Discussion:
“The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and Plastic Sensors”
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Lynn McGuire
2018-11-28 20:15:25 UTC
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“The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and Plastic
Sensors”

https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-internet-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensors

“The year is 2028. It’s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and you’re famished.
You’re staring wistfully at the only remaining item in your
refrigerator: a package of sausages with an unappetizing grayish hue.
Ugh. Did they always look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In
2018, you’d have to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But
in 2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package’s embedded sensor, which measures
the concentration of gases associated with meat decomposition. The
smartphone displays the message “Safe to eat within the next 20 hours,”
and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry
to bother with the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package—along with its sensor
technology.”

Yup, I can see this.

Lynn
Juho Julkunen
2018-11-28 20:24:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and Plastic
Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-internet-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensors
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and you?re famished.
You?re staring wistfully at the only remaining item in your
refrigerator: a package of sausages with an unappetizing grayish hue.
Ugh. Did they always look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In
2018, you?d have to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But
in 2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which measures
the concentration of gases associated with meat decomposition. The
smartphone displays the message ?Safe to eat within the next 20 hours,?
and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry
to bother with the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its sensor
technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
--
Juho Julkunen
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-28 20:49:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and Plastic
Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-internet-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensors
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and you?re famished.
You?re staring wistfully at the only remaining item in your
refrigerator: a package of sausages with an unappetizing grayish hue.
Ugh. Did they always look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In
2018, you?d have to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But
in 2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which measures
the concentration of gases associated with meat decomposition. The
smartphone displays the message ?Safe to eat within the next 20 hours,?
and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry
to bother with the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its sensor
technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
That gets added in the 2029 model year refrigerators.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-28 20:51:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and
Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-internet-
of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensors
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and you?re
famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only remaining item
in your refrigerator: a package of sausages with an
unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look like that?
Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have to rely on your
sense of smell and take a gamble. But in 2028, you might simply
wave your smartphone over the package. The smartphone
interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which measures the
concentration of gases associated with meat decomposition. The
smartphone displays the message ?Safe to eat within the next 20
hours,? and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with
sausages. Too hungry to bother with the recipes, you tear open
the package, toss the sausages into a frying pan, and discard
the package?along with its sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
I would think that the package would have a sensor that would
actually measure any decomposition toxins inside the package,
powered by the refrigerator light coming on.

This "wave the smart phone" thing seems outdated and archaic.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Peter Trei
2018-11-28 23:06:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and
Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-internet-
of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensors
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and you?re
famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only remaining item
in your refrigerator: a package of sausages with an
unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look like that?
Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have to rely on your
sense of smell and take a gamble. But in 2028, you might simply
wave your smartphone over the package. The smartphone
interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which measures the
concentration of gases associated with meat decomposition. The
smartphone displays the message ?Safe to eat within the next 20
hours,? and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with
sausages. Too hungry to bother with the recipes, you tear open
the package, toss the sausages into a frying pan, and discard
the package?along with its sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
I would think that the package would have a sensor that would
actually measure any decomposition toxins inside the package,
powered by the refrigerator light coming on.
This "wave the smart phone" thing seems outdated and archaic.
Actually, I can imagine this. I'm assuming we have something a bit more
sophisticated than a chemical patch that changes color, but less than a
complex and expensive device with a display and battery.

If the sensor in the package was essentially passive and unpowered,
it could look like an RFID from a communications standpoint. Bring your
phone with its near-field communications turned on up to it, and it could
power the sensor enough to do its operations, and transmit data back to the
phone, which displays it.

