Discussion:
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
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Lynn McGuire
2018-10-24 17:35:50 UTC
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_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/

A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade paperback
published by Broadway Books.

This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent movie version
by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that is my personal
preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one

The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of itself. The
population has swelled to a half billion people through immigration,
legal and illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City.

In 2045, everyone is plugged into the virtual reality environment known
as OASIS. The founder of OASIS, the richest man in the USA, passed away
five years ago and everyone, including our protagonist, is looking for
the hidden easter eggs that lead to his power and fortune.

The universe of the book is incredibly rich. OASIS contains thousand of
worlds with its own currency. It even has a free school system that
children can attend and graduate from.

My rating: 5 out of 5 stars
Amazon rating: 4.6 out of 5 stars (18,292 reviews)

Lynn
Ahasuerus
2018-10-24 17:50:21 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade paperback
published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent movie version
by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that is my personal
preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of itself. The
population has swelled to a half billion people through immigration,
legal and illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_ (1966), which was
set in 1999. Human civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Scott Lurndal
2018-10-24 17:57:03 UTC
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Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade paperback
published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent movie version
by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that is my personal
preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of itself. The
population has swelled to a half billion people through immigration,
legal and illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_ (1966), which was
set in 1999. Human civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't. :-)

Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-24 18:40:10 UTC
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Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade paperback
published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent movie version
by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that is my personal
preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of itself. The
population has swelled to a half billion people through immigration,
legal and illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_ (1966), which was
set in 1999. Human civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't. :-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of each
other is definitely crazy.

Lynn
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-24 18:58:07 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade paperback
published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent movie version
by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that is my personal
preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of itself. The
population has swelled to a half billion people through immigration,
legal and illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_ (1966), which was
set in 1999. Human civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't. :-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of each
other is definitely crazy.
Lynn
That seems like it would be harder and more expensive than putting
up a 22 story building..
You are assuming that the trailer stacks are bolted together in a safe
manner. They are not.

https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-elusive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
and
https://www.columbusnavigator.com/ready-player-one-columbus/

Lynn
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-24 20:16:07 UTC
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade paperback
published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent movie version
by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that is my personal
preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of itself. The
population has swelled to a half billion people through immigration,
legal and illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_ (1966), which was
set in 1999. Human civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't. :-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of each
other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-24 20:32:54 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade paperback
published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent movie version
by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that is my personal
preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of itself. The
population has swelled to a half billion people through immigration,
legal and illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_ (1966), which was
set in 1999. Human civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't. :-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of each
other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical trailer
parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom_).

https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-elusive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/


Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-24 21:11:34 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4, Lynn
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel
that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is
no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading
the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist
lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of
each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical
trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless one
is willing to really stretch the definitions of both "mobile home"
and "skyscraper."

Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately jump
to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-24 21:21:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4, Lynn
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel
that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading
the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist
lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of
each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical
trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless one
is willing to really stretch the definitions of both "mobile home"
and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately jump
to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the surrounding
stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking off. Those stacks
should make a nice chimney.

Lynn
Kevrob
2018-10-24 22:06:25 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading
the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist
lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of
each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical
trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless one
is willing to really stretch the definitions of both "mobile home"
and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately jump
to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the surrounding
stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking off. Those stacks
should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.

My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"

But, seriously, he could buy a very nice house.

---
Kevin R
a.a #2310
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-10-24 22:21:26 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is
no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading
the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist
lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of
each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical
trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless one
is willing to really stretch the definitions of both "mobile home"
and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately jump
to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the surrounding
stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking off. Those stacks
should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
But, seriously, he could buy a very nice house.
Dang. Shoulda bought one!

(And make no mistake, there are some *very* expensive locations here.
This computer is not posting from one of them..)
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Moriarty
2018-10-24 23:15:40 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel
that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is
no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading
the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist
lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of
each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical
trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless one
is willing to really stretch the definitions of both "mobile home"
and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately jump
to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the surrounding
stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking off. Those stacks
should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to be a better person.

(*) Or she.

-Moriarty
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-24 23:24:00 UTC
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Post by Moriarty
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel
that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is
no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading
the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist
lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of
each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical
trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless one
is willing to really stretch the definitions of both "mobile home"
and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately jump
to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the surrounding
stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking off. Those stacks
should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and one by
one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to be a better
person.
(*) Or she.
Actually, to be both virtuous and practical ... s/he should
immediately seek the services of a good tax accountant. Figure
out how many good causes s/he can donate to and deduct, so as to
give the IRS as little as possible. Ordinarily I would say let
he IRS have what's coming to them, but not till there's a change
in the aspect of respectability.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2018-10-25 00:19:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and one by
one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to be a better
person.
(*) Or she.
Actually, to be both virtuous and practical ... s/he should
immediately seek the services of a good tax accountant. Figure
out how many good causes s/he can donate to and deduct, so as to
give the IRS as little as possible. Ordinarily I would say let
he IRS have what's coming to them, but not till there's a change
in the aspect of respectability.
I think it is a disgusting ruse that the state claws back the prize
it awards in its near-monopolistic games, but the trick is built into
Federalism. Even if the state you bought the ticket in exempted you
from state income tax on the winnings, it is the Feds who grab the
lion's share of the tax haul. There's no Federal Lottery in the
US. Mega Millions and Powerball are interstate compacts, and not
all states participate.

Given that some 40% or more of the winnings would be dumped
into Federal and, in most cases, state coffers if one had a
clueless accountant. by the time one's taxes are filed and paid,
directing a good chunk of that to efforts the winner approves of
seems to me only just and right. If it were me, I'd fund organizations
trying to limit government that were eligible for charitable deductions,
in addition to any other charitable causes I would support.

Would buying out Fred Wilpon's share of the Mets be considered a
charitable expenditure? :)

Sharing the money with family will, if you are too generous, incur
gift taxes. This is why some winners keep mum, gather the tribe,
and set up a family trust. The ticket, when signed and handed over
to the state gaming authorities for redemption, has been assigned
to the trust, as was done by a Pennsylvania winner back in April.

https://www.phillyvoice.com/montgomery-county-lawyer-claims-457-million-powerball-jackpot-for-trust/

Plus side: tax advantages, everybody included gets a taste.
In PA, it enabled the winners to stay anonymous!
Not every state allows that. Where you have to
reveal your name, you may not be required to pose
for publicity photos. I'd skip the photo. Where
I had to get snapped, I'd shave my scruffy beard
ASAP and die my hair back to the color I had
in my 20s. [I might be growing a beard this winter.
I had one last winter, but it may be too soon
to start.]

Down side: You don't have as big a nut as you would have had,
and can't be as big a shot.
Pissing off any shirt-tail relative you didn't
invite into the trust.
I'm single, so I wouldn't have to convince a spouse,
nor worry about "her side of the family."

I'd try to get in space-tourist shape, a perhaps futile goal,
but even if I only got close, it would improve my quality of
life, with or without money.

I could live very nicely on interest and dividends from a serious
lump sum. I currently live pretty cheaply, within my paycheck's
cash flow. I'd probably be gladdest about ending retirement worries,
at least initially.

See:

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/dear-mega-millions-jackpot-winner-145300283.html

I was kicking myself yesterday for buying a second lottery ticket.
I had forgotten I bought one on Saturday night. The occassional
lottery ticket is the only wagering I do. We have several casinos
in CT, but i've never been, not even for a show or a sporting
event at the attached arenas and auditoriums. I've never been any
good at playing cards for money, and I don't need a rathole for my
savings. I could make political contributions if I just wanted to
flush it down a metaphorical toilet.

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-25 01:39:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and one by
one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to be a better
person.
(*) Or she.
Actually, to be both virtuous and practical ... s/he should
immediately seek the services of a good tax accountant. Figure
out how many good causes s/he can donate to and deduct, so as to
give the IRS as little as possible. Ordinarily I would say let
he IRS have what's coming to them, but not till there's a change
in the aspect of respectability.
I think it is a disgusting ruse that the state claws back the prize
it awards in its near-monopolistic games, but the trick is built into
Federalism. Even if the state you bought the ticket in exempted you
from state income tax on the winnings, it is the Feds who grab the
lion's share of the tax haul. There's no Federal Lottery in the
US. Mega Millions and Powerball are interstate compacts, and not
all states participate.
Given that some 40% or more of the winnings would be dumped
into Federal and, in most cases, state coffers if one had a
clueless accountant. by the time one's taxes are filed and paid,
directing a good chunk of that to efforts the winner approves of
seems to me only just and right. If it were me, I'd fund organizations
trying to limit government that were eligible for charitable deductions,
in addition to any other charitable causes I would support.
Would buying out Fred Wilpon's share of the Mets be considered a
charitable expenditure? :)
Not by me. I had to play softball* in elementary school, and my
interest in baseball is somewhere on the shady side of zero.
Post by Kevrob
Sharing the money with family will, if you are too generous, incur
gift taxes. This is why some winners keep mum, gather the tribe,
and set up a family trust. The ticket, when signed and handed over
to the state gaming authorities for redemption, has been assigned
to the trust, as was done by a Pennsylvania winner back in April.
Well, we've already *got* a family trust. It owns a house in
Chula Vista which is rented out and brings us in enough rent to
pay about 75% of *our* rent.

