Discussion:
Dilbert: under the mask
(too old to reply)
Lynn McGuire
2020-05-18 18:26:54 UTC
Permalink
Dilbert: under the mask
https://dilbert.com/strip/2020-05-18

2020 is definitely turning out much different than I envisioned.

Lynn
Charles Packer
2020-05-20 21:51:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Dilbert: under the mask
https://dilbert.com/strip/2020-05-18
2020 is definitely turning out much different than I envisioned.
Lynn
When coronavirus infected the Sunday funnies I stopped reading them.
End of a life-long habit. Cold turkey. Never going back. Not even
Doonesbury.

http://cpacker.org
Chrysi Cat
2020-05-21 08:05:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Packer
Post by Lynn McGuire
Dilbert: under the mask
https://dilbert.com/strip/2020-05-18
2020 is definitely turning out much different than I envisioned.
Lynn
When coronavirus infected the Sunday funnies I stopped reading them.
End of a life-long habit. Cold turkey. Never going back. Not even
Doonesbury.
http://cpacker.org
You realise the alternative would have been similar, especially for
slice-of-life strips to writing a comic in WWII that featured a family
able to pig out on meat and butter on a daily basis, right?

And that more people might have abandoned the funnies for that than
would follow your lead in these actual circumstances?
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Robert Carnegie
2020-05-21 08:46:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Charles Packer
Post by Lynn McGuire
Dilbert: under the mask
https://dilbert.com/strip/2020-05-18
2020 is definitely turning out much different than I envisioned.
Lynn
When coronavirus infected the Sunday funnies I stopped reading them.
End of a life-long habit. Cold turkey. Never going back. Not even
Doonesbury.
http://cpacker.org
You realise the alternative would have been similar, especially for
slice-of-life strips to writing a comic in WWII that featured a family
able to pig out on meat and butter on a daily basis, right?
And that more people might have abandoned the funnies for that than
would follow your lead in these actual circumstances?
It's acceptable not to read cartoons. I respect
Charles's choice, but I think he's referring to the
actual Sunday newspaper.

Incidentally, Dilbert's Sunday version seems to
run in a parallel universe where daily strip
plot lines, when there are any, aren't happening,
and currently neither is the coronavirus, I think.
But I am not trying to lure Charles back in.
Of course, daily and Sunday strips are produced to
sell to different titles, so newspaper readers would
see one and not see the other. So they need to make
sense independently. So for instance I suppose
dinosaurs have to be introduced, verbally at least,
in each strand separately. Did I say "make sense"...
Jack Bohn
2020-05-21 10:29:41 UTC
Permalink
On Thursday, 21 May 2020 09:05:57 UTC+1, Chrysi Cat  wrote: 
On 5/20/2020 3:51 PM, Charles Packer wrote: 
On Mon, 18 May 2020 13:26:54 -0500, Lynn McGuire wrote: 
 
Dilbert: under the mask 
     https://dilbert.com/strip/2020-05-18 
 
 
When coronavirus infected the Sunday funnies I stopped reading them. 
End of a life-long habit. Cold turkey. Never going back. Not even 
Doonesbury.  
 
You realise the alternative would have been similar, especially for 
slice-of-life strips to writing a comic in WWII that featured a family 
able to pig out on meat and butter on a daily basis, right? 
There was a movie -a false alarm on someone's sf movie list- only incidentally set in the future, after the war so its pre-war plot of a club of sons-of-privilege determined to do no useful work might be more palatable (less unpalatable). Come to think of it, George Orwell defended P.G. Wodehouse, who, held from leaving some German-held area, was making radio broadcasts with an attitude that had not kept pace with the times.

Critics point to the horror movies of the '40s as having no acknowledgement of the War. Other genres had a more varied record (Warner Bros cartoons kept familiar the phrases, "Was this trip really necessary?" snd, "Turn out that light!") Some, including my current favorite, "The Heavenly Body, " may have become "lost" in the '50s for its dated war references.

