Discussion:
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
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Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-21 20:05:13 UTC
Permalink
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith

This is the second version of E. E. Smith's _Triplanetary_. The
first version, originally serialized in the 1930s, did not tie into
Smith's "Lensman" series. For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started. He also lightly edited the novel to make
clear that while everybody assumed the villian was just a space
pirate (as he legitimately was in the first version), he was really
an agent of Eddore posing as a space pirate.

Both the original version and this revised version are available
on Project Gutenberg for free.

As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
Jack Bohn
2020-03-22 14:33:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it was like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through _Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
--
-Jack
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-22 14:57:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and
future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it was
like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting
three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways
into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through
_Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
There were arguments for YEARS on this group over which was
better: to read the Lensman series in internal chronological
order, beginning with _Triplanetary,_ or to read them in order of
original publication, beginning with _Galactic Patrol._

As it happened, back in the 1960s somebody (Pyramid?) issued them
all as a set, and somebody lent me the set, and so I began with
_Triplanetary._ That is still the order in which I still reread
them.

Maybe, as we (however many of us) sit inside self-quarantining,
we'll drag out and reread the whole series (you *did* keep them all,
didn't you?) and the argument will start up again.

In which case I may dig out the sequence (still saved to disk) in
which I made my case, and Sea Wasp put on his Arisian hat and we
discussed it in character.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Magewolf
2020-03-22 17:43:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and
future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it was
like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting
three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways
into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through
_Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
There were arguments for YEARS on this group over which was
better: to read the Lensman series in internal chronological
order, beginning with _Triplanetary,_ or to read them in order of
original publication, beginning with _Galactic Patrol._
As it happened, back in the 1960s somebody (Pyramid?) issued them
all as a set, and somebody lent me the set, and so I began with
_Triplanetary._ That is still the order in which I still reread
them.
Maybe, as we (however many of us) sit inside self-quarantining,
we'll drag out and reread the whole series (you *did* keep them all,
didn't you?) and the argument will start up again.
In which case I may dig out the sequence (still saved to disk) in
which I made my case, and Sea Wasp put on his Arisian hat and we
discussed it in character.
Well Triplanetary and First Lensman are the weakest books in the series
so starting there has always struck me as a bad idea.

Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
m***@sky.com
2020-03-22 18:11:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and
future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it was
like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting
three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways
into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through
_Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
There were arguments for YEARS on this group over which was
better: to read the Lensman series in internal chronological
order, beginning with _Triplanetary,_ or to read them in order of
original publication, beginning with _Galactic Patrol._
As it happened, back in the 1960s somebody (Pyramid?) issued them
all as a set, and somebody lent me the set, and so I began with
_Triplanetary._ That is still the order in which I still reread
them.
Maybe, as we (however many of us) sit inside self-quarantining,
we'll drag out and reread the whole series (you *did* keep them all,
didn't you?) and the argument will start up again.
In which case I may dig out the sequence (still saved to disk) in
which I made my case, and Sea Wasp put on his Arisian hat and we
discussed it in character.
Well Triplanetary and First Lensman are the weakest books in the series
so starting there has always struck me as a bad idea.
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
I liked the brief look at Atlantis in Triplanetary
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2020-03-22 19:25:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and
future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it was
like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting
three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways
into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through
_Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
There were arguments for YEARS on this group over which was
better: to read the Lensman series in internal chronological
order, beginning with _Triplanetary,_ or to read them in order of
original publication, beginning with _Galactic Patrol._
As it happened, back in the 1960s somebody (Pyramid?) issued them
all as a set, and somebody lent me the set, and so I began with
_Triplanetary._ That is still the order in which I still reread
them.
Maybe, as we (however many of us) sit inside self-quarantining,
we'll drag out and reread the whole series (you *did* keep them all,
didn't you?) and the argument will start up again.
In which case I may dig out the sequence (still saved to disk) in
which I made my case, and Sea Wasp put on his Arisian hat and we
discussed it in character.
Well Triplanetary and First Lensman are the weakest books in the series
so starting there has always struck me as a bad idea.
Awful as a first-time read.

