Discussion:
[OT][Map Projections]Speaking of XKCD (977)
(too old to reply)
Quadibloc
2019-07-25 22:58:58 UTC
Permalink
I came across

https://xkcd.com/977/

from a link on my web page as I was searching the Internet...

I recently updated my web site, adding this page

http://www.quadibloc.com/maps/mcf0704.htm

and I was hoping to add still another web page about *this* map projection

https://www.genekeyes.com/CAHILL_GALLERY/1976-Lee-Conformal.html

which is what prompted my searches.

John Savard
m***@sky.com
2019-07-26 04:15:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
I came across
https://xkcd.com/977/
from a link on my web page as I was searching the Internet...
I recently updated my web site, adding this page
http://www.quadibloc.com/maps/mcf0704.htm
and I was hoping to add still another web page about *this* map projection
https://www.genekeyes.com/CAHILL_GALLERY/1976-Lee-Conformal.html
which is what prompted my searches.
John Savard
Thanks for the URL. I like the cube-gnomic, which I hadn't seen before. I also note that the Gnomic projection fits well into the xkcd "What your favourite map projection says about you" format - if you like the Gnomic projection you _really_ like great circle routes.
Default User
2019-07-27 20:40:29 UTC
Permalink
As a kid, I'd really only seen the traditional Mercator map that they hung in classrooms. Then I happened to be looking at a globe and realized, "Hey, Greenland is really small on this."


Brian
m***@gmail.com
2019-08-04 00:40:07 UTC
Permalink
What I do for a living! I'm a map projections (coordinate systems) expert for a GIS software company. We have 7 of the xkcd 977 projections, just added an 8th and you can emulate Gall-Peters with a different projection.

We generally steer clear of self-named projections because there are usually some rights issues. We added Fuller (the Dymaxion name is a trademark iirc) after BFI requested it and made it public.

Melita
Quadibloc
2019-08-07 20:09:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
What I do for a living! I'm a map projections (coordinate systems) expert for a
GIS software company. We have 7 of the xkcd 977 projections, just added an 8th
and you can emulate Gall-Peters with a different projection.
We generally steer clear of self-named projections because there are usually
some rights issues. We added Fuller (the Dymaxion name is a trademark iirc)
after BFI requested it and made it public.
I have a degree in physics, so I had the mathematical background to fool around
with this sort of thing, having had some interest after seeing the pretty
pictures in certain books about the subject.

Getting back to my map projection pages, I've made a number of minor additions,
but in some ways, I'm taking them to the next level - first by adding some more
sophisticated conformal projections based on elliptic integrals, and now I've
given the formulas for maintaining the conformal property or the equal-area
property for the ellipsoid - just in the simplest fashion of replacing the
latitude with an equivalent spherical one. (The "authalic" latitude for equal-
area; no doubt it has a fancy name for conformal too, and I'll encounter it soon
enough.)

John Savard
Quadibloc
2019-08-14 03:55:41 UTC
Permalink
Incidentally, my favorite projection is Bartholomew's Regional Projection. Not the original version, as appeared in Bartholomew's Atlas of Advanced Geography,
but the modified version that appeared in the Times Atlas.

I have just learned that I have John Ian Bartholomew to thank for it. A snippet
view of a history of the Bartholomew cartographic dynasty noted an address one
John Bartholomew gave concerning the Atlantis and the Regional projections,
among others, and the map in the Times Atlas on the Atlantis projection -
available in the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection - notes its originator
as John Bartholomew, M. C., LL. D.; the honorary law degree was, I am confident,
an honor unique to that particular scion of the family.

John Savard
puppetsock
2019-08-14 20:39:46 UTC
Permalink
On Thursday, July 25, 2019 at 6:59:00 PM UTC-4, Quadibloc wrote:
[map projections]

What does Google Maps do?
Quadibloc
2019-08-14 22:59:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by puppetsock
What does Google Maps do?
They may have changed it, but my understanding is that they just show a normal Mercator projection (on the sphere, not the spheroid), scaled down so as not to be bigger in size as you look at places nearer the poles.

A very simplistic choice, but I think it's entirely accurate for their purpose.

John Savard
Alan Baker
2019-08-14 23:12:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by puppetsock
What does Google Maps do?
They may have changed it, but my understanding is that they just show a normal Mercator projection (on the sphere, not the spheroid), scaled down so as not to be bigger in size as you look at places nearer the poles.
A very simplistic choice, but I think it's entirely accurate for their purpose.
You are both conversing via this thing called "the internet", yes?

