Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and
rent out Texas."

I lived in Texas for about a year once, but since I was three at
the time I don't remember much.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2019-10-25 16:53:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
On Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:23:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Saturday, October 19, 2019 at 3:48:30 AM UTC-7, Robert
Post by Robert Carnegie
On Friday, October 18, 2019 at 8:55:02 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I
had a visit
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite
a while.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with
scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying
to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get
back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time
to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out
the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing
red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football
field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.
I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).
So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)
Could it be Sheckley's "Watchbird"?
The title sounds vaguely familiar, so perhaps so.

If it ends with the more-advanced killer bots, having destroyed all
the less-advaned killer bots left over from the last war, discovering
... additional potential targets ... then almost certainly!
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
A variant on "If I owned Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and
rent out Texas."
I lived in Texas for about a year once, but since I was three at
the time I don't remember much.
I was stationed at San Angelo a couple times.

The first time, we were in old wooden barracks, each with its own
furnace. It got so cold -- how cold was it? -- that there was actually
/snow/ on the ground. OK, it was maybe 1/16", but still, snow. That
was the weekend between the Friday the engineers took our furnace
apart and the Monday they put it back together. Talk about /cold/!

The second time we had a major rainstorm. This is when we discovered
that the streets had no drains -- they turned into rivers.

Not that drains necessarily prevent streets from turning into rivers,
even when they don't get clogged. It has to do with where they are
placed. Where water would naturally collect is the best place, but not
always the one chosen. At least around here.

That stay was also memorable because the post commander, a colonel
(I'm not sure if the Air Force designation was "female airman" or
"airwoman") discovered that the convenience store was closing at a
convenient hour for the employees, but not so convenient for the
soldiers, in particular the female solders (the Army designation, at
least at the time), who were students and taking classes at night. The
store suddenly started staying open a /lot/ later.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-25 19:47:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
On Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:23:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Saturday, October 19, 2019 at 3:48:30 AM UTC-7, Robert
Post by Robert Carnegie
On Friday, October 18, 2019 at 8:55:02 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I
had a visit
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250
mountain lions in
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite
a while.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with
scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying
to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get
back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time
to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out
the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing
red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football
field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.
I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).
So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)
Could it be Sheckley's "Watchbird"?
The title sounds vaguely familiar, so perhaps so.
If it ends with the more-advanced killer bots, having destroyed all
the less-advaned killer bots left over from the last war,
No, the bots were designed to keep people from harming each
other. They were turned loose and not controllable by anyone,
and then they started doing things like interfering with a
surgical operation and letting the patient die.

So the designers invented a new kind of bot that hunted
Watchbirds, and they went and destroyed most or all of them. And
then they figured out that even with the Watchbirds gone, there
were other targets that had to be destroyed.

discovering
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
... additional potential targets ... then almost certainly!
Very likely.

The name was borrowed from a children's book (_The Watchbirds_,
1938) on various bad behaviors that good children should avoid.
*I* was a child when I last read it, and that was back when rocks
were soft, so I don't remember any of the behaviors being
discouraged, but each page described the bad behavior, gave its
perpetrator a name, and then there were two drawings:

"This is a Watchbird watching a [perpetrator]."

"This is a Watchbird watching YOU."