pt
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-28 22:22:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 4:51:26 PM UTC-5, Jibini Kula
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and
Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-intern
et-
of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensor
s
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages
with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look
like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have
to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But in
2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the
package. The smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded
sensor, which measures the concentration of gases associated
with meat decomposition. The smartphone displays the message
?Safe to eat within the next 20 hours,? and then offers a
list of recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry to
bother with the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the
sausages into a frying pan, and discard the package?along
with its sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
I would think that the package would have a sensor that would
actually measure any decomposition toxins inside the package,
powered by the refrigerator light coming on.
This "wave the smart phone" thing seems outdated and archaic.
Actually, I can imagine this. I'm assuming we have something a
bit more sophisticated than a chemical patch that changes color,
but less than a complex and expensive device with a display and
battery.
If the sensor in the package was essentially passive and
unpowered, it could look like an RFID from a communications
standpoint. Bring your phone with its near-field communications
turned on up to it, and it could power the sensor enough to do
its operations, and transmit data back to the phone, which
displays it.
It's still easier, and more reliable, for the refrigerator to
handle it. You can go to the refrigerator while leaving your phone
in the other room, but it's hard to go to the refrigerator without
the refrigerator. Plus, the refrigerator could easily include
little spotlights to highlight a) the food that's expired, or b)
all of the needed ingredients for tonight's entree. Or c) both,
using different colors.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-28 23:30:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and Plastic
Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-internet-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensors
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and you?re famished.
You?re staring wistfully at the only remaining item in your
refrigerator: a package of sausages with an unappetizing grayish hue.
Ugh. Did they always look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In
2018, you?d have to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But
in 2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which measures
the concentration of gases associated with meat decomposition. The
smartphone displays the message ?Safe to eat within the next 20 hours,?
and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry
to bother with the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its sensor
technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought four
refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the refrigerators were
killed by an invasion of roof rats into the house. They really like to
nest under the fridge and chew the wiring insulation. I killed four of
them in excruciating ways and they got the message.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2018-11-28 23:37:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and Plastic
Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-internet-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensors
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and you?re famished.
You?re staring wistfully at the only remaining item in your
refrigerator: a package of sausages with an unappetizing grayish hue.
Ugh. Did they always look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In
2018, you?d have to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But
in 2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which measures
the concentration of gases associated with meat decomposition. The
smartphone displays the message ?Safe to eat within the next 20 hours,?
and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry
to bother with the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its sensor
technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought four
refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the refrigerators were
killed by an invasion of roof rats into the house. They really like to
nest under the fridge and chew the wiring insulation. I killed four of
them in excruciating ways and they got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the norm.
Post by Lynn McGuire
Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-28 22:41:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and
Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-interne
t-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-senso
rs
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages
with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look
like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have to
rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But in 2028,
you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which
measures the concentration of gases associated with meat
decomposition. The smartphone displays the message ?Safe to
eat within the next 20 hours,? and then offers a list of
recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry to bother with
the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its
sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought four
refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the refrigerators
were killed by an invasion of roof rats into the house. They
really like to nest under the fridge and chew the wiring
insulation. I killed four of them in excruciating ways and they
got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the norm.
And more to the point, there might not be a lot of choice.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-29 02:08:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and
Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-interne
t-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-senso
rs
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages
with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look
like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have to
rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But in 2028,
you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which
measures the concentration of gases associated with meat
decomposition. The smartphone displays the message ?Safe to
eat within the next 20 hours,? and then offers a list of
recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry to bother with
the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its
sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought four
refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the refrigerators
were killed by an invasion of roof rats into the house. They
really like to nest under the fridge and chew the wiring
insulation. I killed four of them in excruciating ways and they
got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the norm.
And more to the point, there might not be a lot of choice.
There will always be the nothing special low-priced refrigerator type
that I buy. I paid $900 (including delivery and setup) for the
Frigidaire 25 ft3 kitchen side by side and considered that to be
over-priced. It does have an ice maker though. They also hauled off
the old dead refrigerator that the roof rat electrocuted himself on as a
part of the deal.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2018-11-29 03:02:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 20:08:39 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and
Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-interne
t-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-senso
rs
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages
with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look
like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have to
rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But in 2028,
you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which
measures the concentration of gases associated with meat
decomposition. The smartphone displays the message ?Safe to
eat within the next 20 hours,? and then offers a list of
recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry to bother with
the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its
sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought four
refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the refrigerators
were killed by an invasion of roof rats into the house. They
really like to nest under the fridge and chew the wiring
insulation. I killed four of them in excruciating ways and they
got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the norm.
And more to the point, there might not be a lot of choice.
There will always be the nothing special low-priced refrigerator type
that I buy. I paid $900 (including delivery and setup) for the
Frigidaire 25 ft3 kitchen side by side and considered that to be
over-priced. It does have an ice maker though. They also hauled off
the old dead refrigerator that the roof rat electrocuted himself on as a
part of the deal.
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can tax us
accordingly.
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-29 03:26:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 20:08:39 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and
Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-interne
t-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-senso
rs
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages
with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look
like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have to
rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But in 2028,
you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which
measures the concentration of gases associated with meat
decomposition. The smartphone displays the message ?Safe to
eat within the next 20 hours,? and then offers a list of
recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry to bother with
the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its
sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought four
refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the refrigerators
were killed by an invasion of roof rats into the house. They
really like to nest under the fridge and chew the wiring
insulation. I killed four of them in excruciating ways and they
got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the norm.
And more to the point, there might not be a lot of choice.
There will always be the nothing special low-priced refrigerator type
that I buy. I paid $900 (including delivery and setup) for the
Frigidaire 25 ft3 kitchen side by side and considered that to be
over-priced. It does have an ice maker though. They also hauled off
the old dead refrigerator that the roof rat electrocuted himself on as a
part of the deal.
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can tax us
accordingly.
They will have to regulate all of the TexMex restaurants in Texas also.
They all buy lard by the five gallon bucket. Not gonna happen.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2018-11-29 03:54:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 21:26:20 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 20:08:39 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and
Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-interne
t-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-senso
rs
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages
with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look
like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have to
rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But in 2028,
you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded sensor, which
measures the concentration of gases associated with meat
decomposition. The smartphone displays the message ?Safe to
eat within the next 20 hours,? and then offers a list of
recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry to bother with
the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package?along with its
sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought four
refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the refrigerators
were killed by an invasion of roof rats into the house. They
really like to nest under the fridge and chew the wiring
insulation. I killed four of them in excruciating ways and they
got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the norm.
And more to the point, there might not be a lot of choice.
There will always be the nothing special low-priced refrigerator type
that I buy. I paid $900 (including delivery and setup) for the
Frigidaire 25 ft3 kitchen side by side and considered that to be
over-priced. It does have an ice maker though. They also hauled off
the old dead refrigerator that the roof rat electrocuted himself on as a
part of the deal.
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can tax us
accordingly.
They will have to regulate all of the TexMex restaurants in Texas also.
They all buy lard by the five gallon bucket. Not gonna happen.
You put far too much trust in the gummint.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-11-29 15:12:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 21:26:20 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 20:08:39 -0600, Lynn McGuire
On 11/28/2018 4:41 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper
and Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-in
terne
t-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-
senso rs
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of
sausages with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they
always look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In
2018, you?d have to rely on your sense of smell and take
a gamble. But in 2028, you might simply wave your
smartphone over the package. The smartphone interrogates
the package?s embedded sensor, which measures the
concentration of gases associated with meat
decomposition. The smartphone displays the message ?Safe
to eat within the next 20 hours,? and then offers a list
of recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry to
bother with the recipes, you tear open the package, toss
the sausages into a frying pan, and discard the
package?along with its sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a
superfluous step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or
the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have
bought four refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of
the refrigerators were killed by an invasion of roof rats
into the house. They really like to nest under the fridge
and chew the wiring insulation. I killed four of them in
excruciating ways and they got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the norm.
And more to the point, there might not be a lot of choice.
There will always be the nothing special low-priced
refrigerator type that I buy. I paid $900 (including
delivery and setup) for the Frigidaire 25 ft3 kitchen side by
side and considered that to be over-priced. It does have an
ice maker though. They also hauled off the old dead
refrigerator that the roof rat electrocuted himself on as a
part of the deal.
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can
tax us accordingly.
They will have to regulate all of the TexMex restaurants in
Texas also. They all buy lard by the five gallon bucket. Not
gonna happen.
You put far too much trust in the gummint.
And you put far too much trust in internet conspiracy theories.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Titus G
2018-11-29 06:57:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
snip
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can tax us
accordingly.
They will have to regulate all of the TexMex restaurants in Texas also.
They all buy lard by the five gallon bucket.  Not gonna happen.
Lynn
I heard that, after Alaska, Texas is the most obese state, that, before
Alaskans, Texans are the most obese of all states, that a 58 year old
had hours of heart surgery 9 years after a previous heart attack, nah,
not gonna happen, it was do-gooders that ate the wiring under my
refrigerators leaving me with only a single package of flood-drowned cow
sausages of dubious vintage after a hard day in the cargo hold
freighting more of those damned space umbrellas. One of these days, I'm
going to pop that open button.
Peter Trei
2018-11-29 15:14:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can tax us
accordingly.
They will have to regulate all of the TexMex restaurants in Texas also.
They all buy lard by the five gallon bucket.  Not gonna happen.
Lynn
I heard that, after Alaska, Texas is the most obese state, that, before
Alaskans, Texans are the most obese of all states, that a 58 year old
had hours of heart surgery 9 years after a previous heart attack, nah,
not gonna happen, it was do-gooders that ate the wiring under my
refrigerators leaving me with only a single package of flood-drowned cow
sausages of dubious vintage after a hard day in the cargo hold
freighting more of those damned space umbrellas. One of these days, I'm
going to pop that open button.
As always:

