Discussion:
Girl Genius 2011-7-22
(too old to reply)
Joel Olson
2011-07-22 21:37:29 UTC
Permalink
Shouldn't Vole be just about out of ammo?
Geoffrey Garrett
2011-07-22 23:08:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel Olson
Shouldn't Vole be just about out of ammo?
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Robert Carnegie
2011-07-23 02:44:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Post by Joel Olson
Shouldn't Vole be just about out of ammo?
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>

"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-23 08:29:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
tphile2
2011-07-23 10:15:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
   Or the barrel overheats and warps.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
Jared
2011-07-23 18:04:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by tphile2
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CornerShot
--
Jared
Greg Goss
2011-07-24 15:36:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jared
Post by tphile2
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CornerShot
Building something that looks vaguely rifle-like with an automatic
pistol clamped in at the end beyond a hinge is "shooting from beyond
the corner". But that link provided the links to the original weapon
tphile2 meant, with the bent barrel.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krummlauf
--
Tomorrow is today already.
Greg Goss, 1989-01-27
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-23 19:37:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by tphile2
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam in the
barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Dorothy J Heydt
2011-07-23 20:42:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by tphile2
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam in the
barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
*could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
(relatively) safe position around the corner. Sounds as if it
would go on the fritz with annoying frequency, mostly in the
remote trigger mechanism, but it would fire around the corner
from the wielder.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Should you wish to email me, you'd better use the gmail edress.
Kithrup's all spammy and hotmail's been hacked.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-23 23:21:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by tphile2
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam in the
barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
*could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
(relatively) safe position around the corner. Sounds as if it
would go on the fritz with annoying frequency, mostly in the
remote trigger mechanism, but it would fire around the corner
from the wielder.
It would have to be cleaned quite often, since the outside wall of
the barrel would rub lead off the bullet if the barrel is curved. If
the gun was a pure 90º from the trigger and handle the gun would pull to
the side when fired. It would make it hard to handle, or to hit a
target. Read about 'recoil' in rifles, or even pistols with a decent
load if you're interested in the subject.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Joel Olson
2011-07-24 00:36:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by tphile2
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam in the
barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
*could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
(relatively) safe position around the corner. Sounds as if it
would go on the fritz with annoying frequency, mostly in the
remote trigger mechanism, but it would fire around the corner
from the wielder.
It would have to be cleaned quite often, since the outside wall of
the barrel would rub lead off the bullet if the barrel is curved. If
the gun was a pure 90º from the trigger and handle the gun would pull to
the side when fired. It would make it hard to handle, or to hit a
target. Read about 'recoil' in rifles, or even pistols with a decent
load if you're interested in the subject.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
I think I've seen a drawing of one with the inside portion of the
curve in the barrel removed. Don't know if it actually worked.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 02:12:21 UTC
Permalink
?
??
?? ?
?? ??
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? ? ? Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950
?? ?? ? ? ? have
?? ?? ? ? ? 100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine
?? ?? ? ? ? that's
?? ?? ? ? ? similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
?? ?? ? ? ? (judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have
?? ?? ? ? ? quite
?? ?? ? ? ? a few bursts to go.
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? ? Er... ?http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines?
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? ? "If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
?? ?? ? ? large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
?? ?? ? ? run out until you shoot him dead."
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? Or the barrel overheats and warps.
?? ??
?? ?? then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
?? ?? built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
?? ?? saw
?? ?
?? ? You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam in the
?? ?barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
??
?? Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
?? *could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
?? mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
?? diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
?? the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
?? (relatively) safe position around the corner. Sounds as if it
?? would go on the fritz with annoying frequency, mostly in the
?? remote trigger mechanism, but it would fire around the corner
?? from the wielder.
?
?
? It would have to be cleaned quite often, since the outside wall of
? the barrel would rub lead off the bullet if the barrel is curved. If
? the gun was a pure 90º from the trigger and handle the gun would pull to
? the side when fired. It would make it hard to handle, or to hit a
? target. Read about 'recoil' in rifles, or even pistols with a decent
? load if you're interested in the subject.
I think I've seen a drawing of one with the inside portion of the
curve in the barrel removed. Don't know if it actually worked.
There are lots of drawings of concept weapons that don't work. Like
one a kid I know brought me. A piece of garden hose for a silencer.
There are several newsgroups about guns, if anyone is really
interested. Some people on news:rec.crafts.metalworking make and repair
guns, and share tips on reloading ammo.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Cryptoengineer
2011-08-21 23:45:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
?
??
?? ?
?? ??
?? ?? On Jul 23, 3:29 am, "Michael A. Terrell"
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? ? On Jul 23, 12:08 am, Geoffrey Garrett
?? ?? ? ? ? Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the
Calico M-950 ?? ?? ? ? ? have
?? ?? ? ? ? 100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum
magazine ?? ?? ? ? ? that's
?? ?? ? ? ? similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least
29 shots ?? ?? ? ? ? (judging from expelled casings and bullet paths)
so he could have ?? ?? ? ? ? quite
?? ?? ? ? ? a few bursts to go.
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? ? Er...
?http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines? ??
?? ? ?? ?? ? ? "If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's
belt-fed, or has a ?? ?? ? ? large banana-shaped magazine in it,
forget it, he's /never/ going to ?? ?? ? ? run out until you shoot
him dead." ?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? Or the barrel overheats and warps.
?? ??
?? ?? then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had
even ?? ?? built a gun that could do that according to a history
channel show I ?? ?? saw
?? ?
?? ? You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam
in the ?? ?barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
??
?? Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
?? *could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
?? mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
?? diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
?? the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
?? (relatively) safe position around the corner. Sounds as if it
?? would go on the fritz with annoying frequency, mostly in the
?? remote trigger mechanism, but it would fire around the corner
?? from the wielder.
?
?
? It would have to be cleaned quite often, since the outside wall
of ? the barrel would rub lead off the bullet if the barrel is
curved. If ? the gun was a pure 90º from the trigger and handle the
gun would pull to ? the side when fired. It would make it hard to
handle, or to hit a ? target. Read about 'recoil' in rifles, or
even pistols with a decent ? load if you're interested in the
subject.
I think I've seen a drawing of one with the inside portion of the
curve in the barrel removed. Don't know if it actually worked.
There are lots of drawings of concept weapons that don't work. Like
one a kid I know brought me. A piece of garden hose for a silencer.
There are several newsgroups about guns, if anyone is really
interested. Some people on news:rec.crafts.metalworking make and
repair guns, and share tips on reloading ammo.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.2482