And if you ask, why don't we just live in it? I reply that *it's
in Chula Vista*, just this side of the Mexican border, closer to
Tijuana than to San Diego. We like living in the Bay Area.
Post by Kevrob
https://www.phillyvoice.com/montgomery-county-lawyer-claims-457-million-powerball-jackpot-for-trust/
Plus side: tax advantages, everybody included gets a taste.
In PA, it enabled the winners to stay anonymous!
Not every state allows that. Where you have to
reveal your name, you may not be required to pose
for publicity photos. I'd skip the photo. Where
I had to get snapped, I'd shave my scruffy beard
ASAP and die my hair back to the color I had
in my 20s. [I might be growing a beard this winter.
I had one last winter, but it may be too soon
to start.]
Down side: You don't have as big a nut as you would have had,
and can't be as big a shot.
I'd settle for just paying some bills. But I have much too high
a regard for the laws of probability to gamble on a lottery or
anything else.
Post by Kevrob
Pissing off any shirt-tail relative you didn't
invite into the trust.
I'm single, so I wouldn't have to convince a spouse,
nor worry about "her side of the family."
Our trust currently belongs to Hal and me. When we're both dead,
it'll belong to our son and our daughter, who will get to divvy
up the monthly rental income. They currently have one child
each; my daughter insists she'll never have another; I don't know
what my son and daughter-in-law have in mind. It could be
divvied up between two grandchildren. After that, it's anybody's
guess. It's on a hill, so sea level rise won't take it out very
soon.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2018-10-25 00:49:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4, Lynn
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel
that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is
no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading
the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist
lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of
each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical
trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless one
is willing to really stretch the definitions of both "mobile home"
and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately jump
to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the surrounding
stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking off. Those stacks
should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and one by
one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to be a better
person.
(*) Or she.
Actually, to be both virtuous and practical ... s/he should
immediately seek the services of a good tax accountant. Figure
out how many good causes s/he can donate to and deduct, so as to
give the IRS as little as possible. Ordinarily I would say let
he IRS have what's coming to them, but not till there's a change
in the aspect of respectability.
Lawyer first, anonymous trust, get those pieces in place, then tax
although there's not really much you can do about that--the tax
ramifications of lottery winnings are pretty well established.

After that then think about what to do with it. You never get as much
deduction as you give to a cause so that from a wealth preservation
viewpoint is a losing strategy--where it can help is if it can shift
you down a bracket and with more than 3/4 billion in income that won't
happen.

The real trick is the investment strategy--if you can pull 5% on
what's left after taxes that's about 25 million a year income--_that_
is what you distribute to various charities after deducting your costs
(with that much money you're going to have costs--accountants,
lawyers, etc, all full time--it's cheaper to have them on salary than
to pay them by the hour).

Then there's security--that's enough that you're a target for
kidnappers etc.

Personally my first stop would be down the hall and to the left--talk
to my employer's lawyers about who I should be hiring, and my second
would be to the right to talk to our financial people about who I
should be getting to work out an investment strategy.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-24 23:47:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 9:06:28 AM UTC+11, Kevrob
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 5:21:08 PM UTC-4, Lynn
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack
outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrap
ers-el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Moriarty
2018-10-24 23:59:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 9:06:28 AM UTC+11, Kevrob
<snip>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
You mean Karma?

-Moriarty
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-25 01:43:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Moriarty
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 9:06:28 AM UTC+11, Kevrob
<snip>
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
You mean Karma?
Old bumper sticker: My karma ran over your dogma.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Greg Goss
2018-10-25 12:14:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Moriarty
You mean Karma?
Old bumper sticker: My karma ran over your dogma.
Usually credited to John Lennon. Dunno if that's correct.
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-10-25 00:44:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 9:06:28 AM UTC+11, Kevrob
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 5:21:08 PM UTC-4, Lynn
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack
outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrap
ers-el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
Given what ends up happening to so many lottery winners, it might be a
punishment.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-10-25 03:09:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 9:06:28 AM UTC+11, Kevrob
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 5:21:08 PM UTC-4, Lynn
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack
outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrap
ers-el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
Given what ends up happening to so many lottery winners, it might be a
punishment.
There was a book out a few years ago called _Best Case Scenarios_.
(In response to a previous book called _Worst Case Scenarios_). It
was mostly humorous, but I recall thinking the section on winning
the lottery sounded pretty good. It was, essentially: get a good
lawyer, assign the winning ticket to an anonymous trust, put yourself
at the head of the board and pay yourself a good salary, then dole
out the assets over time as you desired. Result was nobody knows you
won, and you get to direct the money. (I'm sure the legalese was more
complicated than my memory of it, and I'm sure it woud vary by state).
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Peter Trei
2018-10-25 17:22:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 9:06:28 AM UTC+11, Kevrob
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 5:21:08 PM UTC-4, Lynn
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack
outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrap
ers-el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
Given what ends up happening to so many lottery winners, it might be a
punishment.
There was a book out a few years ago called _Best Case Scenarios_.
(In response to a previous book called _Worst Case Scenarios_). It
was mostly humorous, but I recall thinking the section on winning
the lottery sounded pretty good. It was, essentially: get a good
lawyer, assign the winning ticket to an anonymous trust, put yourself
at the head of the board and pay yourself a good salary, then dole
out the assets over time as you desired. Result was nobody knows you
won, and you get to direct the money. (I'm sure the legalese was more
complicated than my memory of it, and I'm sure it woud vary by state).
As others say, putting the lump sum into an anonymous trust is the first step.
Some states allow you to remain anonymous, others don't. Then tax
lawyers, investors, and annual audits of both by one of several auditing
firms.

Then what? On my side of the family, there are about 10 people I'd like to
free from financial worry, on my wife's side, about 30. Set up college funds
for all the kids, get the others out of debt. Beyond that, a one-time $100k
per household, and the limit before gift taxes each year to the retired.
A promise to pay catastrophic medical bills.

To some extent, this is to stop them from coming after me for more. Dunno
if it would work.

We'd probably have to move to somewhere with better security.

I think the most effective leverage to make the world a better place would be
to b/u/y/ donate to politicians (after having meetings so they know what
I'm interested in), or run for office myself.

pt


pt
Juho Julkunen
2018-10-25 13:26:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Moriarty
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
Given what ends up happening to so many lottery winners, it might be a
punishment.
Could be a test, then.
--
Juho Julkunen
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-25 01:42:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 9:06:28 AM UTC+11, Kevrob
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 5:21:08 PM UTC-4, Lynn
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack
outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrap
ers-el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
I wonder if a good lawyer could convince the lottery-runners that
the saint was a front for a charitable organization, recognized
by the IRS as non-taxable?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
J. Clarke
2018-10-25 02:22:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 9:06:28 AM UTC+11, Kevrob
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 5:21:08 PM UTC-4, Lynn
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack
outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrap
ers-el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
I hope he(*) makes a list of everything bad he's ever done and
one by one makes up for all his mistakes. He should just try to
be a better person.
(*) Or she.
You're assuming that the win isn't a reward for being, literally, a
saint, of course.
I wonder if a good lawyer could convince the lottery-runners that
the saint was a front for a charitable organization, recognized
by the IRS as non-taxable?
Now there's an interesting notion. Start a church. Make the church
the owner of the ticket, let the church cash it in. Probably been
tried.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-10-25 00:41:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is
no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading
the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist
lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of
each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical
trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic
Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless one
is willing to really stretch the definitions of both "mobile home"
and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately jump
to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the surrounding
stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking off. Those stacks
should make a nice chimney.
Somebody in South Carolins won the Mega Millions lottery.
My first thought was, "I bet he upgrades to one hell of a
nice trailer!"
But, seriously, he could buy a very nice house.
A big White House even.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-24 23:45:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4, Lynn
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there
is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before
reading the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our
protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other
people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City.
[snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top
of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out
in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-
el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless
one is willing to really stretch the definitions of both
"mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately
jump to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking
off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-25 01:47:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there
is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before
reading the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our
protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other
people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City.
[snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top
of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out
in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-
el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless
one is willing to really stretch the definitions of both
"mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately
jump to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking
off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of used
drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane. Oh yeah,
and a lot of beer.

Lynn
J. Clarke
2018-10-25 02:30:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 20:47:31 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there
is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before
reading the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our
protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other
people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City.
[snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top
of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out
in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-
el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless
one is willing to really stretch the definitions of both
"mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately
jump to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking
off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of used
drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane. Oh yeah,
and a lot of beer.
<https://weburbanist.com/2015/12/08/social-climbers-7-vertical-trailer-parks-for-mobile-urbanites/>
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 17:17:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 20:47:31 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
<https://weburbanist.com/2015/12/08/social-climbers-7-vertical-tr
ailer-parks-for-mobile-urbanites/>
None of the ones that have ever actually existed qualify as
"skyscrapers," though.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-25 19:48:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 20:47:31 -0500, Lynn McGuire
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
<https://weburbanist.com/2015/12/08/social-climbers-7-vertical-tr
ailer-parks-for-mobile-urbanites/>
None of the ones that have ever actually existed qualify as
"skyscrapers," though.
How high did they get? Imperfect recollection of the photos of
the ones that used to exist tells me "stack of four, maybe five."
So no, that's hardly a skyscraper. Roman insulae were four
stories tall.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 20:37:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 20:47:31 -0500, Lynn McGuire
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player
_o ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of
Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscra
pe rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than
a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an
actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
<https://weburbanist.com/2015/12/08/social-climbers-7-vertical-
tr ailer-parks-for-mobile-urbanites/>
None of the ones that have ever actually existed qualify as
"skyscrapers," though.
How high did they get?
The pictures references (of thing that have actually been built)
were three or less. And the proposed ones (from 50 years ago,
mostly) weren't excatly "mobile homes."
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-10-25 22:31:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 20:47:31 -0500, Lynn McGuire
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player
_o ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of
Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscra
pe rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than
a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an
actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
<https://weburbanist.com/2015/12/08/social-climbers-7-vertical-
tr ailer-parks-for-mobile-urbanites/>
None of the ones that have ever actually existed qualify as
"skyscrapers," though.
How high did they get?
The pictures references (of thing that have actually been built)
were three or less. And the proposed ones (from 50 years ago,
mostly) weren't excatly "mobile homes."
As I recall from the movie, the fictional stacks were about six to eight
trailers high.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-25 23:01:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by J. Clarke
On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 20:47:31 -0500, Lynn McGuire
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
         https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
       The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
       there is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
         https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player
         _o ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself.  The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.
  Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of
Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscra
pe rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than
a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an
actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
<https://weburbanist.com/2015/12/08/social-climbers-7-vertical-
tr ailer-parks-for-mobile-urbanites/>
None of the ones that have ever actually existed qualify as
"skyscrapers," though.
How high did they get?
The pictures references (of thing that have actually been built)
were three or less. And the proposed ones (from 50 years ago,
mostly) weren't excatly "mobile homes."
As I recall from the movie, the fictional stacks were about six to eight
trailers high.
Here is some of the concept art for the movie showing a 21 trailer stack:

Loading Image.../revision/latest?cb=20180629100718

From:
Loading Image...