...
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I was stationed at San Angelo a couple times.
We were in San Antonio, because my father was stationed at
Lackland Air Base.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
The first time, we were in old wooden barracks, each with its own
furnace. It got so cold -- how cold was it? -- that there was actually
/snow/ on the ground. OK, it was maybe 1/16", but still, snow. That
was the weekend between the Friday the engineers took our furnace
apart and the Monday they put it back together. Talk about /cold/!
The second time we had a major rainstorm. This is when we discovered
that the streets had no drains -- they turned into rivers.
Not that drains necessarily prevent streets from turning into rivers,
even when they don't get clogged. It has to do with where they are
placed. Where water would naturally collect is the best place, but not
always the one chosen. At least around here.
That stay was also memorable because the post commander, a colonel
(I'm not sure if the Air Force designation was "female airman" or
"airwoman") discovered that the convenience store was closing at a
convenient hour for the employees, but not so convenient for the
soldiers, in particular the female solders (the Army designation, at
least at the time), who were students and taking classes at night. The
store suddenly started staying open a /lot/ later.
Well, good.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-25 20:31:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
On Wed, 23 Oct 2019 23:23:24 -0700, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:22:56 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 21 Oct 2019 18:22:02 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Saturday, October 19, 2019 at 3:48:30 AM UTC-7, Robert
Post by Robert Carnegie
On Friday, October 18, 2019 at 8:55:02 PM UTC-4, Dorothy J
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
It would be neat if the mountain lions ate feral pigs. I
had a visit
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
from the feral pigs recently, they tore up the ground
(grubbing) under
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
the 80 ft tall live oak. Since we have about 250 mountain lions in
Texas and four million feral pigs, they could eat for quite
a while.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Full-grown pigs are pretty tough. It's possible the cats don't
want to tackle them.
I'll bet!
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
I would love to savor roasted or BBQed wild/feral, invasive
boar. It'd be unethical to turn it down!
The article says they were brought from Europe to be
"hunted"; go to it.
A lot of people do hunt them as a nuisance, many with
scoped rifles based on the flexible AR-15 platform. Those folks are a
major part of the "resistance" to suggestions to banning such rifles.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Yes, semi-autos are preferred especially when you're trying
to get more than one of a passel. When one goes down (or they hear a
gunshot) they tend to scatter.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
It's usually done at a comfortable distance- for values of
"comfortable" = the damned things can't get to you before you can get
back into your vehicle. Think 200-300 yards. Also, they won't have time
to scatter before you get a second shot off.
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Sounds like a job Puff the Magic Dragon.
http://youtu.be/EuThvjefCTk
There are four million feral hogs in Texas. Growing at 20% per year.
Gonna need a few squadrons of Puffs.
https://www.wideopenspaces.com/texas-losing-war-feral-hogs-2/
At 18,000 rounds a minute Puff can take out a lot of hogs in a day.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
BTW, the feral hogs are masters at hiding. They normally feed at 4 am
to 6 am.
Puff was created to deal with the VC, who were also masters at hiding
and generally traveled at night. In addition to the two tons of ammo
they carry, there are flares.
However, if you want to get _serious_ about it, Puff has a big brother
that sees in the dark.
Puff was an early version, a C-47 with 3 7.62 mini guns poking out
the side. It would circle a target, and could " put a bullet or glowing
red tracer (every fifth round) into every square yard of a football
field-sized target in potentially less than 10 seconds."
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Peter Trei
There are later, more lethal versions.
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.
I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).
So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)
Could it be Sheckley's "Watchbird"?
Post by Paul S Person
Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
A variant on "If I owned Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and
rent out Texas."
I lived in Texas for about a year once, but since I was three at
the time I don't remember much.
I was born in Texas and we moved to New Jersey four weeks later. Dad
had a National something grant to go to Princeton and get a PhD in
Chemical Engineering. Turned out to be three years of hell for my
mother since I had lung issues and could not go outside below 50 F. So
they had to basically keep me indoors for ten months out of the year.
Then we moved to Oklahoma for seven years and back to Texas after Dad
got tired of being a professor.

Lynn
nuny@bid.nes
2019-10-26 07:40:33 UTC
Permalink
On Thursday, October 24, 2019 at 9:23:51 AM UTC-7, Paul S Person wrote:

(snip, the carets are all screwed up and I'm lazy)

re: feral pigs vs. Puff the Magic Dragon
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dimensional Traveler
IIRC the current gunship includes a 105mm howitzer.
For the really pissed off hogs. :)
IIRC, a howitzer-mounting successor flew in Vietnam as well as Puff.
I find it very hard not to politicize this, being from a very
Democratic area (a lot of the time, Republicans don't even put up a
candidate for the state legislature in my district, there's no point).
Feral pigs don't care which Party the owner of the garden/crops/whatever
they're eating subscribes to, or the demographics of the county whose
ecosystem they're devouring. Tastes the same to them.
Post by Paul S Person
So, let me just point out that AI-powered drone pig killing machines
are /not/ the way to go. When they run out of pigs, who do you think
they will target next? (I still remember, vaguely, an SF story on a
very similar topic.)
They could be programmed not to kill anything on two legs.

"Four legs bad, two legs good"

Probably adversely affect the other quadrupeds' populations though.
Post by Paul S Person
Maybe you could build a really-studly Wall around an area in Texas and
"encourage" all the feral pigs to go there. And then close the door.
And leave it closed.
If feral pigs could be herded they wouldn't be a problem.


Mark L. Fergerson

Robert Carnegie
2019-10-19 01:55:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Nize hat! Hyu vin it in a fight, ja?
Paul S Person
2019-10-19 16:23:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.

You'll look like something to eat.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-19 17:39:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.

Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-19 19:04:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-19 20:34:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.