Yes, it really exists.
German WWW2 tech.

pt
Michael A. Terrell
2011-08-22 00:11:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Michael A. Terrell
?
??
?? ?
?? ??
?? ?? On Jul 23, 3:29 am, "Michael A. Terrell"
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? ? On Jul 23, 12:08 am, Geoffrey Garrett
?? ?? ? ? ? Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the
Calico M-950 ?? ?? ? ? ? have
?? ?? ? ? ? 100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum
magazine ?? ?? ? ? ? that's
?? ?? ? ? ? similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least
29 shots ?? ?? ? ? ? (judging from expelled casings and bullet paths)
so he could have ?? ?? ? ? ? quite
?? ?? ? ? ? a few bursts to go.
?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? ? Er...
?http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines? ??
?? ? ?? ?? ? ? "If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's
belt-fed, or has a ?? ?? ? ? large banana-shaped magazine in it,
forget it, he's /never/ going to ?? ?? ? ? run out until you shoot
him dead." ?? ?? ?
?? ?? ? Or the barrel overheats and warps.
?? ??
?? ?? then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had
even ?? ?? built a gun that could do that according to a history
channel show I ?? ?? saw
?? ?
?? ? You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam
in the ?? ?barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
??
?? Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
?? *could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
?? mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
?? diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
?? the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
?? (relatively) safe position around the corner. Sounds as if it
?? would go on the fritz with annoying frequency, mostly in the
?? remote trigger mechanism, but it would fire around the corner
?? from the wielder.
?
?
? It would have to be cleaned quite often, since the outside wall
of ? the barrel would rub lead off the bullet if the barrel is
curved. If ? the gun was a pure 90º from the trigger and handle the
gun would pull to ? the side when fired. It would make it hard to
handle, or to hit a ? target. Read about 'recoil' in rifles, or
even pistols with a decent ? load if you're interested in the
subject.
I think I've seen a drawing of one with the inside portion of the
curve in the barrel removed. Don't know if it actually worked.
There are lots of drawings of concept weapons that don't work. Like
one a kid I know brought me. A piece of garden hose for a silencer.
There are several newsgroups about guns, if anyone is really
interested. Some people on news:rec.crafts.metalworking make and
repair guns, and share tips on reloading ammo.
http://www.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.2482
Yes, it really exists.
German WWW2 tech.
Like I said in another post: The bullets fragmented, which made the
weapon fairly useless. The fragments smear the inside of the barrel,
which not ony plugs the rifling, but reduces the inside diameter
slightly with each round. If the weapon was any good, Police & SWAT
teams would have them for urban combat against criminals and violent
gangs.
--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.
Marcus L. Rowland
2011-07-24 02:18:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by tphile2
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam in the
barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
*could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
(relatively) safe position around the corner. Sounds as if it
would go on the fritz with annoying frequency, mostly in the
remote trigger mechanism, but it would fire around the corner
from the wielder.
It would have to be cleaned quite often, since the outside wall of
the barrel would rub lead off the bullet if the barrel is curved. If
the gun was a pure 90º from the trigger and handle the gun would pull to
the side when fired. It would make it hard to handle, or to hit a
target. Read about 'recoil' in rifles, or even pistols with a decent
load if you're interested in the subject.
Google is your friend... The Imperial War Museum web site has pictures.
It's a modified German MP4 assault rifle: the curved part is an
extension with curved barrel and prism that clamps or screws onto the
end of the barrel, and can presumably be removed for cleaning. It looks
like it deflected the bullet downwards rather than to the side; to shoot
around corners the sniper presumably lay on his side with the barrel and
prism looking around the corner, that way the recoil would be a bit more
manageable (up rather than sideways):

"On display in our Second World War gallery, this rifle is the subject
of frequent enquiries. Many people have expressed surprise or disbelief
that a firearm can be made to shoot around corners; yet this is
precisely what the curved barrel attachment enables this weapon to do.

The attachment was the fruit of experiments, carried out in Germany
during the early 1940s, with the object of providing a device which
would enable troops to shoot from behind cover, without exposing
themselves to enemy fire. Various deflecting troughs and curved barrels
were tried with a number of infantry weapons, before the combination
which we have on display was arrived at. The relatively short bullet
fired by the MP44 made it particularly suitable for this rôle. The
attachment deflects the flight of the bullet through 30 degrees and,
with the aid of the prismatic sight which is fitted, a reasonable degree
of accuracy can be attained. A further version of the device was
developed which deflected the bullet through 90 degrees. This was
intended for use as a close-defence weapon by armoured vehicle crews;
however it was found that bullets fired through it generally fragmented
due to the stresses involved."