Lynn
Robert Woodward
2018-10-26 05:03:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
(SNIP)
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
None of the ones that have ever actually existed qualify as
"skyscrapers," though.
How high did they get?
The pictures references (of thing that have actually been built)
were three or less. And the proposed ones (from 50 years ago,
mostly) weren't excatly "mobile homes."
As I recall from the movie, the fictional stacks were about six to eight
trailers high.
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/readyplayerone/images/b/ba/ConceptStacks4.
jpg/revision/latest?cb=20180629100718
http://readyplayerone.wikia.com/wiki/Stacks?file=ConceptStacks4.jpg
That was supposed to be in Oklahoma City, in Tornado Alley? Looks like a
charge of negligent homicide in waiting.
--
"We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_.
—-----------------------------------------------------
Robert Woodward ***@drizzle.com
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-26 17:34:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Woodward
(SNIP)
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
None of the ones that have ever actually existed qualify as
"skyscrapers," though.
How high did they get?
The pictures references (of thing that have actually been built)
were three or less. And the proposed ones (from 50 years ago,
mostly) weren't excatly "mobile homes."
As I recall from the movie, the fictional stacks were about six to eight
trailers high.
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/readyplayerone/images/b/ba/ConceptStacks4.
jpg/revision/latest?cb=20180629100718
http://readyplayerone.wikia.com/wiki/Stacks?file=ConceptStacks4.jpg
That was supposed to be in Oklahoma City, in Tornado Alley? Looks like a
charge of negligent homicide in waiting.
Oklahoma City in 2045 in a dystopian USA. Not many public servants
going around checking the height of the trailer stacks. Especially
trailer stacks in a old junkyard.

Lynn
Scott Lurndal
2018-10-26 13:03:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
How high did they get?
The pictures references (of thing that have actually been built)
were three or less. And the proposed ones (from 50 years ago,
mostly) weren't excatly "mobile homes."
As I recall from the movie, the fictional stacks were about six to eight
trailers high.
The standard twenty and forty foot intermodal container can be stacked
10 high (e.g in containerships and at ports). As the containers are
interlocked with each other at all four corners, the structure is quite rigid.

The main problem that an earthquake would cause for a stack would be related to
liquifaction of the underlying support surface.
Greg Goss
2018-10-26 15:30:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
How high did they get?
The pictures references (of thing that have actually been built)
were three or less. And the proposed ones (from 50 years ago,
mostly) weren't excatly "mobile homes."
As I recall from the movie, the fictional stacks were about six to eight
trailers high.
The standard twenty and forty foot intermodal container can be stacked
10 high (e.g in containerships and at ports). As the containers are
interlocked with each other at all four corners, the structure is quite rigid.
The main problem that an earthquake would cause for a stack would be related to
liquifaction of the underlying support surface.
I expect that a standars shipping container is MUCH stronger than a
mobile home. To say nothing of plumbing connections and resident
access,
--
We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 16:38:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Greg Goss
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
How high did they get?
The pictures references (of thing that have actually been built)
were three or less. And the proposed ones (from 50 years ago,
mostly) weren't excatly "mobile homes."
As I recall from the movie, the fictional stacks were about six to eight
trailers high.
The standard twenty and forty foot intermodal container can be stacked
10 high (e.g in containerships and at ports). As the containers are
interlocked with each other at all four corners, the structure is quite rigid.
The main problem that an earthquake would cause for a stack would be related to
liquifaction of the underlying support surface.
I expect that a standars shipping container is MUCH stronger than a
mobile home. To say nothing of plumbing connections and resident
access,
Yes. But if the ground liquifies under it, it's going to topple.

You'll recall that the Loma Prieta earthquake caused the top lane
of a freeway to collapse onto the bottom one ... because the
ground under that stretch of the freeway was alluvial clay, not
sufficiently tightly packed, over an old riverbed. There were
many casualties, but not as many as might otherwise have been ...
because the trans-Bay World Series game* had just begun, and
people who otherwise would have been on the freeway commuting
home had left work early to watch the game on TV.

The game was called, and replayed several days later.

_____
*San Francisco Giants vs. Oakland A's. I forget who won.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-25 04:01:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there
is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018. I heartily recommend seeing the movie before
reading the book but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our
protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other
people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City.
[snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top
of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out
in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-
el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless
one is willing to really stretch the definitions of both
"mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately
jump to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking
off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of used
drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane. Oh yeah,
and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country. I'll pass. At a distance.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 17:17:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country. I'll pass. At a distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-25 19:54:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country. I'll pass. At a distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over the
border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery store
and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing. Then after the
first wave, everybody else came charging out of the store
screaming. But in spite of being (at that time) UNreinforced
brick, the only damage it took was a cracked plate-glass window.
It does have reinforcing now; all those little diamond-shaped
plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple feet apart.

The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my big
old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the man
hasn't managed to fix it yet. Hal tells him that if he doesn't
watch out, he'll have to send it to school. :)

The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further away
from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine, and was
sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt the bench
shaking. I thought it was the rowdy middle-school kids on the
other end of the bench, till I got home.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-25 20:29:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country. I'll pass. At a distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over the
border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery store
and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing. Then after the
first wave, everybody else came charging out of the store
screaming. But in spite of being (at that time) UNreinforced
brick, the only damage it took was a cracked plate-glass window.
It does have reinforcing now; all those little diamond-shaped
plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple feet apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my big
old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the man
hasn't managed to fix it yet. Hal tells him that if he doesn't
watch out, he'll have to send it to school. :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further away
from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine, and was
sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt the bench
shaking. I thought it was the rowdy middle-school kids on the
other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ? I will throw in a side of feral
hogs for free.

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 20:38:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by
Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/080419013
5/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that
is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_play
er_o ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a
shadow of itself. The population has swelled to a
half billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with
eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack outside
of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked
on top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you
being metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscr
ape rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions
of both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to
the surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks
start cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice
chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more
than a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than
an actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane. Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country. I'll pass. At a
distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over
the border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery
store and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing. Then
after the first wave, everybody else came charging out of the
store screaming. But in spite of being (at that time)
UNreinforced brick, the only damage it took was a cracked
plate-glass window. It does have reinforcing now; all those
little diamond-shaped plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple feet
apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my big
old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the man
hasn't managed to fix it yet. Hal tells him that if he doesn't
watch out, he'll have to send it to school. :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further away
from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine, and
was sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt the
bench shaking. I thought it was the rowdy middle-school kids
on the other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ? I will throw in a side
of feral hogs for free.
I'll take all of those combined over tornados.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 02:58:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by
Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/080419013
5/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that
is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_play
er_o ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a
shadow of itself. The population has swelled to a
half billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with
eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack outside
of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked
on top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you
being metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscr
ape rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions
of both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to
the surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks
start cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice
chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more
than a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than
an actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane. Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country. I'll pass. At a
distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over
the border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery
store and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing. Then
after the first wave, everybody else came charging out of the
store screaming. But in spite of being (at that time)
UNreinforced brick, the only damage it took was a cracked
plate-glass window. It does have reinforcing now; all those
little diamond-shaped plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple feet
apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my big
old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the man
hasn't managed to fix it yet. Hal tells him that if he doesn't
watch out, he'll have to send it to school. :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further away
from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine, and
was sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt the
bench shaking. I thought it was the rowdy middle-school kids
on the other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ? I will throw in a side
of feral hogs for free.
I'll take all of those combined over tornados.
I agree.

I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny baby,
maybe twenty feet high? It came walking across an SCA camp,
knocking down a few sunshades and creating a few bruises. We
have lots of first-aiders, and they went running toward the
damaged sunshades, one of them calling 911 as he ran. Within
minutes, we had an ambulance from the county, an ambulance from
the nearby city, an ambulance from the nearby military base, and
a fire engine full of paramedics. It must have been a very quiet
day outside the path of that little tornado. The paramedics sort
of flipped a coin to decide who would deal with the bruises, and
the rest went home after the usual "Who ARE you guys? what are
you DOING?" questions, and getting the usual two-minute
explanation with hand-waving.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 15:25:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by
Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190
13 5/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel
but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and
well bound trade paperback published by Broadway
Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but,
that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_pl
ay er_o ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a
shadow of itself. The population has swelled to
a half billion people through immigration, legal
and illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with
eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack outside
of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked
on top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you
being metaphorical about high-rise apartment
buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down
and Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skys
cr ape rs- el
usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not
really, unless one is willing to really stretch the
definitions of both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to
the surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks
start cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice
chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more
than a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more
than an actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane. Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country. I'll pass. At a
distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over
the border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery
store and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing. Then
after the first wave, everybody else came charging out of the
store screaming. But in spite of being (at that time)
UNreinforced brick, the only damage it took was a cracked
plate-glass window. It does have reinforcing now; all those
little diamond-shaped plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple
feet apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my
big old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the
man hasn't managed to fix it yet. Hal tells him that if he
doesn't watch out, he'll have to send it to school. :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further
away from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine,
and was sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt
the bench shaking. I thought it was the rowdy middle-school
kids on the other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ? I will throw in a
side of feral hogs for free.
I'll take all of those combined over tornados.
I agree.
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).

F5 tornados have been known to move tanks full of liquid weighing
700,000 pounds for the better part of a mile - without touching
the ground along the way.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Scott Lurndal
2018-10-26 16:03:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took out
a church - great picture in second link of funnel.

https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-areas-history-of-tornadoes/
Kevrob
2018-10-26 16:43:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took out
a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-areas-history-of-tornadoes/
We don't get tornados often on the coast here in the Northeast,
though they aren't impossible. Waterspouts over teh Atlantic crop up,
and they sometimes come onshore, which weakens them.

