Discussion:
Her Lone Wolf By Paige Tyler
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David Johnston
2020-05-21 05:33:44 UTC
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This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character. Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.

In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.

At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security. Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS. It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy. Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.

This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel. The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.

I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.

This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible. But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller. The romance verges on
perfunctory. Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers. The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.

And why did I read it? The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
Robert Carnegie
2020-05-21 08:22:21 UTC
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Permalink
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character. Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security. Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS. It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy. Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel. The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
Why would the name of a Secret Service tell you what
it actually does? See also "The Laundry", but that's
a nickname.

Pronoun issue: is the DCA the department that employs
animal people? And apart from keeping them out of
trouble what else does it do? Regulate other animal
people? And why does someone employed in the DCA
want to close it? It interferes with their serial
killing is one theory, but that would tend to give
the book the virtue of brevity.
Post by David Johnston
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible. But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller. The romance verges on
perfunctory. Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers. The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it? The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
Robert Carnegie
2020-05-21 08:27:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
... <https://thelaundrybrixton.com>

Safe, as far as I know, but I don't promise.

The web site may be fine but the business an
organised crime front, for all I know. It's not
impossible (I haven't actually been there).
I haven't been to my local laundry for a while,
either.
David Johnston
2020-05-21 18:30:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel. The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
Why would the name of a Secret Service tell you what
it actually does? See also "The Laundry", but that's
a nickname.
Sorry, I got the name wrong. It's actually the Department of Covert
Operations. Which pretty much does tell you what they do.
Post by Robert Carnegie
Pronoun issue: is the DCA the department that employs
animal people?
Yes.

And apart from keeping them out of
Post by Robert Carnegie
trouble what else does it do?
Assassinates terrorists mostly.

Regulate other animal
Post by Robert Carnegie
people? And why does someone employed in the DCA
want to close it?
They don't like the shifters and just want them exterminated instead of
used to assassinate terrorists. <cue X-Men theme song>
J. Clarke
2020-05-21 19:35:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 21 May 2020 01:22:21 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character. Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security. Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS. It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy. Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel. The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
Why would the name of a Secret Service tell you what
it actually does? See also "The Laundry", but that's
a nickname.
Pronoun issue: is the DCA the department that employs
animal people? And apart from keeping them out of
trouble what else does it do? Regulate other animal
people? And why does someone employed in the DCA
want to close it? It interferes with their serial
killing is one theory, but that would tend to give
the book the virtue of brevity.
While all goverments and government agencies don't use similar naming
methods, without googling any of them what are "Copper Canyon", "Pave
Low", and "Pave Penny""?
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible. But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller. The romance verges on
perfunctory. Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers. The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it? The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
Chrysi Cat
2020-05-22 08:02:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 21 May 2020 01:22:21 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character. Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security. Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS. It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy. Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel. The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
Why would the name of a Secret Service tell you what
it actually does? See also "The Laundry", but that's
a nickname.
Pronoun issue: is the DCA the department that employs
animal people? And apart from keeping them out of
trouble what else does it do? Regulate other animal
people? And why does someone employed in the DCA
want to close it? It interferes with their serial
killing is one theory, but that would tend to give
the book the virtue of brevity.
While all goverments and government agencies don't use similar naming
methods, without googling any of them what are "Copper Canyon", "Pave
Low", and "Pave Penny""?
I'm afraid I only _think_ I know "Pave Low" without googling. It's
either aerial S&R, or aerial covert infiltration, and it's a US Army
term that either was originally applied as the name of the aircraft type
used for it, or the term GOT applied to the first aircraft type (an
MH-60 helicopter) used for it.

Term originated in the Vietnam War.