I gotta go to work, I'll tell the Flash Gordon story later, if someone doesn't beat me to it.
And that more people might have abandoned the funnies for that than 
would follow your lead in these actual circumstances? 
After about a month of funnies in business-as-usual, I will grant them a pass if they don't want a month backlog of shutdown strips after we are set free. (Blondie just caught up last week; a "social distancing" joke made *at the office*. But it's in its own strange time warp, anyway; Blondie has her entrepreneurial business, but Dagwood will never go "business casual.")
Incidentally, Dilbert's Sunday version seems to 
run in a parallel universe where daily strip 
plot lines, when there are any, aren't happening, 
and currently neither is the coronavirus, I think. 
They may be to a different schedule, for production reasons, or a temporary difference in the ratio of six-panel to four-panel jokes.
--
-Jack
Jack Bohn
2020-05-22 04:43:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
I'll tell the Flash Gordon story later, if someone doesn't beat me to it.
An amusing example of comic strip lead time.

In 1941, Flash Gordon wrapped up the story begun in 1934. No spoilers, something along the lines of the end of the 1935 serial or 1980 feature film. A new story began in June as our heroes received news from Earth that a dictator titled "The Red Sword" was leading mechanized invasions of other countries; they resolved to bring super-science from Mongo to stop him. This allegorical war against the Hun continues on the Sunday pages. The last panel on the December 7, 1941 strip is a victorious image of US Navy planes over the ocean. The story is then wrapped up in 3 weeks, and the first strip of the new year stresses the need for radium to power Mongo weapons, and Flash, Dale, and Zarkov rocket back to Mongo to secure a large enough supply. They crashland in enemy territory and are sidelined from any Earthly activity at least into 1945, when Alex Raymond is called up and reprint editors lose interest.
--
-Jack
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-05-22 04:52:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Bohn
Post by Jack Bohn
I'll tell the Flash Gordon story later, if someone doesn't beat me to it.
An amusing example of comic strip lead time.
In 1941, Flash Gordon wrapped up the story begun in 1934. No spoilers,
something along the lines of the end of the 1935 serial or 1980 feature
film. A new story began in June as our heroes received news from Earth
that a dictator titled "The Red Sword" was leading mechanized invasions
of other countries; they resolved to bring super-science from Mongo to
stop him. This allegorical war against the Hun continues on the Sunday
pages. The last panel on the December 7, 1941 strip is a victorious
image of US Navy planes over the ocean. The story is then wrapped up in
3 weeks, and the first strip of the new year stresses the need for
radium to power Mongo weapons, and Flash, Dale, and Zarkov rocket back
to Mongo to secure a large enough supply. They crashland in enemy
territory and are sidelined from any Earthly activity at least into
1945, when Alex Raymond is called up and reprint editors lose interest.
--
-Jack
It didn't involve lead time, but during that time period the comic
pages' other famous SF hero went to war with Mars yelling "Remember
Pearl Harbor!".
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-05-21 12:13:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Incidentally, Dilbert's Sunday version seems to
run in a parallel universe where daily strip
plot lines, when there are any, aren't happening,
and currently neither is the coronavirus, I think.
But I am not trying to lure Charles back in.
Of course, daily and Sunday strips are produced to
sell to different titles, so newspaper readers would
see one and not see the other. So they need to make
sense independently. So for instance I suppose
dinosaurs have to be introduced, verbally at least,
in each strand separately. Did I say "make sense"...
Having different continuities in the daily & sunday strips is almost universal
practice on the comics page. It's not pronounced for "Dilbert" where the
continuity is fairly loose (though it's common for the monday-saturday
strips to have a storyline). It's very explicit in something like
"Rip Haywire" or "The Phantom" which have completely different adventures
going on during the week and on Sunday.