I'd have expected that happens on the West Coast, and a little internet
searching confirms that. Not all waterspouts are tornadic, though.

https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/waterspout.html

Kevin R
Cryptoengineer
2018-10-26 17:43:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny baby,
maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took out
a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-areas-his
t ory-of-tornadoes/
We don't get tornados often on the coast here in the Northeast,
though they aren't impossible. Waterspouts over teh Atlantic crop up,
and they sometimes come onshore, which weakens them.
Tornadoes in New England are fairly rare, but hardly unknown. A couple
times a year, they make they news. Just in the last 2 days,
the roof was ripped off a house by one.

They're not always little:

In 1953, an F4 hit Worcester, and killed 93.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_Worcester_tornado

In 2011, a high-end F3 passed thru Springfield, and killed 3. The
trail was visible from space:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_New_England_tornado_outbreak#The_Great
er_Springfield_tornado

I remember that one.

pt
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 17:57:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an
F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took out
a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-are
as-history-of-tornadoes/
We don't get tornados often on the coast here in the Northeast,
You get a hell of a lot more than we do.

https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps/

has maps. You get very few above F2, and no F5 at all, from the looks
of it, if F0/1/2 do occur.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Kevrob
2018-10-26 21:38:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an
F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took out
a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-are
as-history-of-tornadoes/
We don't get tornados often on the coast here in the Northeast,
You get a hell of a lot more than we do.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps/
has maps. You get very few above F2, and no F5 at all, from the looks
of it, if F0/1/2 do occur.
That's true. I spent most of my adult life, all but the last decade,
in Wisconsin, where twisters are much more prevalent, so the occasional
ones we get here doesn't seem like a lot. WI isn't exactly Tornado Alley,
but there have been ones that wiped out towns, in my living memory.

We aren't supposed to get any torandoes soon, but there's a
nor'easter earing down on us.

https://www.ctpost.com/weather/article/What-you-need-to-know-about-Saturday-s-13338573.php

Further North, away from the shorleine, there may be s...
sn....


sneerrrr.....

I can't type it yet. It's still October!

Many tree falls are expected, as the trees are still full of
leaves, most of them still quite green. That means power
ooutages. Bleccchhh!

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 22:33:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Kevrob
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an
F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took out
a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-are
as-history-of-tornadoes/
We don't get tornados often on the coast here in the Northeast,
You get a hell of a lot more than we do.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps/
has maps. You get very few above F2, and no F5 at all, from the looks
of it, if F0/1/2 do occur.
That's true. I spent most of my adult life, all but the last decade,
in Wisconsin, where twisters are much more prevalent, so the occasional
ones we get here doesn't seem like a lot. WI isn't exactly Tornado Alley,
but there have been ones that wiped out towns, in my living memory.
We aren't supposed to get any torandoes soon, but there's a
nor'easter earing down on us.
Okay, maybe you can clear up something for me. Is a nor'easter a
storm that comes *from* the northeast, or one heading *into* the
northeast?

Because when Pacific Hurricane Willa struck the west coast of Mexico
on Tuesday (it has now been downgraded to a tropical storm),
somebody predicted that it was going to cross the continent and
turn into a nor'easter. (It hasn't, it's going east to drop rain
on Florida.

So please enlighten me as to what, and where, a nor'easter does.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2018-10-27 01:54:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Okay, maybe you can clear up something for me. Is a nor'easter a
storm that comes *from* the northeast, or one heading *into* the
northeast?
It comes onshore from the Northeast, or North by Northeast. The winds
are cyclonic, or rotational, and counterclockwise, So, as it travels
(generally) East to West, the wind at 12 o'clock (N) sweeps through
9 o'clock (W) down to S (6 o'clock, then back up to 12.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Because when Pacific Hurricane Willa struck the west coast of Mexico
on Tuesday (it has now been downgraded to a tropical storm),
somebody predicted that it was going to cross the continent and
turn into a nor'easter. (It hasn't, it's going east to drop rain
on Florida.
If Willa had enough energy left when it made it to the Atlantic, it could
set up as, or merge with an existng low,, and Nor'easters have their start
in low pressure systems.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
So please enlighten me as to what, and where, a nor'easter does.
Could be 50-60 mph gusts on the South Shore and East End of New York's
Long Island, I grew up in a town on the shores of the Great South Bay,
and some of my family still live on the Island. I'm 15 miles north of
the Connecticut coast, or 50-60 miles from my home town, as the gull flies.

See:

https://www.weather.gov/safety/winter-noreaster

https://www.weather.gov/media/okx/Briefings/10262018pm_web.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nor%27easter

The etymology of Nor'easter is fascinating, per the Wiki.
Some loathe the term.

Kevin R

Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 22:58:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Friday, October 26, 2018 at 1:57:23 PM UTC-4, Jibini Kula
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, October 26, 2018 at 12:03:09 PM UTC-4, Scott
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a
tiny baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than
an F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw
even technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took
out a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-
are as-history-of-tornadoes/
We don't get tornados often on the coast here in the
Northeast,
You get a hell of a lot more than we do.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-map
s/
has maps. You get very few above F2, and no F5 at all, from the
looks of it, if F0/1/2 do occur.
That's true. I spent most of my adult life, all but the last
decade, in Wisconsin, where twisters are much more prevalent, so
the occasional ones we get here doesn't seem like a lot.
Very true. But then, few places do, outside of, perhaps, Oklahoma
and Kansas.
WI
isn't exactly Tornado Alley, but there have been ones that wiped
out towns, in my living memory.
Yeah. I've seen videos. Houses flying away, just like in the Wizard
of Oz. (Okay, one house, that was specifically build to be as
tornado resistant as possible, but it really did look like the
Wizard of Oz. Every building in town (in North Dakota) was
destroyed.
We aren't supposed to get any torandoes soon, but there's a
nor'easter earing down on us.
They're not common this late in the year anywhere.
https://www.ctpost.com/weather/article/What-you-need-to-know-abou
t-Saturday-s-13338573.php
Further North, away from the shorleine, there may be s...
sn....
sneerrrr.....
I can't type it yet. It's still October!
Many tree falls are expected, as the trees are still full of
leaves, most of them still quite green. That means power
ooutages. Bleccchhh!
At least there's no active volcanoes.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-27 00:15:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, October 26, 2018 at 1:57:23 PM UTC-4, Jibini Kula
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On Friday, October 26, 2018 at 12:03:09 PM UTC-4, Scott
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a
tiny baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than
an F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw
even technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took
out a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-
are as-history-of-tornadoes/
We don't get tornados often on the coast here in the
Northeast,
You get a hell of a lot more than we do.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-map
s/
has maps. You get very few above F2, and no F5 at all, from the
looks of it, if F0/1/2 do occur.
That's true. I spent most of my adult life, all but the last
decade, in Wisconsin, where twisters are much more prevalent, so
the occasional ones we get here doesn't seem like a lot.
Very true. But then, few places do, outside of, perhaps, Oklahoma
and Kansas.
WI
isn't exactly Tornado Alley, but there have been ones that wiped
out towns, in my living memory.
Yeah. I've seen videos. Houses flying away, just like in the Wizard
of Oz. (Okay, one house, that was specifically build to be as
tornado resistant as possible, but it really did look like the
Wizard of Oz. Every building in town (in North Dakota) was
destroyed.
We aren't supposed to get any torandoes soon, but there's a
nor'easter earing down on us.
They're not common this late in the year anywhere.
https://www.ctpost.com/weather/article/What-you-need-to-know-abou
t-Saturday-s-13338573.php
Further North, away from the shorleine, there may be s...
sn....
sneerrrr.....
I can't type it yet. It's still October!
Many tree falls are expected, as the trees are still full of
leaves, most of them still quite green. That means power
ooutages. Bleccchhh!
At least there's no active volcanoes.
No, not likely. The east coast isn't particularly tectonically
active, and the nearest really interesting stuff is on the
Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Though there's always the potential of the
New Madrid going off again, in the other direction.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 16:45:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California, mostly in the
foothills of the Sierras, but seldom big enough to cause damage
or injury. Note that the one we got at the event tore down
sunshades consisting of tarps (or lengths of fabric sewn
together) draped over constructions of PVC pipe without much
tensile strength. It didn't pick up cars, porta-potties, or
people.
Post by Scott Lurndal
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took out
a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
https://www.geostat.org/data/mountain-view-ca/tornados
So mostly F1s, a couple of 2s. That matches my experience.
Post by Scott Lurndal
https://blog.sfgate.com/science/2015/05/16/a-look-at-the-bay-areas-history-of-tornadoes/
Wow. We didn't have anything like that kind of damage at the
park.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 18:09:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California,
For xome values of "a lot," I suppose.

Take a look at the maps here:

https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps/

and be glad you don't live in the midwest.

According to the accompanying article, over half of tornadoes are
EF0, and a quarter are EF1. Neither are, as a rule, all that
destructive (though there are exceptions, including fatalities, for
both).

NOAA offers the following definitions:

Scale Est Wind Speed Typical Damage
F0 < 73 Light damage. Some damage to chimneys;
branches broken off trees;shallow-rooted trees pushed over; sign
boards damaged.

F1 73-112 Moderate damage. Peels surface off roofs;
mobile homes pushed offfoundations or overturned; moving autos
blown off roads.

F2 113-157 Considerable damage. Roofs torn off frame
houses; mobile homesdemolished; boxcars overturned; large trees
snapped or uprooted; light-object missilesgenerated; cars lifted
off ground.

F3 158-206 Severe damage. Roofs and some walls
torn off well-constructed houses;trains overturned; most trees in
forest uprooted; heavy cars lifted off the ground andthrown.
F4 207-260 Devastating damage. Well-constructed houses leveled;
structures withweak foundations blown away some distance; cars
thrown and large missiles generated.