But that's because you routinely ran across that one--especially the
chopper that picked up the title-- in end-of-the-Cold-War fiction and
when I was trying to fit in with the "other" boys instead of accepting
myself, I read way too much Tom Clancy and Larry Bond.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible. But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller. The romance verges on
perfunctory. Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers. The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it? The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger.
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
J. Clarke
2020-05-22 23:10:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 21 May 2020 01:22:21 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character. Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security. Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS. It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy. Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel. The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
Why would the name of a Secret Service tell you what
it actually does? See also "The Laundry", but that's
a nickname.
Pronoun issue: is the DCA the department that employs
animal people? And apart from keeping them out of
trouble what else does it do? Regulate other animal
people? And why does someone employed in the DCA
want to close it? It interferes with their serial
killing is one theory, but that would tend to give
the book the virtue of brevity.
While all goverments and government agencies don't use similar naming
methods, without googling any of them what are "Copper Canyon", "Pave
Low", and "Pave Penny""?
I'm afraid I only _think_ I know "Pave Low" without googling. It's
either aerial S&R, or aerial covert infiltration, and it's a US Army
term that either was originally applied as the name of the aircraft type
used for it, or the term GOT applied to the first aircraft type (an
MH-60 helicopter) used for it.
Term originated in the Vietnam War.
But that's because you routinely ran across that one--especially the
chopper that picked up the title-- in end-of-the-Cold-War fiction and
when I was trying to fit in with the "other" boys instead of accepting
myself, I read way too much Tom Clancy and Larry Bond.
Actually it was the specific model of chopper. Very good.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible. But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller. The romance verges on
perfunctory. Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers. The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it? The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
Wolffan
2020-05-22 10:30:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 21 May 2020 01:22:21 -0700 (PDT), Robert Carnegie
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character. Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security. Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS. It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy. Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel. The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
Why would the name of a Secret Service tell you what
it actually does? See also "The Laundry", but that's
a nickname.
Pronoun issue: is the DCA the department that employs
animal people? And apart from keeping them out of
trouble what else does it do? Regulate other animal
people? And why does someone employed in the DCA
want to close it? It interferes with their serial
killing is one theory, but that would tend to give
the book the virtue of brevity.
While all goverments and government agencies don't use similar naming
methods, without googling any of them what are "Copper Canyon", "Pave
Low", and "Pave Penny""?
Pave Penny is a glide bomb guidance system using lasers. Vietnam War stuff, a
lot of of ‘Pave’ stuff had something to do with lasers. ‘Paveway’
were various laser-guided bombs, Pave Knife, Pave Spike, Pave Tack were all
laser targeting systems for use with Paveway. Anyone who played Harpoon in
the late 80s to early 90s would know about the ‘Pave’ lasers. When
playing Blue, I quickly learned that sending in F-4s with Paveways against a
target with SAMs, such as a Red surface battlegroup, was a good way to lose
all your F-4s. Nah, you send in a whole lot of aircraft with HARMs and
Harpoon, and run Red out of SAMs, and _then_ send in Paveway-equiped aircraft
to mop up. Of course Red is sending in Backfires and Oscars to hunt Blue’s
carriers...

Pave Low is a heavily modified for special operations CH-53 heavyweight
helicopter. I only know this one because it showed up in one of the Tom
Clancy books, about where ol’ Tom started to go off the rails. This would
be the one where ol’ Tom had Rangers roaming Columbia hunting drug cartel
coke factories, and the USN sending A-6s with laser-guided glide bombs to
blow up cartel big shots. I found it... implausible. Then Bill Clinton used
cruise missiles to blow up a Sudanese powdered milk factory and GPS-guided
glide bombs to blow up the Chinese embassy in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, and
suddenly it wasn’t as implausible as all that. The plot of Rainbow Six,
now, _that_ is implausible. I stopped reading ol’ Tom about there.
Apparently a lot of other people really liked Rainbow Six, though...

Copper Canyon was the National AeroSpace Plane. I know that one because og
Fallen Angels by Niven and Pournelle. I don’t think they used ‘Copper
Canyon’ in the book, but I looked up a lot of stuff as a result of that.
book.
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible. But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller. The romance verges on
perfunctory. Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers. The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it? The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
m***@sky.com
2020-05-22 04:07:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character. Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security. Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS. It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy. Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel. The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
Why would the name of a Secret Service tell you what
it actually does? See also "The Laundry", but that's
a nickname.
(trimmed)

I note that the UK is more careful about military operation codenames than the US - the US picked Desert Shield/Desert Storm, but the UK codename for the Gulf War came out of a random computer choice and they got https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Granby
Lynn McGuire
2020-05-21 18:56:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character.  Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security.  Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS.  It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy.  Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel.  The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible.  But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller.  The romance verges on
perfunctory.  Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers.  The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it?  The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
Sounds like this book might be better, "Wolf in Shadow" by John Lambshead:
https://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Shadow-John-Lambshead-ebook/dp/B00DFLUTA2/

Just the name of the author writing a werewolf book is awesome.

Lynn
David Johnston
2020-05-21 19:01:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a
secret government department that recruits "shifters", men and women
with "animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal
DNA" would give a comic book character.  Even though this is a variety
of theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite
limited. They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes
turn yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and
sensory abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial
displeasure and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't
want "Homeland Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security.  Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS.  It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy.  Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull
strings to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually
thinking about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical
romance novel.  The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside
the absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an
attempt to sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible.  But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller.  The romance verges on
perfunctory.  Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers.  The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it?  The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
   https://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Shadow-John-Lambshead-ebook/dp/B00DFLUTA2/
Just the name of the author writing a werewolf book is awesome.
Lynn
Hey, my library can get it. _When it opens_.
Robert Carnegie
2020-05-21 20:05:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character.  Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security.  Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS.  It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy.  Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel.  The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible.  But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller.  The romance verges on
perfunctory.  Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers.  The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it?  The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
https://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Shadow-John-Lambshead-ebook/dp/B00DFLUTA2/
Just the name of the author writing a werewolf book is awesome.
There are two Lambsheads in ISFDB and I suspect
they are not both genuine.