And of course the Sunday strips have another convention where the first
couple of panels have to be independent from the rest of the strip, which
is kind of annoying.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Robert Carnegie
2020-05-21 12:22:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Robert Carnegie
Incidentally, Dilbert's Sunday version seems to
run in a parallel universe where daily strip
plot lines, when there are any, aren't happening,
and currently neither is the coronavirus, I think.
But I am not trying to lure Charles back in.
Of course, daily and Sunday strips are produced to
sell to different titles, so newspaper readers would
see one and not see the other. So they need to make
sense independently. So for instance I suppose
dinosaurs have to be introduced, verbally at least,
in each strand separately. Did I say "make sense"...
Having different continuities in the daily & sunday strips is almost universal
practice on the comics page. It's not pronounced for "Dilbert" where the
continuity is fairly loose (though it's common for the monday-saturday
strips to have a storyline). It's very explicit in something like
"Rip Haywire" or "The Phantom" which have completely different adventures
going on during the week and on Sunday.
And of course the Sunday strips have another convention where the first
couple of panels have to be independent from the rest of the strip, which
is kind of annoying.
I presumed someone somewhere is only publishing that
part... but if they do, how do you tell?
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-05-21 12:37:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Robert Carnegie
Incidentally, Dilbert's Sunday version seems to
run in a parallel universe where daily strip
plot lines, when there are any, aren't happening,
and currently neither is the coronavirus, I think.
But I am not trying to lure Charles back in.
Of course, daily and Sunday strips are produced to
sell to different titles, so newspaper readers would
see one and not see the other. So they need to make
sense independently. So for instance I suppose
dinosaurs have to be introduced, verbally at least,
in each strand separately. Did I say "make sense"...
Having different continuities in the daily & sunday strips is almost universal
practice on the comics page. It's not pronounced for "Dilbert" where the
continuity is fairly loose (though it's common for the monday-saturday
strips to have a storyline). It's very explicit in something like
"Rip Haywire" or "The Phantom" which have completely different adventures
going on during the week and on Sunday.
And of course the Sunday strips have another convention where the first
couple of panels have to be independent from the rest of the strip, which
is kind of annoying.
I presumed someone somewhere is only publishing that
part... but if they do, how do you tell?
Nobody only publishes the drop panels, but many places only publish the
non-drop panels. You can tell by taking multiple papers (unlikely..) or
looking at different sites online.

Here's a strip artist explicitly publishing some:

https://www.jimkeefe.com/archives/6076
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-21 14:51:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
And of course the Sunday strips have another convention where the first
couple of panels have to be independent from the rest of the strip, which
is kind of annoying.
That's because some newspapers would edit them out, to save
space.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2020-05-21 14:49:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Incidentally, Dilbert's Sunday version seems to
run in a parallel universe where daily strip
plot lines, when there are any, aren't happening,
and currently neither is the coronavirus, I think.
This is true of many cartoon strips. The Sunday strip offers
more scope for a longer, laid-back sort of story, and perhaps is
a reflection of a time when people would read the Sunday funnies
but not the dailies? Anyone know about that?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Paul S Person
2020-05-21 17:16:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Incidentally, Dilbert's Sunday version seems to
run in a parallel universe where daily strip
plot lines, when there are any, aren't happening,
and currently neither is the coronavirus, I think.
This is true of many cartoon strips. The Sunday strip offers
more scope for a longer, laid-back sort of story, and perhaps is
a reflection of a time when people would read the Sunday funnies
but not the dailies? Anyone know about that?
In many cases, they had more time on Sunday.

And the Sunday funnies were in color!
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-05-21 18:08:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Robert Carnegie
Incidentally, Dilbert's Sunday version seems to
run in a parallel universe where daily strip
plot lines, when there are any, aren't happening,
and currently neither is the coronavirus, I think.
This is true of many cartoon strips. The Sunday strip offers
more scope for a longer, laid-back sort of story, and perhaps is
a reflection of a time when people would read the Sunday funnies
but not the dailies? Anyone know about that?
In many cases, they had more time on Sunday.
And the Sunday funnies were in color!
As a practical matter, you generally had the option for subscribing to
your local paper 7 days a week, just monday-saturday, or only on Sunday.

I think a significant number of people only took the Sunday paper as they
had more time on Sundays, plus it had all the shopping coupons & circulars.

Locally I suppose a certain number of people are hosed for the resolution
of daily strips, as "The State" no longer publishes a Saturday edition.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Jay E. Morris
2020-05-21 23:12:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
I think a significant number of people only took the Sunday paper as they
had more time on Sundays, plus it had all the shopping coupons & circulars.
That, in our case, plus the Wednesday because it had coupons also. A few
years back we dropped it because between the circulars in the mail and
coupons in our grocery store's app we didn't need it.
Mopoleum
2020-05-23 01:19:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
You realise the alternative would have been similar, especially for
slice-of-life strips to writing a comic in WWII that featured a family
able to pig out on meat and butter on a daily basis, right?
And that more people might have abandoned the funnies for that than
would follow your lead in these actual circumstances?
I think to the extent that there are comics with kids reading them these
days, it's a good thing when artists address it. I think the ones that I've
read have generally handled the experience pretty well, finding humor but
still being respectful, and skipping bathos.