What else is available on "the internet"?

Google Maps!

So why are you speculating about what Google Maps does?

Why not just check for yourself?

<https://www.google.com/maps/@56.124368,-117.1687454,2.47z>
Quadibloc
2019-08-15 12:03:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Baker
You are both conversing via this thing called "the internet", yes?
What else is available on "the internet"?
Google Maps!
So why are you speculating about what Google Maps does?
Why not just check for yourself?
If I look at the Google Map telling me how to get to the nearest pharmacy, for
example, how would I be able to tell it wasn't a Plate Carree as opposed to a
Mercator? So on the Internet I *read* about what Google Maps does, but of
course, what I read comes from the past, and they could have updated later.

John Savard
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-15 19:17:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Alan Baker
You are both conversing via this thing called "the internet", yes?
What else is available on "the internet"?
Google Maps!
So why are you speculating about what Google Maps does?
Why not just check for yourself?
If I look at the Google Map telling me how to get to the nearest pharmacy, for
example, how would I be able to tell it wasn't a Plate Carree as opposed to a
Mercator? So on the Internet I *read* about what Google Maps does, but of
course, what I read comes from the past, and they could have updated later.
Well......

What I did was to open Google Maps, which by default showed me
about a square mile surrounding my house in Vallejo. I then hit
the minus sign in the lower right-hand corner, which caused the
map to pan outward till what I was seeing was a view of the
northwestern part of the Earth, as seen from way up high above
Vallejo.

I think I already explained this.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
David DeLaney
2019-08-15 20:22:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Alan Baker
So why are you speculating about what Google Maps does?
Why not just check for yourself?
If I look at the Google Map telling me how to get to the nearest pharmacy, for
example, how would I be able to tell it wasn't a Plate Carree as opposed to a
Mercator? So on the Internet I *read* about what Google Maps does, but of
course, what I read comes from the past, and they could have updated later.
I devoutly hope you are not trying to integrate four-dimensional Minkowski
geometry into your presumably-two-dimensional map projection schemata?

Dave, and do yours come with little pins showing where the nearest vat is, for
men feeling their testosterone may be trying to rear its ugly head? Public
service sort of thing, don't ya know

ps: and WHY does your editor manage to put a space on the end of every line you
post, anyway? We are not yet in the regime where whitespace is too cheap to
meter!!1!
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Jack Bohn
2019-08-16 12:29:26 UTC
Permalink
You are both conversing via this thing called "the internet", yes? 
What else is available on "the internet"? 
Google Maps! 
That reminds me that one of the "projects" while visiting my brother this summer was chopping down a tree. Has the satellite view updated, yet? No, it seems to be from Spring, or the Spring before.

(Street view? But I know what it looks like from ground level. Not updated either -- I suppose transitions between satellite photos aren't as jarring as between car photos, but has anybody scrolled across two satellite maps stitched together?)
--
-Jack
Jay E. Morris
2019-08-16 18:29:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Alan Baker
You are both conversing via this thing called "the internet", yes?
What else is available on "the internet"?
Google Maps!
That reminds me that one of the "projects" while visiting my brother this summer was chopping down a tree. Has the satellite view updated, yet? No, it seems to be from Spring, or the Spring before.
(Street view? But I know what it looks like from ground level. Not updated either -- I suppose transitions between satellite photos aren't as jarring as between car photos, but has anybody scrolled across two satellite maps stitched together?)
Way back when Terraserver was free I used it a lot to make topo maps
using satellite photos. You could tell that sections were taken
different times/days because of the differences in lighting, colors, and
cloud shadow (or lack there of). In a few cases a certain area might be
of a lower resolution than those around it.

But that was...15...years ago I think. Things may have gotten much better.