F5 261-318 Incredible damage. Strong frame houses
leveled off foundations and swept away; automobile-sized missiles
fly through theair in excess of 100 meters (109 yds); trees
debarked; incredible phenomena will occur.

Note that the upper end on wind speeds - 318 mph - is not the
fastest a tornado can go, it's just the fastest anyone has ever
measured before the equipment failed (the only way to get accurate
measurements is from the inside).
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
So mostly F1s, a couple of 2s. That matches my experience.
Mostly F0s, actually, with occasional F1s, and a handful of F2s.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 22:34:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California,
For xome values of "a lot," I suppose.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps/
and be glad you don't live in the midwest.
Believe me, I am!
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 22:59:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an
F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California,
For xome values of "a lot," I suppose.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps
/
and be glad you don't live in the midwest.
Believe me, I am!
The weather can really suck there, too.

(That's a dig at the people, if you stretch the defininition
enough to call them that, in the midwest. Another subject I can
speak on authoritatively. Did I ever tell you about my niece's
redneck wedding?)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-27 00:19:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an
F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California,
For xome values of "a lot," I suppose.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps
/
and be glad you don't live in the midwest.
Believe me, I am!
The weather can really suck there, too.
(That's a dig at the people, if you stretch the defininition
enough to call them that, in the midwest. Another subject I can
speak on authoritatively. Did I ever tell you about my niece's
redneck wedding?)
No. Were shotguns involved?

(I shouldn't talk like that. I don't know whereof I speak, and
you do.)

The only time I've been in the Midwest was when we drove
cross-country for MidAmeriCon in 1976. And Pennsic in 1992,
if western Pennsylvania counts.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
--
Terry Austin
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB
"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek
Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Titus G
2018-10-26 23:13:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California,
For xome values of "a lot," I suppose.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps/
and be glad you don't live in the midwest.
Believe me, I am!
Where I live in Aotearoa, I have never been frightened by weather in my
life despite suffering mild hypothermia in an offroad motorcycle enduro
event in snow in winter many years ago so it is fascinating to read of
the difficulties people here have to prepare for including hurricanes
and floods as well as tornadoes. So although my primary purpose here is
to seek Sci Fi or Fantasy suggestions, it is also interesting to read
off the cuff undramatised opinions based on experiences.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 23:48:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a
tiny baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than
an F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw
even technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California,
For xome values of "a lot," I suppose.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-ma
ps/
and be glad you don't live in the midwest.
Believe me, I am!
Where I live in Aotearoa, I have never been frightened by
weather in my life despite suffering mild hypothermia in an
offroad motorcycle enduro event in snow in winter many years ago
so it is fascinating to read of the difficulties people here
have to prepare for including hurricanes and floods as well as
tornadoes.
There used to be two storm-chaser shows on one of the cable
channels (until one of the teams found out - fatally - that their
"tornado armored vehicle wasn't so torando armored after all.
There's only so much prepare you can do with tornadoes). One of
them ran into their first genuine F5 in Lousiana in one episode.
The funnel was between a mile and a mile and a half across at
ground level. They chased it, on the ground, for an hour and 45
minutes, at 60 mph, and then only stopped to help rescue crews in a
town that had been margely destroyed. The tornado kept going.
(Keeping in mind that F5 means wind speeds in excess of 260 mph, to
over 300.)

How's that for a tale of dealing with weather?
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-27 00:26:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a
tiny baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than
an F1 (and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw
even technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California,
For xome values of "a lot," I suppose.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-ma
ps/
and be glad you don't live in the midwest.
Believe me, I am!
Where I live in Aotearoa, I have never been frightened by
weather in my life despite suffering mild hypothermia in an
offroad motorcycle enduro event in snow in winter many years ago
so it is fascinating to read of the difficulties people here
have to prepare for including hurricanes and floods as well as
tornadoes.
There used to be two storm-chaser shows on one of the cable
channels (until one of the teams found out - fatally - that their
"tornado armored vehicle wasn't so torando armored after all.
There's only so much prepare you can do with tornadoes). One of
them ran into their first genuine F5 in Lousiana in one episode.
The funnel was between a mile and a mile and a half across at
ground level. They chased it, on the ground, for an hour and 45
minutes, at 60 mph, and then only stopped to help rescue crews in a
town that had been margely destroyed. The tornado kept going.
(Keeping in mind that F5 means wind speeds in excess of 260 mph, to
over 300.)
How's that for a tale of dealing with weather?
Hm. The word that comes to mind is "insane."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-27 00:25:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Titus G
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
True. We get a *lot* of tornados in California,
For xome values of "a lot," I suppose.
https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/06/07/look-tornadoes-rating-maps/
and be glad you don't live in the midwest.
Believe me, I am!
Where I live in Aotearoa, I have never been frightened by weather in my
life despite suffering mild hypothermia in an offroad motorcycle enduro
event in snow in winter many years ago so it is fascinating to read of
the difficulties people here have to prepare for including hurricanes
and floods as well as tornadoes. So although my primary purpose here is
to seek Sci Fi or Fantasy suggestions, it is also interesting to read
off the cuff undramatised opinions based on experiences.
Well, you get your share of earthquakes and vulcanism.

Rec.arts.sf.fandom used to be the place where fen hung out and
discussed whatever they were interested in, other than science
fiction. (Favorite topics included cats, chocolate, and Jewish
minutiae.) But it doesn't seem to be very active at present, so
pull up a chair and chat.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 17:55:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
I saw a tornado once, like about a year ago. It was a tiny
baby, maybe twenty feet high?
California has never recorded anything more powerful than an F1
(and I have doubts as to whether or not what you saw even
technically qualified for that).
I recall an F2 in Mountain View, California in 1998. Took out
a church - great picture in second link of funnel.
Interesting. Last time I looked at the maps, there were none in
California. There still aren't many. (Though there at two F3s in San
Diego county somewhere, now, too).

I wonder if some old data has been reanalyzed.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-10-25 22:30:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
         https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
       The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
       there is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
         https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
         ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself.  The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and illegal.
  Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country.  I'll pass.  At a distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over the
border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery store
and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing.  Then after the
first wave, everybody else came charging out of the store
screaming.  But in spite of being (at that time) UNreinforced
brick, the only damage it took was a cracked plate-glass window.
It does have reinforcing now; all those little diamond-shaped
plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple feet apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my big
old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the man
hasn't managed to fix it yet.  Hal tells him that if he doesn't
watch out, he'll have to send it to school.  :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further away
from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine, and was
sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt the bench
shaking.  I thought it was the rowdy middle-school kids on the
other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ?  I will throw in a side of feral
hogs for free.
Why should she give you her once every 20 years natural disaster for
your almost every year disaster?
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-25 22:49:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
         https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
       The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
       there is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
         https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
         ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself.  The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and illegal.
  Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country.  I'll pass.  At a distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over the
border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery store
and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing.  Then after the
first wave, everybody else came charging out of the store
screaming.  But in spite of being (at that time) UNreinforced
brick, the only damage it took was a cracked plate-glass window.
It does have reinforcing now; all those little diamond-shaped
plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple feet apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my big
old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the man
hasn't managed to fix it yet.  Hal tells him that if he doesn't
watch out, he'll have to send it to school.  :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further away
from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine, and was
sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt the bench
shaking.  I thought it was the rowdy middle-school kids on the
other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ?  I will throw in a side of
feral hogs for free.
Why should she give you her once every 20 years natural disaster for
your almost every year disaster?
Usually once every ten years in the Houston area.
1. Harvey - 2017
2. Ike - 2008
3. Allison - 2001
4. Alicia - 1983
5. Carla - 1961

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Texas_hurricanes_(1980%E2%80%93present)

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 23:50:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by
Ernest Cline
        
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
       The author is reputedly writing a
sequel but        there is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and
well bound trade paperback published by Broadway
Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but,
that is my personal preference.
        
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
         ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a
shadow of itself.  The population has swelled to
a half billion people through immigration, legal
and illegal.   Energy, food, and housing are
incredibly expensive. Our protagonist lives in a
house trailer with eleven other people in a 21
trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked
on top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you
being metaphorical about high-rise apartment
buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks
about vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books
(_Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skys
crape rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not
really, unless one is willing to really stretch the
definitions of both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to
the surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks
start cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice
chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more
than a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more
than an actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane. Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country.  I'll pass.  At a
distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over
the border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery
store and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing.  Then
after the first wave, everybody else came charging out of the
store screaming.  But in spite of being (at that time)
UNreinforced brick, the only damage it took was a cracked
plate-glass window. It does have reinforcing now; all those
little diamond-shaped plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple
feet apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my
big old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the
man hasn't managed to fix it yet.  Hal tells him that if he
doesn't watch out, he'll have to send it to school.  :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further
away from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine,
and was sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt
the bench shaking.  I thought it was the rowdy middle-school
kids on the other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ?  I will throw in a
side of feral hogs for free.
Why should she give you her once every 20 years natural
disaster for your almost every year disaster?
Usually once every ten years in the Houston area.
Maybe he was referring to the feral hogs.

(As opposed to southern Ccalifornia, where feral hogs would be far
better behaved than the feral humans. And might kill and eat a few
of them, to boot.)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 03:04:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by
Ernest Cline
        
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
       The author is reputedly writing a
sequel but        there is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and
well bound trade paperback published by Broadway
Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but,
that is my personal preference.
        