I was a little surprised to see Blondie making the move, since it's seemed
in the past to strive for a somewhat timeless character, but I thought
they've done it well.

But then none of this is new. This is an interesting start to a series on
the response of cartoonists to the 1918 influenza outbreak:

http://drawing-blood.org/outbreaks/the-spanish-flu-in-comics-strips-1918

He notes how Krazy Kat "reminds us of the dangers of xenophobia as the
media and public imagination associates the supposed country of 'origin'
for the pandemic with disease and contagion."
Peter Trei
2020-05-23 02:41:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mopoleum
Post by Chrysi Cat
You realise the alternative would have been similar, especially for
slice-of-life strips to writing a comic in WWII that featured a family
able to pig out on meat and butter on a daily basis, right?
And that more people might have abandoned the funnies for that than
would follow your lead in these actual circumstances?
I think to the extent that there are comics with kids reading them these
days, it's a good thing when artists address it. I think the ones that I've
read have generally handled the experience pretty well, finding humor but
still being respectful, and skipping bathos.
I was a little surprised to see Blondie making the move, since it's seemed
in the past to strive for a somewhat timeless character, but I thought
they've done it well.
But then none of this is new. This is an interesting start to a series on
http://drawing-blood.org/outbreaks/the-spanish-flu-in-comics-strips-1918
He notes how Krazy Kat "reminds us of the dangers of xenophobia as the
media and public imagination associates the supposed country of 'origin'
for the pandemic with disease and contagion."
Neat site. Bookmarked!

Pt
Joy Beeson
2020-05-21 12:33:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Packer
Not even
Doonesbury.
Doonesbury ended long ago.

Something is shambling around on the editorial page next to Mallard
Filmore, but it isn't Doonesbury.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
Paul S Person
2020-05-21 17:18:41 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 21 May 2020 08:33:21 -0400, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
Post by Charles Packer
Not even
Doonesbury.
Doonesbury ended long ago.
Something is shambling around on the editorial page next to Mallard
Filmore, but it isn't Doonesbury.
The Sunday strips sometimes have a spark or two, but it appears that
Trudeau isn't doing daily strips any more, just reruns.

Which are as hilarious the second time around as they were the first,
and occasionally even somewhat topical.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2020-05-21 18:10:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul S Person
On Thu, 21 May 2020 08:33:21 -0400, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
Post by Charles Packer
Not even
Doonesbury.
Doonesbury ended long ago.
Something is shambling around on the editorial page next to Mallard
Filmore, but it isn't Doonesbury.
The Sunday strips sometimes have a spark or two, but it appears that
Trudeau isn't doing daily strips any more, just reruns.
Which are as hilarious the second time around as they were the first,
and occasionally even somewhat topical.
The dailies have been re-runs since 2014.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Mark Jackson
2020-05-21 18:24:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Paul S Person
On Thu, 21 May 2020 08:33:21 -0400, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
Doonesbury ended long ago.
Something is shambling around on the editorial page next to Mallard
Filmore, but it isn't Doonesbury.
The Sunday strips sometimes have a spark or two, but it appears that
Trudeau isn't doing daily strips any more, just reruns.
The dailies have been re-runs since 2014.
I believe the last first-run daily was June 8, 2013. This was followed
by reruns of fairly recent strips until "Alpha House" was picked up for
a second season. At that point Trudeau went Sundays-only definitively,
and the syndicate began rerunning the strip from the beginning in March
2014.
--
Mark Jackson - http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~mjackson
After a certain point in one's career, the worry that
they'll finally notice your true absence of talent
morphs into worrying that they'll finally notice
that you've Lost It. - William Gibson
Jack Bohn
2020-05-21 19:48:30 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 21 May 2020 08:33:21 -0400, Joy Beeson 
Something is shambling around on the editorial page next to Mallard 
Filmore, but it isn't Doonesbury. 
The Sunday strips sometimes have a spark or two, but it appears that 
Trudeau isn't doing daily strips any more, just reruns. 
Which are as hilarious the second time around as they were the first, 
and occasionally even somewhat topical. 
Or "prescient," as the kids are saying these days.
--
-Jack
Paul S Person
2020-05-22 16:33:15 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 21 May 2020 10:18:41 -0700, Paul S Person
Post by Paul S Person
On Thu, 21 May 2020 08:33:21 -0400, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
Post by Charles Packer
Not even
Doonesbury.
Doonesbury ended long ago.
Something is shambling around on the editorial page next to Mallard
Filmore, but it isn't Doonesbury.
The Sunday strips sometimes have a spark or two, but it appears that
Trudeau isn't doing daily strips any more, just reruns.
Which are as hilarious the second time around as they were the first,
and occasionally even somewhat topical.
I should also point out that Roland Hedley's tweets (as shown on the
Doonesbury page) are often quite hilarious, as his "support" of Trump
turns out to ... not work so well.
--
"I begin to envy Petronius."
"I have envied him long since."
Default User
2020-05-22 00:00:23 UTC
Permalink
I'm surprised that Dilbert still is having in-person work, rather than most people working at home. When I was still a productive member of society, and fair number of people were doing that a number of days per week.