http://collections.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.988/outputRegister/lo
whtml
--
Marcus L. Rowland www.forgottenfutures.com
www.forgottenfutures.org
www.forgottenfutures.co.uk
Forgotten Futures - The Scientific Romance Role Playing Game
Diana: Warrior Princess & Elvis: The Legendary Tours
The Original Flatland Role Playing Game
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 06:19:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Marcus L. Rowland
Google is your friend... The Imperial War Museum web site has pictures.
It's a modified German MP4 assault rifle: the curved part is an
extension with curved barrel and prism that clamps or screws onto the
end of the barrel, and can presumably be removed for cleaning. It looks
like it deflected the bullet downwards rather than to the side; to shoot
around corners the sniper presumably lay on his side with the barrel and
prism looking around the corner, that way the recoil would be a bit more
"On display in our Second World War gallery, this rifle is the subject
of frequent enquiries. Many people have expressed surprise or disbelief
that a firearm can be made to shoot around corners; yet this is
precisely what the curved barrel attachment enables this weapon to do.
The attachment was the fruit of experiments, carried out in Germany
during the early 1940s, with the object of providing a device which
would enable troops to shoot from behind cover, without exposing
themselves to enemy fire. Various deflecting troughs and curved barrels
were tried with a number of infantry weapons, before the combination
which we have on display was arrived at. The relatively short bullet
fired by the MP44 made it particularly suitable for this rôle. The
attachment deflects the flight of the bullet through 30 degrees and,
with the aid of the prismatic sight which is fitted, a reasonable degree
of accuracy can be attained. A further version of the device was
developed which deflected the bullet through 90 degrees. This was
intended for use as a close-defence weapon by armoured vehicle crews;
however it was found that bullets fired through it generally fragmented
due to the stresses involved."
Due to friction and uneven heating in the barrel. I had no doubt you
can fire something in a gimmicky barrel, but I wouldn't want to have to
depend on it to survive a battle. Hand grenades are more suited for
taking out the enemy hiding behind a rock or a tree. A bazooka is
better for taking out the building they are hiding behind. The M-72 LAW
can disable a tank, or destroy a jeep. The whole idea of combat is to
take out as many of the enemy as you can, while losing as few of your
troops as possible. Gimmick weapons are usually a sign that the user is
losing badly and will try anything they can think of, on the
battlefield.
Post by Marcus L. Rowland
http://collections.iwm.org.uk/server/show/ConWebDoc.988/outputRegister/lo
whtml
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Joel Polowin
2011-07-24 17:26:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Gimmick weapons are usually a sign that the user is
losing badly and will try anything they can think of, on the
battlefield.
OBSF: Clarke's "Superiority".
http://www.mayofamily.com/RLM/txt_Clarke_Superiority.html
William George Ferguson
2011-07-24 02:29:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by tphile2
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam in the
barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
*could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
(relatively) safe position around the corner. Sounds as if it
would go on the fritz with annoying frequency, mostly in the
remote trigger mechanism, but it would fire around the corner
from the wielder.
Mythbusters built one pretty much exactly as you describe. They first
established that the curved barrel idea wouldn't work.
--
I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.
(Bene Gesserit)
Greg Goss
2011-07-24 15:39:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by tphile2
then he can shoot sideways around corners. The WWII nazis had even
built a gun that could do that according to a history channel show I
saw
You try it. The lead bullet will be so soft that it will jam in the
barrel, and the weapon will expolode.
Haven't researched or anything, but it seems that what you
*could* maybe have is a smallish gun whose entire shooting
mechanism is at the front, followed by a right-angle bend with a
diagonal mirror that reflects the image being targeted back to
the wielder, who is pulling a remote trigger from his
(relatively) safe position around the corner.
Wikipedia has both versions: a modern rifle-shaped thing with a video
camera and a clamped-in automatic pistol at one end, and a flip-out
vid screen back of the hinge, and a German weapon from WW2. The
German bent barrel was supposedly good for 300 rounds for the 30
degree version and 160 rounds for the 45 degree version. The article
doesn't say how long the 60 and 90 degree versions were good for.
--
Tomorrow is today already.
Greg Goss, 1989-01-27
Quadibloc
2011-07-24 18:26:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Wikipedia has both versions: a modern rifle-shaped thing with a video
camera and a clamped-in automatic pistol at one end, and a flip-out
vid screen back of the hinge, and a German weapon from WW2.  The
German bent barrel was supposedly good for 300 rounds for the 30
degree version and 160 rounds for the 45 degree version.  The article
doesn't say how long the 60 and 90 degree versions were good for.
I remember reading about a different kind of modern weapon, where the
corner was near the enemy rather than the shooter - and the bullet was
timed to explode when it got just past the corner the enemy was hiding
behind.

Here, it seems to me to be obvious that the Germans had the wrong
idea. Instead of bending the barrel, have the whole gun aimed normally
at the enemy - but fix it so that it can be aimed and fired from
behind the corner.

John Savard
Robert Carnegie
2011-07-23 13:59:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
   Or the barrel overheats and warps.
You're obsessed with the real world, in my opinion.

Fictional guns sometimes jam; they never do, um, what you said. The
one other problem with them is that as you blaze away, the background
music swells, the gun noise dies away, the picture gradually goes out
of focus and your participation in the movie is seen to be
concluded.
Overheated, probably, warped, maybe...
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-23 19:39:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
You're obsessed with the real world, in my opinion.
Fictional guns sometimes jam; they never do, um, what you said. The
one other problem with them is that as you blaze away, the background
music swells, the gun noise dies away, the picture gradually goes out
of focus and your participation in the movie is seen to be
concluded.
Overheated, probably, warped, maybe...
Obsessed? No. It was taught in weapons training what would happen
if the weapon overheats. They can also get so hot that it ignites the
primer and won't stop firing till it either runs out of ammunition, or
explodes. That's why some weapons had spare barrels, so one could cool,
while another was in use.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
J. Clarke
2011-07-24 04:21:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
You're obsessed with the real world, in my opinion.
Fictional guns sometimes jam; they never do, um, what you said. The
one other problem with them is that as you blaze away, the background
music swells, the gun noise dies away, the picture gradually goes out
of focus and your participation in the movie is seen to be
concluded.
Overheated, probably, warped, maybe...
Obsessed? No. It was taught in weapons training what would happen
if the weapon overheats. They can also get so hot that it ignites the
primer and won't stop firing till it either runs out of ammunition, or
explodes.
That's why a proper machine gun fires from an open bolt--no round in the
chamber until you're _sure_ you want to shoot.
Post by Michael A. Terrell
That's why some weapons had spare barrels, so one could cool,
while another was in use.
And why the ones used in WWI were often water-cooled--those things would
keep firing until the barrel wore out or something broke.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 06:14:08 UTC
Permalink
?
? ?
? ? ?
? ? ?
? ? ? ? ? Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
? ? ? ? ? 100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
? ? ? ? ? similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
? ? ? ? ? (judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
? ? ? ? ? a few bursts to go.
? ? ?
? ? ? ? Er... ?http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines?
? ? ?
? ? ? ? "If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
? ? ? ? large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
? ? ? ? run out until you shoot him dead."
? ? ?
? ? ? Or the barrel overheats and warps.
? ?
? ? You're obsessed with the real world, in my opinion.
? ?
? ? Fictional guns sometimes jam; they never do, um, what you said. The
? ? one other problem with them is that as you blaze away, the background
? ? music swells, the gun noise dies away, the picture gradually goes out
? ? of focus and your participation in the movie is seen to be
? ? concluded.
? ? Overheated, probably, warped, maybe...
?
?
? Obsessed? No. It was taught in weapons training what would happen
? if the weapon overheats. They can also get so hot that it ignites the
? primer and won't stop firing till it either runs out of ammunition, or
? explodes.
That's why a proper machine gun fires from an open bolt--no round in the
chamber until you're _sure_ you want to shoot.
Do you consider the M60 that I used in the US Army, a proper machine
gun?
? That's why some weapons had spare barrels, so one could cool,
? while another was in use.
And why the ones used in WWI were often water-cooled--those things would
keep firing until the barrel wore out or something broke.
Water cooled is OK if you're in a fixed position. Since a lot of
fighting in W.W.-I was trench warfare they could use water, but in wars
since then they used ligher weapons that could quickly change
positions. A lot of things changed between the two World Wars. A lot of
it had to do with metulurgy, which allowed them to make lighter but
stronger parts for weapons
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Robert Carnegie
2011-07-23 22:09:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
   Or the barrel overheats and warps.
You're obsessed with the real world, in my opinion.
Oh, by the way, you do realise that comment was meant to demean
and humiliate /me/, not you? :-)
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-23 23:23:15 UTC
Permalink
?
?
? ? ? Er... ?http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines?
?
? ? ? "If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
? ? ? large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
? ? ? run out until you shoot him dead."
?
? ? Or the barrel overheats and warps.
?
? You're obsessed with the real world, in my opinion.
Oh, by the way, you do realise that comment was meant to demean
and humiliate /me/, not you? :-)
It was? I must have missed the demean and humiliate part. :-)
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
J. Clarke
2011-07-23 15:55:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
Now when has that _ever_ happened on a TV show?
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-23 19:40:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
Now when has that _ever_ happened on a TV show?
Do you base your life on TV shows?
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2011-07-23 20:54:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er...<http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
Now when has that _ever_ happened on a TV show?
Do you base your life on TV shows?
Girl Genius isn't real life, in case you had not noticed, and it
generally follows TV Tropes MUCH more closely than Real Life.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.livejournal.com
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-23 23:36:26 UTC
Permalink
?
??
???
????
?????
????? Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
????? 100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
????? similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
????? (judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
????? a few bursts to go.
????
???? Er...?http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines?
????
???? "If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
???? large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
???? run out until you shoot him dead."
???
???
??? Or the barrel overheats and warps.
??
?? Now when has that _ever_ happened on a TV show?
?
?
? Do you base your life on TV shows?
?
?
Girl Genius isn't real life, in case you had not noticed, and it
generally follows TV Tropes MUCH more closely than Real Life.
Some days I'm too sick to care. My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Robert Carnegie
2011-07-24 01:22:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back.  I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
Ouch. Sincerely. Dare I suggest you turn off your computer? :-)