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
         ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a
shadow of itself.  The population has swelled to
a half billion people through immigration, legal
and illegal.   Energy, food, and housing are
incredibly expensive. Our protagonist lives in a
house trailer with eleven other people in a 21
trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked
on top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you
being metaphorical about high-rise apartment
buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks
about vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books
(_Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skys
crape rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not
really, unless one is willing to really stretch the
definitions of both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to
the surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks
start cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice
chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more
than a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more
than an actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane. Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country.  I'll pass.  At a
distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over
the border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery
store and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing.  Then
after the first wave, everybody else came charging out of the
store screaming.  But in spite of being (at that time)
UNreinforced brick, the only damage it took was a cracked
plate-glass window. It does have reinforcing now; all those
little diamond-shaped plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple
feet apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my
big old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the
man hasn't managed to fix it yet.  Hal tells him that if he
doesn't watch out, he'll have to send it to school.  :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further
away from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine,
and was sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt
the bench shaking.  I thought it was the rowdy middle-school
kids on the other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ?  I will throw in a
side of feral hogs for free.
Why should she give you her once every 20 years natural
disaster for your almost every year disaster?
Usually once every ten years in the Houston area.
Maybe he was referring to the feral hogs.
(As opposed to southern Ccalifornia, where feral hogs would be far
better behaved than the feral humans. And might kill and eat a few
of them, to boot.)
There are feral pigs in Marin County, come to think of it.
They've been there for decades. Phil Frank's strip _Farley_
featured them off and on for years: being Marinites, they were
wealthy hippies who lived, you should excuse the expression, high
off the hog.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Dimensional Traveler
2018-10-26 06:07:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by
Ernest Cline
       Â
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
       The author is reputedly writing a
sequel but        there is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and
well bound trade paperback published by Broadway
Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but,
that is my personal preference.
       Â
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
         ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a
shadow of itself.  The population has swelled to
a half billion people through immigration, legal
and illegal.   Energy, food, and housing are
incredibly expensive. Our protagonist lives in a
house trailer with eleven other people in a 21
trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked
on top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you
being metaphorical about high-rise apartment
buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks
about vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books
(_Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skys
crape rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not
really, unless one is willing to really stretch the
definitions of both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to
the surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks
start cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice
chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more
than a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more
than an actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane. Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country.  I'll pass.  At a
distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over
the border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery
store and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing.  Then
after the first wave, everybody else came charging out of the
store screaming.  But in spite of being (at that time)
UNreinforced brick, the only damage it took was a cracked
plate-glass window. It does have reinforcing now; all those
little diamond-shaped plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple
feet apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my
big old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the
man hasn't managed to fix it yet.  Hal tells him that if he
doesn't watch out, he'll have to send it to school.  :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further
away from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine,
and was sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt
the bench shaking.  I thought it was the rowdy middle-school
kids on the other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ?  I will throw in a
side of feral hogs for free.
Why should she give you her once every 20 years natural
disaster for your almost every year disaster?
Usually once every ten years in the Houston area.
Maybe he was referring to the feral hogs.
(As opposed to southern Ccalifornia, where feral hogs would be far
better behaved than the feral humans. And might kill and eat a few
of them, to boot.)
There are feral pigs in Marin County, come to think of it.
They've been there for decades. Phil Frank's strip _Farley_
featured them off and on for years: being Marinites, they were
wealthy hippies who lived, you should excuse the expression, high
off the hog.
Hey, we have to feed our resident cougar something! He was tired of
venison.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 02:51:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_o
ne
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself. The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and illegal.
Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven
other people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma
City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
I also live in earthquake country. I'll pass. At a distance.
And possibly at a high velocity.
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over the
border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery store
and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing. Then after the
first wave, everybody else came charging out of the store
screaming. But in spite of being (at that time) UNreinforced
brick, the only damage it took was a cracked plate-glass window.
It does have reinforcing now; all those little diamond-shaped
plaques anchoring tie-rods, a couple feet apart.
The more recent, and closer, Napa quake broke some crockery
upstairs in my daughter's kitchen, and did SOMEthing to my big
old UPS; it's been in the shop for four years now and the man
hasn't managed to fix it yet. Hal tells him that if he doesn't
watch out, he'll have to send it to school. :)
The Coalinga, on the other hand, which was rather further away
from Berkeley ... I had left work early with a migraine, and was
sitting on the bench waiting for the bus when I felt the bench
shaking. I thought it was the rowdy middle-school kids on the
other end of the bench, till I got home.
Wanna swap earthquakes for hurricanes ? I will throw in a side of feral
hogs for free.
No, thank you. All things considered, I prefer earthquakes: they
happen less often. And I've been told that hurricanes/tornados
give the impression to the anxious mind that they are *stalking*
you.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
David Goldfarb
2018-10-26 04:51:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over the
border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery store
and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing.
I was inside The Other Change of Hobbit at the time. It was in its
first location, on the ground floor of a parking garage, and my first
thought was that there was a truck passing overhead, which was not
uncommon. But the shaking didn't *stop* -- and then there was one
short sharp shock.

One or two of the bookcases tipped over, but there was no serious
damage where I was.

The store cat was no help at all, as regards warning.
--
David Goldfarb | Nunc, Pince, tibi nocendus sum.
***@gmail.com |
***@ocf.berkeley.edu | -- Aniinsani
Dimensional Traveler
2018-10-26 06:06:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Goldfarb
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Well, I remember the Loma Prieta (I was in Albany, just over the
border from Berkeley); I had just come out of the grocery store
and I had to sort of dance to keep my footing.
I was inside The Other Change of Hobbit at the time. It was in its
first location, on the ground floor of a parking garage, and my first
thought was that there was a truck passing overhead, which was not
uncommon. But the shaking didn't *stop* -- and then there was one
short sharp shock.
One or two of the bookcases tipped over, but there was no serious
damage where I was.
The store cat was no help at all, as regards warning.
Just because the cat knew it was coming didn't mean he had to tell _you_
about it. :P
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Dimensional Traveler
2018-10-25 05:27:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
        https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
      The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there
      is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well bound
trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early
2018.  I heartily recommend seeing the movie before
reading the book but, that is my personal preference.
        https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself.  The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal.  Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our
protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other
people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City.
[snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people, including
344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top
of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out
in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-
el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really, unless
one is willing to really stretch the definitions of both
"mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course, immediately
jump to the . . . issues that would occur during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start cooking
off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of used
drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.  Oh yeah,
and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them. :)
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 17:18:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
       
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
      The author is reputedly writing a sequel
but there       is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.        
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself.  The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.  Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack outside
of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them. :)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the farther
from, the better.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-25 19:55:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
       
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
      The author is reputedly writing a sequel
but there       is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.        
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself.  The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.  Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack outside
of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them. :)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the farther
from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Lynn McGuire
2018-10-25 20:27:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
      Â
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
      The author is reputedly writing a sequel
but there       is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.       Â
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself.  The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.  Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack outside
of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them. :)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the farther
from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Google Translate says "Experts Believe". Huh ?

Lynn
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 20:44:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by
Ernest Cline
      Â
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
      The author is reputedly
writing a sequel but there       is
no hint of publishing it yet.  I read the small
font and well bound trade paperback published by
Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that
is my personal preference.
      Â
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a
shadow of itself.  The population has swelled to
a half billion people through immigration, legal
and illegal.  Energy, food, and housing are
incredibly expensive. Our protagonist lives in a
house trailer with eleven other people in a 21
trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked
on top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you
being metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks
about vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books
(_Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscr
ape rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions
of both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to
the surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks
start cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice
chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more
than a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than
an actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them. :)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum
credo.
Google Translate says "Experts Believe". Huh ?
The implication, I believe, is that when I speak of "the farther
from, the better," I know whereof I speak.

Had I been born in rural Missouri, it wouldn't have seemed so
fucking *weird*, but I spent my first 12 years in Nebraska.

Though, really, when it comes to weird, nothing beats LA (and
Hollywood). Even SF/Berzerkley has to work at it. But at least
people here don't marry first cousins.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 03:05:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
      Â
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
      The author is reputedly writing a sequel
but there       is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.       Â
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself.  The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.  Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack outside
of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrape
rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them. :)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the farther
from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Google Translate says "Experts Believe". Huh ?
Google failed you. I goofed, it should have been "experti credo"
(dative), and it means "I believe the one who went through it."
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2018-10-26 04:48:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Google Translate says "Experts Believe". Huh ?
I think Dorothy was aiming at "I believe the experienced one."
Credo is definitely "I believe."

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 12:51:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Google Translate says "Experts Believe". Huh ?
I think Dorothy was aiming at "I believe the experienced one."
Credo is definitely "I believe."
Yes. It didn't help that I used accusative instead of the proper
dative. My Latin, like the rest of me, is getting old.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 20:42:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
On 10/24/2018 6:45 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 1:35:56 PM UTC-4,
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
       
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
      The author is reputedly writing a sequel
but there       is no hint of
publishing it yet.  I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018.  I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that
is my personal preference.        
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow
of itself.  The population has swelled to a half
billion people through immigration, legal and
illegal.  Energy, food, and housing are incredibly
expensive. Our protagonist lives in a house trailer
with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack
outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make
Room!_ (1966), which was set in 1999. Human
civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)?  Or are you
being metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie.  Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and
Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscra
pe rs- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur
during an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer.  Especially to
the surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off.  Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than
a handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an
actual skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them. :)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure, undiluted
redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of 250 people, was
right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country, where family trees
consist of parallel lines, where gunsandbeer is one word (because
"If God didn't mean for us to drink and shoot at the same time, He
wouldn't have made beer bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where
ten fingers and ten toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing
is optional. I didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.

I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri was
bad memories.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 03:12:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch
of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction
crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them. :)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often they
went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles II of
Spain sometime.
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure, undiluted
redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of 250 people, was
right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country, where family trees
consist of parallel lines, where gunsandbeer is one word (because
"If God didn't mean for us to drink and shoot at the same time, He
wouldn't have made beer bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where
ten fingers and ten toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing
is optional. I didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri was
bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how much
cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster of
settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 15:28:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum
credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles
II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it was
_everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to marry
until far more recently than many people are comforable with,
because the population was so thin you might not meet anyone more
distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure, undiluted
redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of 250 people,
was right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country, where family
trees consist of parallel lines, where gunsandbeer is one word
(because "If God didn't mean for us to drink and shoot at the
same time, He wouldn't have made beer bottles such Damn! Fine!
Targets!") where ten fingers and ten toes are an average, not a
rule, and webbing is optional. I didn't graduate high school so
much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri was
bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how much
cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster of
settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal in
California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too, but
the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some alternate
dimension where such things are normal.)
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Cryptoengineer
2018-10-26 15:49:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the farther
from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles
II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it was
_everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to marry
until far more recently than many people are comforable with,
because the population was so thin you might not meet anyone more
distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure, undiluted
redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of 250 people, was
right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country, where family trees consist
of parallel lines, where gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God
didn't mean for us to drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't
have made beer bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where ten fingers
and ten toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is optional. I
didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri was
bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how much
cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster of
settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal in
California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too, but
the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some alternate
dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_United_States_by
_state

First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in practice) in CA,
and a number of other states, most far from the Ozarks.