Not as jarring as some of the car photos though.
Peter Trei
2019-08-17 14:53:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jay E. Morris
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Alan Baker
You are both conversing via this thing called "the internet", yes?
What else is available on "the internet"?
Google Maps!
That reminds me that one of the "projects" while visiting my brother this summer was chopping down a tree. Has the satellite view updated, yet? No, it seems to be from Spring, or the Spring before.
(Street view? But I know what it looks like from ground level. Not updated either -- I suppose transitions between satellite photos aren't as jarring as between car photos, but has anybody scrolled across two satellite maps stitched together?)
Way back when Terraserver was free I used it a lot to make topo maps
using satellite photos. You could tell that sections were taken
different times/days because of the differences in lighting, colors, and
cloud shadow (or lack there of). In a few cases a certain area might be
of a lower resolution than those around it.
But that was...15...years ago I think. Things may have gotten much better.
Not as jarring as some of the car photos though.
If you look at Lake Pihkva, along the Estonia/Russia border, at certain scales,
most of the lake and shoreline show summer views, but some of it shows winter,
with the lake frozen and snow on the ground.

pt
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2019-08-17 16:30:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
If you look at Lake Pihkva, along the Estonia/Russia border, at certain scales,
most of the lake and shoreline show summer views, but some of it shows winter,
with the lake frozen and snow on the ground.
pt
The Great Flood of 2015 destroyed many local dams. If you look at an area
at some resolutions, you will see lakes. At others, you will see craters
with streams running through the middle..
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
David DeLaney
2019-08-17 18:32:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
Google Maps! 
That reminds me that one of the "projects" while visiting my brother this
summer was chopping down a tree. Has the satellite view updated, yet? No,
it seems to be from Spring, or the Spring before.
SF-y thing I was made aware of yesterday: how to locate yourself anywhere on
Earth to within a couple meters, with just three words -- what3words.com .

Dave, it has interesting possibilities for divinaton, cryptic geocaching, and
so much more, and the app itself doesn't need a phone signal to work
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Peter Trei
2019-08-31 02:03:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Jack Bohn
Google Maps! 
That reminds me that one of the "projects" while visiting my brother this
summer was chopping down a tree. Has the satellite view updated, yet? No,
it seems to be from Spring, or the Spring before.
SF-y thing I was made aware of yesterday: how to locate yourself anywhere on
Earth to within a couple meters, with just three words -- what3words.com .
Dave, it has interesting possibilities for divinaton, cryptic geocaching, and
so much more, and the app itself doesn't need a phone signal to work
Interesting, but I don't have much hopes of it catching on. If you need an app, you have a device that can handle traditional lat/long just as easily. I'm also guessing that its English-only.

BTW, to get this to work, they need 166,198 different words.

pt
m...k...@gmail.com
2019-08-31 13:53:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Jack Bohn
Google Maps! 
That reminds me that one of the "projects" while visiting my brother this
summer was chopping down a tree. Has the satellite view updated, yet? No,
it seems to be from Spring, or the Spring before.
SF-y thing I was made aware of yesterday: how to locate yourself anywhere on
Earth to within a couple meters, with just three words -- what3words.com .
Dave, it has interesting possibilities for divination, cryptic geocaching, and
so much more, and the app itself doesn't need a phone signal to work
Interesting, but I don't have much hopes of it catching on. If you need an app, you have a device that can handle traditional lat/long just as easily. I'm also guessing that its English-only.
BTW, to get this to work, they need 166,198 different words.
pt
IIRC, there are non-English word banks. I think it's better for areas without other addressing like refugee camps, rural areas, etc. Anyway, one issue that I've heard people complain about is that there's no pattern. Given one what3words string, you can't predict what any of the surrounding strings will be.