...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 02:17:21 UTC
Permalink
? My A/C went out last night. I got it
? running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
? electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
? degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
? last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
Ouch. Sincerely. Dare I suggest you turn off your computer? :-)
...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
My TV draws 9 watts. The computer has a small LCD monitor, but none
of them were generating heat. I lost my 22" HP monitor when the flyback
failed. It would do 2048*1536. :(

The first power failure must have happened while I was trying to get
to sleep. The A/C has a remote control, and doesn't turn itself back on
when the power returns. It was in the upper 90s today, while the
electric was off. The 'heat soak' raised the temperature of everything
inside and it can take 24+ hours to cool everything off.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
J. Clarke
2011-07-24 04:25:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
? My A/C went out last night. I got it
? running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
? electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
? degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
? last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
Ouch. Sincerely. Dare I suggest you turn off your computer? :-)
...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
My TV draws 9 watts. The computer has a small LCD monitor, but none
of them were generating heat. I lost my 22" HP monitor when the flyback
failed. It would do 2048*1536. :(
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
Post by Michael A. Terrell
The first power failure must have happened while I was trying to get
to sleep. The A/C has a remote control, and doesn't turn itself back on
when the power returns. It was in the upper 90s today, while the
electric was off. The 'heat soak' raised the temperature of everything
inside and it can take 24+ hours to cool everything off.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 06:20:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
J. Clarke
2011-07-24 08:00:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
Greg Goss
2011-07-24 15:47:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
Occasionally you luck out.

I bought a cheap 21 inch monitor in 96 or so. A few years later I met
the dealer at a party and we talked about the various stuff I'd bought
from him. I mentioned that I really liked the monitor, and hadn't
seen anything at anywhere near the price since.

He expressed surprise. "Everyone else who bought that model had
theirs catch fire."

It quit working after the third of the seven moves we did in sixteen
months in 2003-2005. I forget the brand.
--
Tomorrow is today already.
Greg Goss, 1989-01-27
Wayne Throop
2011-07-24 17:30:14 UTC
Permalink
: Greg Goss <***@gossg.org>
: I bought a cheap 21 inch monitor in 96 or so. [...]
: It quit working after the third of the seven moves we did in sixteen
: months in 2003-2005. I forget the brand.

I have a TV, forget the brand
Ain't never seen it, they tell me it's grand
Lucky I'm sane after all I been through
I can't complain, but sometimes I still do
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 18:39:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
It developed a bunch of different colored vertical lines on the right
third of the screen, and within days, that whole area was useless.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
J. Clarke
2011-07-24 22:28:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
It developed a bunch of different colored vertical lines on the right
third of the screen, and within days, that whole area was useless.
Sounds like it was defective and they should have replaced it under
warranty.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-25 00:21:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
It developed a bunch of different colored vertical lines on the right
third of the screen, and within days, that whole area was useless.
Sounds like it was defective and they should have replaced it under
warranty.
You would think so.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
J. Clarke
2011-07-25 06:34:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
It developed a bunch of different colored vertical lines on the right
third of the screen, and within days, that whole area was useless.
Sounds like it was defective and they should have replaced it under
warranty.
You would think so.
Samsung didn't?
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-25 11:07:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
It developed a bunch of different colored vertical lines on the right
third of the screen, and within days, that whole area was useless.
Sounds like it was defective and they should have replaced it under
warranty.
You would think so.
Samsung didn't?
I never got a reply. I'm going to dig it out and try one more time,
since it had a three year warranty. No one makes panels in that
resolution & size anymore, so they will probably replace it with
something with a lower resolution, if they ever do anything.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
J. Clarke
2011-07-25 14:03:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
It developed a bunch of different colored vertical lines on the right
third of the screen, and within days, that whole area was useless.
Sounds like it was defective and they should have replaced it under
warranty.
You would think so.
Samsung didn't?
I never got a reply.
What, they don't answer the phone?
Post by Michael A. Terrell
I'm going to dig it out and try one more time,
since it had a three year warranty. No one makes panels in that
resolution & size anymore, so they will probably replace it with
something with a lower resolution, if they ever do anything.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-25 17:25:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
I use a 25" Samsung TV for a monitor these days. It does 1920x1200 and
cost something like 350 bucks. And it's vastly sharper than the Hitachi
that I spent a couple of grand for many years back even though
theoretically the Hitachi has higher resolution.
I bought a new Samsung 24" a few years ago, and it died within two
weeks. I gave up on the piece of crap, and Samsung.
Mine's being doing fine for years.
It developed a bunch of different colored vertical lines on the right
third of the screen, and within days, that whole area was useless.
Sounds like it was defective and they should have replaced it under
warranty.
You would think so.
Samsung didn't?
I never got a reply.
What, they don't answer the phone?
I didn't have long distance phone service and their tool free was
screwed up, so I emailed them.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Robert Sneddon
2011-07-25 22:43:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Samsung didn't?
I never got a reply. I'm going to dig it out and try one more time,
since it had a three year warranty.
I'm sitting in front of a Samsung monitor which I got replaced when its
predecessor died within the 3-year warranty period. I had no hassle
getting this done, although I'm in the UK and Samsung US might do things
differently.
Post by Michael A. Terrell
No one makes panels in that
resolution & size anymore, so they will probably replace it with
something with a lower resolution, if they ever do anything.
I got a like-for-like swap, exactly the same model (SyncMaster 2343BW).
It has an oddball resolution (2048 x 1152) but any video card I've used
with it drives it properly without downsizing to, say, 1920 x 1080.