Re-reading it that was is quite fun though. Can't for the life of me remember
details, but there's definitely some entertainment value in knowing things in
the 'wrong' order by reading the books in internal chronology rather than
publication.
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
I ain't disagreeing.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye. Then it's a scavenger hunt.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2020-03-22 20:05:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
My Visualization disagrees with yours on this, youth.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Robert Woodward
2020-03-23 04:49:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
My Visualization disagrees with yours on this, youth.
Young man, the best I can say about _First Lensman_ is that it isn't as
bad as _Subspace Explorers_.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2020-03-24 02:20:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
My Visualization disagrees with yours on this, youth.
Young man, the best I can say about _First Lensman_ is that it isn't as
bad as _Subspace Explorers_.
There speaks the callowness of youth; the tragic inability to
comprehend the depths of one's utter incapacity to grasp even the most
basic of truths. KNOW, YOUTH, THAT IT WAS INEVITABLE -- IT WAS
*NECESSARY* -- THAT THE HISTORIAN OF CIVILIZATION RECORD THE MOMENTS
THAT BIRTHED THAT CIVILIZATION. Those who read the record -- dramatized
though it was -- of the actions of Kimball Kinnison and those near to
and affected by him, including those who would become the next Guardians
of Civilization, will have found within those pages references that
would remain obscure to those whose minds had not yet reached the Third
Stage of Development. As those records were meant for many who would not
yet have attained that stage, even a mind of very moderate power can
Visualize the need to provide an account of that most crucial and
delicate moment in the history of two Galaxies, the coming together of
the plans of Arisia and the machinations of Eddore in such a fashion as
to produce, not ruin, but the genesis of the Civilization that would one
day bring down the oppressive and cruel reign of Eddore and her puppets.
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-24 02:56:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
My Visualization disagrees with yours on this, youth.
Young man, the best I can say about _First Lensman_ is that it isn't as
bad as _Subspace Explorers_.
There speaks the callowness of youth; the tragic inability to
comprehend the depths of one's utter incapacity to grasp even the most
basic of truths. KNOW, YOUTH, THAT IT WAS INEVITABLE -- IT WAS
*NECESSARY* -- THAT THE HISTORIAN OF CIVILIZATION RECORD THE MOMENTS
THAT BIRTHED THAT CIVILIZATION. Those who read the record -- dramatized
though it was -- of the actions of Kimball Kinnison and those near to
and affected by him, including those who would become the next Guardians
of Civilization, will have found within those pages references that
would remain obscure to those whose minds had not yet reached the Third
Stage of Development. As those records were meant for many who would not
yet have attained that stage, even a mind of very moderate power can
Visualize the need to provide an account of that most crucial and
delicate moment in the history of two Galaxies, the coming together of
the plans of Arisia and the machinations of Eddore in such a fashion as
to produce, not ruin, but the genesis of the Civilization that would one
day bring down the oppressive and cruel reign of Eddore and her puppets.
As usual, _acu tetigisti._
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Juho Julkunen
2020-04-02 03:22:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
My Visualization disagrees with yours on this, youth.
Young man, the best I can say about _First Lensman_ is that it isn't as
bad as _Subspace Explorers_.
Why are you ragging on _Subspace Explorers_? At least it isn't as bad as
_The Galaxy Primes_.