https://xkcd.com/1109/

pt
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-29 19:41:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Trei
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can tax us
accordingly.
They will have to regulate all of the TexMex restaurants in Texas also.
They all buy lard by the five gallon bucket.  Not gonna happen.
Lynn
I heard that, after Alaska, Texas is the most obese state, that, before
Alaskans, Texans are the most obese of all states, that a 58 year old
had hours of heart surgery 9 years after a previous heart attack, nah,
not gonna happen, it was do-gooders that ate the wiring under my
refrigerators leaving me with only a single package of flood-drowned cow
sausages of dubious vintage after a hard day in the cargo hold
freighting more of those damned space umbrellas. One of these days, I'm
going to pop that open button.
https://xkcd.com/1109/
pt
Cool !

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2018-11-29 19:40:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
snip
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by J. Clarke
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can tax us
accordingly.
They will have to regulate all of the TexMex restaurants in Texas
also. They all buy lard by the five gallon bucket.  Not gonna happen.
Lynn
I heard that, after Alaska, Texas is the most obese state, that, before
Alaskans, Texans are the most obese of all states, that a 58 year old
had hours of heart surgery 9 years after a previous heart attack, nah,
not gonna happen, it was do-gooders that ate the wiring under my
refrigerators leaving me with only a single package of flood-drowned cow
sausages of dubious vintage after a hard day in the cargo hold
freighting more of those damned space umbrellas. One of these days, I'm
going to pop that open button.
Sorry uncaring dude, my heart issues are due to a congenital condition
of a missing right coronary artery.

Lynn
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-29 03:45:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 20:08:39 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper
and Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-inte
rne
t-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-se
nso rs
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages
with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always
look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d
have to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But
in 2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the
package. The smartphone interrogates the package?s
embedded sensor, which measures the concentration of gases
associated with meat decomposition. The smartphone
displays the message ?Safe to eat within the next 20
hours,? and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with
sausages. Too hungry to bother with the recipes, you tear
open the package, toss the sausages into a frying pan, and
discard the package?along with its sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a
superfluous step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or
the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought
four refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the
refrigerators were killed by an invasion of roof rats into
the house. They really like to nest under the fridge and
chew the wiring insulation. I killed four of them in
excruciating ways and they got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the
norm.
And more to the point, there might not be a lot of choice.
There will always be the nothing special low-priced refrigerator
type that I buy. I paid $900 (including delivery and setup) for
the Frigidaire 25 ft3 kitchen side by side and considered that
to be over-priced. It does have an ice maker though. They also
hauled off the old dead refrigerator that the roof rat
electrocuted himself on as a part of the deal.
Until some do-gooder decides that we have to have "smart"
refrigerators that tell the gummint what we eat so they can tax
us accordingly.
Shiny side in, or out?