I used the Samsung website to register the display's purchase (serial
number etc.) and to sort out the swap/replacement when I needed it.

http://www.samsung.com/
--
To reply, my gmail address is nojay1 Robert Sneddon
Dorothy J Heydt
2011-07-24 02:35:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Michael A. Terrell
My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back.  I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
Ouch. Sincerely. Dare I suggest you turn off your computer? :-)
...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
Our flat is considerably warmed by the three or so (out of
SEVERAL) computers running in it. When the weather's warm we set
up a fan in the living room window and have to blow relatively
cool (because shaded by trees and the house next door) air in.
Fortunately, our flat is in the basement so we get some degree of
earth-cooling. Also fortunately, we're in the SF Bay Area so we
seldom get the kind of horrendous temperatures you guys in the
East are getting: you have my sympathies; I'd die.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Should you wish to email me, you'd better use the gmail edress.
Kithrup's all spammy and hotmail's been hacked.
Jared
2011-07-24 05:41:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Michael A. Terrell
My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
Ouch. Sincerely. Dare I suggest you turn off your computer? :-)
...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
Our flat is considerably warmed by the three or so (out of
SEVERAL) computers running in it. When the weather's warm we set
up a fan in the living room window and have to blow relatively
cool (because shaded by trees and the house next door) air in.
Fortunately, our flat is in the basement so we get some degree of
earth-cooling. Also fortunately, we're in the SF Bay Area so we
seldom get the kind of horrendous temperatures you guys in the
East are getting: you have my sympathies; I'd die.
I work in a converted conference room, and the air conditioning has been
overloaded by more than a dozen computers running 24/7, not to mention
the people.

The people who were called to look at why the A/C wasn't working said
there was nothing wrong with it; it's just way under capacity for a full
room on a hot day.

We have no windows, so we set up fans to circulate air from the rest of
the building.
--
Jared
Greg Goss
2011-07-24 15:50:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jared
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
Our flat is considerably warmed by the three or so (out of
SEVERAL) computers running in it.
I work in a converted conference room, and the air conditioning has been
overloaded by more than a dozen computers running 24/7, not to mention
the people.
When I left Calgary in 1981, there was a new office building downtown
that ran a fountain outside its front door as part of their cooling
system. Since the building was super-insulated, the fountain ran
year-round, even in Calgary's prairie winter cold snaps below -40C.

When I returned in 2005, there were flowers and a small tree in "the
fountain". A friend suggested that CRT monitors and better ballasts
reduced the amount of "natural" heating that could be expected in and
office tower.
--
Tomorrow is today already.
Greg Goss, 1989-01-27
Dorothy J Heydt
2011-07-24 16:44:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Jared
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
Our flat is considerably warmed by the three or so (out of
SEVERAL) computers running in it.
I work in a converted conference room, and the air conditioning has been
overloaded by more than a dozen computers running 24/7, not to mention
the people.
When I left Calgary in 1981, there was a new office building downtown
that ran a fountain outside its front door as part of their cooling
system. Since the building was super-insulated, the fountain ran
year-round, even in Calgary's prairie winter cold snaps below -40C.
When I returned in 2005, there were flowers and a small tree in "the
fountain". A friend suggested that CRT monitors and better ballasts
reduced the amount of "natural" heating that could be expected in and
office tower.
Long long ago ... around 1968 it would have been ... I was
working for a research institute that had a whole, building's-
footprint-sized, computer room in its basement. It was running
360s and 350s, maintaining what for its time must have been a
humongous database.

It had, of course, to be severely air-conditioned. This was in
the days of PUNCH CARDS, fergoshsake. The AC units were in the
room's ceiling, and one of them leaked: not a good thing with all
the cables running under the false floor. So someone brought in
a big garbage can, lined with a heavy plastic bag, to catch the
drips.