There is one Ramsbottom, which is a pity.
Lynn McGuire
2020-05-21 21:15:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character.  Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security.  Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS.  It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy.  Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel.  The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible.  But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller.  The romance verges on
perfunctory.  Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers.  The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it?  The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
https://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Shadow-John-Lambshead-ebook/dp/B00DFLUTA2/
Just the name of the author writing a werewolf book is awesome.
There are two Lambsheads in ISFDB and I suspect
they are not both genuine.
There is one Ramsbottom, which is a pity.
I know. But one can hope, right ? BTW, here is his Baen bio:
https://www.baen.com/Interviews/intlambshead

"Dr. John Lambshead is senior research scientist in marine biodiversity
at the Natural History Museum, London. He is also the Visiting Chair at
Southampton University, Oceanography, and Regent's Lecturer, University
of California. He has authored almost a hundred academic/scientific
publications. In their special 2000 millennium edition, London's Evening
Standard newspaper nominated him as one of London's top 100 "unknown
thinkers" for his scientific research. But Baen's Bar fans know him
quite well for his topic "I Love Lucy"—relating to the title of his
first novel, Lucy's Blade, a Baen hardcover release for May."

Lynn
m***@sky.com
2020-05-22 04:03:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character.  Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security.  Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS.  It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy.  Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel.  The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible.  But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller.  The romance verges on
perfunctory.  Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers.  The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it?  The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
https://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Shadow-John-Lambshead-ebook/dp/B00DFLUTA2/
Just the name of the author writing a werewolf book is awesome.
There are two Lambsheads in ISFDB and I suspect
they are not both genuine.
There is one Ramsbottom, which is a pity.
https://www.baen.com/Interviews/intlambshead
"Dr. John Lambshead is senior research scientist in marine biodiversity
at the Natural History Museum, London. He is also the Visiting Chair at
Southampton University, Oceanography, and Regent's Lecturer, University
of California. He has authored almost a hundred academic/scientific
publications. In their special 2000 millennium edition, London's Evening
Standard newspaper nominated him as one of London's top 100 "unknown
thinkers" for his scientific research. But Baen's Bar fans know him
quite well for his topic "I Love Lucy"—relating to the title of his
first novel, Lucy's Blade, a Baen hardcover release for May."
Lynn
Lucy's blade has been out for a while now - it's not bad
Lynn McGuire
2020-05-22 18:26:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@sky.com
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Robert Carnegie
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by David Johnston
This is a book in a paranormal romance series revolving around a secret
government department that recruits "shifters", men and women with
"animal DNA" that gives them the kind of abilities that "animal DNA"
would give a comic book character.  Even though this is a variety of
theriomorph romance their shapeshifting abilities are quite limited.
They can grow claws, get a bit of a game face and their eyes turn
yellow. That's about it apart from their superhuman athletic and sensory
abilities.
In this book a former agent for the secretive department is now an FBI
agent and realized the serial killer is one of the shifters who is
hunting humans for sport so she calls in her old associates who of
course send her former partner and lover much to her initial displeasure
and the even greater displeasure of her boss who doesn't want "Homeland
Security" horning on his glory.
At which point I was thinking that if I was her boss I'd be suspecting
that our serial killer was a former agent for Homeland Security.  Or
some dodgy intelligence agency pretending to be HS.  It would have
explained why an outfit that doesn't chase serial killers is chasing
this guy.  Of course her boss is wasting his time trying to pull strings
to get the intruder off the task force instead of actually thinking
about the case.
This has way, way more bureaucratic infighting than your typical romance
novel.  The star crossed lovers were separated by a guy inside the
absurdly generically named Department of Covert Affairs in an attempt to
sabotage its operations so it will be shut down.
I note incidentally that on the cover he is devoid of the scars that
he's supposed to and she couldn't be dressed less like an FBI agent.
It's not skimpy, just incredibly girly.
This is more science fiction than fantasy, but needless to say the
science is terrible.  But ultimately the test of whether it works is
about whether it works as a thriller.  The romance verges on
perfunctory.  Ultimately it's a simple but workable procedural with
super powers.  The bureaucratic infighting is actually pretty fun, though.
And why did I read it?  The library's still closed up and their
overdrive lending service has a selection of available fiction
that's...<sigh>
https://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Shadow-John-Lambshead-ebook/dp/B00DFLUTA2/
Just the name of the author writing a werewolf book is awesome.
There are two Lambsheads in ISFDB and I suspect
they are not both genuine.
There is one Ramsbottom, which is a pity.
https://www.baen.com/Interviews/intlambshead
"Dr. John Lambshead is senior research scientist in marine biodiversity
at the Natural History Museum, London. He is also the Visiting Chair at
Southampton University, Oceanography, and Regent's Lecturer, University
of California. He has authored almost a hundred academic/scientific
publications. In their special 2000 millennium edition, London's Evening
Standard newspaper nominated him as one of London's top 100 "unknown
thinkers" for his scientific research. But Baen's Bar fans know him
quite well for his topic "I Love Lucy"—relating to the title of his
first novel, Lucy's Blade, a Baen hardcover release for May."
Lynn
Lucy's blade has been out for a while now - it's not bad
Yup. And so is "Wolf in Shadow". I noted in my review that the city of
London was a character in the book on its own.

Lynn
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