I remember being, um, challenged by a dog once, who was very
territorial and thought his territory extended to the sidewalk I
was walking on. I happened to be wearing a cloak, and by raising
my arms I suddenly appeared to be about four times as large as I
was. The dog and I agreed to disagree.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2019-10-19 22:45:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I remember being, um, challenged by a dog once, who was very
territorial and thought his territory extended to the sidewalk I
was walking on. I happened to be wearing a cloak, and by raising
my arms I suddenly appeared to be about four times as large as I
was. The dog and I agreed to disagree.
Chrysi Cat
2019-10-20 00:13:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
<snip>

I take it you're forgetting that cats kill for sport? She could maim
Lynn and then still go after you anyway, then come back to finish him off!
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
J. Clarke
2019-10-20 00:45:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
<snip>
I take it you're forgetting that cats kill for sport? She could maim
Lynn and then still go after you anyway, then come back to finish him off!
Nahh. Probably take one bite of Lynn and make a face like the cat I
saw eat his first cockroach and never touch another human again.
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-21 23:16:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
     https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww.  Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah !  I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property
about five
years ago.  He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a
three
foot tail.  He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down
the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner.  Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good.  I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately.  No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
<snip>
I take it you're forgetting that cats kill for sport? She could maim
Lynn and then still go after you anyway, then come back to finish him off!
And this is why one should carry a .44 special everywhere one goes.
Five rounds from my snubby will give just about anything a bad day.
Just don't shoot until you can see their eyes.
https://charterfirearms.com/collections/bulldog

Lynn
Dimensional Traveler
2019-10-22 00:45:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
     https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww.  Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah !  I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property
about five
years ago.  He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and
a three
foot tail.  He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down
the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner.  Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good.  I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately.  No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
<snip>
I take it you're forgetting that cats kill for sport? She could maim
Lynn and then still go after you anyway, then come back to finish him off!
And this is why one should carry a .44 special everywhere one goes. Five
rounds from my snubby will give just about anything a bad day. Just
don't shoot until you can see their eyes.
   https://charterfirearms.com/collections/bulldog
If you can see the eyes of a charging cougar, its too late.
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Titus G
2019-10-22 01:01:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
     https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww.  Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah !  I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property
about five
years ago.  He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and
a three
foot tail.  He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down
the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner.  Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good.  I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately.  No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
<snip>
I take it you're forgetting that cats kill for sport? She could maim
Lynn and then still go after you anyway, then come back to finish him off!
And this is why one should carry a .44 special everywhere one goes.
Five rounds from my snubby will give just about anything a bad day.
Just don't shoot until you can see their eyes.
    https://charterfirearms.com/collections/bulldog
If you can see the eyes of a charging cougar, its too late.
If he doesn't reply, we will know why.

P.S. By cougar, do you mean cougar or do you mean elderly women chasing
youngsters with wobbly hearts, (Another Old Man Dies Alone in a Short
Term Rent Hotel Room)?
Dimensional Traveler
2019-10-22 05:18:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
     https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww.  Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah !  I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property
about five
years ago.  He was a big dude, about a four foot long body
and a three
foot tail.  He had been watching a deer fawn until I came
down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner.  Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good.  I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately.  No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
<snip>
I take it you're forgetting that cats kill for sport? She could maim
Lynn and then still go after you anyway, then come back to finish him off!
And this is why one should carry a .44 special everywhere one goes.
Five rounds from my snubby will give just about anything a bad day.
Just don't shoot until you can see their eyes.
    https://charterfirearms.com/collections/bulldog
If you can see the eyes of a charging cougar, its too late.
If he doesn't reply, we will know why.
P.S. By cougar, do you mean cougar or do you mean elderly women chasing
youngsters with wobbly hearts, (Another Old Man Dies Alone in a Short
Term Rent Hotel Room)?
The four-legged kind.
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-21 23:13:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
Just about anyone could outrun me beforehand. My heart problems
probably go back to birth.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-21 23:51:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
Just about anyone could outrun me beforehand. My heart problems
probably go back to birth.
Well, here's to you ticking over for quite a while yet.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
William Hyde
2019-10-22 19:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
Just about anyone could outrun me beforehand. My heart problems
probably go back to birth.
I've traced mine, which sound very much like yours, back to my great-grandfather who died suddenly at age 44 in 1880.

I'm happy to say that whatever it was, it is not present in the younger generation. A cousin and I are the sole proprietors of this particular genetic defect.

William Hyde
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-22 20:22:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
Just about anyone could outrun me beforehand. My heart problems
probably go back to birth.
I've traced mine, which sound very much like yours, back to my great-grandfather who died suddenly at age 44 in 1880.
I'm happy to say that whatever it was, it is not present in the younger generation. A cousin and I are the sole proprietors of this particular genetic defect.
William Hyde
My great-grandfather who was born and raised in the late 1800s about 30
miles away from here, had a massive heart attack at the age of 55 and
never walked again. He had another heart attack at 57 and died. All of
my aunts, uncles, and cousins through him have heart problems by age 60.