Right, did _First Lensman_ also feature vigorous union busting?
--
Juho Julkunen
Or _Subspace Encounters_, for that matter.
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-04-02 03:48:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
My Visualization disagrees with yours on this, youth.
Young man, the best I can say about _First Lensman_ is that it isn't as
bad as _Subspace Explorers_.
Why are you ragging on _Subspace Explorers_? At least it isn't as bad as
_The Galaxy Primes_.
Right, did _First Lensman_ also feature vigorous union busting?
Dunno; I've never read either of those.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Robert Woodward
2020-04-02 05:18:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
My Visualization disagrees with yours on this, youth.
Young man, the best I can say about _First Lensman_ is that it isn't as
bad as _Subspace Explorers_.
Why are you ragging on _Subspace Explorers_? At least it isn't as bad as
_The Galaxy Primes_.
IMHO, books where an author is copying himself badly are worse than
books where the author is copying someone else badly.
Post by Juho Julkunen
Right, did _First Lensman_ also feature vigorous union busting?
I don't remember any such actions, however I did read it a long time ago.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
-------------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Johnny1A
2020-04-06 05:43:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Robert Woodward
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by Magewolf
Honestly First Lensman can be skipped all together if you want. At
least the non-connecting parts of Triplanetary can be interesting.
First Lensman on the other hand has almost no reason to exist.
My Visualization disagrees with yours on this, youth.
Young man, the best I can say about _First Lensman_ is that it isn't as
bad as _Subspace Explorers_.
Why are you ragging on _Subspace Explorers_? At least it isn't as bad as
_The Galaxy Primes_.
IMHO, books where an author is copying himself badly are worse than
books where the author is copying someone else badly.
Post by Juho Julkunen
Right, did _First Lensman_ also feature vigorous union busting?
I don't remember any such actions, however I did read it a long time ago.
No, in the entire _Lensman_ series Smith confined himself to a single brief and reasonable-in-context commentary from Port Admiral Haynes about the virtues of libertarian-style economics.

_Subspace Explorers_ is not all bad. Some parts of it are interesting. Unfortunately, right wing wish-fulfilment fantasy is just about as boring as left-wing wish fulfilment fantasy, and _Subspace Explorers_ is packed with RWWF.
Kevrob
2020-04-06 12:17:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Johnny1A
No, in the entire _Lensman_ series Smith confined himself to a single brief and reasonable-in-context commentary from Port Admiral Haynes about the virtues of libertarian-style economics.
OTOH, those authoritarians and their leader in feldgrau
persecuted the honest merchants of agricultural products
from Trenco.....

--
Kevin R
a.a #2310

Quadibloc
2020-03-22 21:52:05 UTC
Permalink
I know that I has bought the Pyramid editions, and found the book an enjoyable
read, even if not perfect in all respects.

Not everyone, though, is as tolerant of the weaknesses of classic space opera, or
seeks entertaining light reading of that sort avidly enough, so I can understand
it won't work for everyone.

John Savard
Jack Bohn
2020-03-22 21:56:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and
future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, then it was
like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting
three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways
into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through
_Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
There were arguments for YEARS on this group over which was
better: to read the Lensman series in internal chronological
order, beginning with _Triplanetary,_ or to read them in order of
original publication, beginning with _Galactic Patrol._
Maybe, as we (however many of us) sit inside self-quarantining,
we'll drag out and reread the whole series (you *did* keep them all,
didn't you?) and the argument will start up again.
I'd _thought_ so. The paperback is here, but the SFBC edition is not where it should be on the shelves.

Well, it's time for the 2018 spring cleaning, anyway.
--
-Jack
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-03-22 18:01:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and
future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it was
like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting
three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways
into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through
_Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
--
-Jack
Love that "bootstraping" sequence in IPC!