On the whole, I prefer the comics not worry about the pandemic. They'll be 3-4 weeks behind, and there's just a limited amount you can do with the situation.

It was interesting that Heart of the City started doing "social distancing" strips right before the end of Tatulli's authorship. When "Steenz" took over, she immediately dropped that and put the kids back in school. I was happy with that.


Brian
Robert Carnegie
2020-05-22 09:18:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Default User
I'm surprised that Dilbert still is having in-person work, rather than most people working at home. When I was still a productive member of society, and fair number of people were doing that a number of days per week.
On the whole, I prefer the comics not worry about the pandemic. They'll be 3-4 weeks behind, and there's just a limited amount you can do with the situation.
It was interesting that Heart of the City started doing "social distancing" strips right before the end of Tatulli's authorship. When "Steenz" took over, she immediately dropped that and put the kids back in school. I was happy with that.
Actually... this being rasfw, in 2020, do comics need to
be produced weeks before their publication? Even if done
with different people on script, art, colour, and lettering
duties - couldn't you have characters reacting to the news
that is /in/ the newspaper?

I suppose that realistically they are more likely to watch
TV or go online but still...
Chrysi Cat
2020-05-22 09:55:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Default User
I'm surprised that Dilbert still is having in-person work, rather than most people working at home. When I was still a productive member of society, and fair number of people were doing that a number of days per week.
On the whole, I prefer the comics not worry about the pandemic. They'll be 3-4 weeks behind, and there's just a limited amount you can do with the situation.
It was interesting that Heart of the City started doing "social distancing" strips right before the end of Tatulli's authorship. When "Steenz" took over, she immediately dropped that and put the kids back in school. I was happy with that.
Actually... this being rasfw, in 2020, do comics need to
be produced weeks before their publication? Even if done
with different people on script, art, colour, and lettering
duties - couldn't you have characters reacting to the news
that is /in/ the newspaper?
I suppose that realistically they are more likely to watch
TV or go online but still...
You /could/, but if even one of them (and particularly the writer) has
difficulty executing their part (for the artist, because the writer
isn't quite the annoying "dictate every little visual detail" type that
I am, and particularly if they're being created "Marvel-style" rather
than being drawn in ways that make sense for pre-existing dialogue; for
the writer, _duh,_ and for the colourist, if they run across a new
background or character who they need to establish the right palette
for), then...

...well, are you familiar with the "Daily Grind Challenge" that about
100 webcomic creators put together in 2002? IIRC, there were 10
remaining contestants by 2005, most of whom were still in the running
for the mini-tontine that had been created even in 2009.

But the bigger deal is, look at those 90 artists who _missed a daily
update,_ most within the first year.

That type of thing happening to people who still read ink on paper would
lead to their calling for heads to roll--and because many are less than
familiar with the whole process, a lot of those heads would likely be
features editors, rather than comic creators. It worked, to an _extent,_
in editorial cartooning, where the creator was often kept in-house in
the days before electronic files, and was always drawing them within 1
to 2 days both in that era and the electronic insert era (the fact that
Mallard Fillmore instead is drawn to a normal comics-page buffer is part
of why it's so ridiculed), but readers of the editorial page were
largely satisfied as long as something close to the proper number of
cartoons were on it and most cartoonists for that didn't have a set
stable of characters that readers expected to see.

And of course, editorial cartooning has been killed worse than comic
strips by the newspaper crisis, so at this point there really aren't too
many people even expecting two daily cartoons on the paper's op-ed page,
whether online or in print (and people aren't nearly as good at seeking
it out as "webcomics" as they are ongoing serials or gag-a-day multipanel).