One of my first cousins was born with a dime sized hole in his heart
which closed up by the time he was one. Sadly, he died a couple of
years ago from esophageal cancer at the age of 44.

Another of our first cousins was born with a quarter sized hole in her
heart and was a blue baby. They operated on her at Texas Childrens
Hospital at 3 days and closed the hole. The hole opened again at age 11
and she had successful open heart surgery again. Now at 50, she is
having afib like me and is trying to ignore it. But she does not have
the tachycardia with the afib like I did.

So, the heart issues are being passed from generation to generation.

Lynn
Paul S Person
2019-10-23 16:04:07 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 15:22:55 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
Just about anyone could outrun me beforehand. My heart problems
probably go back to birth.
I've traced mine, which sound very much like yours, back to my great-grandfather who died suddenly at age 44 in 1880.
I'm happy to say that whatever it was, it is not present in the younger generation. A cousin and I are the sole proprietors of this particular genetic defect.
William Hyde
My great-grandfather who was born and raised in the late 1800s about 30
miles away from here, had a massive heart attack at the age of 55 and
never walked again. He had another heart attack at 57 and died. All of
my aunts, uncles, and cousins through him have heart problems by age 60.
One of my first cousins was born with a dime sized hole in his heart
which closed up by the time he was one. Sadly, he died a couple of
years ago from esophageal cancer at the age of 44.
Another of our first cousins was born with a quarter sized hole in her
heart and was a blue baby. They operated on her at Texas Childrens
Hospital at 3 days and closed the hole. The hole opened again at age 11
and she had successful open heart surgery again. Now at 50, she is
having afib like me and is trying to ignore it. But she does not have
the tachycardia with the afib like I did.
So, the heart issues are being passed from generation to generation.
Used to be, when they got bad enough, they killed the carrier before
reproduction and so were removed from circulation.

But, thanks to Modern Medicine, they can now survive and (together
with the people they afflict) multiply.

Still, all things considered, we are probably better off /with/ Modern
Medicine (even the dollar-chasing pill-pushing version we have in the
USA) than without it.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-23 17:52:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 15:22:55 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property
about five
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body
and a three
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came
down the road
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And, whatever you do, don't bend over.
You'll look like something to eat.
That's why you don't run.
Even if you are a runner. Because you are (by long evolutionary
process) a long-distance runner, and the cat is a sprinter.
That's good. I can't run anymore after my heart surgery last year, I
run out of breath almost immediately. No extra capacity left.
Even when you could run, you couldn't outrun a sprinter.
But I don't have to outrun the cat, I just have to outrun Lynn <evil
grin>.
Just about anyone could outrun me beforehand. My heart problems
probably go back to birth.
I've traced mine, which sound very much like yours, back to my
great-grandfather who died suddenly at age 44 in 1880.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
I'm happy to say that whatever it was, it is not present in the
younger generation. A cousin and I are the sole proprietors of this
particular genetic defect.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by William Hyde
William Hyde
My great-grandfather who was born and raised in the late 1800s about 30
miles away from here, had a massive heart attack at the age of 55 and
never walked again. He had another heart attack at 57 and died. All of
my aunts, uncles, and cousins through him have heart problems by age 60.
One of my first cousins was born with a dime sized hole in his heart
which closed up by the time he was one. Sadly, he died a couple of
years ago from esophageal cancer at the age of 44.
Another of our first cousins was born with a quarter sized hole in her
heart and was a blue baby. They operated on her at Texas Childrens
Hospital at 3 days and closed the hole. The hole opened again at age 11
and she had successful open heart surgery again. Now at 50, she is
having afib like me and is trying to ignore it. But she does not have
the tachycardia with the afib like I did.
So, the heart issues are being passed from generation to generation.
Used to be, when they got bad enough, they killed the carrier before
reproduction and so were removed from circulation.
But, thanks to Modern Medicine, they can now survive and (together
with the people they afflict) multiply.
So it appears we (sometimes) tend to value people as human beings
who might add something to our culture, history, or just ordinary
lives, rather that as carriers for successful genes, which is
certainly what our genes would say if they could speak.
Post by Paul S Person
Still, all things considered, we are probably better off /with/ Modern
Medicine (even the dollar-chasing pill-pushing version we have in the
USA) than without it.
Oh yes. Since we're talking about heart trouble:

When my son was born he had some heart trouble that the doctors
couldn't figure out; he was getting very low blood oxygen levels,
and they rushed him over to Children's Hospital of the East Bay
and put him in an isolette and gave him lots of O2.