Melita
J. Clarke
2019-08-31 16:15:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Trei
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Jack Bohn
Google Maps! 
That reminds me that one of the "projects" while visiting my brother this
summer was chopping down a tree. Has the satellite view updated, yet? No,
it seems to be from Spring, or the Spring before.
SF-y thing I was made aware of yesterday: how to locate yourself anywhere on
Earth to within a couple meters, with just three words -- what3words.com .
Dave, it has interesting possibilities for divination, cryptic geocaching, and
so much more, and the app itself doesn't need a phone signal to work
Interesting, but I don't have much hopes of it catching on. If you need an app, you have a device that can handle traditional lat/long just as easily. I'm also guessing that its English-only.
BTW, to get this to work, they need 166,198 different words.
pt
IIRC, there are non-English word banks. I think it's better for areas without other addressing like refugee camps, rural areas, etc. Anyway, one issue that I've heard people complain about is that there's no pattern. Given one what3words string, you can't predict what any of the surrounding strings will be.
It makes no sense to me what purpose such a thing would serve. It has
a different three words for my front door and my side door.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Melita
Robert Carnegie
2019-09-01 15:48:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Trei
Post by David DeLaney
Post by Jack Bohn
Google Maps! 
That reminds me that one of the "projects" while visiting my brother this
summer was chopping down a tree. Has the satellite view updated, yet? No,
it seems to be from Spring, or the Spring before.
SF-y thing I was made aware of yesterday: how to locate yourself anywhere on
Earth to within a couple meters, with just three words -- what3words.com .
Dave, it has interesting possibilities for divination, cryptic geocaching, and
so much more, and the app itself doesn't need a phone signal to work
Interesting, but I don't have much hopes of it catching on. If you need an app, you have a device that can handle traditional lat/long just as easily. I'm also guessing that its English-only.
BTW, to get this to work, they need 166,198 different words.
pt
IIRC, there are non-English word banks. I think it's better for areas without other addressing like refugee camps, rural areas, etc. Anyway, one issue that I've heard people complain about is that there's no pattern. Given one what3words string, you can't predict what any of the surrounding strings will be.
It makes no sense to me what purpose such a thing would serve. It has
a different three words for my front door and my side door.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Melita
It's intentional that a nearly right address is not
anywhere near at all to the right address. I gather that
its backstory includes trying to meet people at specific
GPS coordinates, with one digit wrong leading to a
rendezvous failing by many miles.

And after all, your front door and your side door may be
in different streets, although if they are in different
cities then you may be in rather a troublesome storybook
- but I expect you know that already.

As a public boon, there is some concern that it's
commercial. But then... our United Kingdom postcodes
are copyright.
David DeLaney
2019-09-05 12:23:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Trei
Interesting, but I don't have much hopes of it catching on. If you need an
app, you have a device that can handle traditional lat/long just as easily.
I'm also guessing that its English-only.

English words, yes, but a lot of people can spell them out to their local
emergency folk. And it'll locate you to a much closer extent than ordinary
lat/long unless you're using fractions of a second of arc.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Trei
BTW, to get this to work, they need 166,198 different words.
The website says 40,000 or so in English. Cube root of 57 trillion ... my
virtual HP-41CX says that's 1,786.3 , so they've got way more than they need
even there.
Post by ***@gmail.com
IIRC, there are non-English word banks. I think it's better for areas without
other addressing like refugee camps, rural areas, etc. Anyway, one issue that
I've heard people complain about is that there's no pattern. Given one
what3words string, you can't predict what any of the surrounding strings will
be.

This is a feature, not a bug. It means that if the other end mishears one of
your three words, it's going to give a location that is CLEARLY quite wrong,
rather than being just a little away from you, so they'll know to confirm the
words they thought they had.

Dave, Earth does not need W3Wv4 yet
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-14 23:47:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by puppetsock
[map projections]
What does Google Maps do?
It doesn't show you the whole world. Just one hemisphere of the
planet, as viewed from directly above the place you started looking
at (in my case, Vallejo, California). With the result that North
America is shown as pretty much its correct shape, Greenland is
visible but rather distorted, and places like Russia and Europe
are names peeking over the edge of the planet.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Alan Baker
2019-08-15 00:02:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by puppetsock
[map projections]
What does Google Maps do?
It doesn't show you the whole world. Just one hemisphere of the
planet, as viewed from directly above the place you started looking
at (in my case, Vallejo, California). With the result that North
America is shown as pretty much its correct shape, Greenland is
visible but rather distorted, and places like Russia and Europe
are names peeking over the edge of the planet.
And imagine that...

You can't see everything on a sphere at once.
Peter Trei
2019-08-15 03:14:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by puppetsock
[map projections]
What does Google Maps do?
It doesn't show you the whole world. Just one hemisphere of the
planet, as viewed from directly above the place you started looking
at (in my case, Vallejo, California). With the result that North
America is shown as pretty much its correct shape, Greenland is
visible but rather distorted, and places like Russia and Europe
are names peeking over the edge of the planet.
Google Earth, on the other hand, shows you a globe, which you can spin
around to your heart's content. No projection.

pt
Robert Carnegie
2019-08-15 08:58:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by puppetsock
[map projections]
What does Google Maps do?
It doesn't show you the whole world. Just one hemisphere of the
planet, as viewed from directly above the place you started looking
at (in my case, Vallejo, California). With the result that North
America is shown as pretty much its correct shape, Greenland is
visible but rather distorted, and places like Russia and Europe
are names peeking over the edge of the planet.
Google Earth, on the other hand, shows you a globe, which you can spin
around to your heart's content. No projection.
Unless your computer or phone has an old-fashioned
two-dimensional screen.
Quadibloc
2019-08-15 12:01:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Google Earth, on the other hand, shows you a globe, which you can spin
around to your heart's content. No projection.
That's true - except, of course, since your computer's screen is two
dimensional, the orthographic projection, or even the vertical perspective
projection, is "really" involved.