THAT is why the print syndicates are still requiring that comics be
submitted at least 2-3 weeks in advance, and of course many of the
old-style print creators _want_ to work even further out than that
(though Ces scrapped a Sally Forth arc, and Bill Holbrook--who /treats/
Kevin and Kell like a print comic even though it's online-only and only
ever had /one/ daily print customer, pivoted to creating strips that
reflected the crisis as soon as he'd gotten through his Easter storyline
that readers would have rioted if it hadn't been allowed to run normally).

Heck, there are even two strips that would be perfect for Charles Packer
if he's still reading the thread though he claims to have abandoned the
funny pages:: Tom Batiuk isn't going to eat into his one-year buffer for
Funky or for Crankshaft for *anything*. I'm less sure if Jim Davis, who
also draws Garfield one year out, will follow suit or try to be somewhat
flexible.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Jaimie Vandenbergh
2020-05-22 13:42:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Default User
I'm surprised that Dilbert still is having in-person work, rather than most people working at home. When I was still a productive member of society, and fair number of people were doing that a number of days per week.
On the whole, I prefer the comics not worry about the pandemic. They'll be 3-4 weeks behind, and there's just a limited amount you can do with the situation.
It was interesting that Heart of the City started doing "social distancing" strips right before the end of Tatulli's authorship. When "Steenz" took over, she immediately dropped that and put the kids back in school. I was happy with that.
Actually... this being rasfw, in 2020, do comics need to
be produced weeks before their publication? Even if done
with different people on script, art, colour, and lettering
duties - couldn't you have characters reacting to the news
that is /in/ the newspaper?
I suppose that realistically they are more likely to watch
TV or go online but still...
South Park has been managing it with half hour weekly episodes on occasion
since the last millennium, and political cartoonists cope on a next-day basis.


Cheers - Jaimie
--
...there should be a feature added to the RAID 0 standard stating that
if anyone selects RAID 0 as an option, they must type in, "I know what
I am doing and that it is wrong," before they can proceed.
- Archangel Mychael, ArsTechnica comments
Kevrob
2020-05-22 14:12:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jaimie Vandenbergh
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Default User
I'm surprised that Dilbert still is having in-person work, rather than most people working at home. When I was still a productive member of society, and fair number of people were doing that a number of days per week.
On the whole, I prefer the comics not worry about the pandemic. They'll be 3-4 weeks behind, and there's just a limited amount you can do with the situation.
It was interesting that Heart of the City started doing "social distancing" strips right before the end of Tatulli's authorship. When "Steenz" took over, she immediately dropped that and put the kids back in school. I was happy with that.
Actually... this being rasfw, in 2020, do comics need to
be produced weeks before their publication? Even if done
with different people on script, art, colour, and lettering
duties - couldn't you have characters reacting to the news
that is /in/ the newspaper?
I suppose that realistically they are more likely to watch
TV or go online but still...
South Park has been managing it with half hour weekly episodes on occasion
since the last millennium, and political cartoonists cope on a next-day basis.
Cheers - Jaimie
Could some of the multi-week buffer remain as space for the
lawyers/editors who want to be able to review content before
publishing it, so as to avoid offending advertisers, readers,
the publisher's spouse....?

Does Jim Davis do any work on Garfield these days? It might
be possible to reprogram the artbots who draw the thing. :)

Kevin R
Default User
2020-05-23 20:11:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Actually... this being rasfw, in 2020, do comics need to
be produced weeks before their publication? Even if done
with different people on script, art, colour, and lettering
duties - couldn't you have characters reacting to the news
that is /in/ the newspaper?
I don't know enough about the newspaper syndication business to say. One strip that I have followed from its beginning is The Big Picture by Lennie Petersen. That began as a regular strip, it ran in the Post-Dispatch and other dailies. It was a slice-of-life strip about his life as a musician and his cat Ginger. Then he stopped after the cat died.

It was still in my list at GoComics, and several years later reruns started appearing. Then he started doing new strips strictly for GoComics. So his lead time is now however long it takes to draw and upload a strip. He'll often do the same strip a few days in a row with some tweaks. But he can be very reactive to current events if he chooses. Usually that's deaths of prominent musicians. Recently, his girlfriend (I think) got cat, one of those no-fur types that they named Homeslice for some reason.


Brian

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