When we saw him, the following morning, we followed the
hospital's custom, which was "Parents, on-hand twenty-four
hours a day, except during medical procedures; put on a mask and
gown and go right in." We went in, passing three tiny little
preemies under heat lamps, and there was Tris, all eleven pounds
one ounce of him, his head and feet up against the isolette
(which was designed for preemies), wired up from guggle to zatch.
Every now and then he'd wave his hand around and grab one of the
wires and pull an electrode loose, and alarms would go off and
all the staff would jump to see what had happened ... and
reattach the electrode and shut off the alarm. By the second
day, they were saying, "WHAT!? Oh, it's just baby Heydt again,
finish what you're doing, Suzie, and reattach him."

But the doctors still couldn't figure out what was wrong with
him, they were afraid it was transposition of the great vessels,
which was a SERIOUS complication demanding open-heart surgery,
which they weren't anxious to attempt until he was at least a
month old.

So they ran a catheter up his femoral artery and discovered that
it was "persistence of the fetal circulation," which meant that
the opening between his two ventricles hadn't closed when he was
born the way it was supposed to. But the nudge from the catheter
somehow caused the opening to close, and for the next couple of
days it was "Oh, here's baby Heydt's blood gases, hmm, yes, take
him down another five percent and take another sample." By the
end of the week he was breathing room air and presently the
cardiologist wrote on the chart, "Treat as cardiacally normal."

But if it hadn't been for all that modern (well, forty-odd years
ago) medical stuff, he would most likely have died. He's now
(arithmetic in head) 44 and doing nicely.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-23 18:59:34 UTC
Permalink
On 10/23/2019 12:52 PM, Dorothy J Heydt wrote:
...
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
So they ran a catheter up his femoral artery and discovered that
it was "persistence of the fetal circulation," which meant that
the opening between his two ventricles hadn't closed when he was
born the way it was supposed to. But the nudge from the catheter
somehow caused the opening to close, and for the next couple of
days it was "Oh, here's baby Heydt's blood gases, hmm, yes, take
him down another five percent and take another sample." By the
end of the week he was breathing room air and presently the
cardiologist wrote on the chart, "Treat as cardiacally normal."
But if it hadn't been for all that modern (well, forty-odd years
ago) medical stuff, he would most likely have died. He's now
(arithmetic in head) 44 and doing nicely.
I had a quarter inch hole in my heart between the two chambers after the
heart surgery last year. Took a couple of months to close up. That is
when I really ran short on breath. I can just imagine a little person
with the same thing.

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-23 22:15:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
...
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
So they ran a catheter up his femoral artery and discovered that
it was "persistence of the fetal circulation," which meant that
the opening between his two ventricles hadn't closed when he was
born the way it was supposed to. But the nudge from the catheter
somehow caused the opening to close, and for the next couple of
days it was "Oh, here's baby Heydt's blood gases, hmm, yes, take
him down another five percent and take another sample." By the
end of the week he was breathing room air and presently the
cardiologist wrote on the chart, "Treat as cardiacally normal."
But if it hadn't been for all that modern (well, forty-odd years
ago) medical stuff, he would most likely have died. He's now
(arithmetic in head) 44 and doing nicely.
I had a quarter inch hole in my heart between the two chambers after the
heart surgery last year. Took a couple of months to close up. That is
when I really ran short on breath. I can just imagine a little person
with the same thing.
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"

And the hospital kept him on enough oxygen in his little tank
that he got sufficient in his blood to keep him going till they
did the catheterization, as described above.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2019-10-23 22:44:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tris_Speaker

Historically-minded Bay-area baseball fans may know of him, as he
ended his career with the then Philadelphia Athletics, who hop-
scotched their way across the country to Oakland.

Kevin R
Chrysi Cat
2019-10-23 23:04:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tris_Speaker
Historically-minded Bay-area baseball fans may know of him, as he
ended his career with the then Philadelphia Athletics, who hop-
scotched their way across the country to Oakland.
Kevin R
And after they got THERE, nearly became the first MLB team to displace
the same franchise TWICE--the Kansas City Blues had moved to Denver when
the A's took over their market and become the Bears.

For '78, the A's were basically sold to an ownership group that would
have had them playing in Mile High Stadium--I've heard rumours that
magnetic schedules had even been printed up for one of the banks or
realtors around here to distribute. The rest of the league's owners
wanted it, but Oakland was already able to see that the Raiders were
about to bolt, refused to cease being a major-league city, and thus
refused to release the A's from their lease even though they were
drawing under 5k fans a game.