Going abroad, its much, much more common in the Middle East; in Pakistan,
first and second cousins are considered the *normal* marriage pool. Quite
aside from the genetic problems it causes when done generation after
generation, I suspect it contributes to the clannishness and tribalism
which characterizes the area.

pt
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 15:55:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum
credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles
II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it
was _everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to
marry until far more recently than many people are comforable
with, because the population was so thin you might not meet
anyone more distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure,
undiluted redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of
250 people, was right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country,
where family trees consist of parallel lines, where
gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God didn't mean for us to
drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't have made beer
bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where ten fingers and ten
toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is optional. I
didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri
was bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how
much cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster
of settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal in
California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too, but
the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some
alternate dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_United_S
tates_by _state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in
practice) in CA, and a number of other states, most far from the
Ozarks.
Appalling (however normal it is in much of the world). The belief
that it's illegal is nearly as good as an actuality would be,
though.

The genecists say it's not a big deal for a couple of generations.
Over the course of 10 or 15, though, people get . . . strange.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Kevrob
2018-10-26 16:37:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles
II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it
was _everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to
marry until far more recently than many people are comforable
with, because the population was so thin you might not meet
anyone more distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure,
undiluted redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of
250 people, was right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country,
where family trees consist of parallel lines, where
gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God didn't mean for us to
drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't have made beer
bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where ten fingers and ten
toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is optional. I
didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri
was bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how
much cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster
of settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal in
California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too, but
the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some
alternate dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_United_S
tates_by _state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in
practice) in CA, and a number of other states, most far from the
Ozarks.
Appalling (however normal it is in much of the world). The belief
that it's illegal is nearly as good as an actuality would be,
though.
The genecists say it's not a big deal for a couple of generations.
Over the course of 10 or 15, though, people get . . . strange.
--
It might not be legal under civil law, but might not
religious norms either preclude or discourage it?

Given how much migration takes place within the 50 States,
two people who could legally marry where they live may
be carrying around rules they were socialized to accept
in their childhood, in some other state. They might be
ignorant of a lack of a legal bar to a consanguineous marriage.

If you think this post is an excuse to type "consanguineous,"
then, yes. Yes it is.

[/Phineas Flynn]

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 16:56:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles
II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it
was _everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to
marry until far more recently than many people are comforable
with, because the population was so thin you might not meet
anyone more distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure,
undiluted redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of
250 people, was right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country,
where family trees consist of parallel lines, where
gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God didn't mean for us to
drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't have made beer
bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where ten fingers and ten
toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is optional. I
didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri
was bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how
much cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster
of settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal in
California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too, but
the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some
alternate dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_United_S
tates_by _state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in
practice) in CA, and a number of other states, most far from the
Ozarks.
Appalling (however normal it is in much of the world). The belief
that it's illegal is nearly as good as an actuality would be,
though.
The genecists say it's not a big deal for a couple of generations.
Over the course of 10 or 15, though, people get . . . strange.
--
It might not be legal under civil law, but might not
religious norms either preclude or discourage it?
Well, during the Middle Ages the official ruling (set down by the
Church) was that there had to be five or more degrees of
consanguinity between the spouses. This means that you had to
lay out the family tree and count out five generations, up and
down, between you and your prospective spouse. This got ignored
a lot -- or avoided by paying for a dispensation -- particularly
by royal families. Habsburgs, again; and others. One of the
contributing causes of WWI was that Kaiser Wilhelm II was envious
of his cousin Edward VII's vast empire. (I don't say the most
significant cause.)
Post by Kevrob
Given how much migration takes place within the 50 States,
two people who could legally marry where they live may
be carrying around rules they were socialized to accept
in their childhood, in some other state. They might be
ignorant of a lack of a legal bar to a consanguineous marriage.
And in addition, if you move around in a country roughly the size
of Europe, you have a greater likelihood of marrying somebody who
isn't your cousin, recognized or not.
Post by Kevrob
If you think this post is an excuse to type "consanguineous,"
then, yes. Yes it is.
Did you need an excuse?
Post by Kevrob
[/Phineas Flynn]
Now, I know who you're talking about, but I haven't read the
novel. What's the connection?
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Kevrob
2018-10-26 18:05:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
If you think this post is an excuse to type "consanguineous,"
then, yes. Yes it is.
Did you need an excuse?
Post by Kevrob
[/Phineas Flynn]
Now, I know who you're talking about, but I haven't read the
novel. What's the connection?
Not Finn, Flynn.

Disney channel cartoon, "Phineas & Ferb," which was charming,
inventive, funny, with snappy music.

"Yes. Yes, I am." was Phineas's usual reply when someone
asked if he were a little young to be doing some strange
activity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phineas_and_Ferb

P&F is in the great tradition of multi-level animation humor, with
plenty of jokes that sail past the kids' heads and hit the
adult funnybone, so the whole family can watch together.

Kevin R
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 22:35:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kevrob
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Kevrob
If you think this post is an excuse to type "consanguineous,"
then, yes. Yes it is.
Did you need an excuse?
Post by Kevrob
[/Phineas Flynn]
Now, I know who you're talking about, but I haven't read the
novel. What's the connection?
Not Finn, Flynn.
Disney channel cartoon, "Phineas & Ferb," which was charming,
inventive, funny, with snappy music.
"Yes. Yes, I am." was Phineas's usual reply when someone
asked if he were a little young to be doing some strange
activity.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phineas_and_Ferb
P&F is in the great tradition of multi-level animation humor, with
plenty of jokes that sail past the kids' heads and hit the
adult funnybone, so the whole family can watch together.
Oh. My grandson used to watch that. I didn't.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 18:15:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article
On Friday, October 26, 2018 at 11:55:41 AM UTC-4, Jibini Kula
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with
a bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an
old construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for
them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And
the farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you?
Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so
often they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century.
Google Charles II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes,
it was _everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first
cousins to marry until far more recently than many people
are comforable with, because the population was so thin you
might not meet anyone more distantly related without
leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure,
undiluted redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town
of 250 people, was right on the edge of uncle/grandpa
country, where family trees consist of parallel lines,
where gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God didn't mean
for us to drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't
have made beer bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where
ten fingers and ten toes are an average, not a rule, and
webbing is optional. I didn't graduate high school so much
as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in
Missouri was bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the
San Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know
how much cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a
cluster of settlements, population 100 each, it seems
likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been
illegal in California for a long, long time. (It was in
Missouri, too, but the closer to the Ozarks you get, the
you fade into some alternate dimension where such things
are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_Unit
ed_S tates_by _state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in
practice) in CA, and a number of other states, most far from
the Ozarks.
Appalling (however normal it is in much of the world). The
belief that it's illegal is nearly as good as an actuality
would be, though.
The genecists say it's not a big deal for a couple of
generations. Over the course of 10 or 15, though, people get .
. . strange.
--
It might not be legal under civil law, but might not
religious norms either preclude or discourage it?
Well, during the Middle Ages the official ruling (set down by
the Church) was that there had to be five or more degrees of
consanguinity between the spouses.
Seven is what I've seen, but it obviously varied a lot more than in
modern times.
This means that you had to
lay out the family tree and count out five generations, up and
down, between you and your prospective spouse. This got ignored
a lot -- or avoided by paying for a dispensation -- particularly
by royal families. Habsburgs, again; and others. One of the
contributing causes of WWI was that Kaiser Wilhelm II was
envious of his cousin Edward VII's vast empire. (I don't say
the most significant cause.)
And if you *really* needed to get rid of a wife, and didn't want to
use the axe, you could *always* find a common relative in there
somewhere, to get an annulment.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 18:13:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Friday, October 26, 2018 at 11:55:41 AM UTC-4, Jibini Kula
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with
a bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an
old construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for
them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And
the farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so
often they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century.
Google Charles II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it
was _everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins
to marry until far more recently than many people are
comforable with, because the population was so thin you
might not meet anyone more distantly related without leaving
the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure,
undiluted redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of
250 people, was right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country,
where family trees consist of parallel lines, where
gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God didn't mean for us
to drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't have made
beer bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where ten fingers
and ten toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is
optional. I didn't graduate high school so much as I
escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in
Missouri was bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how
much cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a
cluster of settlements, population 100 each, it seems
likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal
in California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri,
too, but the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into
some alternate dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_Unite
d_S tates_by _state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in
practice) in CA, and a number of other states, most far from
the Ozarks.
Appalling (however normal it is in much of the world). The
belief that it's illegal is nearly as good as an actuality
would be, though.
The genecists say it's not a big deal for a couple of
generations. Over the course of 10 or 15, though, people get .
. . strange.
--
It might not be legal under civil law, but might not
religious norms either preclude or discourage it?
Depends on the religion, I suppose. Christianity, in general,
frowns on first cousins. At one point in the early middle ages, one
could not marry closer than common great-to-the-7th grandparents,
which got changed because in a world with no divorce, it made
annullment too easy.
Given how much migration takes place within the 50 States,
two people who could legally marry where they live may
be carrying around rules they were socialized to accept
in their childhood, in some other state. They might be
ignorant of a lack of a legal bar to a consanguineous marriage.
I suspect there's more issues with age of consent variations
between states, but states are required to recognize legal
marriates from other states in the US (however much some try not
to).
If you think this post is an excuse to type "consanguineous,"
then, yes. Yes it is.
Well, as long as you happy, that's what counts.
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Dorothy J Heydt
2018-10-26 16:48:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum
credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles
II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it
was _everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to
marry until far more recently than many people are comforable
with, because the population was so thin you might not meet
anyone more distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure,
undiluted redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of
250 people, was right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country,
where family trees consist of parallel lines, where
gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God didn't mean for us to
drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't have made beer
bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where ten fingers and ten
toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is optional. I
didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri
was bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how
much cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster
of settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal in
California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too, but
the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some
alternate dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_United_S
tates_by _state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in
practice) in CA, and a number of other states, most far from the
Ozarks.
Appalling (however normal it is in much of the world). The belief
that it's illegal is nearly as good as an actuality would be,
though.
The genecists say it's not a big deal for a couple of generations.
Over the course of 10 or 15, though, people get . . . strange.
Yes. Charles Darwin, e.g., married his first cousin, and AFAIK
their children were normal.