As for Google Maps, if you zoom out, it now switches to a globe too, I remember
reading.

John Savard
Peter Trei
2019-08-15 15:57:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Peter Trei
Google Earth, on the other hand, shows you a globe, which you can spin
around to your heart's content. No projection.
That's true - except, of course, since your computer's screen is two
dimensional, the orthographic projection, or even the vertical perspective
projection, is "really" involved.
It's no more distorted than looking at a physical globe on the table in front of you (module stereo perception).

Pt
Dorothy J Heydt
2019-08-15 19:17:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Peter Trei
Google Earth, on the other hand, shows you a globe, which you can spin
around to your heart's content. No projection.
That's true - except, of course, since your computer's screen is two
dimensional, the orthographic projection, or even the vertical perspective
projection, is "really" involved.
As for Google Maps, if you zoom out, it now switches to a globe too, I remember
reading.
Yes, you read it here.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Quadibloc
2019-08-15 19:55:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
As for Google Maps, if you zoom out, it now switches to a globe too, I remember
reading.
Yes, you read it here.
I saw it before I saw your post that mentioned it. I was reading an article on
the web discussing how it was controversial that Google was using (shock,
horror) Mercator.

Presumably it would have been better, for a map on a large scale, for Google to
use the _transverse_ Mercator, computed for the ellipsoid? That would be just
silly for their application, even if that's what is used for large-scale paper
maps for good reason.

John Savard
Quadibloc
2019-08-15 19:57:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
As for Google Maps, if you zoom out, it now switches to a globe too, I remember
reading.
Yes, you read it here.
I saw it before I saw your post that mentioned it. I was reading an article on
the web discussing how it was controversial that Google was using (shock,
horror) Mercator.
Presumably it would have been better, for a map on a large scale, for Google to
use the _transverse_ Mercator, computed for the ellipsoid? That would be just
silly for their application, even if that's what is used for large-scale paper
maps for good reason.
It might have been one of these articles I had read:

https://www.theverge.com/2018/8/5/17653122/google-maps-update-mercator-projection-earth-isnt-flat

https://www.engadget.com/2018/08/03/google-maps-globe-mode/

Something like that had turned up as I was doing web searches about the
Transverse Mercator as I was working on the part of my web site about map
projections.

John Savard
m***@gmail.com
2019-08-15 22:13:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Quadibloc
As for Google Maps, if you zoom out, it now switches to a globe too, I remember
reading.
Yes, you read it here.
I saw it before I saw your post that mentioned it. I was reading an article on
the web discussing how it was controversial that Google was using (shock,
horror) Mercator.
Presumably it would have been better, for a map on a large scale, for Google to
use the _transverse_ Mercator, computed for the ellipsoid? That would be just
silly for their application, even if that's what is used for large-scale paper
maps for good reason.
John Savard
The spherical equations for Mercator are dead simple so it's fast. It's also quasi-conformal (quasi because on a major auxiliary sphere rather than an ellipsoid) which means angles/shapes are maintained. That's useful for right-angled buildings and intersections.

They cropped it at around 82° North and South so that they ended up with a lovely square--easy to index. That might be why they used Mercator versus another world map. Just about every other world map with straight edges is a rectangle.

Melita
Quadibloc
2019-08-15 23:28:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
They cropped it at around 82° North and South so that they ended up with a
lovely square--easy to index. That might be why they used Mercator versus
another world map. Just about every other world map with straight edges is a
rectangle.
True, but I would have thought it would have been the _last_ of their reasons.

If they used a Plate Carree, I figured they'd have to use a _different_ Plate
Carree depending on the latitude of the area being displayed - the little area
on the screen should look like the area on the Earth being shown. So if instead
the intent is to use only one projection without alteration... well, the spec
then _defines_ the Mercator as the answer, the only conformal projection with
North at the top everywhere. No stretching, no rotation, every place on Earth
except the poles just comes out right. The only thing that has to be adjusted is
the scale bar.