Had the relocation happened as planned, the Bears (former Blues) would
have twice been forced to leave town by the A's. Just one of those bits
of trivia that my autie mind latches onto HARD.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-23 23:41:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.

He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.

Whatever works, I say.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2019-10-24 00:19:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I loved the TV show, and books based on it, starring Leo McKern as
"Rumpole of the Bailey," by John Mortimer. Rumpole's ex-pupil,
Phyllida (Trant) Erskine-Brown, named her twins Tristan and Isolde.*
Claude Erskine-Brown was big on Wagner.

* I have a brother and sister who are twins, and they were born
on Washington's birthday. Nurses and others at the hospital
suggested my mother name them "George and Martha." My mother
resisted, thinking naming twin siblings after a famous married
couple would be creepy. I agree.

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-24 01:36:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I loved the TV show, and books based on it, starring Leo McKern as
"Rumpole of the Bailey," by John Mortimer. Rumpole's ex-pupil,
Phyllida (Trant) Erskine-Brown, named her twins Tristan and Isolde.*
Claude Erskine-Brown was big on Wagner.
* I have a brother and sister who are twins, and they were born
on Washington's birthday. Nurses and others at the hospital
suggested my mother name them "George and Martha." My mother
resisted, thinking naming twin siblings after a famous married
couple would be creepy. I agree.
Well, there was the time my son and a friend of his found a pair
of orphaned feral kittens, about two weeks old. He brought one
home to me and I took a look at its rear end and provisionally
decided it was male. About a week later his friend decided she
was too busy and could we take the other? So I looked at the
other kitten, and said, "Okay, *this* one is male." So we named
them Sebastian and Viola.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2019-10-24 02:00:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, there was the time my son and a friend of his found a pair
of orphaned feral kittens, about two weeks old. He brought one
home to me and I took a look at its rear end and provisionally
decided it was male. About a week later his friend decided she
was too busy and could we take the other? So I looked at the
other kitten, and said, "Okay, *this* one is male." So we named
them Sebastian and Viola.
That was _very_ good.

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-24 02:21:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, there was the time my son and a friend of his found a pair
of orphaned feral kittens, about two weeks old. He brought one
home to me and I took a look at its rear end and provisionally
decided it was male. About a week later his friend decided she
was too busy and could we take the other? So I looked at the
other kitten, and said, "Okay, *this* one is male." So we named
them Sebastian and Viola.
That was _very_ good.
Thank you.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Peter Trei
2019-10-24 03:52:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I loved the TV show, and books based on it, starring Leo McKern as
"Rumpole of the Bailey," by John Mortimer. Rumpole's ex-pupil,
Phyllida (Trant) Erskine-Brown, named her twins Tristan and Isolde.*
Claude Erskine-Brown was big on Wagner.
* I have a brother and sister who are twins, and they were born
on Washington's birthday. Nurses and others at the hospital
suggested my mother name them "George and Martha." My mother
resisted, thinking naming twin siblings after a famous married
couple would be creepy. I agree.
Well, there was the time my son and a friend of his found a pair
of orphaned feral kittens, about two weeks old. He brought one
home to me and I took a look at its rear end and provisionally
decided it was male. About a week later his friend decided she
was too busy and could we take the other? So I looked at the
other kitten, and said, "Okay, *this* one is male." So we named
them Sebastian and Viola.
Before we met, my wife had a pair of cats who rejoiced in the names "EBCDIC" and "ASCII"