(No, this will be about adding something that costs pennies to add
after they add electronic controls for energy savings. If it
happens.)
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Ninapenda Jibini
2018-11-29 03:44:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 17:30:16 -0600, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Juho Julkunen
?The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper
and Plastic Sensors?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-inter
ne
t-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sen
so rs
?The year is 2028. It?s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and
you?re famished. You?re staring wistfully at the only
remaining item in your refrigerator: a package of sausages
with an unappetizing grayish hue. Ugh. Did they always look
like that? Are they still safe to eat? In 2018, you?d have
to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But in
2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the
package. The smartphone interrogates the package?s embedded
sensor, which measures the concentration of gases
associated with meat decomposition. The smartphone displays
the message ?Safe to eat within the next 20 hours,? and
then offers a list of recipes for cooking with sausages.
Too hungry to bother with the recipes, you tear open the
package, toss the sausages into a frying pan, and discard
the package?along with its sensor technology.?
Yup, I can see this.
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous
step. Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Sounds like an expensive refrigerator to me. I have bought
four refrigerators in the last ten years. Two of the
refrigerators were killed by an invasion of roof rats into
the house. They really like to nest under the fridge and
chew the wiring insulation. I killed four of them in
excruciating ways and they got the message.
In 2028 it might not be expensive anymore, it might be the
norm.
And more to the point, there might not be a lot of choice.
There will always be the nothing special low-priced refrigerator
type that I buy.
Maybe. But I wouldn't bet on it. California is already talking
about requiring catalytic converters on hot water heaters, and
electronic controls can and do make a difference on energy usage.
I'd be surprised if electronic controls are *not* required within
the foreseeable future. Once there's a computer in there, adding a
few more widgets in is not much more expensive.

And once the single largest market requires it, manufacturers
aren't going to split their production lines for long, especially
when other states follow suit.

So maybe, but I wouldn't bet on it.
--
Terry Austin

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Titus G
2018-11-29 06:56:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
  Two of the refrigerators were
killed by an invasion of roof rats into the house.  They really like to
nest under the fridge and chew the wiring insulation.  I killed four of
them in excruciating ways and they got the message.
Lynn
If they had been killed in humane ways they would not have got the
message because a dead rat that has died in an excruciating way is less
of a threat than a dead rat that has not died in an excruciating way.
QED
Quadibloc
2018-11-29 05:18:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Having the package do that might defeat the purpose of making this kind of thing
so cheap that it can be used as wrapping for sausages.

John Savard
Juho Julkunen
2018-11-29 16:38:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Juho Julkunen
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Having the package do that might defeat the purpose of making this kind of thing
so cheap that it can be used as wrapping for sausages.
If we can make sensors cheap enough to be disposable, an inch of e-
paper can't be the sticking point.

If the sensors need to be externally powered, have the fridge do it.
You could display a warning about the expiry dates on the door while
you're at it.

(And update your shopping list app or odred more online, but I don't
really want my appliances to be that networked or proactive.
Autoinventory would be handy, though.)
--
Juho Julkunen
Dimensional Traveler
2018-11-29 18:04:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Juho Julkunen
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Having the package do that might defeat the purpose of making this kind of thing
so cheap that it can be used as wrapping for sausages.
If we can make sensors cheap enough to be disposable, an inch of e-
paper can't be the sticking point.
If the sensors need to be externally powered, have the fridge do it.
You could display a warning about the expiry dates on the door while
you're at it.
(And update your shopping list app or odred more online, but I don't
really want my appliances to be that networked or proactive.
Autoinventory would be handy, though.)
There are already refrigerators that will send an "out of stock" message
to your phone for things like milk. I'm sure that can be linked to your
shopping list app but make no guesses as to how easily.)
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
J. Clarke
2018-11-29 18:19:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 10:04:00 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Juho Julkunen
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Having the package do that might defeat the purpose of making this kind of thing
so cheap that it can be used as wrapping for sausages.
If we can make sensors cheap enough to be disposable, an inch of e-
paper can't be the sticking point.
If the sensors need to be externally powered, have the fridge do it.
You could display a warning about the expiry dates on the door while
you're at it.
(And update your shopping list app or odred more online, but I don't
really want my appliances to be that networked or proactive.
Autoinventory would be handy, though.)
There are already refrigerators that will send an "out of stock" message
to your phone for things like milk. I'm sure that can be linked to your
shopping list app but make no guesses as to how easily.)
That's _if_ you scan the milk in when you put it in the refrigerator.
And it won't know that you've used up all the milk until you tell it
that you have.