A day or so later, someone had brought in a fine specimen of
bamboo, tall enough nearly to reach the ceiling, and set its
roots in the garbage can and letting its tall stalks ascend
through the cool moist air. It throve. It was lovely. It
lasted until the director of the institute, one of the most
humourless men I have ever encountered, happened to come
downstairs and see it. Then it vanished. Eventually the
AC got fixed.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Should you wish to email me, you'd better use the gmail edress.
Kithrup's all spammy and hotmail's been hacked.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 18:41:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Jared
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
Our flat is considerably warmed by the three or so (out of
SEVERAL) computers running in it.
I work in a converted conference room, and the air conditioning has been
overloaded by more than a dozen computers running 24/7, not to mention
the people.
When I left Calgary in 1981, there was a new office building downtown
that ran a fountain outside its front door as part of their cooling
system. Since the building was super-insulated, the fountain ran
year-round, even in Calgary's prairie winter cold snaps below -40C.
When I returned in 2005, there were flowers and a small tree in "the
fountain". A friend suggested that CRT monitors and better ballasts
reduced the amount of "natural" heating that could be expected in and
office tower.
Long long ago ... around 1968 it would have been ... I was
working for a research institute that had a whole, building's-
footprint-sized, computer room in its basement. It was running
360s and 350s, maintaining what for its time must have been a
humongous database.
It had, of course, to be severely air-conditioned. This was in
the days of PUNCH CARDS, fergoshsake. The AC units were in the
room's ceiling, and one of them leaked: not a good thing with all
the cables running under the false floor. So someone brought in
a big garbage can, lined with a heavy plastic bag, to catch the
drips.
A day or so later, someone had brought in a fine specimen of
bamboo, tall enough nearly to reach the ceiling, and set its
roots in the garbage can and letting its tall stalks ascend
through the cool moist air. It throve. It was lovely. It
lasted until the director of the institute, one of the most
humourless men I have ever encountered, happened to come
downstairs and see it. Then it vanished. Eventually the
AC got fixed.
They should have had him fixed, too. :)
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 06:31:30 UTC
Permalink
?? My A/C went out last night. I got it
?? running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
?? electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
?? degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
?? last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
?
?Ouch. Sincerely. Dare I suggest you turn off your computer? :-)
?
?...I recently noticed that my house is warmed considerably by using
?the TV set - which is not fancy by modern standards, but that's the
?problem, really, it's a respectable-sized CRT.
Our flat is considerably warmed by the three or so (out of
SEVERAL) computers running in it. When the weather's warm we set
up a fan in the living room window and have to blow relatively
cool (because shaded by trees and the house next door) air in.
Fortunately, our flat is in the basement so we get some degree of
earth-cooling. Also fortunately, we're in the SF Bay Area so we
seldom get the kind of horrendous temperatures you guys in the
East are getting: you have my sympathies; I'd die.
95 degrees didn't bother me, till I got sick about 15 years ago. At
the worst, I would be wearing a pair of shorts in a 65 degree room, and
sweating all day long. It has taken over 10 years not to feel sick and
dizzy at 85 degrees.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
David DeLaney
2011-07-24 01:40:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Some days I'm too sick to care. My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
You have my sympathies. My A/C has been functioning, but has been struggling,
for the last couple of weeks. A guy may be coming by on Monday to see if
cleaning off the exit coils & stuff back there will help it run better.

Dave "baseball games are not meant to be watched at 9 degrees, either" DeLaney
--
\/David DeLaney posting from ***@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
http://www.vic.com/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 06:25:12 UTC
Permalink
? Some days I'm too sick to care. My A/C went out last night. I got it
?running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
?electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
?degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
?last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
You have my sympathies. My A/C has been functioning, but has been struggling,
for the last couple of weeks. A guy may be coming by on Monday to see if
cleaning off the exit coils ? stuff back there will help it run better.
This is a through wall unit, in a croner under a roof over so it
doesn't get a lot of crap, and it's easy to hose out. The central air
hasn't been turned on in over five years. It started an electrical fire
the last time I turned it on, and I still need to replace a lot of
wiring and the damaged box that feeds it. This year was the first time
I felt well enough to work on it, but I ended up spending every decent
day helping others in need, until it was just too damned hot to work on
my own problems.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Greg Goss
2011-07-24 15:43:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours
I guess you weren't the only one who finally got their AC working.
--
Tomorrow is today already.
Greg Goss, 1989-01-27
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 18:46:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Michael A. Terrell
My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours
I guess you weren't the only one who finally got their AC working.
I saw a tree trimming crew under the main feeder into the area. They
probably took out the recloser at the substation, because there was no
visible attempt to restore power. If there is a momentary overload the
reclose will try to restore power three times. Also, most A/C systems
don't use a control system that requires you to manually restart it
after an outage. They do have a timer before the compressor restarts,
with dithers the starting time of the units.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Gene Wirchenko
2011-07-28 02:56:29 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 19:36:26 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"
<***@earthlink.net> wrote:

[snip]
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Some days I'm too sick to care. My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
Ouch! My condolences. I need my A/Cs in high summer (apartment
and window units).
Post by Michael A. Terrell
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
No deep thinking this time of year then?

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-28 15:45:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gene Wirchenko
On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 19:36:26 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"
[snip]
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Some days I'm too sick to care. My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
Ouch! My condolences. I need my A/Cs in high summer (apartment
and window units).
I have been averaging about four hours sleep at a time. The bad
thing is when i can'tt sleep, i can't concentrate enough to read more
than a few minutes at a time. I had a couple good weeks about a month
ago and read almost 60 old paperbacks, then the sleep problems started
again. I want to build a real 'Book Scanner' so I can read them on a
monitor when I'm stuck in bed. I'm looking at building a custom
controller to flip electronic pages while laying there. Mount a few
buttons on the side rail of my old hospital bed to do that, and turn the
computer on or off.
Post by Gene Wirchenko
Post by Michael A. Terrell
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
No deep thinking this time of year then?
Sure! You use the torch to cut out the parts for the project at
hand. Who needs an old metal box, anyway? :)
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Robert Carnegie
2011-07-29 11:34:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gene Wirchenko
On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 19:36:26 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"
[snip]
  Some days I'm too sick to care. My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back.  I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
     Ouch!  My condolences.  I need my A/Cs in high summer (apartment
and window units).
   I have been averaging about four hours sleep at a time.  The bad
thing is when i can'tt sleep, i can't concentrate enough to read more
than a few minutes at a time.  I had a couple good weeks about a month
ago and read almost 60 old paperbacks, then the sleep problems started
again.  I want to build a real 'Book Scanner' so I can read them on a
monitor when I'm stuck in bed.  I'm looking at building a custom
controller to flip electronic pages while laying there.  Mount a few
buttons on the side rail of my old hospital bed to do that, and turn the
computer on or off.
And pretend you're that one guy in about the first Star Trek episode
(depending how you count), "Where No Man Has Gone Before"... uh, my
exponentially increasing psychic power has just told me it's Gary
Mitchell.

Just for text to read, a modern camera snapshotting each page might be
adequate. Maybe I'm slow to catch on but I've taken to photographing
interesting public notices to consult later, such as which bus
services will run on a holiday date, and that's usually with a lower
resolution setting on my Samsung Galaxy Tab camera, which I mainly use
on the rather unhelpful office flexible-hours clock, to have a
portable record of my sign-in time and the fact I /did/ sign in. I'm
not exactly sure how to change it.