OTOH there's a population in rural Louisiana who are mostly deaf
... and now they're going blind in middle age. The documentary I
saw (this was a while ago) explained that you can tell when
someone's vision is going when they start signing in a small
space right in front of them, because their peripheral vision is
going.
--
Dorothy J. Heydt
Vallejo, California
djheydt at gmail dot com
www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2018-10-26 17:33:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the farther
from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles
II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it was
_everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to marry
until far more recently than many people are comforable with,
because the population was so thin you might not meet anyone more
distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure, undiluted
redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of 250 people, was
right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country, where family trees consist
of parallel lines, where gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God
didn't mean for us to drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't
have made beer bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where ten fingers
and ten toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is optional. I
didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri was
bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how much
cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster of
settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal in
California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too, but
the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some alternate
dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_United_States_by
_state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in practice) in CA,
and a number of other states, most far from the Ozarks.
Going abroad, its much, much more common in the Middle East; in Pakistan,
first and second cousins are considered the *normal* marriage pool. Quite
aside from the genetic problems it causes when done generation after
generation, I suspect it contributes to the clannishness and tribalism
which characterizes the area.
pt
Or vice versa.

Of course Jerry Lee Lewis's career was destroyed by marrying his 13 year old
cousin, so he was only able to make records for another 56 years.
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
Cryptoengineer
2018-10-26 17:54:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google Charles
II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it was
_everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to marry
until far more recently than many people are comforable with,
because the population was so thin you might not meet anyone more
distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure, undiluted
redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of 250 people, was
right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country, where family trees
consist of parallel lines, where gunsandbeer is one word (because
"If God didn't mean for us to drink and shoot at the same time, He
wouldn't have made beer bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where
ten fingers and ten toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is
optional. I didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri was
bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how much
cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster of
settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal in
California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too, but
the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some alternate
dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_United_States_
by _state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in practice) in
CA, and a number of other states, most far from the Ozarks.
Going abroad, its much, much more common in the Middle East; in
Pakistan, first and second cousins are considered the *normal*
marriage pool. Quite aside from the genetic problems it causes when
done generation after generation, I suspect it contributes to the
clannishness and tribalism which characterizes the area.
pt
Or vice versa.
Of course Jerry Lee Lewis's career was destroyed by marrying his 13
year old cousin, so he was only able to make records for another 56
years.
Actually, first cousin once removed - his cousin's daughter, so half
the shared ancestry.

I read an interview with her - they were together for 13 years, and
had two kids. She doesn't regret the marriage, but doesn't
reccomend it for others:

https://medium.com/cuepoint/ballad-of-the-13-year-old-bride-f909cbe1c6b4

pt
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-26 18:22:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ted Nolan <tednolan>
Post by Cryptoengineer
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
[trimmed some, because this is getting unwield]
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Lynn McGuire
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a
bunch of used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old
construction crane.  Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And a lot of other rednecks to hold their beers for them.
:)
Uncle/grandpa country is a great place to be from. And the
farther from, the better.
Yes, you came from flyover country, didn't you? Expertum
credo.
Uncle/grandpa country ....
Gosh. Sounds like the Habsburgs. They intermarried so often
they went *extinct* in the eighteenth century. Google
Charles II of Spain sometime.
Very much like that, except it wasn't the social elistes, it
was _everyone_. In Arkansas, it was legal for first cousins to
marry until far more recently than many people are comforable
with, because the population was so thin you might not meet
anyone more distantly related without leaving the county.
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
is a relatively small subset of flyover
country. Nebraska was redneck country, yes, 100% pure,
undiluted redneck country. But rural Missouri, in a town of
250 people, was right on the edge of uncle/grandpa country,
where family trees consist of parallel lines, where
gunsandbeer is one word (because "If God didn't mean for us
to drink and shoot at the same time, He wouldn't have made
beer bottles such Damn! Fine! Targets!") where ten fingers
and ten toes are an average, not a rule, and webbing is
optional. I didn't graduate high school so much as I escaped.
I have family in Nebraska. The only think I left in Missouri
was bad memories.
Well, congrats on escaping. I spent three years in the San
Joaquin Valley, and that was pretty bad. I don't know how
much cousin marriage went on, but when you live in a cluster
of settlements, population 100 each, it seems likely.
I wouldn't doubt it happened, but at least it's been illegal
in California for a long, long time. (It was in Missouri, too,
but the closer to the Ozarks you get, the you fade into some
alternate dimension where such things are normal.)
Huh?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_marriage_law_in_the_United_S
tates_by _state
First cousin marriage is perfectly legal (though rare in
practice) in CA, and a number of other states, most far from the
Ozarks.
Going abroad, its much, much more common in the Middle East; in
Pakistan, first and second cousins are considered the *normal*
marriage pool. Quite aside from the genetic problems it causes
when done generation after generation, I suspect it contributes
to the clannishness and tribalism which characterizes the area.
pt
Or vice versa.
Of course Jerry Lee Lewis's career was destroyed by marrying his
13 year old cousin, so he was only able to make records for
another 56 years.
I suspect that had more to do with her being 13 than being his
cousin.

According to Wikipedia, 18 states still have no minimum age to
marry (with conditions, usually judicial consent).
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-25 17:16:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
On 10/24/2018 4:11 PM, Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest
Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor
sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but
there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well
bound trade paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an
excellent movie version by Stephen Spielberg was
released in early 2018. I heartily recommend seeing
the movie before reading the book but, that is my
personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_on
e
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion
people through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy,
food, and housing are incredibly expensive. Our
protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other
people in a 21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City.
[snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_
(1966), which was set in 1999. Human civilization is
crumbling under the weight of 7 billion people,
including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it
isn't.
:-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on
top of each other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about
vertical trailer parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out
in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscraper
s- el usive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
In other words, despite dreams for 50 years, not really,
unless one is willing to really stretch the definitions of
both "mobile home" and "skyscraper."
Living in southern California, I would, of course,
immediately jump to the . . . issues that would occur during
an earthquake.
Don't forget fire in the bottom trailer. Especially to the
surrounding stacks when the trailer propane tanks start
cooking off. Those stacks should make a nice chimney.
I seriously doubt you could build a superstructure more than a
handful of stories high that wouldn't cost more than an actual
skyscraper to begin with.
Never doubt the ingenuity of a bunch of rednecks with a bunch of
used drill pipe, a diesel welder, and an old construction crane.
Oh yeah, and a lot of beer.
And never underestimate the destructive power of "Hey, y'all, watch
this."
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
Peter Trei
2018-10-24 21:36:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Dorothy J Heydt
Post by Lynn McGuire
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade paperback
published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent movie version
by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018. I heartily recommend
seeing the movie before reading the book but, that is my personal
preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of itself. The
population has swelled to a half billion people through immigration,
legal and illegal. Energy, food, and housing are incredibly expensive.
Our protagonist lives in a house trailer with eleven other people in a
21 trailer stack outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_ (1966), which was
set in 1999. Human civilization is crumbling under the weight of 7
billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't. :-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
Vertical trailer parks of 22+ house trailers stacked on top of each
other is definitely crazy.
Have you seen those in Real Life (tm)? Or are you being
metaphorical about high-rise apartment buildings?
Just in the RP1 movie. Cory Doctorow also talks about vertical trailer
parks in his dystopian books (_Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom_).
https://99percentinvisible.org/article/mobile-home-skyscrapers-elusive-dream-vertical-urban-trailer-parks/
Not to hijack the thread, but 99percentinvisible is one of my favorite podcasts.
Highly recommended.

pt
Jibini Kula Tumbili Kujisalimisha
2018-10-24 19:38:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Ahasuerus
Post by Lynn McGuire
_Ready Player One (Movie Tie-In): A Novel_ by Ernest Cline
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0804190135/
A dystopian novel set in 2045 with no prequel nor sequel that I know of.
The author is reputedly writing a sequel but there is no
hint of
publishing it yet. I read the small font and well bound trade
paperback published by Broadway Books.
This novel was originally published in 2011, an excellent
movie version by Stephen Spielberg was released in early 2018.
I heartily recommend seeing the movie before reading the book
but, that is my personal preference.
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/ready_player_one
The United States of America in 2045 is but a shadow of
itself. The population has swelled to a half billion people
through immigration, legal and illegal. Energy, food, and
housing are incredibly expensive. Our protagonist lives in a
house trailer with eleven other people in a 21 trailer stack
outside of Oklahoma City. [snip]
Reminds me of Harry Harrison's _Make Room! Make Room!_ (1966),
which was set in 1999. Human civilization is crumbling under the
weight of 7 billion people, including 344 million US citizens.
Because you don't see it crumbling, doesn't mean it isn't. :-)
Heinlein's _Crazy Years_ are here, indeed.
19 years is a lot of hindsight. You sure your view isn't colored by
your TDS?
--
Terry Austin

Vacation photos from Iceland:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/QaXQkB

"Terry Austin: like the polio vaccine, only with more asshole."
-- David Bilek

Jesus forgives sinners, not criminals.
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