Anyway, _Galactic Patrol_ is the way the series was originally introduced,
so yeah, give it a try.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
David Johnston
2020-03-26 02:20:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it was like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through _Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
Triplanetary is very much worth skipping. It adds nothing to the
Lensman series.
Johnny1A
2020-03-26 02:35:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it was like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC collecting three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't get any ways into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got through _Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
Triplanetary is very much worth skipping. It adds nothing to the
Lensman series.
It does give a bit of a sense of how far back the backstory goes...and the stakes as one civilization after another goes crashing down because the Arisians need more time.
Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
2020-03-30 21:37:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and
future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it
was like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC
collecting three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't
get any ways into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got
through _Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
Triplanetary is very much worth skipping. It adds nothing to the
Lensman series.
Must I call Mentor out again? He's got other things to do!
--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Website: http://www.grandcentralarena.com Blog:
http://seawasp.dreamwidth.org
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-03-30 22:51:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by David Johnston
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started.
...
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
I got an old paperback as a youth, I read the historical and
future-historical stuff up to the beginning of the original, the it
was like I hit a brick wall. Later I got a volume from SFBC
collecting three of the books, and tried _First Lensman_, but didn't
get any ways into it. Maybe I should try _Galactic Patrol_? I got
through _Spacehounds of IPC_ fine.
Triplanetary is very much worth skipping. It adds nothing to the
Lensman series.
Must I call Mentor out again? He's got other things to do!
Since he's busy, I'll repost the exchange we had a while ago
(when the galaxies were further apart).
Post by Sea Wasp (Ryk E. Spoor)
Post by David Johnston
Post by Jack Bohn
But ... the unraveling of what is behind Boskone, and what is
behind THAT, may be a slow unveiling of mystery upon mystery
to Kinnison (who in fact never learns the final truth at all),
but it needn't be a mystery to us, the students of the History
of Civilization.
It is even so, Dorothy Heydt of Tellus. More, it is a trivial
exercise for even the most moderate intellect to comprehend,
should it be so desired, the revelations experienced by those stalwart
defenders of Civilization, without ourselves being mystified.
To think otherwise >would be the same as to insist that no pain or
joy could be understood, save only by experiencing it directly.
I thank you, Sea Wasp of Arisia, for your encouraging words.
While my Visualization of the Cosmic All can never rise beyond
the novice level, given the short lifespan within which I must
develop it, I still have attained (to a limited degree) the
ability to see that History as a whole, its end and its beginning
arrayed before me like so many pages upon a scroll that has now
been fully unrolled for my perusal.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Johnny1A
2020-03-24 05:25:43 UTC
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Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
053 Triplanetary (The Lensman Series Book 1) by E. E. "Doc" Smith
This is the second version of E. E. Smith's _Triplanetary_. The
first version, originally serialized in the 1930s, did not tie into
Smith's "Lensman" series. For this revision, he wrote some
introductory chapters narating the clash of Arisa and Eddore since
the long ago collision of two galaxies up to the point where the
novel originally started. He also lightly edited the novel to make
clear that while everybody assumed the villian was just a space
pirate (as he legitimately was in the first version), he was really
an agent of Eddore posing as a space pirate.
Both the original version and this revised version are available
on Project Gutenberg for free.
As for the book itself, this is a classic space opera, from the
author who practically created the genre. Don't expect deep
characterization here or modern attitudes, but the story moves right
along.
To my mind, an interesting aspect of _Triplanetary_ and FL (and to a lesser degree the whole series, but it's most visible in _Triplanetary_) is the almost Lovecraftian overtones of the setting and series.

I didn't perceive this when I first read the series ( read in it in order from _Triplanetary_ to _Children of the Lens_, except that I read _Second Stage Lensman_ after Children) as a mid-teen. Rereading as an adult, I could see it, though.

From the POV of a normal, ordinary L0 mind on Earth, Velantia, etc., if they knew about the L3 races, would likely see _both_ the Eddorians and the Arisians as demonic. It's all very well that the Arisians have the long-term good of the various _species_ in mind, but that's thin consolation to an Atlantean watching the world crash back to the Bronze Age, an 20C Tellurian watching nuclear bombs burn the cities, a Roman enduring Nero, or a Velantian in the claws of the Delgonians.

From their perspective, if they knew the truth, it would appear that the Universe was ruled by two races of gods, one incomparably malevolent and one callously indifferent. The Arisians are not, in fact, actually indifferent, but it would certainly look that way from far below.
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