Triple geek points if you use a projector aimed at the ceiling to
display. Quadruple if this requires provision of an appropriate
projection screen up there.
J. Clarke
2011-07-29 12:43:55 UTC
Permalink
In article <2a8da106-8c91-4f65-906d-782e0d4cf160
@p19g2000yqa.googlegroups.com>, ***@excite.com says...
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Gene Wirchenko
On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 19:36:26 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"
[snip]
  Some days I'm too sick to care. My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back.  I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
     Ouch!  My condolences.  I need my A/Cs in high summer (apartment
and window units).
   I have been averaging about four hours sleep at a time.  The bad
thing is when i can'tt sleep, i can't concentrate enough to read more
than a few minutes at a time.  I had a couple good weeks about a month
ago and read almost 60 old paperbacks, then the sleep problems started
again.  I want to build a real 'Book Scanner' so I can read them on a
monitor when I'm stuck in bed.  I'm looking at building a custom
controller to flip electronic pages while laying there.  Mount a few
buttons on the side rail of my old hospital bed to do that, and turn the
computer on or off.
And pretend you're that one guy in about the first Star Trek episode
(depending how you count), "Where No Man Has Gone Before"... uh, my
exponentially increasing psychic power has just told me it's Gary
Mitchell.
Just for text to read, a modern camera snapshotting each page might be
adequate. Maybe I'm slow to catch on but I've taken to photographing
interesting public notices to consult later, such as which bus
services will run on a holiday date, and that's usually with a lower
resolution setting on my Samsung Galaxy Tab camera, which I mainly use
on the rather unhelpful office flexible-hours clock, to have a
portable record of my sign-in time and the fact I /did/ sign in. I'm
not exactly sure how to change it.
Triple geek points if you use a projector aimed at the ceiling to
display. Quadruple if this requires provision of an appropriate
projection screen up there.
The hard part is the page-turner.

A friend of mine is visually-impaired and uses a webcam duct-taped to a
desk lamp as a reading aid. Works fine. The particular one that he
uses is a Logitech C910, but any HD webcam should work.
Robert Carnegie
2011-07-29 13:54:25 UTC
Permalink
Look at wireless "presenter" remote controls for computer systems - or
indeed media-player remote control handsets. Or just a keyboard,
wireless or not, that you don't mind having in bed...

It's kind of disappointing that relatively little of this wireless
stuff uses Bluetooth, instead it usually comes with its own adapter
that sits in a USB port. But maybe that's fine with you.

Come to think, there are compact keyboards designed for PDAs or
smartphones that use the likes of Bluetooth.
J. Clarke
2011-07-29 22:20:56 UTC
Permalink
In article <6531974b-6337-4f1e-8630-3448ff5602f2
@n35g2000yqf.googlegroups.com>, ***@excite.com says...
Post by Robert Carnegie
Look at wireless "presenter" remote controls for computer systems - or
indeed media-player remote control handsets. Or just a keyboard,
wireless or not, that you don't mind having in bed...
It's kind of disappointing that relatively little of this wireless
stuff uses Bluetooth, instead it usually comes with its own adapter
that sits in a USB port. But maybe that's fine with you.
Come to think, there are compact keyboards designed for PDAs or
smartphones that use the likes of Bluetooth.
I had the impression that he was looking to read paper books, not
electronic.

FWIW, here's a page-turner that was made with Lego Mindstorms:



And an improved version



There's also a commercial product

<http://www.enablemart.com/Catalog/Workstation-Accessories/Flip-
Automatic-Page-Turner>.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-29 22:01:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Gene Wirchenko
On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 19:36:26 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"
[snip]
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Some days I'm too sick to care. My A/C went out last night. I got it
running, a few minutes before noon, then the entire city was without
electricity for about two hours starting at 12:03 PM. It's down to 87
degrees at 7:34 PM, and sweat is running down my back. I didn't sleep
last night, and it doesn't like like I'll get much tonight.
Ouch! My condolences. I need my A/Cs in high summer (apartment
and window units).
I have been averaging about four hours sleep at a time. The bad
thing is when i can'tt sleep, i can't concentrate enough to read more
than a few minutes at a time. I had a couple good weeks about a month
ago and read almost 60 old paperbacks, then the sleep problems started
again. I want to build a real 'Book Scanner' so I can read them on a
monitor when I'm stuck in bed. I'm looking at building a custom
controller to flip electronic pages while laying there. Mount a few
buttons on the side rail of my old hospital bed to do that, and turn the
computer on or off.
And pretend you're that one guy in about the first Star Trek episode
(depending how you count), "Where No Man Has Gone Before"... uh, my
exponentially increasing psychic power has just told me it's Gary
Mitchell.
Just for text to read, a modern camera snapshotting each page might be
adequate. Maybe I'm slow to catch on but I've taken to photographing
interesting public notices to consult later, such as which bus
services will run on a holiday date, and that's usually with a lower
resolution setting on my Samsung Galaxy Tab camera, which I mainly use
on the rather unhelpful office flexible-hours clock, to have a
portable record of my sign-in time and the fact I /did/ sign in. I'm
not exactly sure how to change it.
Triple geek points if you use a projector aimed at the ceiling to
display. Quadruple if this requires provision of an appropriate
projection screen up there.
A 'Book Scanner' uses a pair of digital cameras to digitize & store
the pages to the computer under computer control. They automaticly
align the shots, autocrop and do a bunch of other work on the fly. The
output can be converted to a PDF, or just viewed on a monitor. To do
good OCR conversion you need 300-400 DPI to reduce errors.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Dorothy J Heydt
2011-07-23 23:49:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er...<http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
Now when has that _ever_ happened on a TV show?
Do you base your life on TV shows?
Girl Genius isn't real life, in case you had not noticed, and it
generally follows TV Tropes MUCH more closely than Real Life.
But then, some of us do not follow TV Tropes. I'm not sure at
this remove who was being accused of basing his/her life on TV
shows, but for my part I hardly even watch them. The videoed
stuff I do watch is seldom a good hunting ground for tropes. I
just, e.g., finished re-watching _Victory at Sea,_ all 29
episodes of it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Should you wish to email me, you'd better use the gmail edress.
Kithrup's all spammy and hotmail's been hacked.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 02:20:35 UTC
Permalink
??
???
????
?????
??????
?????? Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
?????? 100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
?????? similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
?????? (judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
?????? a few bursts to go.
?????
????? Er...?http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines?
?????
????? "If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
????? large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
????? run out until you shoot him dead."
????
????
???? Or the barrel overheats and warps.
???
??? Now when has that _ever_ happened on a TV show?
??
??
?? Do you base your life on TV shows?
??
??
?
?
? Girl Genius isn't real life, in case you had not noticed, and it
?generally follows TV Tropes MUCH more closely than Real Life.
?
But then, some of us do not follow TV Tropes. I'm not sure at
this remove who was being accused of basing his/her life on TV
shows, but for my part I hardly even watch them. The videoed
stuff I do watch is seldom a good hunting ground for tropes. I
just, e.g., finished re-watching _Victory at Sea,_ all 29
episodes of it.
I worked in TV broadcasting too many years to watch much of it. I had
to watch whatever we were producing or transmitting at all times, while
maintaining equipment at the stations. It wasn't unusual to slip into a
studio and replace part of a camera between shots, after noticing a
minor problem while broadcasting live programming.