John Savard
Torbjorn Lindgren
2019-08-15 12:01:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by puppetsock
[map projections]
What does Google Maps do?
It doesn't show you the whole world. Just one hemisphere of the
planet, as viewed from directly above the place you started looking
Actually, it's a "depends".

Google Maps on Chrome browser on a desktop/laptop the default is
(usually!) "Globe" mode but it can be toggled off to show the Mercator
projection. This "3D Globe Mode" was introduced in 2018[1] and at the
lowest zoom you see a globe showing half the earth (movable &
spinnable as always with click-n-drag).

On mobile, apps and desktop with non-Chrome based browsers it still
use their traditional mapping (Mercator). In most cases this will
actually show more of the earth at the lowest zoom level than the 3D
Globe Model.

1. https://www.theverge.com/2018/8/5/17653122/google-maps-update-mercator-projection-earth-isnt-flat
Quadibloc
2019-08-15 13:16:03 UTC
Permalink
This discussion about map projections led me to recgnize an additional reason why the Mercator projection was so popular. What the Mercator projection did for Google Maps, it could do for wall maps!

A wall map on the Mercator projection that is detailed - with a lot of cities shown, their names printed in sufficiently small type that, of course, you couldn't possibly read them when standing far enough away to see the whole map...

lets you walk up close to it, and see a map of France or Switzerland, say, that is a reasonably decent map of France or Switzerland with north at the top.

So *one wall map* could take the place of an atlas for every student!! Back in, say, the Victorian era, where fancy color printing was *expensive*, this would be an important consideration. And the Mercator really is the only projection where the map can be an atlas all by itself. Well, maybe you would want an inset map of Antarctica...

John Savard
David DeLaney
2019-08-15 20:18:15 UTC
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Post by puppetsock
[map projections]
What does Google Maps do?
I don't want to hear the sound-effect from that song's chorus in my head any
more, thanks.

Dave, will mash up icosahedra and mildly oblate spheroids for celestial music
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Quadibloc
2019-08-15 23:32:11 UTC
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Post by David DeLaney
Post by puppetsock
What does Google Maps do?
I don't want to hear the sound-effect from that song's chorus in my head any
more, thanks.
Only one candidate match has come up in initial processing, and it does not have
a distinctive sound effect associated with it. Although some might find the
general subject of the song questionable under modern sensibilities.

John Savard
David DeLaney
2019-08-16 03:41:22 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by David DeLaney
Post by puppetsock
What does Google Maps do?
I don't want to hear the sound-effect from that song's chorus in my head any
more, thanks.
Only one candidate match has come up in initial processing, and it does not have
a distinctive sound effect associated with it. Although some might find the
general subject of the song questionable under modern sensibilities.
Try matching "What does the __blank__ say?"

Dave, or don't
--
\/David DeLaney posting thru EarthLink - "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
my gatekeeper archives are no longer accessible :( / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.
Quadibloc
2019-08-16 03:49:38 UTC
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Post by David DeLaney
Dave, or don't
Other than I'm sure it isn't the Woggle-Bug, I have no clue.

John Savard
Robert Carnegie
2019-08-16 09:36:10 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by David DeLaney
Dave, or don't
Other than I'm sure it isn't the Woggle-Bug, I have no clue.
John Savard
"Dog goes "woof"
Cat goes "meow"
Bird goes "tweet"
And mouse goes "squeek"
Cow goes "moo"
Frog goes "croak"
And the elephant goes "toot"
...
"But there's one sound
That no one knows"
....
Quadibloc
2019-08-16 10:49:25 UTC
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Post by Robert Carnegie
...
"But there's one sound
That no one knows"
....
The sound of the Who that Horton heard? This rings no bells for me.

But thank you anyways.

John Savard
Quadibloc
2019-08-16 10:54:50 UTC
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Post by Quadibloc
Post by Robert Carnegie
...
"But there's one sound
That no one knows"
....
The sound of the Who that Horton heard? This rings no bells for me.
But thank you anyways.
Of course, while there are many things I do not know, Google still knows them.
So I see it's from a popular music video about the sound of the fox... from a
musical group called Ylvis.

Apparently, the name comes from the surnames of the duo rather than being a
reference to one Elvis Presley.

John Savard
Quadibloc
2019-08-30 20:33:49 UTC
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Here's a much later xkcd comic about map projections...

https://xkcd.com/2082/

John Savard
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