Pt
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-24 05:21:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, there was the time my son and a friend of his found a pair
of orphaned feral kittens, about two weeks old. He brought one
home to me and I took a look at its rear end and provisionally
decided it was male. About a week later his friend decided she
was too busy and could we take the other? So I looked at the
other kitten, and said, "Okay, *this* one is male." So we named
them Sebastian and Viola.
Before we met, my wife had a pair of cats who rejoiced in the names "EBCDIC" and "ASCII"
I read that off to Hal. He's chortling.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Carnegie
2019-10-24 23:26:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I loved the TV show, and books based on it, starring Leo McKern as
"Rumpole of the Bailey," by John Mortimer. Rumpole's ex-pupil,
Phyllida (Trant) Erskine-Brown, named her twins Tristan and Isolde.*
Claude Erskine-Brown was big on Wagner.
* I have a brother and sister who are twins, and they were born
on Washington's birthday. Nurses and others at the hospital
suggested my mother name them "George and Martha." My mother
resisted, thinking naming twin siblings after a famous married
couple would be creepy. I agree.
Well, there was the time my son and a friend of his found a pair
of orphaned feral kittens, about two weeks old. He brought one
home to me and I took a look at its rear end and provisionally
decided it was male. About a week later his friend decided she
was too busy and could we take the other? So I looked at the
other kitten, and said, "Okay, *this* one is male." So we named
them Sebastian and Viola.
There's an episode of _The Glums_ where the dimwit
son has a pet tortoise. As far as I remember,
uncertainty as to the creature's sex is the reason
for giving it a name that's both male and female...
Laurence Olivia. There you are, another Shakespearean
reference. (But the first suggestion was "Mixed Bathing".)
Kevrob
2019-10-25 00:02:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I loved the TV show, and books based on it, starring Leo McKern as
"Rumpole of the Bailey," by John Mortimer. Rumpole's ex-pupil,
Phyllida (Trant) Erskine-Brown, named her twins Tristan and Isolde.*
Claude Erskine-Brown was big on Wagner.
* I have a brother and sister who are twins, and they were born
on Washington's birthday. Nurses and others at the hospital
suggested my mother name them "George and Martha." My mother
resisted, thinking naming twin siblings after a famous married
couple would be creepy. I agree.
Well, there was the time my son and a friend of his found a pair
of orphaned feral kittens, about two weeks old. He brought one
home to me and I took a look at its rear end and provisionally
decided it was male. About a week later his friend decided she
was too busy and could we take the other? So I looked at the
other kitten, and said, "Okay, *this* one is male." So we named
them Sebastian and Viola.
There's an episode of _The Glums_ where the dimwit
son has a pet tortoise. As far as I remember,
uncertainty as to the creature's sex is the reason
for giving it a name that's both male and female...
Laurence Olivia. There you are, another Shakespearean
reference. (But the first suggestion was "Mixed Bathing".)
Name it Shelly, and let folks find out later if he/she/xe is
Sheldon, Michelle, or some "tortoise quid." :) and (--)o

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-25 05:23:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I loved the TV show, and books based on it, starring Leo McKern as
"Rumpole of the Bailey," by John Mortimer. Rumpole's ex-pupil,
Phyllida (Trant) Erskine-Brown, named her twins Tristan and Isolde.*
Claude Erskine-Brown was big on Wagner.
* I have a brother and sister who are twins, and they were born
on Washington's birthday. Nurses and others at the hospital
suggested my mother name them "George and Martha." My mother
resisted, thinking naming twin siblings after a famous married
couple would be creepy. I agree.
Well, there was the time my son and a friend of his found a pair
of orphaned feral kittens, about two weeks old. He brought one
home to me and I took a look at its rear end and provisionally
decided it was male. About a week later his friend decided she
was too busy and could we take the other? So I looked at the
other kitten, and said, "Okay, *this* one is male." So we named
them Sebastian and Viola.
There's an episode of _The Glums_ where the dimwit
son has a pet tortoise. As far as I remember,
uncertainty as to the creature's sex is the reason
for giving it a name that's both male and female...
Laurence Olivia. There you are, another Shakespearean
reference. (But the first suggestion was "Mixed Bathing".)
"The turtle lives 'twixt plated decks
That practically conceal its sex.
I think it clever of the turtle
In such a fix, to be so fertile."
--Ogden Nash
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Gary R. Schmidt
2019-10-24 02:52:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I loved the TV show, and books based on it, starring Leo McKern as
"Rumpole of the Bailey," by John Mortimer. Rumpole's ex-pupil,
Phyllida (Trant) Erskine-Brown, named her twins Tristan and Isolde.*
Claude Erskine-Brown was big on Wagner.
And Rumpole always referred to Phyllida as "Portia."

For obvious reasons.

Cheers,
Gary B-)
--
When men talk to their friends, they insult each other.
They don't really mean it.
When women talk to their friends, they compliment each other.
They don't mean it either.
Robert Carnegie
2019-10-24 23:17:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I loved the TV show, and books based on it, starring Leo McKern as
"Rumpole of the Bailey," by John Mortimer. Rumpole's ex-pupil,
Phyllida (Trant) Erskine-Brown, named her twins Tristan and Isolde.*
Claude Erskine-Brown was big on Wagner.
* I have a brother and sister who are twins, and they were born
on Washington's birthday. Nurses and others at the hospital
suggested my mother name them "George and Martha." My mother
resisted, thinking naming twin siblings after a famous married
couple would be creepy. I agree.
I'm not sure whether to regard "James Herriot" as
a fictional person. He's the protagonist of
popular semi-autobiographical first-person stories of
veterinary practice in mid 20th century Yorkshire,
but the author's name isn't really James Herriot,
nor were his practice colleagues actually named
Siegfried Farnon (played on TV by Robert Hardy)
and Tristan Farnon (Peter Davison).
p***@hotmail.com
2019-10-24 03:27:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, the neonatologist said to us, after examining him, "He's
really sick -- but he's stronger than I am!"
I only knew of one "Tris" when I was a lad, but he was
famously tough.
Well, my Tris was christened David, but as he grew up he decided
there were too many Davids in his generation, so he started using
his SCA name, Tristan av Ravnsborg.
He later changed his last name to Salazar, because his fiancee
(born Fitton) used Salazar as her stage name, in honor of her
Colombian grandmother. She wanted to change it to her legal
name, but didn't have the necessary funds. But Tris did ... so
he changed *his* name and then when they married, she got a chit
from SSA to change her name for free.
Whatever works, I say.
I think this is an example of what is now called "life hacking".