I don't get many channels, and very little Science Fiction on TV.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Gene Wirchenko
2011-07-28 02:53:49 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 11:55:09 -0400, "J. Clarke"
[snip]
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
Now when has that _ever_ happened on a TV show?
There could always be an Exigency of Plot.

Sincerelyk,

Gene Wirchenko
J. Clarke
2011-07-28 12:11:13 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, ***@ocis.net
says...
Post by Gene Wirchenko
On Sat, 23 Jul 2011 11:55:09 -0400, "J. Clarke"
[snip]
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
Now when has that _ever_ happened on a TV show?
There could always be an Exigency of Plot.
It did happen in a poem once.
Dorothy J Heydt
2011-07-23 16:22:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
And blows up in his face? That would work.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Should you wish to email me, you'd better use the gmail edress.
Kithrup's all spammy and hotmail's been hacked.
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-23 19:41:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
And blows up in his face? That would work.
The back pressure will cause the chamber to explode, and the hot,
sharp fragments of shrapnel can kill you.
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
J. Clarke
2011-07-24 04:25:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
And blows up in his face? That would work.
The back pressure will cause the chamber to explode, and the hot,
sharp fragments of shrapnel can kill you.
And this happening to Vole is a bad thing because?
Michael A. Terrell
2011-07-24 06:25:54 UTC
Permalink
?
? ?
? ? ?
? ? ??
? ? ?? ?
? ? ?? ? Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
? ? ?? ? 100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
? ? ?? ? similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
? ? ?? ? (judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
? ? ?? ? a few bursts to go.
? ? ??
? ? ?? Er... ?http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines?
? ? ??
? ? ?? "If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
? ? ?? large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
? ? ?? run out until you shoot him dead."
? ? ?
? ? ? Or the barrel overheats and warps.
? ?
? ? And blows up in his face? That would work.
?
?
? The back pressure will cause the chamber to explode, and the hot,
? sharp fragments of shrapnel can kill you.
And this happening to Vole is a bad thing because?
I didn't say it was a bad thing. Just likely to happen. :)
--
It's easy to think outside the box, when you have a cutting torch.
Dorothy J Heydt
2011-07-24 06:42:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Geoffrey Garrett
Hard to say. Both the Thompson submachine gun and the Calico M-950 have
100-round magazines (the Tommy having that iconic drum magazine that's
similar to the mag on Vole's weapon.) We've seen at least 29 shots
(judging from expelled casings and bullet paths) so he could have quite
a few bursts to go.
Er... <http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BottomlessMagazines>
"If someone is firing an automatic weapon that's belt-fed, or has a
large banana-shaped magazine in it, forget it, he's /never/ going to
run out until you shoot him dead."
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
And blows up in his face? That would work.
The back pressure will cause the chamber to explode, and the hot,
sharp fragments of shrapnel can kill you.
And this happening to Vole is a bad thing because?
I can't see anything wrong with it. Unless the shrapnel hits Gil
or Tarvek or somebody else who doesn't deserve it.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
Should you wish to email me, you'd better use the gmail edress.
Kithrup's all spammy and hotmail's been hacked.
Greg Goss
2011-07-24 15:51:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Michael A. Terrell
Or the barrel overheats and warps.
And blows up in his face? That would work.
The back pressure will cause the chamber to explode, and the hot,
sharp fragments of shrapnel can kill you.
"fragments of shrapnel"?
--
Tomorrow is today already.
Greg Goss, 1989-01-27
Quadibloc
2011-07-24 18:31:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
  The back pressure will cause the chamber to explode, and the hot,
sharp fragments of shrapnel can kill you.
"fragments of shrapnel"?
The fragments of the chamber of which the shrapnel is composed, not
fragments into which shrapnel might be further divided. Thus, while
you have a point, it's not as incorrect as it might sound.

John Savard
s***@gmail.com
2020-05-28 18:03:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel Olson
Shouldn't Vole be just about out of ammo?
no
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-28 19:09:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joel Olson
Shouldn't Vole be just about out of ammo?
no
Um ... remind me who Vole is/was?

Now, if the OP had been referring to *today's* strip, I would
say, ...


"Only if all those hair ornaments are really made of candy."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2020-05-28 21:47:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Joel Olson
Shouldn't Vole be just about out of ammo?
no
Um ... remind me who Vole is/was?
The ex-Jaeger (they kicked him out of the club) who is not loyal to
the Heterodynes.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Now, if the OP had been referring to *today's* strip, I would
say, ...
"Only if all those hair ornaments are really made of candy."
Peter Trei
2020-05-28 22:18:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Joel Olson
Shouldn't Vole be just about out of ammo?
no
Um ... remind me who Vole is/was?
The ex-Jaeger (they kicked him out of the club) who is not loyal to
the Heterodynes.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Now, if the OP had been referring to *today's* strip, I would
say, ...
"Only if all those hair ornaments are really made of candy."
He underwent some severe personal changes in 2014, long after this thread.

https://girlgenius.fandom.com/wiki/Captain_Vole

Pt
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-28 22:42:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Joel Olson
Shouldn't Vole be just about out of ammo?
no
Um ... remind me who Vole is/was?
The ex-Jaeger (they kicked him out of the club) who is not loyal to
the Heterodynes.
Ohhhh, right. Him. Thanks.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
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