Right now it's just something else to go wrong.
Peter Trei
2018-11-29 18:25:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 10:04:00 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Juho Julkunen
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Having the package do that might defeat the purpose of making this kind of thing
so cheap that it can be used as wrapping for sausages.
If we can make sensors cheap enough to be disposable, an inch of e-
paper can't be the sticking point.
If the sensors need to be externally powered, have the fridge do it.
You could display a warning about the expiry dates on the door while
you're at it.
(And update your shopping list app or odred more online, but I don't
really want my appliances to be that networked or proactive.
Autoinventory would be handy, though.)
There are already refrigerators that will send an "out of stock" message
to your phone for things like milk. I'm sure that can be linked to your
shopping list app but make no guesses as to how easily.)
That's _if_ you scan the milk in when you put it in the refrigerator.
And it won't know that you've used up all the milk until you tell it
that you have.
Right now it's just something else to go wrong.
In reality, is this a solution in search of a problem? We already test food
in the refrigerator for freshness, by appearance and smell. It's pretty damn
rare to actually get the point of eating spoiled food.

pt
Robert Carnegie
2018-11-29 23:20:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 10:04:00 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Juho Julkunen
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Having the package do that might defeat the purpose of making this kind of thing
so cheap that it can be used as wrapping for sausages.
If we can make sensors cheap enough to be disposable, an inch of e-
paper can't be the sticking point.
If the sensors need to be externally powered, have the fridge do it.
You could display a warning about the expiry dates on the door while
you're at it.
(And update your shopping list app or odred more online, but I don't
really want my appliances to be that networked or proactive.
Autoinventory would be handy, though.)
There are already refrigerators that will send an "out of stock" message
to your phone for things like milk. I'm sure that can be linked to your
shopping list app but make no guesses as to how easily.)
That's _if_ you scan the milk in when you put it in the refrigerator.
And it won't know that you've used up all the milk until you tell it
that you have.
Right now it's just something else to go wrong.
Two words, or maybe one: FridgeCam. It's already real. Ish.

Basically you can look in your fridge with the supermarket's wi-fi.

I don't think you can get a little drone that flies around in there
to check on product dates... and anyway, if the door's closed,
it's /dark/.
J. Clarke
2018-11-30 00:34:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 15:20:43 -0800 (PST), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 10:04:00 -0800, Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Juho Julkunen
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Juho Julkunen
Waving a smarphone over the package seems like a superfluous step.
Can't the refrigerator tell me that? Or the package?
Having the package do that might defeat the purpose of making this kind of thing
so cheap that it can be used as wrapping for sausages.
If we can make sensors cheap enough to be disposable, an inch of e-
paper can't be the sticking point.
If the sensors need to be externally powered, have the fridge do it.
You could display a warning about the expiry dates on the door while
you're at it.
(And update your shopping list app or odred more online, but I don't
really want my appliances to be that networked or proactive.
Autoinventory would be handy, though.)
There are already refrigerators that will send an "out of stock" message
to your phone for things like milk. I'm sure that can be linked to your
shopping list app but make no guesses as to how easily.)
That's _if_ you scan the milk in when you put it in the refrigerator.
And it won't know that you've used up all the milk until you tell it
that you have.
Right now it's just something else to go wrong.
Two words, or maybe one: FridgeCam. It's already real. Ish.
Basically you can look in your fridge with the supermarket's wi-fi.
I don't think you can get a little drone that flies around in there
to check on product dates... and anyway, if the door's closed,
it's /dark/.
Not when the lighting is by LED.

Robert Carnegie
2018-11-29 01:06:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
“The Internet of Disposable Things Will Be Made of Paper and Plastic
Sensors”
https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/materials/the-internet-of-disposable-things-will-be-made-of-paper-and-plastic-sensors
“The year is 2028. It’s 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night and you’re famished.
You’re staring wistfully at the only remaining item in your
refrigerator: a package of sausages with an unappetizing grayish hue.
Ugh. Did they always look like that? Are they still safe to eat? In
2018, you’d have to rely on your sense of smell and take a gamble. But
in 2028, you might simply wave your smartphone over the package. The
smartphone interrogates the package’s embedded sensor, which measures
the concentration of gases associated with meat decomposition. The
smartphone displays the message “Safe to eat within the next 20 hours,”
and then offers a list of recipes for cooking with sausages. Too hungry
to bother with the recipes, you tear open the package, toss the sausages
into a frying pan, and discard the package—along with its sensor
technology.”
Into recycling, I hope.

But in 2028 won't sausages be printed on demand?

Old people will still have smartphones though. Which will be
our legal guardians.
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