Peter Wezeman
anti-social Darwinist
Scott Lurndal
2019-10-20 17:02:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And the south bay, and the peninsula; even as far north as south san francisco.

I see one a year or thereabouts in the county park two blocks
away. Along with bobcat, wild turkeys, feral pigs, rattlesnakes and the aforementioned deer
(five of them just this morning).
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-10-20 20:22:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And the south bay, and the peninsula; even as far north as south san francisco.
I see one a year or thereabouts in the county park two blocks
away. Along with bobcat, wild turkeys, feral pigs, rattlesnakes and the aforementioned deer
(five of them just this morning).
We see deer in and around the East Bay -- none near the part of
Vallejo where I live. There are (at least) three presumably wild
turkeys that hang out on the Gilman Tract, a piece of garden land
belonging to the University and gardened by a cooperative. This
ia within a block or so of a freeway exit, and the intersection
is always crammed with traffic. And every now and then the
turkeys wander out into the intersection and everyone has to slow
down and avoid them. You'd think they'd have learned to stay out
of the streets by now, but then, they are *turkeys.*
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-25 00:42:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww. Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah ! I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago. He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail. He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And the south bay, and the peninsula; even as far north as south san francisco.
I see one a year or thereabouts in the county park two blocks
away. Along with bobcat, wild turkeys, feral pigs, rattlesnakes and the aforementioned deer
(five of them just this morning).
I have to wind my way through stupid deer most nights on the way home.
Anywhere from 2 or 3 to 10+. The idiots will change their mind and run
across the road in front of me real quick. Although, since I blew the
engine in my old truck a few weeks ago, they don't seem to worry as much
about my old rice rod (a spoilered 2005 Honda Civic).

Lynn
Dimensional Traveler
2019-10-25 01:12:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
    https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww.  Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah !  I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago.  He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail.  He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And the south bay, and the peninsula; even as far north as south san francisco.
I see one a year or thereabouts in the county park two blocks
away.   Along with bobcat, wild turkeys, feral pigs, rattlesnakes and
the aforementioned deer
(five of them just this morning).
I have to wind my way through stupid deer most nights on the way home.
Anywhere from 2 or 3 to 10+.  The idiots will change their mind and run
across the road in front of me real quick.  Although, since I blew the
engine in my old truck a few weeks ago, they don't seem to worry as much
about my old rice rod (a spoilered 2005 Honda Civic).
Someone once told me that when deer go evasive even _they_ don't know
which way they will go next or can control it.
--
"You need to believe in things that aren't true. How else can they become?"
Lynn McGuire
2019-10-25 01:32:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Lynn McGuire
Arlo and Janis: cat adaptability
    https://www.gocomics.com/arloandjanis/2019/10/18
Awwwww.  Bookmarked.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Hah !  I saw a mountain lion on my large commercial property about five
years ago.  He was a big dude, about a four foot long body and a three
foot tail.  He had been watching a deer fawn until I came down the road
in my truck.
People see mountain lions in the East Bay hills quite often.
They (the people, not the cats) are warned not to run, but to
spread out their arms and look as large (=dangerous) as possible.
And the south bay, and the peninsula; even as far north as south san francisco.
I see one a year or thereabouts in the county park two blocks
away.   Along with bobcat, wild turkeys, feral pigs, rattlesnakes and
the aforementioned deer
(five of them just this morning).
I have to wind my way through stupid deer most nights on the way home.
Anywhere from 2 or 3 to 10+.  The idiots will change their mind and
run across the road in front of me real quick.  Although, since I blew
the engine in my old truck a few weeks ago, they don't seem to worry
as much about my old rice rod (a spoilered 2005 Honda Civic).
Someone once told me that when deer go evasive even _they_ don't know
which way they will go next or can control it.
Ah, twitch muscles.

Lynn
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